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Redmond Yawning at Apple-Google Alliance?

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the much-ado-about-something dept.

214

Debra D'Agostino writes "Despite the media hype around Google CEO Eric Schmidt's appointment to Apple's board, CIO Insight Executive Editor Dan Briody says it's not that big a story. 'Apple and Google are already plenty tight,' he says. Arthur Levinson, CEO of Genentech, has been on both boards for years. And Al Gore and Intuit Chairman Bill Campbell are both Apple board members and advisors to Google. 'While it's fun to speculate about what an Apple-Google alliance could produce (GoogleMacs? MacGoogle? GoogleTunes?) this move is far from an alliance,' Briody writes. 'And even if it were, it wouldn't be first time that two upstart powerhouses have joined forces in an attempt to unseat Microsoft. Remember AOL-Netscape? Boy, they just steamrolled the team from Redmond, didn't they?'"

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Slashdot lies. (-1, Offtopic)

Gemini_25_RB (997440) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021474)

Nothing for you to see here. I don't know about that. If we're lucky, we can all see the fiery explosion that will be the downfall of M$.

Percpetion != reality (5, Interesting)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021517)

Perhaps Apple & Google have been tight for years, so this is not news for MS. However, for Joe Sixpack this **is* news and Apple & Google are now two well known names (which they really weren't a year or so back).

I think a lot of people bought and listened to MS because they were the biggest and seemed to be leading the way, so you bought their stuff and did things their way because that was the easiest... Now with two giants providing a different path, MS will start to look far weaker and people will feel that they are now entitled to make non-MS decisions.

Re:Percpetion != reality (5, Interesting)

shadowdodger (976256) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021609)


Perhaps Apple & Google have been tight for years, so this is not news for MS. However, for Joe Sixpack this **is* news and Apple & Google are now two well known names (which they really weren't a year or so back).


If anyone really thinks that Google and Apple were not well known a few years ago they really need to have thier heads examined. Granted that Google search took a while for it to catch on but at lesat by 2002 it was well known enough. And Apple... don't even get me started.

But on more relavent note, M$ knows what's going on between these two at least as well as the general public, if not better. And I assure you they are not yawning at what's happening, but what precisely do you expect them to do? Go cry to their Mommies and Daddies? Microsoft is doing the only thing that any good company can do when faced with someone better than you catching up with your tails and trying to knock you down. Looking for what to do next. Not trying to hide from what's coming. They are also going one step farther and trying to learn what they can from these two companies. Weather or not they are succesful is something that can be debated amongst your selves.

On a more hopeful note, if Google and Apple ever made any sort of actual loose partnership, it's be the coolest company ever. :)

Re:Percpetion != reality (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021749)

I'm pretty sure that by 2000 most people had happily forgotten that apple had ever existed. I know I had and I'm rather upset that they've resurfaced.

Re:Percpetion != reality (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021997)

'cause your a douchebag. Idiot.

Re:Slashdot lies. (3, Interesting)

Fordiman (689627) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021537)

What he said about AOL-Netscape may be true, but AOL-Netscape was a lame-ass alliance.

Seriously, I've known Apple fanboys to be zealous to the point of failed logic, but I've never known a mac user to be outright stupid (lookin' at you, AOL).

Meanwhile, Google is ubiquitous and powerful, with a number of good web-apps that are challenging to MS's model. And the pair of them are at the (to date) height of their power with very little overlaping in the finger-to-pie categories.

If there's a plan, I hope it's a good one.

Re:Slashdot lies. (5, Funny)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021593)

I've never known a mac user to be outright stupid

As a mac user myself, who reads and posts on many mac-centric websites....

You obviously haven't looked very hard. I've seen apple fanbois who would brag about the opportunity to bend over and have steve jobs fuck them in the ass with a baseball bat with the letters "DRM" spelled out in razor blades.

Re:Slashdot lies. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021618)

This illustrates the need for a moderation class of +1: Vivid and Disturbing Image.

Re:Slashdot lies. (1)

yakhan451 (841816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021656)

To be fair I posted that in a BDSM forum, not a Mac forum.

Re:Slashdot lies. (1)

Fordiman (689627) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021675)

Dayum.

Still, that's zealotism to the point of failed logic. Have you seen them do the kinda shit AOLers are famous for*?

* Script-kiddieism; excessive and post-useful typing in l33t; LOL@URMOM!!!!; the bad habit of ruining their computers with ad/spyware in the space of minutes**; being the worst forum trolls in the universe; and finally, installing AOL

** I swear, AOL'ers and post-AOL'ers are primarily responsible for windows users' reps as typhoid users

Re:Slashdot lies. (0)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021693)

I didn't need that image. But there are a lot of sad Mac fans. I've even had the displeasure of talking to one that said that Microsoft is a failed corporation. We aren't talking about just any biased person, but a full-on kool-aid-aholic. I think it's really sad to see the fans to be so rabid at times.

Partial disclosure: I happen to have a couple Macs that I regularly use. I like the OS though I wish there were some better choices made with respect to the hardware, especially the desktops.

Re:Slashdot lies. (2, Insightful)

wass (72082) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021748)

I think it's really sad to see the fans to be so rabid at times.


actually, such silly behavior is no different from the linux and bsd zealotry that is just as prevalent on places like slashdot. But for whatever reason it's somehow cooler to be a linux zealot than a mac fanboi.

Re:Slashdot lies. (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022021)

"actually, such silly behavior is no different from the linux and bsd zealotry that is just as prevalent on places like slashdot. But for whatever reason it's somehow cooler to be a linux zealot than a mac fanboi."

Well... "cooler" in the tiny world that is Slashdot, perhaps; but as far as the rest of humanity is concerned, there aren't many things that are less cool than a Linux zealot. (Or should that be a GNU/Linux zealot?)

Re:Slashdot lies. (3, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022275)

....but as far as the rest of humanity is concerned, there aren't many things that are less cool....

You're kidding right? Do you really think most of the world can tell what particular sub-genus of nerd you fit into?

Clue for you - we're all just computer guys to most people.

Re:Slashdot lies. (0, Troll)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022285)

the linux and bsd zealotry that is just as prevalent on places like slashdot

Aaaaah, but the Mac guys combine their zealotry with cluelessness. It's really annoying.

Re:Slashdot lies. (2, Interesting)

AndyAndyAndyAndy (967043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021953)

While Windows has it's devotees, you're much more likely to find die-hard Mac users than fanatical Windows users. Despite increased sales, Macintosh is still a cult / non-conforming sort of thing, so chances are better at finding 'stupid' fanatics who don't know anything besides it's not Win.
This just isn't the same as Windows fans, who *generally* either buy the cheapest (Dell) machine or need it for work. So don't say there are many / more Mac idiots, just more outspoken and obvious ones... partly -because- it is Mac and not Windows.

Re:Slashdot lies. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16022032)

What do you mean by "need it for work," what, are there that many microsoft programmers out there? Perhaps you mean "are forced to use pc's because they aren't smart enough to find a way around it and instead come to love them"? Or do you mean "sheep-like in their use of the standard tool"? Maybe "stoopid"?

Re:Slashdot lies. (1)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022064)

Seriously, I've known Apple fanboys to be zealous to the point of failed logic, but I've never known a mac user to be outright stupid (lookin' at you, AOL).
If you want to, I got an email of one right here... but don't say I didn't warn you...

Re:Slashdot lies. (5, Interesting)

kingkade (584184) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021632)

If we're lucky, we can all see the fiery explosion that will be the downfall of M$.

Where do you guys come from with all this venom and FUD? God, complete with a $. Your type really seem to think so much alike that I'd swear every one of you are the same person. It's so ironic, it's sad.

Anyway, getting to the point: Maybe I agree or disagree but you should provide some reasoning along with a statement.

Let me try: I don't think there is an alliance, and even Google and Apple together are not going to just "crush" Microsoft. MS' sheer size, marketshare along with its diverse involments in many more markets that Google nd Apple combined coupled with its admittedly dubious business practices are going to ensure they'll be around a *long* time.

Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (5, Insightful)

Famatra (669740) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021838)

"MS' sheer size, marketshare along with its diverse involments"

Microsoft has at least two achilles heels: Windows and Office. This is so since these are the only two money makers for Microsoft, the rest of their 'diverse involments' lose money hand over fist. If Microsoft were to be harmed in either of these two markets then it would be a severe blow.

I'd guess that the first of these weaknesses that will be exploited is in the Office market since it is easier to switch to another suite, i.e. OpenOffice, then it is to switch operating systems. Switching over to other non-Microsoft products paves the way towards helping people rid themselves of Windows as well.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021911)

Not true. MSN could stand on it's own two feet. But let's reveal what's really going on here. Microsoft nave have jumped into so many other markets that are not making a profit, but think about this. If they wait it out like alot of Japanese compies do (long term is the key), one of them could become an Office or Windows XP. If it is a war, Microsoft has the right plan as does Google.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (2, Insightful)

admactanium (670209) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022180)

Not true. MSN could stand on it's own two feet
MAYBE it could now. but for many years there was a constant debate in redmond whether or not to even keep msn alive. i know this for a fact because i was peripherally affected by that decision.

plus, microsoft threw a shit-ton of money at msn search; around $100M if i recall correctly. so to say that msn could "stand on its own" isn't exactly accurate because their search technology would never stand a chance to catch google if they didn't have the rest of the company to cover their enormous losses each year. i don't see any other independant search engines who stand on their own spending that much on their search technology.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022245)

MSN is more than msn search. We're talking about internet access, msn gaming studios, msnbc, etc. And it was profitable. I'm not sure where you're getting these enormous losses from. Perhaps its from the money they dumped into the search engine but before that it could substain itself. The search technology wasn't a focus until they threw all that money at it.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

admactanium (670209) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022429)

yeah, i'm aware of all that msn is. they were not doing well for a long time and people in redmond were very close to pulling the plug on it, mostly because they couldn't decide amongst themselves what msn was supposed to be. for a long time it was a competitor to aol, then that market started to close up and then it was a competitor to yahoo. after that didn't work they wanted to be a competitor to google. the range of services you see there isn't a result of focused development. quite the opposite, they're mostly leftovers from previous attempts at defining msn as a brand and company.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

kingkade (584184) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021970)

so since these are the only two money makers for Microsoft, the rest of their 'diverse involments' lose money hand over fist. If Microsoft were to be harmed in either of these two markets then it would be a severe blow.

You mean like the fact that, currenty, virtually Google's entire revenue is based upon their pay-per-click business model?

Microsoft Games must be doing pretty well. And XBox 360, like the XBox, will come back to eventually bring those business units into the black.

"losing money hand over fist", eh? Remember our little talk about elaborating our reasoning? By the way, sorry I insulted your intellignece by misspelling "involvement". Happy?

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

supasam (658359) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022058)

" entire revenue is based upon their pay-per-click business model" more like plain-vanilla advertisements. [cough*network television*cough] scuse me.

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (1)

vnangia (730425) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022110)

Unless I'm completely mistaken, the last couple of times there was an application versus platform war, platform triumphed - think Lotus 1-2-3, for example. You may be right that encouraging people to switch to OpenOffice is an improvement over a total Microsoft platform, but it is only an application, not a platform. I'm fairly sure that unless FOSS is successful in overturning the platform, Microsoft is not going anywhere. What Apple and Google have going for them, if there is such an alliance, is that they respectively provide platform and application. Unfortunately, Google is not a killer exclusive app for the Mac platform, and their bread-and-butter search and advertising is their main revenue stream. Their applications, IIRC, are all losing money. Hardly a logical place for Google's shareholders to keep it?

Re:Microsoft's Two Big Weaknesses (2, Interesting)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022356)

I'd guess that the first of these weaknesses that will be exploited is in the Office market since it is easier to switch to another suite, i.e. OpenOffice, then it is to switch operating systems. Switching over to other non-Microsoft products paves the way towards helping people rid themselves of Windows as well.

It's funny that with so many Office/Windows wannabes this keeps happening *not*.

Most Linux/Apple fans assume Windows users feel desperately trapped into Windows/Office and wanna switch the moment they are given the opportunity.

It's simply not the case. Not even just home users, but many professionals (art, programming, whatever) and businesses feel just right in Windows, where it provides them with easy to support and manage, flexible and capable solution.

And don't understimate Microsoft. They are not vegetables. If Office/Windows was to start losing market share, you can expect Microsoft will not sit with their hands up their bottom parts.

You'll see massive campaign with lowering of prices, new attractive offers, various incentives and a lot of interesting new features in Microsoft's products that will keep them in business. In fact, they are doing some of this all the time which allowed them to produce incredible products like .NET, Tablet/Media Center XP, VS 2005, Office 2007, Vista (pending, but we know it's coming..) and so on.

Re:Slashdot lies. (1)

NetRAVEN5000 (905777) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022102)

Microsoft will be around until Windows and Office are unseated. With Linux and OpenOffice.org (not to mention many other non-MS alternatives) I can see where this *could* happen very soon.

Not to mention that Google also has many different business ventures, and Apple also has a couple of their own.

this article is tiresome (5, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021479)

These are exciting times for Microsoft Haters. Google is growing in strength, serving up online ads by the bucket, even making headway in the corporate software market.

What adult writes like this?

Blogs are the new Op-Ed page, only with no journalistic standards.

Re:this article is tiresome (1)

qortra (591818) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021605)

What adult writes like this?

To be fair, the portion of the article that you quoted is infact objectively true, and not editorial at all. If I were as upset with the current state of blogs as you obviously are, I would have quoted the following gems from this article:

The truth is, Apple and Google are already plenty tight. (perhaps true but badly phrased)

or

Well, duh. That's the business model in Redmond. (badly written and possibly misleading; several reputable companies have headquarters in Redmond [wikipedia.org] , and many of which have varying business models.

Those quotes could actually be misattributed to non-adult persons.

I agree, this article is tiresome (0, Troll)

twitter (104583) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021732)

What adult writes like this?

Someone who loves M$, apparently. The summary about Microsoft's "seat" and the "Microsoft haters" and "upstarts" who would have taken their chair makes me think of the movie Tombstone or Steve Ballmer's famous chair throwing temper tantrum. Don't bother to read the article because there's nothing more there but the same kind of embarrassing nonsense. The author apparently thinks that it's OK to steal and lock down other people's innovative ideas, sue public schools and all the other villiany that comes from M$ and that no rational person should mind the abuse because M$ is eternal. So it is with WinTel fanboys everywhere and that is nothing new.

Re:I agree, this article is tiresome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021913)

twitter, please read this carefully. Following this advice will make Slashdot a better place for everyone, including yourself.

  • As a representative of the Linux community, participate in mailing list and newsgroup discussions in a professional manner. Refrain from name-calling and use of vulgar language. Consider yourself a member of a virtual corporation with Mr. Torvalds as your Chief Executive Officer. Your words will either enhance or degrade the image the reader has of the Linux community.
  • Avoid hyperbole and unsubstantiated claims at all costs. It's unprofessional and will result in unproductive discussions.
  • A thoughtful, well-reasoned response to a posting will not only provide insight for your readers, but will also increase their respect for your knowledge and abilities.
  • Don't bite if offered flame-bait. Too many threads degenerate into a "My O/S is better than your O/S" argument. Let's accurately describe the capabilities of Linux and leave it at that.
  • Always remember that if you insult or are disrespectful to someone, their negative experience may be shared with many others. If you do offend someone, please try to make amends.
  • Focus on what Linux has to offer. There is no need to bash the competition. Linux is a good, solid product that stands on its own.
  • Respect the use of other operating systems. While Linux is a wonderful platform, it does not meet everyone's needs.
  • Refer to another product by its proper name. There's nothing to be gained by attempting to ridicule a company or its products by using "creative spelling". If we expect respect for Linux, we must respect other products.
  • Give credit where credit is due. Linux is just the kernel. Without the efforts of people involved with the GNU project , MIT, Berkeley and others too numerous to mention, the Linux kernel would not be very useful to most people.
  • Don't insist that Linux is the only answer for a particular application. Just as the Linux community cherishes the freedom that Linux provides them, Linux only solutions would deprive others of their freedom.
  • There will be cases where Linux is not the answer. Be the first to recognize this and offer another solution.

From http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/docs/HOWTO/Advoca cy [ibiblio.org]

Re:I agree, this article is tiresome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16022108)

Yeah, i know you guys! Whenever someone says anything bad about microsoft, lets trot out the "no os wars" rule anonymously! That'll stick it to um!!!

Re:this article is tiresome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021868)

Blogs are the new Op-Ed page, only with no journalistic standards.

<sarcasm>Right. There are not enough doctored photos and terrorist-supporting articles to meet the new journalistic standards.</sarcasm>

Frankly speaking, journalistic standards are so low now that it's really pointless trying to compare blogs and mainstream media using "journalistic standards". Instead, we need to make loud noises about the low standards and try to get the mainstream media to raise them.

so... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021480)

apple is an upstart now?

Re:so... (2)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021559)

apple is an upstart now?
Maybe, if you compare it to IBM, Xerox, or Nintendo.

Re:so... (2, Insightful)

dilvish_the_damned (167205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021665)

I was thinking the same thing. For that matter Google is hardly an upstart.
Oh wait, maybe he meant "Uppity".

 

Re:so... (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021786)

By that definition isn't Sony an upstart?

Someone's an Andromeda fan... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021506)

Arthur Levinson, CEO of Genentech

I wonder who's idea it was to name the company after a Nightsider?

Question from a Mac user (5, Insightful)

NTiOzymandias (753325) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021529)

If Apple and Google are so tight, where the hell is that Mac-compatible Google Talk voice chat client we were promised a year ago?

Not to mention... well... ALL the rest of Google's software.

I'm not blaming Google specifically, mind you.... Apple should hurry up and fix those Javascript bugs in Safari already so that stuff like Writely will finally work.

Re:Question from a Mac user (1, Interesting)

Fordiman (689627) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021557)

Get linux. Use KDE. Submit bugs to the KHTML/KJS bugzilla. I guarantee you, if you do that, the next Safari will be far improved (ie: where do you think they get their rendering engine from?)

Re:Question from a Mac user (4, Informative)

tajmorton (806296) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021896)

They don't actually use KHTML. Instead, they use a codebase called WebKit [webkit.org] , a forked derivitive of KHTML.

Apple doesn't use much new code from KTHML anymore, but does contribute some back, although merging it into the KHTML tree is hard, because of the way the WebKit team makes patches. See the Wikipedia article on KHTML for more info. [wikipedia.org]

If you want stuff fixed in Safari, report bugs to the WebKit team [webkit.org] .

Re:Question from a Mac user (2, Informative)

QuantumFTL (197300) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022135)

Submit bugs to the KHTML/KJS bugzilla. I guarantee you, if you do that, the next Safari will be far improved (ie: where do you think they get their rendering engine from?)

WebKit is a fork of KHTML. Safari passed ACID2 well before "modern KHTML"-based browsers did because it is now a rather different beast - so different that many of the patches passed back to the original KHTML team are practically unusable. Making KHTML better at this point is nice, but unlikely to directly affect Safari.

Besides, shouldn't you just use Camino?

Board connections != product collaboration (5, Informative)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021592)

If Apple and Google are so tight, where the hell is that Mac-compatible Google Talk voice chat client we were promised a year ago?

Likewise, how come Intuit has waffled back and forth over Mac support during Campbell's tenure on Apple's board? How come the presence of Ellison on Apple's board never resulted in any staggering Oracle+Apple ventures?

Boards of directors are supposed provide outside perspective and serve as a safeguard for shareholders. Whether they actually do this in the era of the massively overpaid chief executive is debatable, but it seems obvious that membership on a board doesn't lead to actual strategic connections between the two companies.

Re:Question from a Mac user (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021903)

Apple should hurry up and fix those Javascript bugs in Safari already so that stuff like Writely will finally work.

WebKit (Safari) Nightly Builds [webkit.org]

I'd say it's in the middling stage right now (1)

DoubleRing (908390) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021530)

I agree that just because Schmidt is on the board that this is an all-out agreement. Don't dismiss this though. Given some time, something could come up--or maybe nothing at all. I can still be pretty sure that Redmond isn't yawning over this. I'd say a few chairs are being thrown around (It's like rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic--er, I mean the board room)

Re:I'd say it's in the middling stage right now (1)

iluvcapra (782887) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021674)

I'd say a few chairs are being thrown around

Possible, but I don't think that particular chair-thrower takes Eric Schmidt very seriously. Remember, in that very same chair-throwing conversation, he called Eric Schmidt "a pussy."

-1 Troll (2, Insightful)

42Penguins (861511) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021548)

If there was ever a trolling story, this is it. NPOV anyone?

Re:-1 Troll (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021805)

NPOV anyone?

It's not Wikipedia, idiot. Crawl back into your mother's basement.

Yawn like a fox! (1)

SauroNlord (707570) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021595)

:o

flamebait much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021604)

Remember AOL-Netscape? Boy, they just steamrolled the team from Redmond, didn't they?

Score -1 flamebait.

Apple-Google that's great (0)

awss82 (995948) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021608)

Well I guess this alliance will provide the best services for the world, since Aplle great designs and Google great technologies, a combination of both will lead to great technological stuff that we have not seen yet.GIPOD

Redmond Yawning at Apple-Google Alliance? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021623)

Damn! And I just bought a lot of stock in office chairs...

Guess I'll have to wait until the next Vista postponement for the price to go back up.

MS Threat (4, Insightful)

gamer4Life (803857) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021639)

No one is going to be a threat to Microsoft until they challenge Windows as an operating system. Microsoft can always include any product they make into their operating system "for free" (actually subsidized by the cost of Windows), and push them out, like what they've done with all before them.

The key to "beating" Microsoft is the OS. Something that's easy to use, runs on cheap/common hardware, and compatible with current software.

Re:MS Threat (1)

TheoCryst (975577) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021669)

...which won't be happening until Apple can somehow find a way to financially justify shipping OS X on beige-boxes. Last time they tried this (OS 7), it almost brought the company to its knees. And frankly, I still don't think they're in the right place to try again... yet. Give it time, and strike when the iron's hot.

Re:MS Threat (1)

Breakfast Pants (323698) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021979)

Even if they did it tomorrow it wouldn't be earth shattering; especially to businesses. This is because Microsoft has a long vested interest in continuing to support beige boxes--if apple switched tomorrow no business would wanna jump in for fear that they might switch back to not supporting beige boxes the day after tomorrow. Nothing would happen in the business world until Apple proved that they would stick with this strategy by becoming financially dependent upon it.

Re:MS Threat (1, Insightful)

earthbound kid (859282) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021760)

"Generals always fight the last war."

The age of the OS is almost over. Remember in the mid-90s, what you did when you wanted a computerized map of some place you'd never been? You went to the store, bought a CD-ROM, put it in your computer, ran the installer, and checked the map. The CD had to be for the right OS (meaning Windows most of the time) or the whole thing wouldn't work.

How do we check maps now? We go to googlemaps.com. It doesn't matter what OS you use for this.

The internet is making whole classes of applications that used to be OS-specific OS-independent. Yes, there will always be some programs that are better to do local, but a) there aren't that many of those. b) eventually, there will be good open source replacements for all such apps*.

*Except for maybe non-casual games.

The OS Wars are almost over. MS and Apple are both selling OSes that are competing with free, which is damned hard. Old versions of Linux were ugly as sin, but Ubuntu et al. aren't that hard on the eyes. Apple here has the advantage that its OS is subsidized by hardware sales, so it's not as hard for them to turn a profit, but MS is going to face serious challenges once OEMs start seeing how they can cut another couple dollars off the cost of their bottom end computers.

Re:MS Threat (2, Insightful)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021837)

What planet do you live on? There isn't an OS out there that can or will match Windows in todays marketplace. The original post says "No one is going to be a threat to Microsoft until they challenge Windows as an operating system" and that is the cold hard truth.

No matter how much you like Redhat or Mandrake or any other flavor of Linux, they're not as supportable as Microsoft or Apple. Remember what it was like before plug and play? Most people couldn't handle installing hardware like speakers and scanners. Driver/Hardware support sucked balls. And it still does for some OS's. And let's not get into the support for Dev's and IT professionals or the books and websites devoted to making peoples lives easier.

The only company that could topple MS is Apple and Apple continues to refuse or fail at opening up it's OS to other OEM's.

MS will never be challenged on the OS level until a company out there can bring a competitvie supportable OS to manufacturers.

Re:MS Threat (4, Interesting)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022122)

No matter how much you like Redhat or Mandrake or any other flavor of Linux, they're not as supportable as Microsoft or Apple. Remember what it was like before plug and play? Most people couldn't handle installing hardware like speakers and scanners. Driver/Hardware support sucked balls. And it still does for some OS's. And let's not get into the support for Dev's and IT professionals or the books and websites devoted to making peoples lives easier.


History does not agree with your premise. If ease of use was so important, Apple would be dominating the industry. MacOS had far superior "plug and play" support well before it came to any environment Windows ran on ("Microsoft" and "Apple" are not OSes). And even with the state that WinXP is in today, there is still a very large market for supporting end user desktops. It would seem that Windows (and even OSX) falls short of your ideal. Don't get me wrong - Linux (since you brought it up) as a desktop platform does have various short-comings. But I don't find "supportability" as much an issue as you make it out.

The only company that could topple MS is Apple and Apple continues to refuse or fail at opening up it's OS to other OEM's.


Apple lost in the early years because IBM lost. When IBM lost control of its "personal computer" architecture and it became a commodity platform, it set the stage for Microsoft's success and the demise for Apple who managed to "win" and keep control of its own platform. Tough break for Apple. They failed to bootstrap their own version of a commodity platform years later. And I'm not so sure any attempt today to support the x86 platform today would be successful (not that it wouldn't be interesting to see it attempted).

MS will never be challenged on the OS level until a company out there can bring a competitvie supportable OS to manufacturers.


You're assuming that Microsoft has to be unseated at the OS level. I disagree. What has to be done is to remove the OS as the lynch-pin to any given strategy. Web apps would be one piece to that - although I'm not convinced that alone will do it.

Re:MS Threat (1)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022217)

You're right about apple but I was referring to Linux. If you read my next reply on the topic you'll see I also agree with you that other MS products being the key to unseating MS. So my assumption is really only based off of what I was replying to and not the entire topic.

Re:MS Threat (2, Interesting)

Admiral Ag (829695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022468)

I think the point is that Linux can out-Windows Windows.

Windows won the OS war because it was cheaper because it could be installed on pretty much any manufacturer's desktop PC. IMHO Apple made the superior product (and I think it still does, but YMMV). But Wintel was "good enough" and cheaper. Apple is never going to compete at the bargain basement cheap box level, but then again the people who buy those sorts of computers are unlikely to care about the OS as long as it works and it is "good enough".

Windows has been and will be hard to dislodge simply because it has a virtual monopoly on compatibility. You "need" Windows because almost everyone else has it, and you need to run the things they do. The more that apps come via the web, the less reason you have to use any particular OS other than its intrinsic merits (and most Windows users don't use Windows for that reason). At that point Linux becomes good enough, and since it is pretty much free, Microsoft cannot compete. Hence Microsoft's obsession with creating "standards" that it controls. So far, they are losing. Google owns search and Apple owns online music (and shortly online movies).

But everyone knows this. If Microsoft cannot stop the increasing flood of OS independent applications, they will bleed money because most people won't need them. They may as well focus on games, because at least there is a need for them there.

Re:MS Threat (0, Flamebait)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021954)

How do we check maps now? We go to googlemaps.com. It doesn't matter what OS you use for this.

The internet is making whole classes of applications that used to be OS-specific OS-independent. Yes, there will always be some programs that are better to do local, but a) there aren't that many of those. b) eventually, there will be good open source replacements for all such apps*.

Cool. Google is going to write a high end graphics application like Photoshop for the web? And all my Windows specific graphics utilities (that aren't even on the Mac)? Do me a favor and email me when you see it. Thanks.

Re:MS Threat (2, Interesting)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021958)

Your predictions are appealing, but I'll play the devil's advocate: they are a little premature and discount Microsoft completely as a competitor, which is pretty short-sighted considering competing in market share (many times unfairly) is the thing Microsoft does best.

For one, applications on the desktop are much more mature than their AJAX and Java counterparts - Writely.com and Google Spreadsheets, for instance, don't even pretend to replace Microsoft Word and Excel at this moment. This will of course change, but saying that the migration of applications to the Web will end the OS war anytime soon is a stretch. Someone still has to build the platform to get to the Internet, after all. We're not looking at the end of an OS war - just a new type of OS war, one where the aim isn't to provide the best native operating system but the best bootstraps to get up to the best web platform. I doubt that Microsoft will stop competing once it becomes clear that native desktop applications are an obsolete piece of nostalgia. How about a very-thin-client version of Windows and subscription-based access to an AJAX version of Office, with all the features of the native versions? I mean Vista is coming along slowly, but make no mistake: Microsoft knows what it can afford to do, and losing its desktop operating system and application share isn't something it will suffer gladly. They'll want to enter by brute-force and compete in this new market just like every other - and while they may not dominate completely like they have in the past, they will certainly be a major player.

I don't see how the migration to OS-independent desktop applications entails a migration to Linux either. Competing with "free" is easier than you think: having millions of dollars in marketing, cultural forces behind your products, promises of support, and a near-guarantee of reliability are all something that Linux doesn't have yet for the free LiveCD versions. It's either free or you pay for support. Not both. Charging just for support and giving away an OS is something Microsoft and Apple can both do in the future to compete on price.

Moreover, the "open source" replacements are often inferior to their commercial counterparts. There are plenty of examples of superior open source products, but I can cite many examples of the opposite. I can't even play DVDs on the standard Ubuntu distribution - it requires apt-get install'ing the css and mpeg libraries. Most users don't want to muck around with package formats. Linux has a long way to go before it is an actual competitor against Microsoft and Apple for users other than those in the tech-savvy crowd. A solid, winning desktop distribution and a standardized UI and widget set will definitely help. If I understand consumers correctly, most feel more comfortable relying on something that they paid good money for. This may change, but again, I think it's too early to declare victory for Linux, especially since Apple is gaining on Microsoft especially among laptop users. Maybe in 10 to 20 years. But the OS wars are still healthy, and are actually heating up.

Re:MS Threat (1)

monoqlith (610041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021972)

Charging just for support and giving away an OS is something Microsoft and Apple can both do in the future to compete on price.

That's not to guarantee that Apple will ever shift from tying its OS to its hardware. Just saying this to keep the other option of licensing their OS open.

Re:MS Threat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16022279)

The OS Wars are almost over. MS and Apple are both selling OSes that are competing with free, which is damned hard.

Microsoft is selling an OS. Apple sells computers (and iPods ;-).

Re:MS Threat (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021898)

The key to "beating" Microsoft is the OS. Something that's easy to use, runs on cheap/common hardware, and compatible with current software.

Dell's Back-To-School special was a $279 XP Home system. Word Perfect. Monitor. One-Year Warranty. You can't get much cheaper than that.

The key to beating Microsoft (4, Interesting)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021647)

The key to beating Microsoft is to unseat Windows. Having a new board member at Apple isn't going to do that.

If Apple was serious about unseating Windows then they would copy Microsoft's strategies. Microsoft can see threats coming. The Playstation was a trojan horse into the living room. MS pumped a lot of money into putting a machine into people's living rooms that would stop them from needing to buy a Playstation. This is a long term strategy.

What Apple should do is buy Sun and put those hardware engineers to work on making the worlds best game console. That console should be a server with thin clients around the house, it should serve up great games and movies to the tv, and also let you wirelessly connect a Monitor and keyboard thin client and use Googles internet office suite for working on all your work like needs. TV and music on demand would be served up through Apples iTunes store. With this strategy Apple/Google/Sun could take over the entire household computing needs. And you know it would be cool because it comes from Apple.

Of course in the meantime I'm going to end up buying Vista, Office 2007, a Nintendo Wii and think about an Xbox 360.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (2, Interesting)

laffer1 (701823) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021726)

Quite a few think windows is the key. I personally think its Office. Sure OpenOffice and a ton of other apps exist. They don't get business people interested. If someone could actually take over the office suite market, they could control the desktop business uses. Microsoft got Windows into the offices of the world with office. Why does Microsoft still make Office for the Mac? Could it be because OSX is actually a good product and if it had a rival Office suite it might take marketshare from Windows?

Apple's done well in the home market and recovered some of their education customers as of late. They still suck in the business sector. Until that changes, Microsoft will keep Windows at the number one slot. If you think about the common objections to Linux, they are often business related. (desktops not servers)

Why buy vista? Perhaps so you can run office 2007? No other app has been announced for it that we must have yet. Just think about that.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (1)

shoma-san (739914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021858)

Office is only half of the solution. Come up with an Office suite that can read MS Office documents and is as supportable as MS's Office and you might have half a chance. It doesn't have to be free or open source either.

If you unseat Windows you unseat Office (1)

NetRAVEN5000 (905777) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022153)

Yes, Microsoft has Office for OSX but I'd be willing to bet that most Mac users stick with whatever is preinstalled. Not everyone likes Office. If they made a Linux version of Office, I would never buy it.

The majority of Office users use Windows. If we got rid of Windows then MS would be screwed because the only other Office version they have is for Mac, and I'm pretty sure there are absolutely NO Macs with Office preinstalled. And for most people, if they saw the pricetag of a new copy of Office, they would probably consider using an alternative rather than buying Office.

"Why buy vista? Perhaps so you can run office 2007? No other app has been announced for it that we must have yet. Just think about that."

Wow, you've gotta be the only person I know who wants to buy Vista to run Office 2007.

Let me ask you this. . . why do you care what version of Office you run if all you use it for is word processing and Excel? That's all most people use it for.

Most people won't buy Office 2007 or Vista until they absolutely have to.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022407)

I think what protects Microsoft's dominance is what I call the "last 1%" - that little bit of extra functionality that we get from the ubiquity of MS products. In my case, it is the integration of EndNote with Microsoft Word ("Cite as you write.") The productivity boost that little feature gives me keeps me away from Writely, OpenOffice, etc; it keeps .doc as the standard format for my documents. For other people, it is different things - add-ons and plugins for MS products that aren't available for non-MS alternatives.

Google contributes to that "1%" phenomenon. It integrates its web-only apps with desktop apps like Google Earth that are Windows-only. Picasa and Picasa Web Albums are another Windows-enhancer.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021827)

What Apple should do is buy Sun and put those hardware engineers to work on making the worlds best game console.

Sun's engineering expertise centered around providing software and hardware for large organizations. I don't think they can take that expertise and apply it well to consumer electronics. Save for Java, nothing they have done has come anywhere near consumer conciousness or use, and even then, Java is pretty well hidden.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (2, Interesting)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021884)

I'm an Engineer. We solve problems period. It's just up to the person in charge to formulate the problem correctly. Of course some Engineers provide good solutions and others don't, but the point is, is that a good Engineer can easily be retargeted. In fact the morale of an Engineer increases greatly when you give them somthing new to do.

A game console is a platform, the Engineers wouldn't be creating the content. I think that taking the Engineers from Sun and giving them a problem formulated by Steve Jobs could give rise to a very interesting solution.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022184)

...Is time.

Empires climb and fall. Fortunes come and go. In this life the only constant is change.

The vast majority of businesses don't long survive the end of their founders' direct participation, and I expect Microsoft is no different. Shortly after Bill Gates loses interest Steve Ballmer will have a stroke trying to sell proprietary software to Venezuela and it will all be over. A series of absurd follies, operational errors and legal decisions will drive the company to receivership. It will be a long sad story with lots of broken dreams and lost jobs and demolished retirement funds.

In the end, companies will still buy their software from somebody and pay somebody to support it and buy new PC's every three years anyway, because that's what they have to do to stay ahead of their competition.

But yes, in the meantime most of them are going to buy Vista and Office and all the back end support stuff and then act shocked when they're pwned, if they discover it at all.

Re:The key to beating Microsoft (1)

dfghjk (711126) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022253)

Apple's not serious about unseating Windows. They can't do it and they know it. They must be content as a vertically integrated solutions company that snipes at MS from the peanut gallery.

What makes you think Sun engineers are qualified to do a game console or that they'd hang around to do it? Sun is successful today on the strength of their servers. Game machines couldn't be more different. Not that you game console idea is credible anyway.

Why? (5, Insightful)

nascarguy27 (984493) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021654)

Why would anyone compare AOL-Netscape to Google-Apple? Aol and Netscape were both failing before they joined. Google and Apple are both doing very well and aren't exactly the same type of merge/join the AOL and Netcape. If memory serves me right AOL bought Netscape. Neither Apple nor Google is buying the other. It's just the CEO of one company serving on the board of another. It happens all the time with businesses.

what about loonix?! (1)

Danzigism (881294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021668)

i really think Google should strengthen its ties with Linux and help to make it something sweet.. all these years they've had something in common, and that's free software.. i guess its not exactly the best capital venture they could take, but what made them so popular is the number of people that use their services.. what better way to keep on promoting yourself to massive amounts of people, than with the opensource/free software movement? who knows.. maybe it shouldn't be their main point of concentration at the moment.. its quite possible that with an Apple and Google partnership, more capital for Google, could mean more money to buy time to contribute the the *nix world..

If by yawning they mean... (1)

jarg0n (882275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021670)

If by yawning they mean throwing chairs I belive this story.

At least Al Gore's on the board... (0)

keith134 (935880) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021707)

...cause after all, he did invent the Internet.

Re:At least Al Gore's on the board... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021761)

OH SHIT! hahahahaHaHAHAHAHAHA HA HAHHAHAHAA LOL HAHAHAHAHAHHAAA ROTFFLMFAO HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

OMG Haha

ha.

Oooooooooooohhhhh... shit. Shit. hehehe.
That was fucking funny man. I haven't heard that one before.

Wow. Just wow. Thanks man. That was great.

Al Gore is Inferior (1)

voice_of_fate (998696) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021849)

He did invent the Internet.

False. Like The Computer, Toast, and Marmite, The Internet is a superior British invention, invented by superior British minds in the heart of Britain. Research into a worldwide information network began in 1601 when Elizabeth I appointed Charles Blount (later 1st Earl of Devonshire) Master of Internet Information Systems. Being the only ICT-trained baron, Blount spent more time making repairs to Royal Laptops and setting up Royal Network Servers. Little progress was made until a British spy under the false identity of Antonio Santi Giuseppe Meucci announced his invention of the telephone. Then Master of Internet Information Systems Henry Phipps (1st Earl of Mulgrave, later disgraced when found to be using his post to distribute illegal copies of Victorian pornography--most un-English) found this invention allowed for much improvement over the previous method of carrying Internet messages, which involved a complex system of levers, pulleys, and mailmen. The later British invention of the computer itself further improved Internet capability.

If you had lived in England, been educated by the superior English educational system, and used the BBC as your only source of information, you would already know this. Al Gore is an inferior entity with little British blood in his veins. He shall be first against the wall when the revolution comes.

Apple and Microsoft are Inferior (1)

voice_of_fate (998696) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021784)

Apple and Microsoft are equally inferior. Google too suffers from American-bred inferiority--even when its Internet searching skills are coupled with the iPod manufacturing capabilities of the lesser "Apple", there will still be a failure to produce an operating system that matches superior British technology.

Neither OS X nor Windows stand up to the superiority of the Great British operating system, Ubuntu. Though founded on communist technology, Canonical Ltd's Ubuntu operating system is greater than its many international parts. Like Indian tea, it manages to glean goodness from what little goodness countries outside of the UK have to offer. Using slave labour from around the world and money stolen from an African, Canonical Ltd have produced the world's best operating system: a British operating system.

There are other reasons Ubuntu is superior to Windows, OS X, and other foreign Linux distributions: some of its developers are British, for example.

Eventually, America will be forced to adopt Ubuntu by the EU, then by the British. In the meantime, we can enjoy spectating these two inferior companies bickering over what little scraps of market share they are permitted to bite into, as they both circle the drain and are finally sucked down into the sewage system of inferiority.

The British invented computers. Before and since then, all British devices have remained superior. Use Ubuntu, the wise choice, the only choice, the British choice.

MacGoogle (5, Funny)

jx100 (453615) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021793)

Comes with a mullet, a swiss army knife, some little toy magnets, a straw, a rubber band, a paperclip, and a couple wires.

You make the computer yourself, or the bad guys get away.

Re:MacGoogle (1, Funny)

jofi (908156) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021811)

"You make the computer yourself"

Really? I can put my own Mac together?

Re:MacGoogle (1)

Elminst (53259) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022383)

Awesome.
If only I had seen this comment before my moderator points disappeared...

Bad comparison (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021801)

AOL-Netscape doesn't seem like the best comparison to me. It might be appropriate if we were talking about, say, Yugo-Google.

I for one hope there is no alliance. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021825)

I've always respected google and appreciate what they've contributed to the OSS community. To me, they are apple, but only better and without the snobbish attitude of anything Apple..

Hipocrisy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16021844)

Microsoft thinks that a mandatory start-up beep is a buzz worthy feature, yet any sort of alliance between a competitor and the world's most popular search engine isn't news?

With attitudes like that, I just want M$ to go the way of the Dell laptop a bit more.

Re:Hipocrisy? (1)

dfghjk (711126) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022229)

"Microsoft thinks that a mandatory start-up beep is a buzz worthy feature..."

You mean like Apple's start-up beep?

"...yet any sort of alliance between a competitor and the world's most popular search engine isn't news?"

It's not an alliance.

"With attitudes like that, I just want M$ to go the way of the Dell laptop a bit more."

You mean like Apple laptops?

Hail to Thee (1)

cdcarter (822001) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021859)

Well I for one welcome our new Moogle (Aoogle?) overlords.

Re:Hail to Thee (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021909)

The combination I believe you were looking for is Appoogle.

Re:Hail to Thee (2, Funny)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022475)

Goople.

Crush Microsoft? (3, Insightful)

msimm (580077) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021943)

Not likely. Alliance or not. In fact no-ones even ready to challenge them, Apple being the strongest contender, but to do *that* Apple would have to give something up I don't believe their willing to do.

Namely, their hardward platform. Let OS X/Tiger/Cheetah/whatever run on the same commodity hardware Windows has for ages and watch uses start to drift. Of course there's give and theirs take, Apple will have lost the ability to micromanage the hardware like they always have (mostly for the better I think) but then there are a lot of people like me who have invested heavily in PC hardware (built from commodity/specialized PC parts) who wouldn't dream of scrapping the whole system to change the operating system.

Then there's the question that *really* puzzles me. I always heard the story of how Apple makes most of its revenue off its hardware sales, and that sounded reasonable enough, then (for testing, my company does web-app development) we get an Apple and find out even point releases are sold seperately as upgrades. Is it just me or does that make it look like Micrsoft is really doing *me* a favor, namely by continuing to update and support their software platform until its end of life?

Thats a legitimate question by the way. I'm not an Apple basher (I'd pay $120 or whatever the going price is to see if I liked it on PC hardware), I do use Windows (XP Pro, on Workstations) and I manage more Linux servers (RHELu3) then any and all of that combined.

But in business Micrsoft is kind and not just because its the right OS (although that it and always has been Microsofts target market). Take any mid-sized business, inventory their hardware and tell me how much its going to cost to replace each system? Because you can't just do one, one there, thats where the compatibility issues come in. Say we've got 100 workstation no at EOL, nobody is going to sign off on a purchase order to replace all those functioning systems unless they have a lot of extra cash and a serious bias. Because in business sense it just doesn't add up. Then remember those EOL systems, you know, the ones the interns use, file stores, backup systems, whatever. Companies invest a lot of capitol into a solution like that and you're absolutely right, its going to be hard to topple.

I'm still not sure what Apples strategy is with the move to Intel, but so far it seem clear that moving into Micrsofts territory is not on the map. Things could change, I'd like that, or Redmond could be the 10,000 lb gorilla they aren't willing to challenge.

Grumble. (0)

Pinback (80041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16021973)

Apple and Google coming together? I read that as Commodore and Compuserve. Or maybe Atari and Yahoo.

Microsoft has pimped the corpse of VMS for all its worth.
Ditto for Apple and NextStep, Linus and the Solaris manuals.

DragonflyBSD is only place any real innovation going on these days. Not that anyone is noticing. Yawn.

nothing to see here (4, Insightful)

Pliep (880962) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022089)

So, it's just a CEO that sits around a board meeting a couple of times per year giving advice. It's NOT a merger, it's NO co-operation in products, there IS NO alliance.

It's just that the media and a lot of lame bloggers make a big hype out of this. Everybody else just yawns along with Redmond.

What about all these Ubuntu + Google rumors...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16022178)

A couple of months ago there were already rumours about google to choose ubuntu as their google desktop platform.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/01/31/google_goe s_desktop_linux/ [theregister.co.uk]
(just search for google+desktop+ubuntu in your favorite search engine...)

I don't care what they choose, I don't trust google,apple,microsoft,any-us-government-controlle d-company anyway...
But I hope that they do not pollute/restrict the ubuntu desktop with their influence.

GTunes (1)

Kuvter (882697) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022276)

I never liked iTunes, but GTunes I'm down with that homey.

Apple and Google? (1)

God of Lemmings (455435) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022354)

Soon they will be as strong and flexible as gumby and hercules combined!

Don't even compare (1)

Tomthemage (999375) | more than 7 years ago | (#16022387)

Remember AOL-Netscape? Boy, they just steamrolled the team from Redmond, didn't they?

AOL and Netscape were never in the same league as Apple and Google are now. I'm not saying that they would necissicarily succeed in upsetting the M$ balance, but they've got a much better shot than AOL and Netscape, together or alone, ever did.
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