Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Computer Designed Car Sets Speed Record

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the sitting-on-a-rocket-and-lighting-the-fuse dept.

247

amcdiarmid writes "Several sources are reporting that the first entirely computer designed car, the JCB Dieselmax, has broken the diesel speed record of 236MPH at a speed of 328MPH. From the article: 'The record attempt came after a string of trial runs on the runways at the airbase. But while testing went well, the team endured a troubled time in the US. The combination of the altitude (4,000ft) and the higher air temperatures affected the performance of the second engine, which was generating insufficient turbo boost pressure and led to days of work for the small team of engineering experts.'"

cancel ×

247 comments

That's pretty fast (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966193)

broken the diesel speed record of 236MPH at a speed of 328MPH.

But they could probably top 350 MPH if they'd ditch the CB antenna and Yosemite Sam "Back Off" mudflaps.

this thing gets some real looks at the Sapp Bros.

Re:That's pretty fast (4, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966301)

> But they could probably top 350 MPH if they'd ditch the CB antenna and Yosemite Sam "Back Off" mudflaps.

Me an' Tim was haulin' chickens
O'er a lakebed outa Wiggins
And we had spent all night on the uphill side,
Of thirty seven hundred square miles of hell called Bonneville Flats,
(Which was up on the great divide...)

And we was sittin' there readin' Slashdot,
And moderatin' like Crow T. Trollbot,
And I says "Tim, let's send an Internet down the tubes,
And then send them chickens on down t'other side"
(Yeah, lets give them hens a ride.)

Chorus:
Bonneville flats, way up on the great divide,
Truckin' on down, the other side.

Leverton put down his bottle,
With Andy's foot down on the throttle,
Ate a couple o' smores, then 1500 horse,
from a two-thousand-ought-six Dieselmax screamed to life.
(We woke up the chickens.)

We roared up off'n that shoulder,
Sprayin' pine cones rocks 'n boulders,
And put four hundred head of them Rhode Island Reds
And a couple of burnt out roosters on the line.
(Look out below. 'cause here we go...)

...and I really don't have to change another word of Wolf Creek Pass [narrowgauge.org] , by C.W. McCall, from that point onwards, because the ride was just about as hairy.

'Cept for that feed store in downtown Pagosa Springs. Place was still a mess from when that truck done run through it.

Bill O'Reilly: Cocaine Addict +1, Informative (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966329)

There are many choleric, garrulous cult leaders who want to shred the basic compact between the people and their government. One -- Bill O'Reilly -- is so refractory, he deserves special mention. It is requisite, even in this summary sketch, to go back a few years to see how honor means nothing to O'Reilly. Principles mean nothing to O'Reilly. All he cares about is how best to lead to the destruction of the human race. At no time in the past did the worst sorts of contemptible good-for-nothings I've ever seen shamble through the streets of cities, demanding rights they imagine some supernatural power has bestowed upon them. O'Reilly should work with us, not step in at the eleventh hour and hog all the glory.

At the risk of belaboring the obvious, everything O'Reilly tells you is a lie. Let me try to explain what I mean by that in a single sentence: What I find frightening is that some academics actually believe O'Reilly's line that laws are meant to be broken. In this case, "academics" refers to a stratum of the residual intelligentsia surviving the recession of its demotic base, not to those seekers of truth who understand that when people say that bigotry and hate are alive and well, they're right. And O'Reilly is to blame. Common-sense understanding of human nature tells us that whenever anyone states the obvious -- that O'Reilly must believe that if he doesn't defuse or undermine incisive critiques of his abysmal behavior by turning them into procedural arguments about mechanisms of institutional restraint, he'll have led a meaningless life -- discussion naturally progresses towards the question, "Does he believe, deep in the adytum of his own mind, that children should get into cars with strangers who wave lots of yummy candy at them?" This is an important question because he has planted his legatees everywhere. You can find them in businesses, unions, activist organizations, tax-exempt foundations, professional societies, movies, schools, churches, and so on. Not only does this subversive approach enhance O'Reilly's ability to do away with intellectual honesty but it also provides irrefutable evidence that his circulars are not pedantic treatises expressing theories or extravaganzas dealing in fables or fancies. They are substantial, sober outpourings from the very soul of revisionism. Well, O'Reilly, we're all getting a little tired of you and your kind messing up the world and then refusing to accept responsibility for what you've done. We're fed up. And the day is coming when you'll be held accountable for your counter-productive, hectoring plans for the future.

As distasteful as O'Reilly's buddies may be, they are also the most evil numskulls you'll ever see. There are two types of people in this world: decent, honest folks like you and me and sick liars and cheats like O'Reilly. Here's an idea: Instead of giving him the ability to label everyone he doesn't like as a racist, sexist, fascist, communist, or some equally terrible "-ist", why don't we get us out of the hammerlock that he is holding us in? If we do, we'll then be able to reverse the devolutionary course he has set for us. The point is that if everyone spent just five minutes a day thinking about ways to take steps toward creating an inclusive society free of attitudinal barriers, we'd all be a lot better off. Is five minutes a day too much to ask for the promise of a better tomorrow? I sure hope not, but then again, O'Reilly should learn to appreciate what he has instead of feeling so oppressed because he can't do everything he wants, every time he wants to.

O'Reilly decries or dismisses capitalism, technology, industrialization, and systems of government borne of Enlightenment ideas about the dignity and freedom of human beings. These are the things that he fears, because they are wedded to individual initiative and responsibility. His musings are a house of mirrors. How are we to find the opening that leads to freedom? In classic sophist fashion, I ask another question in reply: What exactly is the principle that rationalizes his imprudent smear tactics? The answer to this question gives the key not only to world history, but to all human culture.

O'Reilly's values have served as a powerful weapon with which money-grubbing pipsqueaks of one sort or another can make bigotry respectable. Do I blame society for this? No, I blame O'Reilly.

You know what we'd have if everybody wanted to impugn the patriotism of O'Reilly's opponents? Total chaos. I'll talk about that another time. I have other, more important, things to discuss now. For starters, you don't have to say anything specifically about O'Reilly for him to start attacking you. All you have to do is dare to imply that we should tell you a little bit about him and his sex-crazed pranks.

Yes, O'Reilly's behavior is totally out of line, but here is the point that is worth considering: He has no great love of democracy or egalitarianism. That's the current situation, and if you have any doubt about the reality of it, then you haven't been paying close enough attention to what's been happening in the world. O'Reilly commonly appoints ineffective people to important positions. He then ensures that these people stay in those positions because that makes it easy for O'Reilly to ignore compromise and focus solely on his personal agenda.

The next time someone says that O'Reilly can convince criminals to fill out an application form before committing a crime, look that person right in the eye and reply, "O'Reilly's drug-induced ravings form a vast brainwashing and brain-contaminating machine, which has worked, on the whole, with great efficiency." Judging by the generally inconsiderate nature of his proxies, I can see that sometime in the future he will silence any criticism of the brainwashing and double standards that he has increasingly been practicing. Fortunately, that hasn't happened...yet. But it will certainly happen if we don't show principle, gumption, verve, and nerve. His hijinks are dangerous to my health. Yes, I could add that giving him the means to paint people of different races and cultures as recalcitrant alien forces undermining the coherent national will is like supplying the gun to your own robber, but I wanted to keep my message simple and direct. I didn't want to distract you from the main thrust of my message, which is that were he alive today, Hideki Tojo would be O'Reilly's most trustworthy ally. I can see Tojo joining forces with O'Reilly to help him deflect attention from his unwillingness to support policies that benefit the average citizen. When he says that he is cunctipotent, in his mind, that's supposed to end the argument. It's like he believes he has said something very profound.

Because of O'Reilly's antics, our schools simply do not teach the basics anymore. Instead, they preach the theology of wily, diabolic plagiarism. Oddly enough, O'Reilly is becoming ever more audacious in his unappeasable hatred of us. Stranger still, when I was younger, I wanted to exert a positive influence on the type of world that people will live in a thousand years from now. I still want to do that, but now I realize that if he feels ridiculed by all the attention my letters are bringing him, then that's just too darn bad. O'Reilly's arrogance has brought this upon himself. The largest problem, however, is that his generalizations are as predictable as sunrise. Whenever I get my message about O'Reilly out to the world, his invariant response is to burn our fair cities to the ground.

I do not find asseverations that are disruptive, dysfunctional, and cranky to be "funny". Maybe I lack a sense of humor, but maybe if O'Reilly were as bright as he thinks he is, he'd know that he says that he has a "special" perspective on voyeurism which carries with it a "special" right to relabel millions of people as "wishy-washy". Wow! Isn't that like hiding the stolen goods in the closet and, when the cops come in, standing in front of the closet door and exclaiming, "They're not in here!"? O'Reilly wants us to believe that we can solve all of our problems by giving him lots of money. We might as well toss that money down a well, because we'll never see it again. What we will see, however, is that when O'Reilly hears anyone say that I have had enough of his waste, fraud, misfeasance, and malfeasance, his answer is to consign most of us to the role of his servants or slaves. That's similar to taking a few drunken swings at a beehive: it just makes me want even more to burn away social illness, exploitation, and human suffering. Verily, I, for one, am sick of our illustrious "leaders" treading on eggshells so as not to upset O'Reilly. Here's what I have to say to them: O'Reilly sees life as a slaphappy, haughty game without any rules. That's self-evident, and even O'Reilly would probably agree with me on that. Even so, stupid yutzes are more susceptible to his brainwashing tactics than are any other group. Like water, their minds take the form of whatever receptacle O'Reilly puts them in. They then lose all recollection that frotteurism has long been O'Reilly's lodestar. Let me recap that for you, because it really is extraordinarily important: It's a pity that two thousand years after Christ, the voices of chthonic flag burners like O'Reilly can still be heard, worse still that they're listened to, and worst of all that anyone believes them. O'Reilly doesn't use words for communication or for exchanging information. He uses them to disarm, to hypnotize, to mislead, and to deceive. In summary, it is my prayer that people everywhere will join me in my quest to respond to Bill O'Reilly's allegations.

Patriotically,
K. Trout, C.E.O.

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

Eternauta3k (680157) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966344)

This article made me feel stupid, I had to read the numbers like 5 times to realize the latter was bigger (didn't notice one was 300 while the other 200) :P

Re:That's pretty fast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966383)

But they could probably top 350 MPH

Oh! Wait a minute! ... -_-

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

Arcane_Rhino (769339) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966618)

Ditch ma CB antenna and Yosemite Sam mudflap? You mus' be a ga-damn communist.

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

LiMikeTnux (770345) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966770)

dude, its terrorist now ;)

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

Kyle_Katarn-(ISF) (982133) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967020)

Try telling Sheriff Buford T. Justice that :P You know, Slashdot is the last place I thought I'd see a S&B reference...

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

Baloo Ursidae (29355) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966824)

But they could probably top 350 MPH if they'd ditch the CB antenna and Yosemite Sam "Back Off" mudflaps.

I don't get it. I use CB, and there's very few magnet mount antennas that won't get blown off at speeds over 65 MPH, and it took some research to find one that had a strong enough magnet to handle Oregon's highest freeway speeds (70 MPH...nobody goes faster because it's cost prohibitive to get a ticket at speeds higher than that since once you're going 70, you're probably going 15 faster than posted, and that's $500 easy).

Re:That's pretty fast (1)

TheWanderingHermit (513872) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967071)

But they could probably top 350 MPH if they'd ditch the CB antenna and Yosemite Sam "Back Off" mudflaps.

Maybe so, but I doubt they could have still not jumped into the 8th dimension and driven through a mountain.

At least not without the oscillation overthruster.

all part of the plan (4, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966205)

Several sources are reporting that the first entirely computer designed car, the JCB Dieselmax, has broken the diesel speed record of 236MPH at a speed of 328MPH.

..and it will help those computers find Sarah Connor just that much more quickly.

Re:all part of the plan (1)

cloricus (691063) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966284)

You are assuming that they understand American whats its instead of the distance and speeds that the rest of the world uses. Any one care to translate them to metric so that our new machine overlords have an easier time?

Re:all part of the plan (3, Informative)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966420)

Approx 528 Km/H or 881664 furlongs/fortnight

Re:all part of the plan (1)

cloricus (691063) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966607)

Thanks...Now where did that model T get too?

Imagine the bandwidth of... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966211)

a diesel computer designed car going 328 MPH filled with hard drives.

Are we talking... (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966233)

a diesel computer designed car going 328 MPH filled with hard drives.

An information super highway, here?

Re:Are we talking... (1)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966295)

Well at least there will be less waste than the Avian Transport of yester year... Ref: http://coders.meta.net.nz/~perry/rfc/index-1149.ht ml [meta.net.nz] RFC 1149 http://coders.meta.net.nz/~perry/rfc/index-2549.ht ml [meta.net.nz] RFC 2549, and quicker too.

Re:Are we talking... (1)

slashbob22 (918040) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966307)

I see a VW Pigeon coming on.

"High Bandwitdh, High Latency, Transport for Today's Information Hungry Society"

Yeah, but... (5, Funny)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966299)

...the ping times are a bitch.

Re:Yeah, but... (4, Funny)

x2A (858210) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966492)

It took 5 days for a car my secretary sent to reach me, because it got stuck in traffic. You see, cars aren't like trucks, you can't just dump loads of stuff onto them. Cars are a cereal of tubes, they run on... I'm not finished, they run on milk in a bowl. Excelsior!

Re:Imagine the bandwidth of... (1)

format1337 (957144) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966272)

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of these things..

Re:Imagine the bandwidth of... (1)

bumptehjambox (886036) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966581)

certainly has the potential of a high 'burstable' speed

Re:Imagine the bandwidth of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15967039)

So where did they get a diesel computer?

Then it did it again... (4, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966220)

...on the next day of testing, it again bested the record. This time it was 350.092 MPH. http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenews.aspx?t ype=topNews&storyID=2006-08-23T151359Z_01_L2331696 1_RTRUKOC_0_UK-TRANSPORT-DIESEL-RECORD.xml [reuters.co.uk]

Re:Then it did it again... (1)

Nesetril (969734) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966348)

Wow, this is like the first time ever that the first poster is right. Damn those mudflaps!

Re:Then it did it again... (4, Informative)

BWJones (18351) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966441)

Yeah, this was their plan to do it incrementally. I got some great shots of the JCB team doing their thing during Speed Week here [utah.edu] . The Dieselmax team was having some problems setting up the car for the salt and were gradually working their way up and had planned all along to really go for the record the week or so after Speed Week.

Re:Then it did it again... (1)

B1ackDragon (543470) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966920)

Stunning pictures! I know very little about cars or racing, but I would have loved to have been out there...

Deisel motors (3, Funny)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966222)

But while testing went well, the team endured a troubled time in the US.

Sources said the motor had been making an unbelievably loud clunking sound, as well as spewing black smoke. Only later did they figure out that was the way the engine was supposed to sound.

(/RM101, the not-so-proud one-time owner of a Diesel Mercedes Benz, the loudest, most embarrassing-to-drive car he's ever owned)

Re:Deisel motors (1)

legoburner (702695) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966296)

Hopefully the black smoke thing will go away as the fuel is changed in the US [chicagotribune.com] (if it is ever changed). Certainly here in the UK diesel seems to have little difference to gas beyond diesel's greater fuel efficiency and slightly higher price, ever since they mandated a change in refining. I have to say it still gives off slightly worse fumes* than regular gas, but the difference is much less significant in comparison to just 10 years ago.

*in terms of odour and appearance

Re:Deisel motors (4, Informative)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966595)

This particular diesel doesn't smoke - it's running a blended mix to help prevent that. Black smoke is unburned fuel and a sign of an improperly tuned diesel. The low sulphur fuel will help air quality and allow us to FINALLY get some of the better diesels here but I don't think it will change the exhaust smoke since if the car is running right it shouldn't smoke anyway. I've got a new TDI and I've yet to see any smoke but expect to see some come Winter...

Re:Deisel motors (4, Informative)

afidel (530433) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966644)

The black smoke hasn't been a problem for properly maintained engines ever, but much cleaner diesel's should be available in the US this fall. Refineries have been producing S15 Low Sulphur diesel since June and all retail outlets should have it by October 15th according to EPA requirements. This means that manufacturers can start importing designs from europe that are designed to run on ultra low sulphur diesel fuel. These designs are MUCH less polluting then engines designed for low grade diesel. For more info see link [chevron.com]

flashsite link posted to slashdot???? (0, Redundant)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966224)

Did somebody happen to warn these folks what Slashdot can do to a server??
any odds on how many comments it will take to bring the server to its knees??

Re:flashsite link posted to slashdot???? (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966343)

Did somebody happen to warn these folks what Slashdot can do to a server??
any odds on how many comments it will take to bring the server to its knees??


The answer: 10.

Re:flashsite link posted to slashdot???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966454)

Haha your sig, that would be the white house. Not funny though...

Re:flashsite link posted to slashdot???? (1)

kemo_by_the_kilo (971543) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966478)

"The answer: 10."

No.
The answer is: 42

The Speed of /. (3, Informative)

1+(smarterThanYou) (539258) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966268)

http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/23/diesel-powered- car-edges-on-half-the-speed-of-sound/ [engadget.com] Apparently Slashdot isn't as fast as it used to be. That car has already hit 360+ mph. 320+ mph is now old hat. As an aside, all these smaller blogs seem to be able to keep up with the news much better than slashdot these days. I often find myself with a feeling of deja vu when I'm on Slashdot, as I've no doubt read the clippings elsewhere a few days prior. Ah, the problems inherent in scale.

Re:The Speed of /. (2, Insightful)

Moofie (22272) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966316)

So go. I won't miss you. Promise.

Re:The Speed of /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966404)

You must be new here. You probably have a sense of deja vu because it's a dupe. Or will be, give it a week or two.

Re:The Speed of /. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966442)

You must be new here. You probably have a sense of deja vu because it's a dupe. Or will be, give it a week or two.

Re:The Speed of /. (2, Interesting)

Waffle Iron (339739) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967053)

I often find myself with a feeling of deja vu when I'm on Slashdot, as I've no doubt read the clippings elsewhere a few days prior.

Does that really matter in the big scheme of things? When I was a kid, I found out about stuff like this in places like Popular Science magazine. Most all the tech news I read was already at least a couple of months old by the time I saw it, but despite that I seem to have turned out OK.

Sure that's fast... (1)

the_humeister (922869) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966270)

... but I want a car that can break the sound barrier [wikipedia.org] . That way I can visit the fiance in 4 hours instead of 8.

Re:Sure that's fast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966334)

driver also drove thrustssc, according to the article another reader submitted

Re:Sure that's fast... (3, Interesting)

Tarquin Sidebottom (239733) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966423)

Interestingly enough, as well as a common driver (as pointed out in the post above), both vehicles had their aerodynamics designed by Ron Ayers.

http://www.jcbdieselmax.com/html/team.php?team_id= 5 [jcbdieselmax.com]

Re:Sure that's fast... (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966473)

Don Vesco (died 2002), holder of multiple motorcycle speed records and current holder of the wheel driven LSR, once boasted that he could drive a motorcycle from NYC to LA in 5 1/2 hours, if . . .he got lucky with all the lights.

KFG

Lights (1)

donutello (88309) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966494)

Something tells me it'll be the red and blue lights that will bother him more than the red and green kind.

Re:Lights (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966646)

Max speed of an AH-64 is 184 mph.

During the 1955 Mille Millia Stirling Moss overhauled a twin engine prop plane with this Mercedes 300SLR.

One of the causes of on duty death among police officers is crashing in high speed chases. Their equipment is not equal to some of the serious speed hardware out there among the public.

Sure, there's the roadblock thingy, but haven't you ever seen Smokey and the Bandit?

KFG

Re:Lights (1)

dakirw (831754) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966850)

Something tells me it'll be the red and blue lights that will bother him more than the red and green kind.
Only if the red and blue lights can catch up. Another likely problem is the slow driver that likes to drive in the fastlane. At the speeds that he's talking about, he won't be able to switch lanes in time. Or trucks passing - they're a plague sometimes while driving on the I-5.

Re:Lights (1)

scheme (19778) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967017)

Only if the red and blue lights can catch up. Another likely problem is the slow driver that likes to drive in the fastlane. At the speeds that he's talking about, he won't be able to switch lanes in time. Or trucks passing - they're a plague sometimes while driving on the I-5.

It's really hard to beat radio waves telling someone to setup a roadblock 10 miles down the road.

Any Greens Thrust past the sound barrier. (1)

Brigadier (12956) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966490)

from the link .....................
Thrust SSC (Super Sonic Car) is a British designed and built jet propelled car developed by Richard Noble and Ron Ayers, which holds the world land speed record. It is powered by two afterburning Rolls-Royce Spey engines, as used in British variants of the F-4 Phantom II. It is 54 ft (16.5 m) long, 12 ft (3.7 m) wide and weighs 10.5 tons.

On October 15, 1997 in the Black Rock Desert in Nevada USA, driven by Andy Green, ThrustSSC became the first land vehicle to smash the sound barrier, reaching a speed of 1227 km/h (763 mph).

http://www.speedace.info/thrust_ssc.htm [speedace.info]

did you get her mail order? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966515)

...or did you surf the web to find your wife to be?

I'm sorry, butI reckon you set yourself up for that one.

Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (4, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966273)

The connotation is that someone signed onto a machine somewhere and at the command prompt, typed "design_car -fast -diesel", and poof, there's the design.

It's a human-designed car, designed by humans using computers (as they have for decades), and no pencils this time. TFA goes on and on about all the people on the team and the work they did, and that's great. So, what's with the headline and summary?

You're wrong. (2, Funny)

Poromenos1 (830658) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966312)

You're full of it. The article is 100% true.

This post was designed by a computer.

Re:You're wrong. (2)

ampathee (682788) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966625)

You can tell it's a computer by the courier typeface.

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966328)

So, what's with the headline and summary?

"Journalism."

KFG

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966364)

From TFA,

To facilitate visualisation of the overall car, Piper's team generated a highly detailed 2D electronic computer model of the car, revealing all of its components to help to identify the fit and practicality of each in relation to the others. A fullsize mock-up was then built for final verification of all aspects of the concept before work started on the real car.

That seems to be all. The whole thing is written in the usual "ripping yarns" style of promational race car enthusiasts.

They're quite welcome to their fun, but I'm not seeing an innovative use of computers here, nor any mention of what other technical achievement they may have made that would make this all that interesting to science.

Does anyone know better? I just see money + latest tech + enthusiasts = faster-than-last-time. That's not a big surprise. What's the story that makes this more than a feature in a Sunday Sports edition?

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966947)

IMHO, the fact that a diesel set a new record, and whomped all over the old record. From 236 to just over 350 (the next day, read other links above). This is not a tiny jump in performance.

Add to the current interest in biodiesel by the nerd community, and the understanding that before diesels become popular in America, two things must happen:

1. They must meet emission standards. European diesels currently can't be sold in the US as they are in the UE because our standards are much tougher (believe it or not).

2. They must be sexy. Diesels are seen as something you put in a big rig. Dodge trucks, followed by Ford and Chevy, are helping, but before you see them in passenger cars, "we" need to see that they can be fast and sexy.

So it isn't the most earth shattering news, but it is a significant jump in performance, and nerdworthy to those of us who think that a small part of the solution of our energy problems is biodiesel/diesel blends.

It took some rich enthusiasts to show you can fly across the ocean many years ago before we realized trans-atlantic flights. It took rich guys buying horseless carrages before we could buy family cars. It took rich nerdy guys buying $250 2400 baud modems and paying over $100 a month for limited internet access before I could buy my 70 year old mom a dell and get her cable modem. Same with VCR, Video cameras, etc. Porn and rich guys have contributed a lot to the things we take for granted now.

Maybe in 5 years, we will be able to buy a diesel powered Camero for $25k. The prototypes look pretty good...

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (4, Funny)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966376)

design_car -fast -diesel
What is it with these Linux geeks. They think the whole world works on the command line. Everyone knows that this car was built by double clicking on "Car", selecting "diesel" in the "Car Design Wizard" and then pushing the speed slider to the top. And apparently there's a hidden option in the registry that increases the range of the speed slider so we expect this record to be broken again very soon.

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (1)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966748)

Just wait until they hit the turbo button- then it will use 2x the MHz to spit out a 2x faster car!

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966497)

...and is there a difference between "Computer Designed Car" and "Computer-Designed Car"?

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (1)

ichigo 2.0 (900288) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966586)

Agree. When I read the title I thought that they had used genetic algorithms or some other evolutionary approach and let the computer churn out the most aerodynamically efficient design, but plain old CAD? Yawn.

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966606)

Was that your connotation? Wasn't mine, don't understand why anyone who knows anything about CAD would think that way. Maybe that's it?

Re:Come on, 'entirely computer designed' ? (2, Informative)

lemonylimey (745130) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966962)

What's trying to be said on the site is that the car didn't undergo any physical testing or prototypes before the metal was cut for the production car. The mechanical parts were tested with Finite Element Analysis and, more notably, the Aerodynamics entirely with Computational Fluid Dynamics. Although most cars are designed entirely on computers these days (The Deiselmax on Unigraphics, incidentally), they'll invariably make a model of the car and test it in a physical wind tunnel. This is true of even ultra-high-end development like F1 - the Toyota team has three Wind Tunnels that run 24/7/365 when they're not down for maintainance.

This wasn't an option for the Dieselmax for two reasons. The first was the speed involved - most automotive wind tunnels with the 'rolling road' surface required for accurate results top out around 240mph, way short of 375mph. The second, much more important factor is size - this car is nine meters long! Normally high-speed road car models are tested at between 1/3rd and 1/6th scale, and to fit the Dieselmax onto a rolling road tunnel would require a very small model, and the results you got from it would be very nearly useless.

FYI (4, Interesting)

hurfy (735314) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966286)

Since it was the 1st thought i had......

Gas-powered seems to be at 410mph

No idea why that record held so long for diesel at what seems a low number (236 vs 410)

Re:FYI (3, Informative)

DragonWriter (970822) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966360)

IIRC, diesel engines generally produce less power output per pound of engine weight, which hurts them in speed contests against gasoline negines. Their advantage in many applications is that they are more cost effective in terms of the kind and quantity of fuel consumed to do their work.

Re:FYI (3, Informative)

LunaticTippy (872397) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966465)

You're wrong about diesel. It is a more efficient design, giving much higher torque per pound of engine weight and often more horsepower. There is an interesting bit about a diesel race car needing to be handicapped to compete fairly with gasoline cars here. [leftlanenews.com]

Re:FYI (4, Interesting)

BLKMGK (34057) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966634)

Diesel gives more torque partly because as a fuel it contains more BTUs per gallon than gas - it has more energy. Compression ignition is also more effeciently (apparently) which results in better MPG. Part of the reason why that Audi did so well was because it didn't have to refuel nearly as often as it's competitors - I believe it was allowed to run the same size fuel tank as the others. As for weight - diesels generally have heavier engines as they stick to iron and don't use aluminum. The compression loads are a great deal higher and the aluminum apparently cannot handle it.

Personally I cannot wait for someone to build a diesel hybrid. Now that ought to get some good MPG!

Re:FYI (2, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966377)

No idea why that record held so long for diesel. . .

It's pretty simple really; lack of interest. It takes someone to put in the time and spend the money and it's not one of your sexier targets.

For the production outfits like Volkswagon there's also very little promotional value in streamliners and virtually none for custom engined cars. They've got to hop up what they sell to imply that's what you're buying.

And diesel buyers are economy buyers.

KFG

Re:FYI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966758)

KFG wrote : "And diesel buyers are economy buyers."

Your opinion would have been accurate 30 years ago, but it's not accurate now, unless you qualify it
by stating that you're speaking only of the US market.

Re:FYI (2, Interesting)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966398)

I'm not sure, but I suspect diesel burns slower. Diesels are also more difficult to build because the compression is much higher, and the fuel is injected at the top of the stroke when the air is already compressed. I imagine both of these could cause problems creating high-RPMs, which is how most standard gasoline racing engines generate their enormous torque.

I'm not an engineer, but that's just my (un)educated guess.

Funny though (2, Informative)

Fei_Id (937827) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966542)

I believe the fastest gasoline powered vehicle; was a single engined vehicle. This diesel is a twin engine. Aerodynamics play a HUGE HUGE factor in top speeds. It takes an enormous amount of horsepower just to increase the top speed by a small amount. Same reason why bikes suck so bad on the top end. Their power to weight ratios on paper show ridiculously fast acceleration numbers possible at higher speeds. But in reality; they are beaten by lower power/weight cars for higher speed runs; solely because of aerodynamics. That and power/weight means much less at higherspeeds. Its more about horsepower and gearing. Ok I'm talking to much now. PS. Ever seen a diesel drag racing vid of a semi-fast one? They blow huge columns of thick black smoke.

Re:FYI (3, Informative)

cerebis (560975) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967002)

No idea why that record held so long for diesel at what seems a low number (236 vs 410)

By default, really.

236mph, while indeed fast, isn't extrodinarily fast by today's standards in car performance. It will have simply been a lack of interest. If they break the broader "internal combustion" record of 409.3mph it would be more impressive, but then again that was set in 1965...

After seeing Top Gear Series 8 Ep 1... (1)

strredwolf (532) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966318)

...I guess that they'll have to rip up the New Mexico Salt Flats so noone else can give it a go.

I followed the link... (4, Funny)

agentcdog (885108) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966335)

and was surprised to see that this thing really runs on 440 AA batteries. Quite the misleading article. Diesel indeed.

British Engineering (0, Flamebait)

dzelenka (630044) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966342)

"... the JCB444 engine has been one of the most significant success stories in the company's history, and in the annals of British engineering."

From what I've seen of British engineering, you don't need to accomplish much to rank highly in those annals. If the engine doesn't fall apart during testing they crack the top ten.

Re:British Engineering (1)

Droid Rot (997386) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966483)

"If the engine doesn't fall apart during testing they crack the top ten." ...and next time you take a flight on a jet airplane, just remember who invented the jet engine.

Re:British Engineering (1)

menkhaura (103150) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966759)

The Nazis [wikipedia.org] ?

In other news.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966355)

Ford has announced that they will begin testing a prototype computer built entirely by a car. The car used to design the computer is actually a Beowolf cluster of recalled Explorers and Expeditions from the Firestone debacle of some years ago.

"We think we can use the characteristics of our best-selling cars to build huge, powerful computers with more space than anyone else", said a Ford spokesperson. "Our latest prototype model already has eight CPU cores in a V shape. It can seat seven hard drives (two of which are situated at the front of the enclosure, visible through the glass front bezel of the machine) and we're making lots of strides in how we can build tires on to the thing so we can drive it around the office while we download our emails and pick up our kids from soccer practice."

Chevrolet declined to comment on whether or not they were working on something similar. All they said is that they think Fords suck and tried to sell us on a new Corvette. "It's an American Revolution", said the salesman we interviewed at the local Chevrolet dealership.

And a million engies (1)

Deliveranc3 (629997) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966356)

RTW...

/CIS Hat We're coming for you /CIS

Neat (2, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966357)

I found a pic of it here [ilexikon.com] .

Wherever you go in life.. (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966782)

..there you are. [banzai-institute.com]

Turbo Boost (4, Funny)

Megane (129182) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966381)

The combination of the altitude (4,000ft) and the higher air temperatures affected the performance of the second engine, which was generating insufficient turbo boost pressure and led to days of work for the small team of engineering experts.

Don't they know that K.I.T.T. can only use the Turbo Boost once per episode?

Re:Turbo Boost (1)

nickmalthus (972450) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966425)

I believe the drivers words right before acceleration were "give me all you got K.I.T.T"

Speed is nice and all... (1, Funny)

corychristison (951993) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966402)

... but I still want my goddamn flying car!

first car designed entirely by computer? (1)

euice (953774) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966448)

as the first car designed entirely by computer Just out of curiosity: Who actually does believe that?

Microparticulates, anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966481)

Die-sells are worstest for polluting the atmosphere - that one shared thing - with small particles that get lodged in people's lungs, never to get out again. Maybe the JCB digger folk were out to see how quickly they could do this, or maybe they are cheapskates, not willing to fork out for 'petrol' and set a proper record, i.e. the land-speed record.
However, does anyone know what the record is for a proper vehicle, i.e. not a rocket on a sled, but where the wheels are driven? Maybe this is it, but then again the die-sel record is not up to much, is it? Germans do that speed every lunchtime nipping out for a burger via the autobahn...

But can it time travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966507)

88 miles per hourrrrr!

Brilliant! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966518)

FTA:

The team has also had to alter the GPS software which measures the car's speed, after it kept cutting out at 223 mph because it thought that was too fast ... So if you have had that speed monitoring software installed in your vehicle just drive real fast and leave them wondering :)

Designed? (2, Insightful)

quanminoan (812306) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966534)

I RTFA and visited the site but exactly how is this car "designed entirely by computers"? More likely is that the computers optimized each component through simulations based on human input. Can anyone fill us in to how exactly the computers helped design the car?

Re:Designed? (1)

Score Whore (32328) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966566)

Somebody mod parent up to +20.

Built for a PC (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966589)

Several sources are reporting that the first entirely computer designed car, the JCB Dieselmax [CC], has broken the diesel speed record [CC] of 236MPH at a speed of 328MPH.

Consumers, however, rejected the car due to lack of a stereo, air conditioner, and cup holders.

Fast? (1)

Tired and Emotional (750842) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966612)

we have semis going faster than that on the freeway.

First car 100% computer designed ? I think not. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#15966728)


Plenty of other cars have been designed using CAD systems, long before now.

Why can't you people skip the hype and just report facts, for a change ?

Forget fast...... (4, Funny)

Rank_Tyro (721935) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966738)

...."we need ludicrous speed".

Re:Forget fast...... (1)

imboboage0 (876812) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967094)

I believe things like that are infinitely impossible.

It uses 2 backhoe engines! (2, Informative)

gurudyne (126096) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966828)

One of the design factors for the original engine was to function as a backhoe counterweight. This made the engine block and other components so robust that the engine could easily survive the 2-stage turbocharging.

They used 200 liters of ice for cooling, had diesel particulate filters on the exhaust, and got 4 miles to the gallon. The car had only 2 gallons of fuel to start. They used a tractor with the same engine, untweaked, as a push vehicle.

Conversions (2, Informative)

cheese-cube (910830) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966859)

For the more metrically inclined among us, 236 M/h equals 379 Km/h (105 m/s) and 328 M/h is 527 Km/h (142 m/s). While the imperial system does have its merits, 527 Km/h looks so much faster than 328 M/h :P

The best line of the story: (1)

schwep (173358) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966955)

"Since arriving in America, the 30-strong team has had to enlist a local bar to help with its laundry after finding the hotel had no suitable facilities."

Bars are great! Beer and laundry facilities... does life get better?

Why care? (2, Interesting)

bjackson1 (953136) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966981)

This is a serious question. Why should I care how fast we can get a diesel engine based car to go? Last time I checked the fastest I drive is around 80mph. I'd be much more interested to see more efficent engines, than more powerful. However, could this technology trickle down to produce more efficent engines? Is there any practical application to this, besides pure speed?

Altitude? Is this a flying car? (1)

kimvette (919543) | more than 7 years ago | (#15966993)

The combination of the altitude (4,000ft) and the higher air temperatures affected the performance of the second engine,


Altitude? Altitude? Is this the flying car the Jetsons promised us?

Or, perhaps they mean elevation?

Damn it, the Jetsons lied to us, and so did this article! ;)

Paging Sir Lucas... (1)

wramsdel (463149) | more than 7 years ago | (#15967013)

Good thing they run the tests during the day...to give those Brits a fighting chance.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...