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Humanity Gene Found?

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the we-win-evolution dept.

231

Banana_Republican writes "Nature is reporting that that multiple copies of a mystery gene may be what makes us human. It appears that humans have multiple carbon copies of a recently discovered gene that other primates lack. In particular, one sequence not so romantically or emotionally termed 'DUF1220' was mentioned . Humans carry 212 copies of DUF1220, whereas chimps have 37 copies, and monkeys have only 30 copies. Apparently the current thinking is that this gene is responsible for coding important areas of brain function."

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Obligitory Monkey Joke (-1, Offtopic)

IntelliAdmin (941633) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026476)

A guy walks into a bar with a monkey and orders a drink for himself. The bartender looks at the monkey and says to the guy, "Hey, we have health standards here, get that monkey out of here!" "Aw," says the guy, "He's Okay. I'll pay for any damages that he makes." Ill at ease, the bartender agrees. After a few minutes, the monkey jumps from the bar over to the pool table, grabs the cue ball and swallows it. "That's it!" the bartender screams, "Get that monkey out of here!" "Hey," says the guy, "it's Okay. Look, I'll pay you for the cue ball and leave." The guy drops a bill on the bar, gathers his monkey and leaves. Two weeks later, the same guy with the same monkey show up at the same bar. The bartender, remembering the incident, says, "Listen buddy, are you going to keep your monkey in line?" "Yeah," says the guy, "don't worry about any cue balls." After a few minutes the monkey runs across the bar to a bowl of grapes and grabs one. He looks at the grape for a minute or two and promply shoves it up his rear end. Sitting there for a while, he then proceeds to eat the grapes one by one. "That has to be the grossest thing I ever saw in my life," says the bartender. "Yeah," says the guy, "but after the cue ball, he began to size everything he eats."

Windows Admin Tools [intelliadmin.com]

Speaking of Bars (4, Funny)

iluvcapra (782887) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026552)

Can't get enough of the wonderful DUF.

Re:Obligitory Monkey Joke (0, Flamebait)

MagicM (85041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026554)

Wow. Doubly offtopic. Once for the lame joke, and once because you're pimping your website.

At least put the link in a signature. The fact that you've already set it as your homepage should be enough.

Please.

Re:Obligitory Monkey Joke (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026876)

Wow. Doubly offtopic. Once for the lame joke, and once because you're pimping your website.

And it was a really lame joke he made.

Hey, if anyone's on Facebook, feel free to join my Seminar Junkies group - I'm the guy in the cape.

Remember, even if we have 220 segments and chimps have 37 segments, it doesn't mean we know what they do, or how they impact other gene-encoding regions - it's only recently we started figuring out most of the segments we thought were "noise" are actually responsible for encoding other genes, due to transcription and folding "errors" - yet which make us what we are.

Re:Obligitory Monkey Joke (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026563)

I think I'll let your non-Sig link fly this time, because your joke was _that_ damn funny.

Re:Obligitory Monkey Joke (3, Funny)

sugapablo (600023) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026800)

Obligatory Simpsons Joke:

"DUFMan, human! OH yeah!"

Splice the genes into monkeys (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026477)

and commence with Planet of the Apes.

Re:Splice the genes into monkeys (1)

legoburner (702695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026514)

So long as the monkey is named Gunther and has a stylish hat. He'll probably only eat "banana-flavored energy bars made from tofu". Damn I'm glad Futurama will be back next year.

Re:Splice the genes into monkeys (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026530)

2008 is the tentative date for it. So a year and a few months, at best. More than two, at worst.

Ha Ha (1)

AssCork (769414) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026483)

Be sure the balls are resting on either side of the chin for maximum comfort!
GO LINUX!

They couldn't have come up with a better name.... (1)

BlahMatt (931052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026487)

because I'd rather not be human because of something called DUF (and no... the 1220 on the end doesn't help).

Re:They couldn't have come up with a better name.. (1)

john83 (923470) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026532)

Duf, Duf that wonderful stuff...

Re:They couldn't have come up with a better name.. (1, Redundant)

OakDragon (885217) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026541)

DUFF? All I can say is: WOO-HOO! [oneposter.com]

Re:They couldn't have come up with a better name.. (5, Informative)

danudwary (201586) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026603)

Not that it's going to stop all the Simpsons jokes, but DUF just stands for Domain of Unknown Function. It's not a name so much as a placeholder. There are lots of DUFs.

Re:They couldn't have come up with a better name.. (1)

BlahMatt (931052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026939)

Ah... that explains it. So they assign a name based on it's function once (and if) they figure out what it does?

Duh! The Homer gene (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026619)

Explains a few things.

D'oh! The Homer gene (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026960)

Now don't you wish you had used a better subject line?

Oh well, so much for the (0)

Travoltus (110240) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026499)

"So what's the difference between a monkey fetus and a human fetus? Huh? Huh?!!!" argument.

Re:Oh well, so much for the (1)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026638)

Duh! Only one of them has a soul. Aborting monkey fetuses isn't murder. /sarcasm off

%s/monkey/fish/g (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026704)

Killing and eating a fish/monkey/rat is murder. /sarcasm off

Re:%s/monkey/fish/g (2, Funny)

Solra Bizna (716281) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026745)

Killing and eating a fish/monkey/rat is murder. /sarcasm off

I think killing and eating a fishmonkeyrat is downright weird.</joke>

-:sigma.SB

Re:Oh well, so much for the (2, Insightful)

thefirelane (586885) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026712)

Your post confuses me... did anyone ever think there was no genetic difference?

Re:Oh well, so much for the (1)

Bull SR (245263) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026839)

A US Presidential candidate insults one by calling it by the genus name of the other.

Duh (2, Insightful)

john83 (923470) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026502)

Apparently the current thinking is that this gene is responsible for coding important areas of brain function.

Fantastic. Unfortunately, that seems to come from the same school of thought as my suggestion here: this gene is responsible for male pattern balding and fully erect bipedal motion.

Re:Duh (3, Funny)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026684)

Hee hee! He said erect. *snicker*

This post brought to you by Humans, the only organism known to make childish penis jokes. (Some Slashdotters belive DUF may be involved.)

Re:Duh (1)

dosun88888 (265953) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026917)

There's nothing childish about my penis, so stop making jokes about it.

Re:Duh (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026813)

I sometimes have problems with bipedal motion when I'm fully erect.

interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026504)

"And they know that the gene makes a protein that is found in the human brain. That suggests that it may help to give the human brain its unique ability to think and reason, they say. "

Interesting conclusion there...

Carbon copies? (1)

Bob Cat - NYMPHS (313647) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026510)

What are those?

Don't they copy A T C G too?

Re:Carbon copies? (5, Funny)

elgee (308600) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026582)

I guess they don't have DRM. Good thing as if it were up to the RIAA, there would only be one human.

Mod parent up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026708)

Please mod parent +1 funny.

Here it comes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026511)

Cue the Simpsons Duff Beer jokes!

Duff (1)

neurostar (578917) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026512)

Homer simpson anyone?

Re:Duff (1)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026560)

Homer Chimpson actually...

Mmmmmm.... DUF (2, Funny)

HaeMaker (221642) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026519)

Homer must be saying, "Told you so. We are not human without DUF".

Re:Mmmmmm.... DUF (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026673)

weak. so weak...

[Cue Barney Gimble's lip-rippling belch] (2, Funny)

The_REAL_DZA (731082) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026836)

Moe : [reading from the bar's copy of Nature] "...it says here, that humans wouldn't be human without something called 'DUF'. Huh!"
Barney [raising mug] : "I'll vouch for that! {BBBbBbbbbllllaaaabbllbbllbbllbb!!}"

Re:[Cue Barney Gimble's lip-rippling belch] (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026907)

ok, that's even weaker.

Re:Mmmmmm.... DUF (1)

StarfishOne (756076) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026926)

Doh, doh.. initially I read: "We are not human without ODF"

Radio Shack (1, Funny)

Johnny Mnemonic (176043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026524)

How many copies of this gene did the fire-by-email Radio Shack managers have?

DUFF MAN SEZ: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026525)

DUF1220, it makes you feel human... Drink up!

I can see the bumper stickers now... (3, Funny)

mpoulton (689851) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026534)

"My honor student has more copies of the DUF 1220 gene than yours!" and "Got DUF1220?"

Obligatory reference to super-brained chimps (3, Funny)

coolgeek (140561) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026536)

"Good news everyone"

My mistake (1)

svunt (916464) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026537)

Boy, is my face red. All this time I've been using tails and fur to distinguish between humans and other primates, when DUF1220 was the key.

It's a common mistake (2, Funny)

RsG (809189) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026612)

In your defense, they're quite hard to tell apart once you've had a few Duffs. What look like slightly unshaven legs and sloping posture the night before reveal themselves fully in the morning after.

Re:It's a common mistake but is there proof? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026905)

In your defense, they're quite hard to tell apart once you've had a few Duffs. What look like slightly unshaven legs and sloping posture the night before reveal themselves fully in the morning after.

Have you tested that theory experimentally and repeatedly? And who did the peer review on the research?

Don't forget human antigenes (4, Interesting)

Baldrson (78598) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026547)

Although there are some critical genes for expression of human characters, one of the characteristics of rapid evolution seems to be the inactivation of genes. As you progress along the line to humans there appear to be fewer and fewer genes being expressed. This seems to be the result of mutation's default action which is to damage gene function which in general means to deactivate it. Its a lot easier to deactivate a gene than it is to create a gene with positive action. So you can expect that if there are ways to create positive characters at the phenotype level by deactivating genes that would be main way those characters emerge during the early stage of evolution. It is probably also be that some older genes need to be silenced to so that newer genes that actually do function can express less competition.

Humanity just can't get enough... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026566)

...of that wonderful DUF

"Beer, the cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems"

DUF1220 slashdot handle (5, Funny)

lems1 (163074) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026575)

Ok, this was going to be my new name in Slashdot but some bastard already registered it!

That makes sense. (0)

RyanFenton (230700) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026587)

Really, it makes sense. Patrick Duffy [imdb.com] is what makes us truly human, after all.

Ryan Fenton

Can't get enough... (0, Redundant)

decipher_saint (72686) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026588)

...of that wonderful DUF!

DNF1220! (0)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026594)

... one sequence not so romantically or emotionally termed 'DUF1220' was mentioned.

For a moment, I thought it was "DNF1220". The possibility that a copy of Duke Nukem Forever had time traveled back to 1220 B.C. to infect the human gene pool is too horrible to imagine.

(As a tester on "Duke Nukem: Land of the Babes" for PSX, where Dukie time travels to future and does a Bill Clinton at the White House, this scenario isn't too far fetch to imagine. Blame my genes!)

Re:DNF1220! (3, Funny)

Kesch (943326) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026729)

Actually, 1220 refers to the fact that it will be released 1220 years after the second coming of Christ. (*Note: This release date is tenative and subject to change.*)

failz08s (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026597)

We strongly urge loJst its earlier AND JULIET 40,,00 these rules will on my Pentium Pro also dead, its against vigorous

The next step in the research. (1)

LotsOfPhil (982823) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026608)

Apparently the current thinking is that this gene is responsible for coding important areas of brain function.
Well, why don't they make some knockout mutants and then look at the brain function? It seems like the logical next step.

We're already there (2, Funny)

JonTurner (178845) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026870)

>>Apparently the current thinking is that this gene is responsible for coding important areas of brain function.
>Well, why don't they make some knockout mutants and then look at the brain function? It seems like the logical next step.

Three words: Jerry Springer Show

Re:The next step in the research. (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026956)

Well, why don't they make some knockout mutants and then look at the brain function? It seems like the logical next step.

Because humans take 16 to 22 years to develop full mental capacity. They'd be better off copying the segments into mice and making intelligent mice. I think we should call the ones with 10 segments Pinky and the ones with 220 segments Brain.

Just make sure they don't escape from the lab and try to take over the world.\

Also, if you thought outcries over stem cells were a bother, wait until we have adults without such segments. Some might even get elected to higher office ...

Next thing we'll hear (1, Interesting)

mendaliv (898932) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026621)

If this has any truth, we'll probably soon hear that the protein made by this gene is found primarily, or in high quantities, in areas important to language production like Broca's area or Wernicke's area.

er... thats a bit of a leap (5, Insightful)

gsn (989808) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026625)

In other news the more midi-chlorians in your blood, the greater the person's Force ability

TFA says that there is a gene that humans have more copies of than primates and that this gene makes a protein in the brain. They don't know what the protein does in the brain indeed they have no idea what having multiple copies of the gene does. Yet they reach the conclusion that this gene may be responsible for giving us our humanity.

All they seem to have is a weak correlation between the number of this gene and intelligence (which is arguable - I know some really dumb people) and as we've all learnt many times "Correlation does not imply causation."

IANAGS but I'd wait until there was some more evidence on offer.

Welcome to every science headline... (1)

PRMan (959735) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026676)

There are constant articles of this nature in the media, especially those concerning dinosaurs, primitive man, origins of the universe, etc.

Re:er... thats a bit of a leap (5, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026737)

All they seem to have is a weak correlation between the number of this gene and intelligence (which is arguable - I know some really dumb people) and as we've all learnt many times "Correlation does not imply causation."

If you RTFA (I know, I know, this is /. and that's against the rules or something) you'll see that the researchers are not claiming anything except "we found this gene, humans have a lot more copies of it than monkeys, and we think that might be important." Anything else is reporter's and/or story submitter's hype.

But there are a couple of other notes I'd like to make in response to your post, which are really responses to lots of posts of this nature. First, this is not a weak correlation; 212 vs. 37 vs. 1 is a significant difference in almost any context, and yes, we've all known some really dumb people, but unless those people are severely retarded, they're still a hell of a lot smarter than the smartest chimp or monkey. Second, I really wish people would stop invoking "correlation does not imply causation" as a mantra. Yes, it's true, but it's also true that correlation implies correlation -- by which I mean that if there is a statistically significant correlation between two variables, then it is entirely reasonable to assume that there exists some connection between them, and to use this assumption as, at the very least, a basis for further investigation.

I think people are so used to misinterpretations of correlation (almost never by scientists, BTW) that they forget that it is still a powerful and useful tool. Actually, this is true of statistics in general. Yes, it's very easy to lie with statistics; it is somewhat harder, but entirely possible and fairly common, to use them to discover great truths.

Re:er... thats a bit of a leap (1)

lubricated (49106) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026916)

This is two datapoints. The evidence for correlation is not strong.

Two datapoints are not statistically significant, for correlation.
Yeah, they found a gene that is alot more common in humans than monkeys. There are probably other such genes appearing by chance. They just happened to find one. They can use it as the basis for more study. Though there aren't many conclusions that can yet be drawn.

Re:er... thats a bit of a leap (1)

SydShamino (547793) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026925)

And how long until we genetically engineer a monkey with, say, 200 copies of this gene?

Uplift, here we come. [wikipedia.org]

just like homer simpson.... (1)

acedotcom (998378) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026642)

...i am loaded with DUF

In other news... (5, Funny)

Evro (18923) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026651)

RIAA and MPAA members found lacking new gene...

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026796)

...they found another gene, called DUFUS

Conclusions ? (1, Interesting)

thePig (964303) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026656)

From the article
Working out the protein's task won't be simple. With mice, researchers simply knock out genes to determine what they do. This cannot be done with primates.

I do not understand. Even though the issue is with the multiple copies of the same gene, can't the researchers just knock off this single gene in mice and get the basic idea of what this protien is all about?

After that they can go ahead and insert multiple copies to gather more info. But just because the protien is in the brain (and there are multiple copies in primates) doesnt alone to suggest that it is the one behind reasoning abilities of humans.

One interesting fact is that it looks as if higher up the intelligence scale of primates, the higher the count seems to be.
But is that enough? Cant it be something that can be related to any of the other defining characteristics of humans ?
Say, opposible thumbs or bipedal motion or something? These also do have relation to brain, doesnt it?

Anyways, it looks like there is much more to this than the article suggests, so I should keep mum, methinks

Re:Conclusions ? (1)

lubricated (49106) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026949)

>> Can't the researchers just knock off this single gene in mice and get the basic idea of what this protien is all about?

The researcher looking and analyzing this data, might not be the type of researcher that works with mice. Even if he was, he would probably get this paper our once this discovery was made. Another one after knocking the gene off.

There's a gene that confers some resistance... (5, Interesting)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026671)

...to HIV. Chimps have more of them than humans. It seems likely that SIV (simian immunodeficiency virus) has existed in chimps much longer than HIV in humans. As a result, Chimps with more copies of the gene have outlived their less well endowed relatives and now almost all chimps can coexist with SIV without showing symptoms of immunodeficiency. Apparently humans have started making similar adaptations and in some areas of the world there is now a generation of humans who seem to do a fairly good job of coexisting with HIV. But all humans still have many fewer of these genes than chimps.

But nobody would make the mistake of saying that this gene is the gene for 'chimpness'. It's just an accident of history that SIV arose before HIV.

I learned all of this from an excellent podcast [royalsoc.ac.uk] whose name I dare not write for fear of offence...

Re:There's a gene that confers some resistance... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026847)

ummm...no

There is a tiny group in europe that has a mutation of a cell recptor the makes them getting HIV/AIDS more difficult.

Since it kills people after the time they can have had children, the people who are not naturally immune(if there are any) will still have their genes passed on. Basically the virus lives too long.

It's one of the MANY many unique issus that makes this virus very tough to fight.

Re:There's a gene that confers some resistance... (1)

Frank T. Lofaro Jr. (142215) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026886)

It's just an accident of history that SIV arose before HIV.

Perhaps HIV was created using SIV, thus arising later,

I hate science reporters (5, Insightful)

Luxifer (725957) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026677)

from paragraph 2 of TFA:
"Scientists don't know what the gene does."
    No, they know what the gene does, it codes for a protein. They don't know what this protein does.
    Then they say that the protein is expressed all over, including the brain, so that means it may be involved in brain function.
For all they know it could be a structural protein, which is a better bet if it's expressed outside the brain.
    Somehow I doubt that a single gene is responsible for humanity.

    I try to be positive when I post, but what kind of morons do they have writing this stuff? And this is Nature magazine? How about some info on what sort of protein it is: Kinase? Carboxylase? Protease? How about some info on the expression levels instead of how many copies there are? There could be 1000 copies in our genome, but if the expression is low, it doesn't matter.
    Guess I'll have to RTFP, where P=Paper.

This is science? (1, Insightful)

TheWoozle (984500) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026682)

Since when does wild-ass guessing = science that is newsworthy?

How about they do a *lot* more research and then get back to us when they have more than "we found that humans have more copies of a 'mystery gene' that codes for proteins in the brain than a monkey"?!

Great.... (4, Funny)

TrebleJunkie (208060) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026693)

...now somebody's going to shove this thing a couple hundred times into a monkey, and it'll be fucking Planet of the Apes for real.

Re:Great.... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026721)

Sweet!//I mean Ook!

Re:Great.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026851)

...now somebody's going to shove this thing a couple hundred times into a monkey, and it'll be fucking Planet of the Apes for real.

Honestly! If your going to be twisted, at least post it anonymous!

Translated for my fellow slashdotters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026713)

Translated directly from summary:
Humans carry 212 copies of DUF1220, whereas George W Bush has 37 copies, and Steve Ballmer has only 30 copies.

Whats the opposite of DUF? (4, Funny)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026714)

If DUF makes us smart, FUD must make us stupid.

Re:Whats the opposite of DUF? (2, Funny)

constantnormal (512494) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026941)

Yes, in a second announcement later in the day, the "inhumanity gene", FUD9999 was discovered.

It took longer to recognize as it was so much more prevalent than the DUF1220 gene.

Apparently, the function of the FUD9999 gene is to convert the proteins that DUF1220 encodes into a complex mixture of steroids and alcohol.

Sad... (1)

HotBlackDessiato (842220) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026740)

...that my first anticipatory reaction to this headline was wondering what the republican counter response would be.

give me some duff :) (1)

Intangion (816356) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026746)

DUF fills your Q zone with pure DUF goodness :)

DNA is software. (1)

mlwmohawk (801821) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026749)

The more I read about DNA the more I have come to think of it in terms of software. Specific genes may be individual instructions and or subroutines. The order in which genes occur probably has as much to do with the whole thing as the pieces of the DNA itself.

That's what worries me about genetic experimentation, of course it is nessisary, but I think we don't quite fully understand it yet and our experiments are like a nube cracker changing code with a debugger. Hopefully, what they experiment on just dies, because, you know, you never really know!

DUF1220 == Duff Beer? (0)

thewiz (24994) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026780)

I wonder if DUF1220 is actually a gene that makes humans crave beer?

Re:DUF1220 == Duff Beer? (1)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026828)

Yeah its what being human all comes down to; a gene for appreciating beer.

Semantics, but... (0)

VorpalEdge (967279) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026787)

Scientists don't know what the gene does. But they do know that humans have more copies of it than chimpanzees, monkeys, rats and mice. And they know that the gene makes a protein that is found in the human brain

Guess you know what the gene does then.

You may not know what the protein does, but you know what the gene does.

Besides, just because humans have more of something doesn't mean it's what automatically causes the brain's "unique ability to think and reason." For all you know, the protein may have different effects between species. This whole article seems like attention-whoring to me.

Come back when you know something useful, k?

Genetic Testing (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026791)

Unfortunately, future candidates for political office will be tested for this gene. Those bearing it will be disqualified from running.

Multiple carbon copies? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026792)

Shouldn't that be multiple NUCLEIC ACID copies?!?!?! OMG LORFL

Gene therapy? (1)

jfengel (409917) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026799)

The important thing is, now that we've found the gene, will be able able to find a cure?

Let's Uplift the Three-Toed sloth! (4, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026806)

Three-toed sloths are an obvious first candidate to become earth's second sapient species.

They can be put to work installing Wi-Fi nodes and spy cameras on telephone poles.

And if they decide to rebel against their human creators, it will be really easy to outrun them.

so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026818)

chimps are only 17.5% human?

As I recall this is a flipped segment (2, Interesting)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026842)

which was puzzling at first, because it's literally flipped around from the chimp gene, and actually is similar to a dog segment. Turns out a lot of what we thought were different gene segments folded wrong and literally reassembled upside down (backwards).

However, just remember that just because we may have found a segment doesn't mean we understand how it works. Sometimes, it's not just the genes it encodes, it's how it impacts other genes on other chromosomes, and how it misfolds or affects transcription errors.

Every day we learn more and more, and understand less and less. But it's fascinating work, and is leading to greater understanding of what makes us tick - even though we are all different and the variation among us homo sapiens is greater than the difference between homo sapiens and a chimp. Sometimes, you may find you may have more genetically in common with someone from Borneo when you're from Germany than you do with another person from Germany.

[note - if I'm wrong about the flip, my apologies, it's been a summer with few seminars - reading the papers is harder in some ways]

The Noodly Appendage Did It... (2, Funny)

hcob$ (766699) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026844)

CAN'T YOU ALL SEE??? This is the work of his noodly appendage! We should all marvel at this(and his) wonderous and miraculus feat(and feet)! Anyone saying otherise is just speaking blasphemy!!!

More Common Elsewhere (5, Informative)

dorath (939402) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026863)

I sent a link of the Slashdot article to my brother, with the requisite Duff joke. He responded by saying that DUF1220 is more common in rabbits, elephants, and some other stuff than it is in humans.

I for one welcome our new armadillo overlords.

http://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgTracks?hgsid=7703 1393&hgt.out2=+3x+&position=chr1%3A142191957-14219 9015 [ucsc.edu]

good to know (1)

rice_burners_suck (243660) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026866)

Good to know that I'm almost as smart as a monkey.

Poor humans still believe they are the pinnacle... (1)

viking2000 (954894) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026893)

Poor humans are still trying to confirm that they are the pinnacle of the universe.

From believing they are in the center of god's creation, they have slowly, as their knowledge increased lost again and again. First they discovered that the earth was not the center of the universe, then that the sun was just a mediocre star in an average neighborhood in an average galaxy. Darwin taught them that they are just another leaf on the tree of life.

Now they are still clinging to the hope that their brains are so superior. The genome projects for some species may be the final nail in the coffin, for again they are likely to face disappointment.

Just get it: you are monkeys that can vocalize a little.

bananas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16026904)

So if I grow a banana with 213 copies of this gene grafted in somewhere, then the banana will be superhuman?

OK, So I'm in a Bad Mood (3, Funny)

XLawyer (68496) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026906)

"Perhaps most revealingly, transgenic mice with this gene incorporated into their genomes have been found to habitually scratch patterns on the floors of their cages that strongly resemble engineering blueprints for a flamethrower."

Does this prove Intelligent Design is flawed? (2, Funny)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026930)

Because, if God was such a bad programmer he had to encode it 220 times, instead of making an efficient coding paradigm that used only say three segments for backup ... well ...

Or does it mean chimps run Linux and only need 22 code segments to do what Humans (Windows) needs 220 code segments to get done?

In other news... (1)

vegasmacguy (908907) | more than 7 years ago | (#16026973)

The UN has asked the Iranian government for full access to search for George Bush's 28 missing copies of the DUF1220 Gene. ::ducks::
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