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365 comments

SecondPost! (-1, Troll)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040342)

Since I'm sure someone had the first one.

Re:SecondPost! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040462)

you fail it!

first (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040346)

Third!

Moo (-1, Redundant)

Chacham (981) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040348)

Umm, aren't they a little late on this one?

Re:Moo (4, Informative)

kimvette (919543) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040372)

Not when motherboard manufacturers still ship BIOS updaters which require MS-DOS. Considering that you can't even BUY MS-DOS any more, and the images are likely leaving MSDN and Server disks soon, a legal alternative to DOS is still a necessity.

Re:Moo (4, Informative)

nxtw (866177) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040386)

XP has the ability to create MS-DOS startup disks which can be used to flash the BIOS. I assume Vista will also have this functionality.

Some BIOSes are include builtin flashing utilities that do not require one to boot into DOS.

Re:Moo (2)

kimvette (919543) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040418)

That's just wonderful, but what if one does not run Windows XP? What if one bought OS X and hacked it to run on their non-Apple PC, or runs BSD or Linux instead? There is no legal MS-DOS in those situations, so an alternative is required. For some manufacturers (Asus, Foxconn) it's a non-issue since the BIOS includes an image loader for updates right in the firmware, but for other manufacturers (Gigabyte, Supermicro) that is not the case.

Re:Moo (4, Funny)

CODiNE (27417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040467)

Why are you worried about a legal DOS when you're running OS X on non-Apple hardware? Well hey if that helps you sleep at night.

Re:Moo (1)

dadragon (177695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040477)

He did also mention BSD and Linux. Those are perfectly legal to use on any PC.

Re:Moo (4, Funny)

3dr (169908) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040595)

He did also mention BSD and Linux. Those are perfectly legal to use on any PC.

Not when my questionably elected, somewhat appointed, congressional representatives get done with them!

Re:Moo (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040493)

Why are you worried about a legal DOS when you're running OS X on non-Apple hardware?

No matter what Apple say, you're never going to convince a hacker with a copy of OSX that he is prohibited from booting it on a generic box. Where would Apple be today had it not been for the hacker ethos? Steve Jobs well knows the answer to that.

Re:Moo (1)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040558)

Why would that hacker then be worried about having a legal DOS?

Re:Moo (2, Insightful)

kimvette (919543) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040674)

OS X can be bought off the shelf. Just FYI. It doesn't have to be downloaded or copied for someone else to have a copy on hand.

What one does with it -- install it on an Apple-branded PC vs. a big-box PC vs. a whitebox PC -- is up to the person who purchased it.

Re:Moo (1)

chaoticgeek (874438) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040720)

Hackers or vandals/criminals? I consider myself a hacker, but I try to do the right thing and I do not steal software. You should really think about what you say unless you would like to be grouped with the mass media and the general public that have no clue what words really mean. You come to slashdot I would think you should know this of many of the other people in this world.

Re:Moo (4, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040505)

I agree it's a bit of a PITA but there's a zillion free downloads that include one version of DOS or another. I've had great luck with the extremely roundabout method:

  1. Download bootable CD image or a DOS floppy image. If the latter, skip next step.
  2. Use IsoBuster (or similar) to strip the CD image out. I think Nero CD even has a tool to do this. I'm quite sure there's freeware tools to do it.
  3. Mount the resulting floppy image as a filesystem. On Windows, I use vmware and do this in a virtual machine, typ. running Windows 98. Linux users with the msdos filesystem compiled in can simply mount it; mount -o loop,rw imagefile mountpoint IIRC.
  4. Remove whatever files you don't want from the floppy, and lay down your own.

Now, on one hand this is probably illegal by the terms of the EULA, which probably says you can use this copy of DOS only to run whatever utility. (Seagate, for example, will provide you with DOS on a floppy or CD image, in order to deliver unto you the hard disk utility they licensed. It's a very nice one actually.) On the other hand, who gives a shit? The only thing wrong with this method is that it's beyond many people.

The real solution is that all BIOS manufacturers need to implement loading BIOS flash files from, at the very minimum, floppy, ISO CDROM, or MS-DOS format USB device, partition 1. This would eliminate this whole thing. I guess if it came down to it they could always just let you do that by putting FreeDOS into BIOS :)

Re:Moo (2, Informative)

xjerky (128399) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040494)

Heh. I had an Asus board that supposedly had a built-in BIOS flasher - but apparently the revision I had contained a bug that ended up nuking the BIOS completely. Very infuriating - it only does one task and at the lowest level possible - shouldnt they have tested it first?? I had to send the board back and get a replacement thanks to their major blunder. Luckily I only had it a few weeks at that point. Supposedly they fixed the bug in later revisions, but after that experience I will NEVER trust built-in BIOS flashers again.

Re:Moo (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040649)

Send the board back? When I nuked a BIOS, the manufacturer just sent me a couple of BIOS chips. Replacing the chip is easier than taking the mainboard out of the case. The last time I flashed a BIOS, I did it from within Windows XP, with Asus Update. No problem.

Re:Moo (1)

xjerky (128399) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040737)

Yes that was probably an option too - since this was 4 years ago, I don't remember why I didn't just do that. Probably because I didn't have a chip puller handy (it was an enclosed socket) and I didn't want to break anything trying to McGuyver it. Plus since I had just bought it it was within the store's return period, so I decided it was easier to just replace the whole thing.

windows flash utils (0, Redundant)

_Shorty-dammit (555739) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040518)

all my motherboards from the last, oh, four or five years have had windows flash utils. While this most certainly leaves non-windows users out in the cold, it still doesn't tie you to DOS exclusively. Whether or not it is wise to flash from windows is a different discussion. The fact remains, those flash utils exist.

Re:Moo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040378)

It's great and all, but it doesn't seem as useful now as it would have been 10 years ago. Yes, I'm sure it's great for some really old machines, but there just aren't as many of them around now.

Necromancy (4, Funny)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040458)

I'm not that skilled in necromancy, but as far as I can tell, in any system Animate Dead spells work only before the corpse rots away. And in the case of DOS, indeed, they're a tiny bit too late.

I guess it's rather the time for exorcisms now.

Re:Necromancy (4, Informative)

Drishmung (458368) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040541)

Nope, from the d20 SRD---Spells (A) [opengamingfoundation.org]
This spell turns the bones or bodies of dead creatures into undead skeletons or zombies that follow the character's spoken commands.
...
Skeletons: A skeleton can be created only from a mostly intact corpse or skeleton. The corpse must have bones. If a skeleton is made from a corpse, the flesh falls off the bones.
. All you need is the skeleton. Looks like there's hope for DOS yet then.

Re:Necromancy (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040745)

Well, since all you need is a skeleton system, I think it should do. For a full system, you'd prolly need a high level priest with revive.

Re:Moo (2)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040491)

Although a fully-functional free MS-DOS clone isn't nearly as useful as it would have been 10 or more years ago, there are still uses for DOS today. For example, Symantec licenses PC-DOS from IBM for Ghost to make boot disks with. The one successful commercial clone of MS-DOS (DR-DOS), has apparently found a niche market as a mature, well-documented OS for embedded systems (not phones, obviously). Imagine putting FreeDOS in ROM on a motherboard as a last-resort boot device, along with some diagnostic tools. To say nothing of giving you the ability to run the best word processor ever written (WordPerfect 5.1) on cast-off hardware. :)

Re:Moo (2, Interesting)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040576)

Umm, aren't they a little late on this one?
You'd be surprised (or perhaps dismayed) to know how many old crawling horror DOS applications there are out there in use. My boss uses this abomination of a program for creating master key systems that was written in Turbo Pascal back in the 80's. He recently paid $60 for the newest "upgrade" (last year!), but the thing is still written in TP, and still cannot be made to print to anything other than LPT1. I wrote a look-alike, work-alike windows app in two weeks (using Borland C++ Builder) that worked with his USB printer and could even import the data files from the old shitty program-- but he "couldn't figure out how to work it" so he continues to use that DOS-based crap. There are lots of people like that, some stuck with legacy software that can't realistically be brought into the 21st century, some just dumbfucks like my boss.

Re:Moo (1)

ZiakII (829432) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040651)

He recently paid $60 for the newest "upgrade" (last year!), but the thing is still written in TP, and still cannot be made to print to anything other than LPT1

If your talking about windows you can use the net use lpt1: //computername/printer name to make a network or USB printer print just like it was LPT1, I have to do it all the time for crappy military dos applications. (btw you do need to share the printer out if its a USB printer)

Re:Moo (1)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040656)

hmmm...got sidetracked by the idiocy of my employer and I never made the point I was aiming for.
I emailed the guy who wrote (and still sells) the software that he ought to be distributing it with VirtualPC combined with DOS, if he's not going to re-write it in a non-toy language.

Bootability (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040359)

How good are the boot disks? I am always running into situations where I need a "DOS" boot disk. Can we put this on a USB key or CD (in addition to the traditional floppy) and get our computers going?

Re:Bootability (1)

varunnangia (999363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040404)

Yes, it does work in LiveCD mode, but anything more exotic that Windows/286 is still experimental. That said, if you need to just fsck or fdisk or something like that, it'll run off a CD quite happily. I've not tried it out with a USB key, but chances are if you're using a computer which uses DOS as it's OS of choice, it doesn't have a boot from USB option... I totally understand your pain.

hooray! (5, Funny)

doofusclam (528746) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040361)

~writes new MS-DOS compatible apps~

Installer needs work... (4, Informative)

varunnangia (999363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040363)

I downloaded the full version, instead of the base, but it requires constant attention and keypresses to get through the installer. It does ship with a number of really useful utilities, though, and it does run Worms beautifully, even under Vista* :) *Note: Virtual PC breaks Aero :(

Re:Installer needs work... (1)

ImTheDarkcyde (759406) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040504)

Does it run better than it would in DOSbox?

Re:Installer needs work... (3, Informative)

varunnangia (999363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040547)

IIRC, DOSbox is based on FreeDOS. So unless the DOSbox devs have changed the installer code, I'd suppose not.

Re:Installer needs work... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040658)

I doubt this. I never was able to get Master of Magic to work under DOSBox, but it works flawlessly and with no extra work under FreeDOS. Sound too!

Just say No! (0, Troll)

human spam filter (994463) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040366)

Free DOS, something like mess-dos? Just say No!

Re:Just say No! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040753)

Hey, it's beer... I mean, free. Can't be from MS, right?

Bones that see a word, Bones that dont (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040371)

your eyes the one that sees the word, you butts the one that dont

Where does this fit into the map? (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040375)

I'm all for MS-Anything replacements ... but I don't understand what this means.

Can someone take a shell box, use this as a root OS, drop an equally front end on top of it, and come up with a Non-Linux OS variant?

  If you have a linux box already, do you run this like a Free-Dos-in-the-box, to fudge portability for MS software?

It's brilliant. I'm not. Someone help me out.

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (1)

human spam filter (994463) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040430)

> My print library doesn't have DRM on it. ..but you can't grep dead trees

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040453)

Sure you can. It just takes the intern a few days to get the results back to you...

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (2, Informative)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040446)

its a complete OS, that is modeled on MSDOS. It fits well into the embedded market. It also works well for old legacy applications where you really cant upgrade the custom hardware or the software ( like in machine controlers ).

The fact it works as a desktop ( with some additional software ) even on the oldest of 'pc' hardware is just a great side effect.

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (4, Funny)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040497)

This is for running MS-DOS programs on your StrongARM NetBSD box, inside of Bochs.

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (4, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040536)

Actually, you almost certainly COULD get along using DOS as your home system these days. I'm at a loss as to why you'd want to, but it's not impossible. To get a decent range of functionality, however, WILL require that you use commercial software, not least to get an IP stack. Once you've done that, there's some old NCSA applications that support it, like telnet and even lynx.

If you want networked email, go looking for a very old version of pegasus mail for DOS; I think you can get POP3 but I doubt you can get any SMTP authentication methods whatsoever, although I guess you could manually pop-before-smtp or something...

The best use for DOS IMO is to run a BBS, but then, who wants to do that any more?

The most common use for DOS ATM is to run industrial control applications, because as pathetic as x86 is, doing x86 DOS assembler is really quite easy and was for a long long time by far the cheapest way to get anything done in terms of control systems. In fact most of the computer-driven machining equipment I've seen, even new stuff purchased in the last five years, is often DOS-based. There's a dinky, crappy PC inside a metal enclosure that probably cost more to design (per unit sold anyway) than your whole PC, and it's usually got some kind of interface board. The software is frequently still written in assembler because you may well neeed per-cycle accuracy to run your stepper motors or what have you.

The second most common use for DOS today is probably doing flash BIOS updates on PCs too stupid to load their BIOS without an additional program load.

Re:Where does this fit into the map? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040731)

DR-DOS (currently owned by Caldera?) already has all the networking stuff built-in, and it allows multitasking as well. It's been available as a free download for many years now too. I don't know if they provide the source code though. But probably most people don't care and just want the binary distro anyway to run their old DOS apps/games.

3hird post LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040640)

b/c u got 2nd!!lollerskating!!!11

Still waiting on Free/PM (1)

rjamestaylor (117847) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040384)

'cause it's not cool unless it's tomorrow's technology today or 25 year old technology today.

FreeWindows 3.11 (4, Funny)

linguae (763922) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040387)

This is exciting that we have a FOSS and functional equivalent of MS-DOS 6.22 (with some other features like long file names). I can run my old DOS games on my Mac with QEMU. Now, I wonder when somebody will get started on FreeWindows 3.11?

ReactOS? (2, Informative)

varunnangia (999363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040442)

I know it's not the same as WfWG3.11, but what about ReactOS [reactos.org] ? Still a long way to go, but you can begin to run applications on it. And it's 100% FOSS.

Re:FreeWindows 3.11 (1)

I'm just joshin (633449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040443)

Ugh... You are a masochist of the worst kind.

Re:FreeWindows 3.11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040529)

Now, I wonder when somebody will get started on FreeWindows 3.11?

Tell IBM to open-source the 3.1 clone they did in the nineties for OS/2

Dos 1.0?? (4, Funny)

scenestar (828656) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040390)

And I Thought debian's release cycle was slow.

Re:Dos 1.0?? (4, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040578)

"And I Thought debian's release cycle was slow."

They did beat Hurd out of the gate, though.

Why no link to the site? (5, Informative)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040407)

The submitter didn't even bother putting a link to freedos.org [freedos.org] into the submission!

Re:Why no link to the site? (5, Funny)

funfail (970288) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040470)

You know, because of Slashdotting... DOS just can't handle a DDOS.

Re:Why no link to the site? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040646)

The submitter didn't even bother putting a link to freedos.

Mmmm, Freedos [wikipedia.org]

--
More free D'ohs [snpp.com]

But does it run.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040409)

But does it run Bash?

RE: =) ! (1)

c0d3r (156687) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040414)

=)!
C:\>debug
-e b800:0 1 1 21 7

Re: =) ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040440)

thats not nice... some clueless fool might... ...

oh wait. its a good thing. carry on.

Re: =) ! (2, Informative)

stevenp (610846) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040463)

Just for the record:
This prints a little smile in the upper left corner of the text screen

Re: =) ! (0, Offtopic)

Spikeles (972972) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040596)

I was going to say, the sad thing is i actually know what that means.. i can still remember how to write a helloworld.com program using debug. Those were the days! I actually taught myself assembly language using Ralf Browns PC Interrupts book and debug. And then i upgraded to Issac's A86 and D86, yep.. those were fun... especially when i was doing TSR's and got the interrupt return vector wrong! :)

Nostalgia (4, Informative)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040717)

I actually know how to break that down... B800:0000 is the start of the ASCII video memory. First 0x1 is the smiley, next 0x1 is dark blue on black. 0x21 is !, 0x7 is light gray on black.

The memory is 4000 bytes long (longer if you use a bigger mode than 80x25) with 2 bytes for a screen tile. First byte specifies extended ASCII character (charmap.exe with font Terminal will show you all characters > 0x20), second specifies the color.

All colors that can be used are: 0 = black, 1 = dark blue, 2 = dark green, 3 = dark cyan, 4 = dark red, 5 = dark purple, 6 = brown, 7 = light gray, 8 = dark gray, 9 = light blue, A = light green, B = light cyan, C = light red, D = light purple, E = yellow, F = white. Note that the first nibble is the background color, second is foreground. By default, if you specify a background >= 8, subtract 8 to get the displayed background. The foreground will blink. Not sure what mechanism overrides this to allow "light" backgrounds, but I've seen it done.

Not exciting... (0, Flamebait)

evilviper (135110) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040432)

I liked DOS as much as anybody, but FreeDOS is perhaps 5 years too late for anyone to care.

Most people have now (FINALLY) moved entirely off DOS (even Microsoft!), which had a solid niche until a few years ago.

FreeDOS has really poor compatibility with everything I try. Try to run some MS-DOS program, and it aborts before showing anything, or perhaps acts in very weird ways, sometimes doing real damage.

The main thing I tried it for, quite recently, was partitioning/formatting, as Windows has a few limitations in that regard. After finishing the job, Windows couldn't even read the partion. FreeDOS is a LONG way from 100% compatible.

What's more, DR-DOS has been freely available, for a very long time now. You can even get the source code to it, if needed, although it's under a restrictive license. It really is 99% compatible with MS-DOS, both applications and filesystems.

What is anyone using FreeDOS for, today, other than bragging rights?

Re:Not exciting... (2, Insightful)

abradsn (542213) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040474)

Dude, it was just released. Give it a chance to be used, before you complain that no-one uses it.
Someone put a tonne of effort into it, and you should have some respect for that at the very least.

Re:Not exciting... (2, Informative)

Abcd1234 (188840) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040480)

Well, it's pretty handy when used in combination with dosemu, as it allows distros to ship a fully functioning DOS box on Linux without requiring non-free software.

Re:Not exciting... (5, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040560)

I liked DOS as much as anybody, but FreeDOS is perhaps 5 years too late for anyone to care.

I wish I knew how you people find moderators dumb enough to mod this kind of crap up.

DOS is still heavily used in industrial control, with new programs being written for it every day. In fact, literally tens of thousands of computer-driven machining tools are running DOS right now as they run through their paces. DOS is literally the most popular OS in this space.

If people want to keep using those machines, and they're smart, they'll back up the programs right now, and burn them to a CD with a copy of FreeDOS. Someday they won't be able to find hardware their original DOS runs on. Of course, a lot of them just load from floppy, so all THOSE people need is a floppy image; they can burn it to a CD and boot from that someday when they can't find a 386 or a 1.44MB floppy drive for less than a hoijllion dollars.

Re:Not exciting... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040704)

I wish I knew how you people find moderators dumb enough to mod this kind of crap up.

The moderators are the same as the posters. The only computing activities they know about are:

1) Games

2) Internet

3) Basic word processing

4) Compiling hello.c

Re:Not exciting... (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040594)

You're obviously not into retro games. When I want to play Sword of the Samurai [links.net] , I run it on top of FreeDOS, which runs on top of http://dosbox.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php>DOSBo x [sourceforge.net] , which runs under Windows XP. Or I could just boot up FreeDOS, but that requires that I shut down XP, which is a nuisance.

There's also a lot of people who write embedded applications in DOS or DOS-like OSs. Having an open source alternative to aging, poorly supported closed-source OSs is good news to them.

Re:Not exciting... (1)

Kasar (838340) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040673)

POS systems all over are still using it. The office machines used to administer the old software's usually running windows and the POS software in a DOS box though, so even if FreeDOS was used for the sales floor machines, it'd be of limited use to the office where they need MS Office-type applications and other things currently not available for DOS.

Not that it can't be used, but I think the world's pretty much moved to GUI and won't be going back. I just don't see a killer app coming for a new DOS.

Why? (1)

bendodge (998616) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040457)

If it's not broke, don't fix it.
Why not use MS-DOS? Expense shouldn't be a reason. Or is it just to have an alternative that is out of MS's reach?

Re:Why? (1)

spauldo (118058) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040671)

You can use it in emulators and use it for an operating system if you're selling a bare PC.

It's nice for legacy stuff - I had a client once that ran a QBASIC application and we had to set up a couple more machines for him. FreeDOS was nice and legal, since I had no idea how to buy a license for MS-DOS. It's not like you can walk down to the store and buy DOS these days.

I have an unopened copy of DOS 6.22 around here somewhere, but it's buried in a box, most likely. Probably next to my 70 NT4 Workstation licenses.

How is this useful? (1)

Danga (307709) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040464)

While this is a cool accomplishment does it serve any real useful purpose? I have had no need for MS-DOS since Windows XP came out since you can create a DOS boot disk easily if you need to and all of my old games that I still like to play every once in a while and old apps run file using the XP compatibility mode. Since I have upgraded to XP I use XP on my machines that I just want to use to play games/web browse/code Windows Apps and Linux on servers and machines I want to code Linux apps on. No MS-DOS needed. If I really wanted to load MS-DOS on a machine and couldn't find my old installer disks then I noticed sealed, brand new copies of version 6.22 can still be bought on eBay like the following: http://cgi.ebay.com/Windows-MS-DOS-6-22-Operating- System-W-Sealed-Floppies_W0QQitemZ260027371141QQih Z016QQcategoryZ11685QQtcZphotoQQssPageNameZWDVWQQr dZ1QQcmdZViewItem [ebay.com]

So, while I find the freeDOS project cool in a nerdy sort of way I do not see how the amount of effort that went into it was worth the actual usefullness of the project.

Re:How is this useful? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040521)

Aww, great. Now I'm going to be outbidded. Thanks!

Re:How is this useful? (1)

mh101 (620659) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040589)

Don't forget not everyone has Windows. I've run FreeDOS on my Mac in an emulated PC environment to play the good old DOS games.

Re:How is this useful? (1)

Simon Simian (694897) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040599)

So, while I find the freeDOS project cool in a nerdy sort of way I do not see how the amount of effort that went into it was worth the actual usefullness of the project. I agree. FreeDOS is awesome!

I'd like to see more focus... (2, Informative)

erroneus (253617) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040469)

...maybe I haven't been looking in the right places or for the right things, but there are two things I need DOS for:

1. A means to boot a machine, load network drivers, protocol stacks and maps drives so I can run Ghost.
2. Other things like updating BIOSes

#1 is at the top of my list, obviously. Boot disks are pretty important. Bootable USB thumb drives and bootable CDROMs are good too. Need'm all. Seems like everywhere I look, things still seem to favor the Win98 DOS... it's annoying because I don't want to use those. For lack of a better term, I'd like to see more "marketting" focus on creating boot disk packages that people can use. Make'm as free as BSD so hardware makers can use them without worry. Philosophy be damned if all it does is make people nervous and hire lawyers, or worse, not use what is available because they simply don't understand it and can't afford a lawyer.

So if it were more available and better packaged, I think we'd get more than better acceptance of it, we'd get something of a clammoring for it.

Re:I'd like to see more focus... (1)

CyDharttha (939997) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040650)

As far as #1 goes, my tool of choice is a knoppix [knoppix.org] bootdisc. I use it for many things, including recovering data from any sort of partition. Wonders of dd and netcat [rajeevnet.com] is a great article including info on cloning drives over a network. I do use freedos in the event I need to do a BIOS update on a machine, and no other method is available.

Alleycat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040486)

Yes, but does it run Alleycat?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alley_Cat_(game) [wikipedia.org]

Re:Alleycat (1)

ParallelJoe (624814) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040694)

I'm not sure about Alleycat but a few years ago I set up an old P133 with FreeDOS, a simple menu system and a bunch of old games including: PacMan, Duke Nukem 2 AND Duke Nukem 3D, Doom, Quake, Wolfenstein 3D, Tomb Raider, etc. plus some old astronomy programs. There are zillions of DOS programs out there. My kids, big time gamers, still boot it up every now and then for a little old school action.

FreeDOS was a solid program even then.

yayo for uselessness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040487)

That's.......excellent. I think I'll go back to browsing the internet, listening to music, and playing games simulatenously on X11.

I like FreeDOS. (1)

Simon Simian (694897) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040495)

I had to use FreeDOS for something a few years ago, but I can't for the life of me remember why. I remember running it in QEMU, I remember being simultaneously impressed with QEMU and FreeDOS, but I can't remember what I was actually doing.

Anywho, I know it must be good software because I'm not easily impressed.

Wow! A blue^H^H^H^H^H^H kill me.

This is what I've been waiting for! (4, Funny)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040501)

Finally! Now I can run loadlin on a completely free OS!

Ten years for a DOS clone..? You got to be joking! (0, Troll)

j.leidner (642936) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040503)

What? It took them 10 years to implement a DOS clone? Congrats for the most useless software project of the 21st century. DOS was never state of the art, not when it was on sale, not even when conceived by Tim Paterso, who was only too well aware it was a Qick and Dirty hack (hence the letters Q and D in its intiaial name, QDOS).

FreeDOS was working for me 3 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040597)

That quick and dirty hack you mention finally devolved VMS into WinNT, what a crock of shit :-o Still, I'm glad FreeDOS is here because I still maintain some old production machinery and the controller software runs on DOS. Dosbox is good as well, I recently used it to run an accoustics exe written in QBasic.

Re:Ten years for a DOS clone..? You got to be joki (1)

WED Fan (911325) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040620)

O.K., clown, how long from Unix to Linux? Now, go sit down.

Stable? (1)

bendodge (998616) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040506)

A stable alternative to MS-DOS? Isn't a little early to make that claim?

Re:Stable? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040540)

Its been stable for years. It just didnt have the 1.0 version mark for people to notice it.

Old Dos Music Apps Can't Be Beat (4, Informative)

Jack Action (761544) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040508)

The Linux Dos emulator Dosemu [dosemu.org] , uses FreeDos. Dosemu is extremely easy to install and use, and once you do, you have access to all the old Dos music applications that have now been released for free.

These include Sequencer Gold Plus [voyetra.com] , and, if you don't like the tracker interface, the CMU Midi Toolkit [cmu.edu] , which allows score info to be entered in a text file.

A lot of these original Dos programs really haven't been beat, and when combined with Linux and a modern soundcard and midi/soundfont instruments -- you can have a pretty robust home music setup.

nostalgia (1)

gsn (989808) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040585)

So many things to get from HOTU, so little time...
no more mounting folders and general dinking around with DOSbox! Only dinking around with the real thing! Ahh the thought that I will soon see beautiful CGA graphics brings a tear to my eye. Alleycat as god intended it... sniff /nostalgia

Good job, guys! (5, Insightful)

SnappyCrunch (583594) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040586)

I'm proud of these guys. Sure, it took 'em ten years, but they've made an OS from scratch that runs applications made for another OS. It's not an easy task. Just ask the GNU guys, or the Linux guys, or the Wine guys, or the ReactOS guys. Even if you don't see the utility of having a DOS clone, there are those who do, and I'll bet they're happy.

Will it run bioforge? (1)

Rix (54095) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040608)

I've never been able to get that running on a modern machine.

32 bit DOS extender? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040627)

Does it come with a DOS extender fully compliant with the DPMI and VCPI specs? I think it's worth waiting a few more years for that.

Totally awesome (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040630)

Sweet! We should have a version of FreeNT 4.0 within the next 20-30 years. I can totally justify stifling my company's technological progress for 20 years to save $110/workstation.

So... (1)

redkazuo (977330) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040632)

if FreeDOS was finally released, does this mean I can hope for DNF this Christmas?

Now they can start with FreeWIN3.11 v0.1 alpha (1)

FireMotion (227702) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040657)

Now that FreeDOS 1.0 is done, they can start building FreeWIN3.11 v0.1 alpha on top of it.
(Do they already have a FreeDOSShell? If not, they can do that first).

In 2016, they might be able to start with FreeWIN95.
2026 FreeWIN98
2036 FreeWIN98SE
2046 FreeWINME
2056 FreeWINXP
2066 FreeWINVISTA

Will Microsoft or FreeDOS be first with the Vista editions? ;)

FAT Legal and others? (1)

btk667 (722104) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040666)

This may seems like an odd question but, what is happening with the FAT legal battle?
Who own FAT now? FREEDOS can use it ?

M$ is allowing this OS to exist? I know DOS is very own, and cannot be bought theses days but still Microsoft is leaving this "great" software freely available to the public?

DOS is alive and kicking. (1)

elgee (308600) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040670)

Twice in the last month, I had to boot from a XP CD and get into the recovery console and use, gasp, DOS to fix some disk and boot sector problems. Until something else comes along, such primitive stuff still works at the lowest level.

Re:DOS is alive and kicking. (1)

btk667 (722104) | more than 7 years ago | (#16040705)

In what cases does DOS help you with Windows XP?
DOS cannot read/write into NTFS?
And I am not sure it can read/write into FAT32!

For recovery purpose i use Knoppix, work great.

Feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040709)

OMFG CD-ROM SUPPORT!!!!!!!111111111111111111111111111111111

DRDOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040713)

FreeDOS, eh? Is DR-DOS still out there?

I don't need DOS anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16040723)

Now that there is Privateer Remake to play in Linux, I am all done with DOS.
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