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When Can I Expect an Email Response?

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the turnabout-is-fair-play dept.

232

An anonymous reader writes "Ever sit there waiting for an email response and wonder what's going on? Did they get it? Did it get filtered? A study looks at the responding habits of a large group of corporate users. They find, among other things, that users would try to 'project a responsiveness image. For example, sending a short reply if a complete reply might take longer than usual, intentionally delaying a reply to make themselves seem busy, or planning out timing strategies for email with read receipts.' Tit-for-tat, 'Users would try to reciprocate email behaviors -- responding quickly to people who responded quickly to them, and lowering their responsiveness to people who responded slowly to them in the past.'"

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232 comments

Filtered (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011156)

Post

I'm not posting to slashdot... (5, Funny)

HotBlackDessiato (842220) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011160)

...anymore. you never respond to my comments.

Re:I'm not posting to slashdot... (4, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011176)

Hey, I just wanted to get a quick reply out to you to let you know that I read your comment. I'll post more in detail later, I have a meeting I need to get to.

Re:I'm not posting to slashdot... (0)

HotBlackDessiato (842220) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011197)

Well I didn't read yours either so there.

furchin is Out of the Office Today (4, Funny)

furchin (240685) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011269)

Thanks for sending me an email. I'm taking a short break today, Wednesday 8/30. In my absence, please talk to KaraM about the MxTK project, JuhnA for workflow issues, or HiuS for general questions.

Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today (5, Funny)

khasim (1285) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011426)

Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:furchin is Out of the Office Today
***error*** User has exceeded disk quota

URGENT: PROBLEM! (5, Funny)

poopie (35416) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011666)

Hey, I just wanted to get a quick reply out to you to let you know that I read your comment. I'll post more in detail later, I have a meeting I need to get to.


Hi Eln,

Thanks so much for your prompt response. This is now urgent! I'm cc'ing all of the dev managers and the VPs of developments so that we can all track your responses to this issue. Please respond to all ASAP!!!

Oh, can we set up a meeting tonight at 8pm to discuss your findings? I've added this to everyone's calendar - I realize that this is short notice, but attendance is mandatory.

If anyone has any thoughts, ideas, random musings, opinions, or collateral information please respond.

Thanks everyone!

Bob
Senior SCSSACP
TPS report generation, QLDT division
AGAAP
email: bob@corp.com
fax: 1-212-212-1212
Mobile: 1-212-212-1223
Telex: TP-10925645
Pager: bob7979797@pagingservice.com
GPS coordinates: N36 06.285', W114 46.655'
IM: hotlovr69@msn.com
What I'm currently listening to: Mr. T - Respect yo Mama

The opinions epressed in the above email represent my opinion and do not represent the opinion of my company or management. This communication from corp.com may contain forward looking statements or confidential information and must not be forwarded or archived.

--

THIS MESSAGE WAS SENT FROM MY BLACKBERRY

--
THIS MESSAGE HAS BEEN SCANNED BY AVG-PRO AND FOUND TO BE VIRUS FREE

Re:URGENT: PROBLEM! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011788)

You forgot to seek safe harbor.

Ob. Beatles (5, Funny)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011373)

you never respond to my comments.

You only give me your funny mod points...

No no no! (5, Funny)

doxology (636469) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011172)

I just the other day got...an internet was sent by my staff at 10 o'clock in the morning on Friday, I got it yesterday.-Ted Stevens, honorable US Senator from Alasak

See, it's not that people time e-mails to make themselves look busy, it's that the tubes get full!

Re:No no no! (4, Funny)

Bob9113 (14996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011516)

Ted Stevens, honorable US Senator from Alasak

You mean Alaska has an honorable Senator with the same name as the bridge guy? What are the odds?

Re:No no no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011535)

Ted Stevens, honorable US Senator from Alasak

You mean Alaska has an honorable Senator with the same name as the bridge guy? What are the odds?

No, this guy is from Alasak. Probably some backwater we've invaded and annexed recently.

Re:No no no! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011700)

Alasak is a province of Tyop (local name: Tyopgraphicalus Errorus), a soveriegn island in the Paficic Ocean.

Re:No no no! (3, Funny)

shigelojoe (590080) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011761)

Ted Stevens, honorable US Senator from Alasak

You mean Alaska has an honorable Senator with the same name as the bridge guy? What are the odds?

No, it's from Alasak, which is like Bizarro-Alaska. Here, the senators are honorable, the winters are quite pleasant, and they really *are* in a box off the coast of Mexico.

They probrably didn't receive your internets (2, Funny)

kensai (139597) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011180)

because the email is down due to clogged vacuum tubes.

Ahh Slash, you kill me... (0, Offtopic)

B5_geek (638928) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011185)

"Nothing for you to see here..."

The irony is delicious. ...waiting ... for ... message

Thanks for your quick response (1)

cyberbian (897119) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011189)

I look forward to your future comments.

Responsiveness Image (3, Funny)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011624)

So what is the "responsiveness image" presented by this article, considering it's an anonymous submission linking to a Wordpress blog that appears to have been created soley for the purpose of presenting a 2nd-hand discussion of a paper published 3 years ago? The part that really confuses me is the lack of ads.

Tyler, J. R. & Tang, J. C. (2003). When Can I Expect an Email Response? A Study of Rhythms in Email Usage. Proceedings from ECSCW '03: European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, 239- 258.

Comment on the article (4, Interesting)

hellfire (86129) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011213)

The first comment to the article on that page is awesome and must be shared:

some additional behaviors that I've seen while working at a 30+ person startup:

- certain people respond to all emails in person, by getting up to talk to them or yelling across cubicles

- certain people prefer to communicate by email even when the recipient is sitting right next to them

- there is another group of people who send very few work-related emails, but who send interesting and/or funny emails to the entire company now and then.

Nothing has changed since snailmail (2, Funny)

Reziac (43301) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011342)

Not only all the behaviours from TFA, but also those noted in your post, are exactly as they were back in the snailmail era. Only the medium has changed.

Back when I was a lad, we had actually write with pen on paper, address envelopes, lick our own stamps, and trudge to the post office uphill both ways in a snowstorm! you kids have it easy, what with email to do all the dirty work. Think of the galoshes makers!!

Re:Nothing has changed since snailmail (2, Funny)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011568)

Back when I was a lad, we had actually write with pen on paper, address envelopes, lick our own stamps, and trudge to the post office

You had a Post Office??? You had it easy! We only had pony express, and we had to run to catch him because he never stopped here. But the behavior was exactly the same then too...some people would take a week to chisel a response.

Re:Nothing has changed since snailmail (2, Funny)

Reziac (43301) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011598)

Damn, that's rough... did you have a problem with the dinosaurs chewing up your stone tablets? I've heard they're subject to breakage.

I disagree (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011585)

We're the Cut'n'paste generation. We don't really think about what we write before putting 'pen to paper' anymore for the following reasons:

1. You can cut'n'paste you sentances to make some resemblance of ordered thought.
2. You can get a quick response, so if you're imprecise, you'll know about it quicker.

So basically latency has plummeted, but we're probably less efficient at doing things than we used to be before all this 'new fangled technology'.

Am I going to read this comment through? Do a spellcheck? nope, I'm going to spin in out, with it's imprecision, flaws and ambiguity, for I know that someone else will pick up on those point very rapidly and therefore I do not need to bother...

Re:I disagree (4, Insightful)

Reziac (43301) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011710)

An AC makes some insightful side points, which I'll quote for the +2 masses:

======
We're the Cut'n'paste generation. We don't really think about what we write before putting 'pen to paper' anymore for the following reasons:

1. You can cut'n'paste you sentances to make some resemblance of ordered thought.
2. You can get a quick response, so if you're imprecise, you'll know about it quicker.

So basically latency has plummeted, but we're probably less efficient at doing things than we used to be before all this 'new fangled technology'.

Am I going to read this comment through? Do a spellcheck? nope, I'm going to spin in out, with it's imprecision, flaws and ambiguity, for I know that someone else will pick up on those point very rapidly and therefore I do not need to bother...
======

Unfortunately, this is very accurate. The digital age has made the hurried, poorly-thought-out, flung-to-the-winds reply that much easier to commit, as any flamewar veteran can attest.

The nearest pen-and-paper equivalent would be to read only the first line of each snailmail letter received, then reply by scribbling on postcards, right three at the post office, and immediately throwing them into the Outgoing Mail slot.

Re:Comment on the article (2, Interesting)

Naviztirf (856598) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011416)

What I hate is taking the time to compose a long email in which multiple issues need to be addressed and receiving a short reply that answers only the first question. For those people I end up sending them an email for each question... Well at least is isn't paper *sigh*.

Re:Comment on the article (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011479)

I'll often send an email to my boss rather than going down the hall to his office just so that there is a written record somewhere of what I requested from or reported to him.

Re:Comment on the article (4, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011786)

If you send someone an email, you want to be able to hold them to what they say in the reply.

If you talk in person instead of email, you don't want anybody to be able to hold you to what you say.

It's all about repudiation.

Re:Comment on the article (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011791)

- there is another group of people who send very few work-related emails, but who send interesting and/or funny emails to the entire company now and then.

Sorry, but there is nothing funny or interesting about those emails. In fact, they create a sucking hole of anti-funny, which theatens destroy all joy on this world and throughout the multiverse.

Its all individual (3, Insightful)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011226)

I have 8 people that work in my Unit. When I send out an email to the group needing an immediate response, I know that only 2 will respond right away (assuming they are at their desk). The rest of them check their email at different frequencies. The little notice they get apparently does not stimulate their curiosity as it does mine. One of them will check each hour. I have one person that will check it each morning and that is it. So if you need an answer before that, you have to call him.

Re:Its all individual (5, Insightful)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011306)

. . .The little notice they get apparently does not stimulate their curiosity as it does mine. . . . I have one person that will check it each morning and that is it. So if you need an answer before that, you have to call him.

Which is fine. It means he is concentrating on the task at hand and not being easily distracted.

If you need an immediate answer, why the hell are you resorting to email? There is no reliable way to even be sure that he received your message, let alone that he is going to read it right away or take the time to addesss it.

If you need an answer for something, never rely on email. It is great for "please review the attached doc and get back to me by Friday" (if followed up with a phone call before Friday) or "FYI" stuff. But it isn't a substitute for a phone call (which may still be shunted to voice mail), or a physical visit if the person is close enough.

Re:Its all individual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011331)

I have one person that will check it each morning and that is it. So if you need an answer before that, you have to call him.

I'd fire that jackhole. What, he can't be bothered to check his goddamned email more than once a day? I'd tell him I can't be bothered to put up with his shit anymore and be done with him. You are an enabler for his passive-aggressive behavior.

Re:Its all individual (1)

Architect_sasyr (938685) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011468)

I'd fire that jackhole

Unfortunately for most, I only check my email three or four times a day... you have a higher chance of me moderating you on /. than an email response.

Why? Because I actually have a job to do. In the 15 minutes I have for my break from maintaining the network I do my own thing... I surf /. I browse the daily wtf... I don't have time for your email, your petty request for more disk space... I am a Network Administrator, not a PR representative for the using class.

Re:Its all individual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011504)

I'd fire you too, for that attitude. "I don't have time for your email, your petty request." That's a great attitude for a person working in SUPPORT to have. I would tell you that we've got a new role for you: learn how to SUPPORT yourself without a paycheck from us.

Re:Its all individual (1)

SCHecklerX (229973) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011617)

Mail shouldn't be high priority. That is what pagers and phones are for.

Re:Its all individual (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011671)

Repeat after me: EMail is not an Instant Messenger

EMail is designed as a best-effort, possibly delayed for hours or days, delivery system. Just like you wouldn't use snail mail to try and setup a shindig on the morrow (instead using the phone or face-to-face meetings). If you need instant messanging, install a Jabber server or other corporate IM solution. This isn't the early-90s anymore and we have a lot more solutions and tools in the toolbox.

Personally, I refuse to check e-mail any more frequently then every 15-30 minutes. And I recommend to others that they do the same (we have an IM system for more urgent missives). Whenever I configure user systems or help them with e-mail, I look at their download frequency and get them to adjust it downwards.

Re:Its all individual (1)

Marcion (876801) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011753)

>I have one person that will check it each morning and that is it.

Sounds like he is the one doing all the work!

Depends who's pushing buttons, too. (3, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011779)

I have 8 people that work in my Unit. When I send out an email to the group needing an immediate response, I know that only 2 will respond right away (assuming they are at their desk).

I've had a request to "send" "data" to someone, with a deadline of thursday for a few weeks now. It began, "OK, fine, no worries just tell me what data you need and in what format." No response. The owner of this project starts sending me colour-coded emails. "Urgent send data" I reply to him, "Give me an idea which items you need and in what form to send it." I get back "put it in an excel spread sheed, I don't know, here talk to this person xxxxxx@xxxxx.org" I email their contact and a week goes by. I get another urgent email. I reply I still don't have any spec or specifics and get another email. I send out a query to that one. Days pass and nothing. Finally I'm getting orange (which I presume is more urgent than red) and another plea to "send data soon, deadline approaching." I reply, to the entire list of those cc'd with the plea. "these people need to contact me, I need specifics, I don't just send "data" any old way." Finally someone kicks the people at xxxxx.org in the pants and they phone. Bam! It's taken care of in mere minutes. Got exactly what they needed.

So why did it take so long?

Surprised? (3, Insightful)

Gemini_25_RB (997440) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011230)

I'm not. Frankly, I would have guessed this, especially considering that this is _corporate_ america, where looking busy can be more beneficial than doing good work. It is interesting how people would send an email and then keep checking "constantly" for a response. Why not just pick up a phone (or walk to the next cubicle in some cases) if you are that concerned about the message? Reciprocating, however, is ... odd; What do all the OCD emailers do the first time they contact someone?

OT: question about American email users (2, Interesting)

Threni (635302) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011530)

Ok, mod me down if you must, but I'm genuinely interested in this.

I work for a company in the UK which works with a company in the States. Sometime I have to email fairly technical (ie its about source code and programming in general) messages to my counterpart in the States. To make the process as simple as possible I spend some time breaking my question(s) into pieces, numbering them, and making them clear and hopefully straight-forward. The American company practically *always* only replies to the first point in the email. If their reply addresses the problem, we still have all the others to go through, as could be seen if they'd been read at the time the first one was.

I've had this with a couple of other companies which are based in the US, and even in the company I'm talking about I've emailed several different people with the same response.

Is this a widespread practice? And if so......why?

Re:OT: question about American email users (2, Insightful)

WuphonsReach (684551) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011695)

Two words: top posting

I work for a company in the UK which works with a company in the States. Sometime I have to email fairly technical (ie its about source code and programming in general) messages to my counterpart in the States. To make the process as simple as possible I spend some time breaking my question(s) into pieces, numbering them, and making them clear and hopefully straight-forward. The American company practically *always* only replies to the first point in the email. If their reply addresses the problem, we still have all the others to go through, as could be seen if they'd been read at the time the first one was.

(I'm being somewhat funny, but I think it's the main reason why. If you're top-posting, then you have to scroll up/down to see the entire message that you're replying to. That or the frequent use of preview windows where you only see the upper portion of the message.)

Re:OT: question about American email users (1)

dereference (875531) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011705)

The American company practically *always* only replies to the first point in the email. [...] Is this a widespread practice? And if so......why?

Yes.





Ok, fine, I'll bite on the "why" part. Actually it's been my experience that these problems are due to a combination of short attention spans and generally poor reading comprehension skills. I've experienced it globally, for what it's worth, but it certainly may be more prevalent in countries with pathetic mandatory schooling.

Re:OT: question about American email users (1)

paralaxcreations (981218) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011789)

I'm from (and still live in) the U.S. and do the same thing as you: itemizing large emails, etc. The replies often depend on who I'm e-mailing. If it's my boss, and it's between 9 and 5...I get a one line answer. If it's any time after 5 (No, my job never ends), I can usually expect a more lengthy response. My friend Chris, on the other hand, tends to reply in poetry.

Maybe it's more prevelant in the U.S...sure, you could argue it's a poor education system to blame, but you could also argue that U.S. companies are busier than UK companies, and hence can't respond as quickly or completely. I couldn't tell you either way, as I haven't worked at every company in the U.S. and the UK.

But despite what image our president portrays, not all of us are babbling idiots, just the voting majority...meaning the elderly, who tend to avoid those fancy Internets anyway.

personal or business (1)

Brigadier (12956) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011232)



I know for me personal vs business is a whole matter. I'm a project manager for an architecture firm. During the day I'll recieve maybe 15 ligit e-mails, 5 of which may involve some type of emergency on someones part. Our industry is such where when you do get a communication from a client, public official etc. it ususally requires immediate action on my part, or on teh part of my design team. So as a rule of thumb I dont' answer my e-mails in order. I review them address the emergencies first. Then scheduel the unimportant e-mails for a slow day, say a friday.

The ironic thing is many of our clients never answer e-mails, however there e-mails must be answered immediately. So my answer teh the question, is importance and hierarchy. If your e-mail is to someone who is more important that you on the project chain don't expect a responce. hwoever visa versa, expect an immediate responce.

The same applies to improtance. ohh yea, the importance flag in outlook is of no use whatsoever because an emergency on your part, doesnt' mean an emergency on mine, unless your a client in which case see above.

Re:personal or business (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011434)

I hope for your shareholders' sake that you don't write your emails with the same care and attention you post to slashdot.

Re:personal or business (1)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011443)

Hey, that makes my strategy of quickly responding to business e-mail (and putting personal e-mail on a lower, 24-hour cycle) correct!

Re:personal or business (5, Funny)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011521)

The same applies to improtance. ohh yea, the importance flag in outlook is of no use whatsoever because an emergency on your part, doesnt' mean an emergency on mine, unless your a client in which case see above.

Agh! E-mail "priorities". In my experience, anything marked "!" important was absolutely not important at all. I used to work for a company where some people would set that on every single e-mail they sent, no matter the content. I ignored it for a while, and then I set a casual rule for myself that anything with a little red exclamation mark next to it got ignored for 10 minutes minimum. Still, it annoyed me, so I made inbox rules to reverse any priorities (setting e-mails marked "low" to "high" and vice versa).

That was all well and good until my boss walked by and noticed all his e-mails were marked low priority. "Oh... huh, you didn't set them low priority? I just thought you were being considerate to my schedule. Must be some kinda bug!"

As my former boss once said... (4, Insightful)

stefanlasiewski (63134) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011238)

"Email means that someone can ignore you instantly"... this after sending 25 emails and making 10 phone calls to someone else in the organization, and that person's supervisor, and the supervisor's supervisor.

3 hour rule (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011239)

I have a rough rule of responding to every email within 3 hours. If that's unreasonable I flag the email to start popping up notifications. Since I started doing this I have noticed that people I correspond with at work tend to be much more responsive. Even if you send back a quick reply saying something like "I'm busy and will deal with your issue later/tomorrow/whatever" it's better than not acknowledging the email until you can fully deal with whatever it contains. I actually started this because people sucked at getting back to me and it was pissing me off and I didn't want to be that person that other people were pissed at because it seemed like they were ignoring emails. I hate that person.

Re:3 hour rule (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011409)

I actually started this because people sucked at getting back to me and it was pissing me off and I didn't want to be that person that other people were pissed at because it seemed like they were ignoring emails. I hate that person.

that's why when I send an email, my sig says that unless you respond in 24 hours, you, your family, your dog, you cat, any assorted pets, your extended family, will die from a curse!

It kinda works. I've met some really nice FBI/Homeland security folks. Man! They have some REALLY HOT chicks working for them!

Re:3 hour rule (1)

ivan256 (17499) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011762)

I have a rough rule of responding to every email within 3 hours. If that's unreasonable I flag the email to start popping up notifications.

Having never met you, but having read that, I now know with 100% certainty that you either have both very little new incoming e-mail and very little else to do other than correspond, or that you're totally full of crap.

If everybody responded to every incoming message, after a very short period of time everybody would spend the entire day replying.

E-mail is a way to interrupt somebody that you'd normally have no business interrupting at no cost to you. In my experience, the bulk of it is broadcast information, or somebody trying to get you to do their job for them. Those types of e-mails should be ignored with prejudice.

People who correspond for a living and aren't in sales are both expendable and will be eliminated from their position eventually. The world needs very very few people that do nothing but make decisions and commentary for a living.

Techinical name for this?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011240)

Is there a name for this??

Reciprocating Behavior Norms??

Someone get a psychologist in here quick!!!

I know I'm guilty of it. Quick responders get the same. Lollygaggers (??) get to wait.

Hates those lollygaggers ...

Hey just like studying Slashdot (2, Funny)

hawkeye_82 (845771) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011241)

"Ever sit there waiting for Slashdot post and wonder what's going on? Did they post it? Did it get ad-blocked? A study looks at the posting habits of a small group of Slashdot editors. They find, among other things, that editors would try to 'project a responsiveness image. For example, posting a short summary if a complete summary might take longer than usual, intentionally duping a story to make themselves seem busy, or planning out timing strategies for posts.' Tit-for-tat, 'Users would try to reciprocate posting behaviors -- responding quickly to people who responded quickly to them, and lowering their responsiveness to people who responded slowly to them in the past.'"

Somewhere along that post, I got bored and just did a copy-paste. Feel free to correct it later.

Well, yeah... (4, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011242)

Most users check their email "constantly"

One thing that contributes to that is Lotus Freaking Notes' brilliant feature of checking email, putting up an alert when you get new mail BUT NOT ACTUALLY DISPLAYING IT IN YOUR INBOX, thus forcing you to break your activity to make sure it's not something that can't be ignored.

As with much of Lotus Freaking Notes, this is a) an interface issue that was ironed out by the rest of the developer world 20 years ago and b) would have taken maybe 15 seconds longer to code properly than it did to do it wretchedly.

Re:Well, yeah... (2, Insightful)

jeffy210 (214759) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011543)

You know that's one thing I think Microsoft got right in Outlook 2003. When you recieve an email you get a semi-translucent pop up in the lower right corner of your screen with the sender, subject, and the first two lines of the email. If you move your mouse to it, it'll turn solid and you can open it, delete it or flag it right then and there. If you choose to ignore it, it just goes away after about 3 seconds.

I've found it's really made things easier because I don't have to check every time I hear a new message come in. I can just quickly glance at it and decide if I need to take care of it now or later.

Re:Well, yeah... (1)

Jett (135113) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011686)

You can even adjust how long it stays up and how transparent it is. It really is one of the most useful features in Outlook2k3 for those of us who get a lot of email in a day.

Email all day (4, Interesting)

floppy ears (470810) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011247)

At my company, almost everything is done by email. Most messages are responded to nearly immediately, and so everybody's expectation is that email is more of a conversation than something that will be looked at in 24 hours (may as well be 24 years).

Of course, little actually gets done since interruptions are contstant. Seriously, probably 2/3 of my time is allocated to just sending and receiving emails. And I work in a major, highly profitable company. I just don't understand how we do it.

Re:Email all day (2, Interesting)

susano_otter (123650) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011347)

Seriously, probably 2/3 of my time is allocated to just sending and receiving emails. And I work in a major, highly profitable company. I just don't understand how we do it.

Labor-saving devices at all levels of your operation, painstakingly integrated into your operation over more years than you've been alive, allow you to get more work done than previous generations even in the face of greater distractions.

(Indeed, it allows your employer to grow into a major, highly profitable company even while employing people who don't have any clue how the company actually runs.)

Re:Email all day (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011500)

It seems the alternative is to call a meeting on ever little thing, ignore processes and best practices, and generally fail to manage your staff because that would mean taking responsibility for their performance.

Think yourself lucky that you communicate with anyone at all, in most companies people don't.

Re:Email all day (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011647)

Of course, little actually gets done since interruptions are contstant. Seriously, probably 2/3 of my time is allocated to just sending and receiving emails. And I work in a major, highly profitable company. I just don't understand how we do it.


Is the other 1/3 of your time allocated to Slashdot?

Couldn't we be studying something more useful? (-1, Offtopic)

Rotten168 (104565) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011248)

Like cancer or AIDS? Just a thought.

Re:Couldn't we be studying something more useful? (2, Funny)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011358)

Or we might leave that to medical professionals and keep doing tech stuff.

Yes! We need less of this "useless" research (2, Insightful)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011450)

Like cancer or AIDS? Just a thought.

Because everyone knows that research in one discipline never proves useful in other disciplines. Thank God knowledge is inherently categorized into "useful" and "unuseful" boxes, so we can easily dismiss research that is a waste of time.

Priority... (1)

simp (25997) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011250)

Email response is all about priority. If I have 20 new emails in de morning but my phone doesn't stop ringing then the emails will have to wait. But I do my work in a support environment, there is always a fire somewhere. I can assume that a code-monkey who spends his time writing the latest and greatest new program can maybe concentrate on his job at hand for a few hours before dealing with emails. You have to avoid the trap of being caught in an endless cycle of writing emails to each other without getting any actual work done.

As for asshats who write an email and then come to my desk 15 minutes later asking why I have not responded yet: well if it was THAT important why didn't you come to me directly...

Re:Priority... (1)

irc.goatse.cx troll (593289) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011558)

As a codemonkey/sysadmin type, in that situation I'd probably have to do the same but certainly would rather be dealing with emails that I can respond to after I've made a good response/thought about it/doublechecked stuff than phonecalls that by their very nature demand instant attention without any ability to control the flow.

Re:Priority... (4, Informative)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011748)

I can assume that a code-monkey who spends his time writing the latest and greatest new program can maybe concentrate on his job at hand for a few hours before dealing with emails.

I write code for a living. My mail-box has typical content like:

  • Customer X has problems with a new bug. Please fix.
  • I added a bug, please check bugtracker
  • FEAUTURE REQUEST! I'd like gizmo special ultra -requires massive redesign- by tomorrow. I saw it somewhere and want it too -Boss
  • Meeting at xx/xx/xx about new planned software. Prepare visualizations and analys.
  • Manual needed for program in alpha fase. Can you write it? I don't have time for it, too busy on support.
  • We wont buy and implement the Novell meta-database. You were on the meeting with Novell, can you make something with the same functionality? Make an analys asap, so we can discuss it.
  • I'm still waiting for the update. Customer is growing impatient, CANT YOU JUST QUICKLY UPDATE THE INSTALLER?
  • Can you put down a description of the issues we adressed in last meeting? So we can approve the core idea's before you start coding.
  • BUG FOUND!! (bug proves to be user configuration-error, described in manual)
  • I know product X-version 4 seems to be near completion. But I we might migrate to Linux. I know at first we wanted to use ASP.NET v2.0 (did you use that?) But would it be much work to translate it into PHP? We could cut license-costs that way. These things shouldn't be too hard to translate.
  • What's the status on program xzy? The deadline is closing.
  • In the meeting we discussed the use case where a new database could solve the problem. Can you design the database, so we can decide to go with it or to drop it? You can skip the specific columns to save time, just make sure you have all the 100 tables we brainstormed about and keep flexibility so we can expand if needed. Can this be done by next week? It would be clearer if you'd explain each table again as a reference.

Trust me, I often don't get around coding as much as I'd want to myself.

When Can I Expect an Email Response? (0, Redundant)

emptycorp (908368) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011257)

The internet is not a truck, you can't just fill it up. The internet is a series of tubes!

Not my experience (1)

complexmath (449417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011264)

Personally, I think email replies strategies are consistent for individuals, but I haven't seen a general rule that applies to people in general. For example, there are some people I email that always reply promptly while others do not. And some people tend to send detailed emails while others never write more than two or three sentences. I think this has more to do with general philosophies of work and the importance of email as a means of communication to the individual. Some people are always "too busy" to bother, and others simply prefer face time (either because of accountability or because they find email exchanges awkward).

Re:Not my experience (2, Interesting)

WuphonsReach (684551) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011747)

It depends on the person's preferred method of communication. (I'm sure I'll mess up the categorizations.) Most people prefer one specific type with less preference for the others. Some folks are equally comfortable with multiple types.

Tactile? Those are the face-to-face meeting folks. They're not comfortable unless they can see you in the same room and watch the body language. They process new things by working with them in a hands-on fashion.

Visual? The e-mail and IM gods. Written is best for them. Very good readers (they tend to learn a lot from written texts).

Aural? The phone for everything folks. Or a cross-over with the face-to-face meeting folks. They are great at communicating and learning via verbal communication. These folks can repeat a conversation verbatim (or darn close).

I forget what the estimates are for the population at large for each category. But a lot of aural-centric folks simply aren't wired for communicating via e-mail / IM and have to be taught. They might come across as abrupt in written communications or leave IM conversations without saying goodbye.

XMPP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011319)

"Ever sit there waiting for an email response and wonder what's going on? Did they get it? Did it get filtered?"

XMPP would take care of that problem.

I've cut back (4, Insightful)

mccalli (323026) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011322)

I've massively cut back my response times to email, and deliberately so. Maybe five times a day I'll go through and reply now, sometimes maybe three.

Instant messenger I tend to reply to...well...instantly. Even if it's only to say that I'll have to answer in a couple of minutes. Your best bet for getting hold of me is a phone message. Why will sound familiar to many. I was getting so distracted and interrupted by email that I turned off any notification that I'd received any. From then on, I found I was able to concentrate on my work a lot more.

What's been interesting is that people I regularly correspond with have noticed this and fitted in with the pattern fine. I don't think they've consciously done it - they've clearly learned how to get hold of me if they need to, and what kind of response times to expect otherwise. It's beneficial all round really - the key is that the two methods of getting hold of me quickly are interactive methods - phone or IM. This cuts down misunderstandings, stops people wasting time formulating the perfect email to send me because they can just get through it in a normal conversational style, adds informality as we're able to use a spot of humour whilst discussing whatever needs doing...it's just better. IRC aside, flamewars are more common in email than in IM. And phone-based flamewars? When's the last time you ever heard of one, if ever? Personal contact always mitigates such behaviour.

So email is no longer a quick way to reach me at work. It's a conscious choice, and it's worked out absolutely fine.

Cheers,
Ian

Re:I've cut back (4, Interesting)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011764)

I generally check my email at least once a day, probably several times. I can use the distraction.

It's extremely odd. As a programmer, distractions make me more productive, so long as they aren't actually interruptions. In Deep Hack Mode (TM), I won't be interrupted at all, so I simply won't check my mail. But most of the time, going to lunch, going for a walk, putting my feet up on my desk, or reading Slashdot will make me more productive, because it makes me think about something else.

Counterintuitive, but it works, because when I come back to what I was stuck on, I see it in a new way. It's almost as if the less I work, the better I work.

Of course, a significant amount of my time is spent doing more of a grind -- fix this bug, tweak this margin, look up that CSS property, go back to a co-worker and explain a fix I need. I can do that for days at a time. But when I'm actually doing what I'm good at, the programming work itself, that's when breaks make me productive.

However, even if this were not the case, I doubt I'd put it off for more than a few days. Unless I'm really that busy, I see no reason to. If it can reasonably be done over email, it makes sense that way, and when it can't, I pick up the phone or I walk into someone's office. I don't often see flamewars, and I don't try to formulate the perfect email -- I type in a normal conversational style.

I guess I separate interactivity from urgentness. For instance, if a server goes down and I'm needed to put out fires, a simple email, IM, SMS, phone call, or absolutely any way of getting the message "COME TO WORK" to me is fine. Another example: Discussing requirements with a client must always be done in person, but isn't necessarily urgent -- that meeting could be set up five days from now.

But that's just what's worked for me. I can understand people crafting the perfect email, or avoiding email for various reasons -- it doesn't have to make sense to me. It's probably the same sort of psychology which causes people to have rules about never taking work home, and having a place of work and a place of play that are distinct and separate -- the same psychology which suggests that you shouldn't do anything in bed other than sleep or sex.

Re:I've cut back (1)

mccalli (323026) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011803)

It's extremely odd. As a programmer, distractions make me more productive, so long as they aren't actually interruptions. In Deep Hack Mode (TM), I won't be interrupted at all, so I simply won't check my mail. But most of the time, going to lunch, going for a walk, putting my feet up on my desk, or reading Slashdot will make me more productive, because it makes me think about something else.

I understand what you're saying and agree with it entirely. I think the key for me is that the kind of distractions you're speaking about are my distractions, not distractions imposed on me from somewhere else. The first kind help me along, the second kind jar me out of my thoughts.

Cheers,
Ian

Black Hole (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011341)

I'm surprised they didn't mention the people who are black holes. You send them emails, they read them, but they do nothing until you walk over there and prod them to see if they have read it and only then will they give you an answer.

I've tried all sorts of things to coax an answer out of people like this through email... writing shorter messages which only ask one yes/no question, writing longer ones, etc etc nothing I try seems to be able to make them type that damn reply.

Re:Black Hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011524)

Are you calling them out in the email? Is the email to a group? If you are getting no response even if it is one to one emails then start bcc their supervisor and ask for a reply in the next day or so. Then wait and ping them in a day or so. Eventually the supervisor will catch on...

I ignor most messages from most people if I am not called out on it. I get about 50 'me too' messages a day and do not want to add to the clutter. Some people I work with on a daily average get 1k in messages a day. They DEFINATLY prioritize who it is from. You may just not rank on their importance scale.

Re:Black Hole (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011549)

Yup. Worked with someone like that. He was then promoted twice in 3 years and now is the director of the US branch of a multi-national corporation. Super busy, no time to respond to email. Righhhhht.

Just... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011345)

Send them your spam, I'm sure they'll respond faster or /. there server whichever is faster

read receipts (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011374)

or planning out timing strategies for email with read receipts.
Options --> dig around a bit --> 'Never Send a Read Receipt'

Is there some kind of etiquette involving read receipts that I don't know about?

Re:read receipts (5, Funny)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011427)

I like to copy the text from a read receipt and then send a dozen or so messages containing that text to the sender over the next 30 minutes. : p

It's true (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16011383)

That tit-for-tat really works for email. The more I respond to those viagra offers the faster they send me more of them!!!

And (2, Interesting)

Fred Porry (993637) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011413)

Its also really interesting, how people behave when you send them a job application: they just wont send a reply, even if you send another shit-friendly email, you can do whatever you want, they just wont effin' reply to your emails/whatever! No way!!!
I'm sorry, beeing unemployed just totally sucks...

Funny, I wrote about this recently. (2, Interesting)

Dock (89815) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011476)

Not a study, but I did write about it...

"When I send somebody an e-mail, I expect them to respond. One day is nothing. Two days if you're busy, I can understand and appreciate that. Three days is rude, and anything beyond that is stupid. We're not talking about sitting down to write an essay here, some grand quest to prove to everyone that you do actually know how to spell, use grammar, punctuation, and occasionally capitalize letters. I'm talking about a simple "Sorry, I don't have any information about that." How hard was that? It takes a few seconds to read, a few to comprehend, and a few more to pen an answer.

Seriously, what is the point of having e-mail if you aren't going to use it? How can you ever expect it to be useful when you treat it with all the responsibility of a two-year-old? When the phone rings, you answer it. You wouldn't for a second think about letting it ring, figuring they'll just call back in a few weeks. And what the hell makes you think you're so special that someone who obviously wants something from you is going to find it acceptable that you made them wait days if not weeks to be blessed with your response?

This past week, I sent an e-mail to an executive producer for a TV show that airs on the SCI FI channel. I'm pretty sure I sent that on either a Friday or a Saturday night, and got a reply on Monday. That's fine, business and all that. I pinged him back, and within minutes got another reply. He was obviously sitting right there still dealing with his mail, and I appreciated him taking the time to help me out with something. But that's the rub, I appreciated him not taking a month to get back to me, something that otherwise should be baseline. It should be commendable that you answer your email within hours, not that you answered it at all." [...]

Rest is over here - http://bitch-what.blogspot.com/2006/08/e-mail-is-b itch-and-so-am-i.html [blogspot.com]

That thing I sent you! (3, Funny)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011496)

FROM: Potamus, Peter
TO: Falcone, Blue
SUBJECT: That thing I sent you!

Did you get that thing I sent you?

...government officials on the other hand... (1)

Urza9814 (883915) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011509)

I've noticed that government employees never respond at all. Everything from my school's network admin to senators.
I did get a reply from Hillary Clinton though. It was an automated response saying she was too busy to read my email. I guess that doesn't really count though, does it?

Re:...government officials on the other hand... (1)

belg4mit (152620) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011812)

I emailed officials from my former high school and got a reply a wekk later.
My senators and representative answer maybe half of my messages with a mass
message after 3 weeks or so.

24 hours (3, Interesting)

Wylfing (144940) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011511)

Cripes, what is funny about this is that I have already metmodded posts from this topic.

Anyway, when I first started in business, which was a surprisingly long time ago given what I'm about to say, the head of our company met with every new hire and, among other things, said this:

Respond to every voice-mail within one hour, and respond to every e-mail within one day.

I have always taken that as a maxim of business communication. Professionals should respond in those timeframes, or else you need to assume (a) something went wrong with the transmission (this covers a lot of professional gaffes, which is good when the person you are accusing is your client), or (b) they have been too busy to respond (which means you should "annoy" them anyway -- busy people like to be gadflied with important items), or (c) they are intentionally ignoring you, which means you should assume #1 or #2 anyway.

Annoying corporate behavior... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011513)

Your PHB wants you to cc'd him on every email when contacting people related to the project but outside the department to make absolutely certain you're not conspiring with someone to get him fire.

That was fun. I did that for six months before getting another job. Why was I required to do this? Turns out my PHB was lying to people outside the department, and, since I didn't know that and wouldn't care anyway, my habit of documenting everything related to my project got him in hot water. He got annoyed when I kept telling people I couldn't answer their questions and that they need to call him directly.

DOWN with "read receipts" (2, Interesting)

jeblucas (560748) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011539)

ARRRRRGGGGHHHH! I can't stand these. I hate them times a million. I have one vendor that wants a receipt sent when I DELETE their message. (I'm CC'd only, I'd yell if I could). I, as a rule, never send receipts back. Never. Not to my boss, no one. If you want to know that I got your message, call me and speak to me. That's a pretty good way to verify, and say, while you're at it; maybe you could just tell me what's up. If you want the aloofness and lack of immediacy of email, then I'm sorry, you don't get to immediately know when I've read your message.

Ted Stevens' advice (0, Redundant)

IQpierce (444229) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011542)

Well sometimes they don't respond to your internets because they haven't gotten them yet. I just the other day got, an internet was sent by my staff at 10 o'clock in the morning on Friday and I just got it yesterday.

See, sometimes them tubes get clogged and that slows down your internets quite a much!

I'm in the current situation. (1)

kinglink (195330) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011576)

I've dealings with an E-store that is going to deliver some anime books to me, however for the last week I have yet to receive a response, my package has not been sent according to the site but I've 0 response with them. It's horrid.

Personally if you're in the service industry a fast response gets you more business. A response "we'll get back to you with in 24 hours" is all most people need right away. It shows you're worthy of doing business.

If you ignore people you'll lose business obviously and a delayed response is just as bad as ignoring people.

Some companies have made me very happy. I got a form letter from Namcobandai, but Nippon Ichi Software America gave me a personalized letter (probably a form letter for Disgaea, but the opening was personalized to my letter).

It's not hard to do this. The problem is saying "It will take time" but the fact is no one wants to wait forever, it's always better to solve the problems right away but no one ever said too much true correspondence is a bad thing.

Then again I'm sure that is how spam got started.

I treat email like I treat my phone (3, Insightful)

Geekboy(Wizard) (87906) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011590)

I ignore them until I want an interrupt, then I deal with them in the priority *I* give them. I do not acknowledge how important you think it is (or how important you think you are). If they come to my desk, I tell them "I'm in the middle of something, and will get to your email/call soon".

Email is not meant to be instant (1)

SCHecklerX (229973) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011605)

Maybe the person didn't get it yet. Mail can be delayed for many different reasons. A spam fighting technique is to use greylisting. Some mail servers will simply queue the tempfail and not try again for a few hours, or maybe not until tomorrow. SMTP servers will guarantee delivery. They won't guarantee delivery in a few seconds.

Heh (2, Interesting)

andreyw (798182) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011631)

I tend to reply as quickly as I can (that might depend on a lot of factors), but I never take into account how slowly someone responded. Just because (for example) someone doesn't have any respect for me to convey a timely reponse to me via email/sms/im/pm, doesn't mean I need to lower myself to that level.

People I hate (1)

Associate (317603) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011640)

I hate people that never respond. Sometimes they justify it as they were only CC'ed not in the main To:. Or they were one of a small list of recipients in the To:, even if the first listed.

I hate people that put return receipts on everything they send out. They get pissed when you elect not to send the return receipt.

I hate people who will copy a great number of people in an organization that aren't remotely involved with an issue just to point out that someone in the organization did something wrong. I usually reply-all to the originator with great condescension.

I hate people who prefer to give work instruction to you in person or over the phone or even IM instead email. They don't want to trouble even though I need the accountability.

It only mildly annoys me when someone forwards something to you that you were on copy of originally. All they had to do was look at who all the note was sent to.

Re:People I hate (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011712)

I hate people...

I hate people...

I hate people...

I hate people...

Froggy, froggy, all green and bumpy.
Why do you frown and act so grumpy?

asynchronous (1)

azdio (185000) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011641)

IMHO the world needs a reminder that email is asynchronous. I have seen the reply-fast-to-email strategies that some employ do more harm than good. In fact I blame this for all of the reply-all mishaps I have seen over the years. Can everyone please set their email client to check for new messages every 60 to 90 minutes and help re-pace the world on this issue. I hope this will start to erase the few words meaningless messages that can add to the weight of an INBOX such as "thanks man" or "ok, I'lll check". Seriously, with technologies like IM and Presence now evolving to workable standards I think this would be wise. As soon as the closed IM networks model shatters (see skype, AOL, MSN.NET, etc...) we'll all be better off with realistic expectations around email. Email is great, I do not need to install Lotus to receive a message from your Lotus Notes system. When that is true for other communications, such as instant messaging moving to SIP and Jabber I will be happier. I should not need to install Skype to use voice over IP or IM with you. What a waste of time (like posting gripes to message boards).

Well, I think... (1)

iovar (998724) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011653)

..that it is the subject that defines the response time. As long there is something to be earned everyone will respond quickly. When I get a bug report I always try to reply ASAP. Even if I have no clue on what the problem is, I respond with a guess and the assurance that I will look into the problem. Thus I improve the chances of getting into a meningfull conversation and sorten out the details of the problem. On the other hand, I still have responded to my Free For Life P0rn Membership, Update Paypal Account, or Internet Lottery Awards mails...

My tuppence worth (2, Interesting)

TractorBarry (788340) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011680)

Personally when I'm at work I only look at my emails about once or, if I get really bored, possibly twice, a day. With my private email accounts it's now got to the point where it may be as little as once a week. There's just that much crap being transmitted by email that I can barely be bothered to use it at all any more.

At home it's the never ending spam that's worn me down. My ISP runs spam filters and I run local spam filtering prior to downloading any actual messages and, whilst the level of spam became reasonable for a while, it's getting worse all the time and I get really bored deleting all the crap - even though most spam is automatically marked for me by software.

At work 70% of the email is useless noise which has been forwarded down the entire management chain with a message to "cascade to all staff". Sadly these message are usually along the lines of "Fred Bloggs has just been appointed as deputy leader to Mike Hunt and will now be reporting to Freda Smiggles" and whilst this is obviously a source of pride for Mr Bloggs, and undoubtedly useful for anyone who has dealings with Mr. Hunt and Ms. Smiggles, it has absolutely nothing to do with me or the team I work for. And in case you're wondering the other 30% consists of:

10% poor quality or old jokes, "unfunny" images and simply awful powerpoint slide shows.
9.9% good jokes or "funny" images.
0.1% funny powerpoint slideshows.
4% false rumours,
4% true rumours and
2% useful information.

Luckily though most of the mangement stuff get's processed by my mail filters so that it's automatically "marked as read" and moved into a spam folder (which is named "Management Information" :) as I simply can't be bothered reading it. It's somewhat depressing really as everyone is aware of the problem and if there's actually important information in one of these mails then either a telephone call will ripple down the management chain or there'll be a desk visit to pass on the information as well.

I've found that the more prevalent the use of email technology, the poorer the "signal to noise" ratio has become. I therefore long ago took the decision to give email less status than normal mail. So I have a quick scan first thing in the morning, seperate out the stuff that looks interesting and then either bin or ignore the rest.

If I'm sent something that requires a reply then I'll usually get round to it but very rarely with much regard to timing. I also always refuse to allow anything like "receipt reports" or "the email has been opened reports" and if I ever lose the ability to do this I'll just not run my mail client more than once a week.

So if you're expecting a reply to an email you've sent me then don't hold your breath. I'll do it when I get round to it. But by the same token when I send emails I don't expect a reply in any great hurry so at least I'm consistent :)

Personally I think the whole idea of a letter, whether transported via a physical medium or the aether, is to facilitate offline communication. You send it when you feel like it and I reply when I feel like it. That's a civilised way to communicate.

Devices and methods which facilitate urgent communication should be used sparingly and should be restricted to life changing/threatening events such as a loved one being taken ill or imminent disaster. Personally my job involves me concentrating on the matter in hand and I do not appreciate being continually interrupted with trivial crap.

Just my tuppence worth.

Screw corporate Email. (2, Funny)

EnsilZah (575600) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011715)

I just sent a mail professing my love to a girl i know and the suspense is fucking killin me.

RE: Response... (1)

poopie (35416) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011755)

When can I expect a response from you?

How about NEVER? Does that work for you?

First post!!!11eleven (1)

dubonbacon (866462) | more than 7 years ago | (#16011861)

I delayed this first post to make myself look busy.
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