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Blue Screen of Death for Mac OS X

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the creative-wastes-of-time dept.

349

An anonymous reader writes "Possibly nothing in the OS world has as much of a bad rap as the infamous BSOD (blue screen of death) in Microsoft Windows. On the other hand Apple hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI which only tells you its time to restart your dead system. Interestingly Mac OS X kernel has a secret API which lets you decide what your kernel panics are going to look like! In this Mac OS X Internals article Amit Singh explains how to use this API. Apparently you can upload custom panic images into the kernel and there's even a way to test these images by causing a fake panic. The article also shows the ultimate joke is to upload an actual BSOD image for authentic Windows looking panics right inside of OS X."

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349 comments

Not like Microsoft invented it... (5, Informative)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085345)

It's not like Microsoft invented it, either. I remember these [wikipedia.org] quite unfondly. Before that I had a frozen screen on a C64. And before that I had stopped lights on the PDP-11 display. And before that we had random characters all over the screen of Ohio Scientific (OSI) computers.

But Microsoft is widely credited with perfecting the BSoD and giving it fame.

A system crash with a tasteful little box can be as easily dispised as all the the preceding. I suppose, like everything Apple is doing these days, they've given it a certain panache and now everybody will want one.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085367)

Better than nothing (Mandrake's kernel panics).

What happens if... (3, Funny)

mr_neke (1001861) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085759)

System encountered a kernel panic in the panic() function.
Cue infinite recursion...

Keep it simple (3, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085442)

If you have an unstable system (BSOD-worthy), then it is probably best to rely on as few system resources as possible. THis includes GUIs etc. That's why a simple text-based BSOD or oops handler is a better idea than something that tries to do a whole bunch of cute graphics etc (which relies on a whole lot more hardware & software to be working properly).

Re:Keep it simple (5, Funny)

Sqwubbsy (723014) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085632)

THis includes GUIs etc. That's why a simple text-based BSOD or oops handler is a better idea than something that tries to do a whole bunch of cute graphics etc (which relies on a whole lot more hardware & software to be working properly).

You are so not a Mac owner based on these statements.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (4, Informative)

DingerX (847589) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085453)

Guru meditations were awesome, and I fondly remember that flashing red border.

But Amiga wasn't first. The Mac "Bomb" preceded it, and was notoriously useless for troubleshooting.

Still, most Windows XP users haven't seen a BSOD ever. Go ahead and ask them. See, Windows XP solved that. But mysteriously, their power supply is unreliable, and "trips" on the slightest whim.

You gotta love that. "BSOD is bad for marketing, and most people don't know what to do with the information anyway. Let's just reset the computer and pretend it's a power spike."

I'd advise people to change their default settings, but one time I had "write memory contents to log file on BSOD" enabled when I was moving data about, and hand less free memory on my HD than in RAM.

Don't ever, ever do that.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085473)

But Amiga wasn't first. The Mac "Bomb" preceded it, and was notoriously useless for troubleshooting.

Now that I think about it, I was in Sacramento, CA, back in the mid-80's and saw an evaluation Atari ST machine in the hands of a developer. He kept getting mushroom clouds. Seems he could get more than one at a time, too.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

Nuskrad (740518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085524)

Even with BSOD enabled, I've only seen it in XP a handful of times, usually when something goes wrong with my graphics card. Compare this to Windows ME, when I'd see them upwards of 10 times a week (and for some people, 10 times a day). WinXP is a pretty stable OS, all things considered, very few errors require a system restart.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

nuklearfusion (748554) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085682)

Still, most Windows XP users haven't seen a BSOD ever. Go ahead and ask them. See, Windows XP solved that. But mysteriously, their power supply is unreliable, and "trips" on the slightest whim.

Actually, i have, a few times. unfortuntly, the screen does not stay up long enough to actually read what it says (thus the cluckey PS comment, i assume.) i had to find out from the Windows recovery disc that the filesystem was currupted (thank god for knoppix, which still read the system.)

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085488)

Yeah, they didn't invent the CTRL ALT DEL either, but they get much credit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdGQsBDSEpk [youtube.com]

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

Bender Unit 22 (216955) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085495)

IIRC we had BSOD on NetWare first. But then it was the Black Screen Of Death.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085595)

IIRC we had BSOD on NetWare first. But then it was the Black Screen Of Death.

I just knew we had a problem when nsnipes stopped working

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (3, Interesting)

MyDixieWrecked (548719) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085636)

A system crash with a tasteful little box can be as easily dispised as all the the preceding.

that is precisely true.

My machine at work has some kind of hardware problem that was never quite solved while it was under applecare. it "panics" at least once a day, some days, it'll "panic" 5-10 times. Some things that set it off are scrolling in a terminal window (such as when I'm sync'ing portage on our server) or putting an audio CD in the lower optical drive.

The last time we brought it to tekserve, they claimed that both scsi drives were bad and they replaced them, and we didn't have a panic for a couple months, but by the time they came back (and with a vengence, I might add), there was no more applecare coverage...

I quote "panic" because sometimes I get that nice pretty "please restart your computer" screen, sometimes I get the text dump on the desktop, and sometimes the machine locks up, altogether.

luckily, we're getting one of those nice quad-xeon machines as soon as adobe releases the new creative suite, at which point I'll throw this machine out of a window.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

Swift2001 (874553) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085701)

Well, I can tell you right now, don't use SCSI. It's an old technology, most of the adapters suck, bad, and if you want speed, a Firewire 800 drive, or an eSATA with a new Mac or a SATA card is pretty damn fast.

But, we Must Use SCSI. Papa Love SCSI. All the children do, too!

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (2, Interesting)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085800)

I take it you don't run any servers. SCSI is vastly superior to SATA in a server role. SATA is better for single user work, but if you are tossing many file read/writes at the same time at the drive, SCSI will simply way out preform SATA.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (1)

shaneFalco (821467) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085775)

In my experience- panics come at you mostly from bad RAM and bad power supplies- might want to look into those.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085641)

It's not like Microsoft invented it, either.

Microsoft had a single DEBUG line in the registry for Windows 95 -- it allowed the application of your choice to intercept the crash.

The first commercially successful program to implement it was "Power Utilities 95 with Crashproof" [quickerwit.com] that handled/exposed many hardware conflict sins without just covering them up.

About 50K copies later and good shelf space at Frys/COMPUSA/BestBuy , Symantec took notice and put out their $29 Crashproofing program that didn't perform dozens of system checks or even unmask the cause of the crash.

If version 1.0 of that Norton floppy disk consisted of anything more than copying a 1 line registry change and a pointer to a bitmap, then it never showed in practice.

Re:Not like Microsoft invented it... (4, Funny)

Frequency Domain (601421) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085784)

No, MS didn't invent it. They just perfected it. Remember when there was talk about adding a BSOD hotkey to the MS keyboard, so you wouldn't have to go through the hassle of running software to get it?

Sort of unrelated (2, Funny)

rodgster (671476) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085348)

Sort of unrelated:

I used to have BSOD as my screen saver for an earlier version of Fedora (IIRC). It was always amusing when people would stop by to chat, a little while later, they'd see my PC suddenly BSOD! The looks I'd see (on other people's faces) makes me laugh just remembering.

Re:Sort of unrelated (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085376)

I had the screen saver on Solaris on my ultra Sparc. I forgot I choose it and it did a Sun BSOD first my heart skipped a beat I was about to type some commands in the prom. then it turned off the saver.

Re:Sort of unrelated (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085405)

Ahh. I remeber that screen saver..circa FC2..good times.

Re:Sort of unrelated (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085443)

Sysinternals made a really nice BSoD screensaver [sysinternals.com] for Windows.

Re:Sort of unrelated (0, Troll)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085552)

You don't understand, The Windows BSOD is a screensaver. When you can count on your OS to crash every 5 minutes, the kernel panic screen is functionally a screensaver.

When does your CD break? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085758)

A-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha!

That was about as relevant as Andrew Dice Clay.

Re:Sort of unrelated (2, Interesting)

ac7xc (686042) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085588)

There was actually a number complaints about the BSOD and another about kernel panic screen savers that RedHat removed those from screen savers. If you search the fedora-list archives you should find the original emails complaining about it. ;-)

Re:Sort of unrelated (2, Funny)

Reverend528 (585549) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085790)

I used to use that screensaver too. One time, my old roommate accidentally locked my computer. When BSOD came up, he thought it had crashed.

That's how I discovered he was looking at porn on my computer.

Re:Sort of unrelated (1)

bubkus_jones (561139) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085846)

Heheheheh. I don't have to worry about mine, my roommate's got his own, so I know I'm the only one looking at porn on my computer.

Likewise (3, Informative)

Umbral Blot (737704) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085354)

Likewise in windows you can change the background color and text color of the BSOD (or at least you could uder 98, I haven't had the desire to play around with it under 2000 / XP since they crash much less frequently).

Troll Umbral Blot at it Again. (-1, Troll)

twitter (104583) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085754)

Likewise in windows you can change the background color and text color of the BSOD (or at least you could uder 98, I haven't had the desire to play around with it under 2000 / XP since they crash much less frequently).

Are you still trying to tell people that XP is stable? I'd say it's worse than 98, which I still have on hand. Neither should be mentioned around OSX or any other Unix derivative. How many mod points are you going to spend promoting such junk? Of course, the Umbral Blot is full of infuriating bullshit a brief Google search shows:

Umbral, do you do anything other than promote M$ and diss everything else? I suppose not, hence your nick name.

Re:Troll Umbral Blot at it Again. (1)

Zaatxe (939368) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085798)

to crash much less frequently != to be stable

Re:Troll Umbral Blot at it Again. (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085877)

The BSoD is much less common on 2000 and XP. Instead it just has a bunch of nasty DLL errors that require a reinstall.

Re:Likewise (0, Offtopic)

Brother Dysk (939885) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085840)

Dude, imagine an orange screen of death - your computer crashes: "OH SOD!" Kickarse!

Get a life (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085361)

Get a life

Let me be the first to say (4, Funny)

GungaDan (195739) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085370)

I, for one, welcome our new department-wide goatse.cx kernel panic message.

Any of you guys hiring?

Re:Let me be the first to say (1)

crashelite (882844) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085732)

new virus re writes code in OS X to show goatse when kernal panic

Well on the upside (4, Insightful)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085371)

The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem.

Which is kinda lacking in the OSX Panic screen.

Re:Well on the upside (3, Interesting)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085411)

But then MS made the brillant decision to reboot the system right when the BSOD appeared, robbing it of any usefulness. Or perhaps they didn't do it on purpose, but I've seen plenty of displays just go blue for a split second, then blank as the system started rebooting.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

fohat (168135) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085459)

It could just be my corp. image, but I have "Automatically Restart" checked under System Properties -> Advanced -> Startup and Recovery. Not sure if it's the default out of the box setting, but I bet I don't see any Blue Screen's with that checked. It will supposedly dump an error log for you in the directory of your choosing, so I guess you don't really have to be able to read the screen; nice if you have a video issue.

cheers!

Re:Well on the upside (1)

RonnyJ (651856) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085498)

Windows 2000 doesn't reboot automatically when a BSOD occurs.

Windows XP does by default, but can be set not to (Control Panel, System, Advanced, Startup and Recovery).

A BSOD will also create a memory dump on disk (which can be set to either be a 'minidump', or a complete memory dump).

Re:Well on the upside (2, Insightful)

mattgreen (701203) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085505)

It gets logged to the system's event log, which you can check out later.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085653)

If I'm not mistaken, this never happened when XP first came out. Did it change with a Service Pack release or something?

Re:Well on the upside (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085431)

OSX dumps the normal debugging info (I don't know if that includes a core dump, but I would expect so) to disk and gives the option of viewing it when it restarts. I think some of the other BSDs do similar things to help kernel debugging.

It also means you can save a copy of the stack trace, which isn't possible on Windows unless you have a camera handy.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

boiert (934539) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085661)

Try setting it to do a kernel memory dump and check your %windir% for memory dumps. Then download the symbols and debugger from microsoft and be surprised.

Re:Well on the upside (2, Informative)

chrisv (12054) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085683)

Actually, it's possible on Windows as well. Not that I particularly *like* Windows by any stretch of the imagination, but XP and 2003, at least, will write a memory dump to the system swap file to be copied into %systemroot%\memory.dmp on the following startup, provided that it's configured to do so. The memory dump can then be loaded into a debugger to do post-mortem debugging. It does have a talent for not being the most useful on some configurations - I've run into issues on systems with >2G of memory, generally with the end of the dump file being truncated, but it certainly does save those details for later analysis.

Re:Well on the upside (5, Funny)

mybecq (131456) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085582)

The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem.

Kind of like knowing that there were:
- 56 bulbs
- 24 horizontal grill bars
- 72 vertical ridges on 1600 sq ft of 1/4" steel
- 20% full gas tank
- 209,000 miles driven
- 3 tread patterns
- 5 axles
- 18 wheels

You still got hit by a truck.

Re:Well on the upside (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085856)

Weighing about 40 tons.

Some information about the system crashing is better than none. I would rather have the machine not crash in the first place but considering that when a machine crashes it is under extreme stress and this is the last thing it can send before it dies so kernel does it best to send what information can about situation caused th crash.
Like those TV CSI shows, you work with what evidence you have at the crime scene.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

aarku (151823) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085587)

OS X writes out a proper log file you can look at later... what good is showing it when it's crashed?

Re:Well on the upside (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085616)

Because you might be unable to boot (happened on my Mandriva box after fiddling with BIOS settings :). So, the error detail might be helpful, if you know what to do with it.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

DDLKermit007 (911046) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085655)

Because windows users generaly aren't smart enough to find thier log file.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085688)

Then they don't know enough to do anything with the debug information.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

diamondsw (685967) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085599)

If you're a developer, you can easily set the boot time arguments to log to the screen. Meanwhile, panic information is logged, so you ca always get at it post-mortem.

For end users, a bunch of hexadecimal won't mean squat. Telling them to reboot in a non-scary way is a Good Thing.

Re:Well on the upside (4, Informative)

shawnce (146129) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085615)

Kernel panic information gets logged on reboot to a file and you can capture a kernel core dump if you want.

Review... TN2063 [apple.com] , TN2118 [apple.com] , Debugging the Kernel [apple.com] , etc.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

DigitlDud (443365) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085656)

If you want better information you can open up the crash dump in WinDbg. An "analyze -v" command will give you useful information most of the time.

Re:Well on the upside (1)

Yaztromo (655250) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085684)

The Win32 BSOD does give you better information so you can try to diagnose the problem. Which is kinda lacking in the OSX Panic screen.

The OS X panic details get logged to a file, so you can easily get this information in a nice digital form after you've rebooted (or by setting the system into target disk mode). Which, on the plus side, means you don't have to sit and scribble down a bunch of hex and hope that you got in all correct before typing into your system to e-mail to someone for diagnosis.

Likewise, upon reboot the Mac will realize it had paniced, and will offer to e-mail the details to Apple for analysis.

Yaz

Re:Well on the upside (1)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085880)

Gee, it's soooo hard. [apple.com]
Starting with Mac OS X 10.2, a panic is indicated by the multi-lingual alert shown in Figure 1. After restarting the system, a file called panic.log should be present in /Library/Logs . This file contains the same data as the panic dump on the screen.

The world's funniest joke (3, Insightful)

Malc (1751) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085377)

Hardly the ultimate joke. Jokes are supposed to be original. This has been a screen saver under Linux for years.

Anyway, couldn't this be described as the ultimate joke [youtube.com] ?

Re:The world's funniest joke (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085504)

Jokes are supposed to be original.

You must be new here.

Re:The world's funniest joke (2, Funny)

Incadenza (560402) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085533)

You must be new here.

Jokes are supposed to be original.

a good joke would consist of the following steps (2, Funny)

Aqua OS X (458522) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085626)

A good joke would consist of the following steps:
1) set an Intel build of MacOS to display the BSoD
2) instal bootcamp and a copy of XP, but never actually boot into XP
3) find and install a cheep faulty RAM module that allows MacOS to kernel panic with some degree of frequency.
4) bring the Mac in for service at an Apple store
5) claim that MacOS started displaying the BSoD after you installed Windows.
6) wait for someone to pick up the red phone to Cupertino.

If you're dealing with an older Mac vet, add an obscure reference to Rhapsody and "Red Box" for bonus points and added confusion.

Old Hat (3, Funny)

overshoot (39700) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085390)

Yawn.

Once upon a time, I was chairing an out-of-town meeting with a roomful of engineers. We spent most of the morning working a spreadsheet with margin calculations on it trying to come up with a margin budget that everyone could live with; I was running the machine that drove the projector.

The conversation took a turn away from the spreadsheet, and after a bit the BSOD came up onscreen. The panic in the room was palpable -- everyone figured we'd just lost the whole morning, and quite a few had afternoon flights out.

So I hit the shift key and entered my password to unlock the screen.

The classic BSOD screensaver gets the same amusement factor without the hassle of hacking OSX.

Re:Old Hat (1)

uuilly (746301) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085741)

This would be a very fitting use for goatse

I have only seen the Screen of Death on OS X only (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085399)

Back early on there was a bug in OS X which I think slashdot mentioned that caused a BSOD it required moving a directory into itself. Besides that one time I havn't seen the BSOD. after over 4 years of using my powerbook even doing stuff that it shouldn't be doing.

Re:I have only seen the Screen of Death on OS X on (1)

malraid (592373) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085593)

My only one was when I brought the machine back from sleep, the thing was that I put the machine to sleep during a OS upgrade... I rebooted, reinstalled the upgrade, and everything worked nicely.

Not bloated enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085421)

Great! The OSX kernel wasn't bloated enough! Now we can add images to it...maybe someone could come along and explain how to REMOVE things from the OSX kernel?

I smell pork rinds and apple sauce...

Leave it to apple! (3, Funny)

lostngone (855272) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085429)

Leave it to Apple to give you a choice when it comes to Panic screens. Does Vista do this yet?

Re:Leave it to apple! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085503)

"Leave it to Apple to give you a choice when it comes to Panic screens. Does Vista do this yet?"

It will once the MS "programmers" hear about this Apple feature.
(That is, once they get done fixing that darn Windows-DRM vulnerability...)

Re:Leave it to apple! (1)

prophetmike (789248) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085544)

...maybe they'll add it as yet another "NEW" feature into Vista SP1.

Crashes we'd all like to see (-1, Troll)

Steve Cowan (525271) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085471)

...is it possible to have a kernel panic automatically retrieve web content from goatse.cx?

Re:Crashes we'd all like to see (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085581)

No, but with the right command-line tools, you might be able to do it yourself without being infected.

Just be careful this doesn't open a backdoor on your computer. *rimshot*

This is taking things too far... (2, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085480)

I know that Mac users are supposed to be more friendly towards Windows users switching over but changing the kernal panic screen to match the BSOD is going too far. If you want it that badly, install Windows on a separate partition.

What about the Guru? (2, Funny)

lennywood1 (571226) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085494)

I'd personally go for a nice old fashioned Guru Meditation Error. :) *Digs around his garage for his A500*

Re:What about the Guru? (1)

Aokubidaikon (942336) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085835)

lol. I used to think my Amiga caught a virus called "Guru Meditation" when that happened.

Hidden? (3, Insightful)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085497)

hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI
It must hide them really well because in 4 or 5 years I haven't seen one. (I did once about 5 years ago though - that'll teach me to mess with third party USB drivers.)

Re:Hidden? (2, Informative)

Stele (9443) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085779)

Funny - about the same amount of time since I saw one on any of my Windows boxen. YMMV.

Stupid boring new crash screen... (5, Informative)

Moofie (22272) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085520)

That's not NEARLY as cool as the car crash sound Macs used to make when they really, really, REALLY blew up fierce. Get a good pair of speakers, and that sound would scare the tar out of everybody in the area!

I think it only happened to me once, on a junky old LCIII, while I was just working. There was a key combo to induce it on boot, though, and I got a lot of mileage out of that...

Gray screen of death (3, Informative)

azav (469988) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085531)

I have gotten the gray screen of death twice on my Quad.

When capturing QuickTime video, QuickTime writes one copy of the file and then makes another. If you are capturing to a mastering codec (ie animation) minutes can become gigabytes. It is easy to fill up the internal HD in this case.

What can easily happen in this case is the file writing routines will start writing over allocated blocks. System files, even track zero. If it writes over track zero, your internal hard drive will be destroyed.

How do I know this? It happened to me twice.

The second time, I was left with a 17 GB file on my hard drive that can not be deleted by any means other than reformatting the disk. The first time it happened, the HD was borked so bad that plugging it into another Mac caused that mac to kernel panic. Apple replaced the drive but I lost everything minus my backups.

As I was told by an Apple tech, when a hd starts up the dirve itself checks the validity of track zero. If it is invalid, you have a hardware fault and this generates a kernel panic.

This was all validated by Apple techs.

You have been warned. Hope this helps someone.

Imagine a Beowulf cluster of insensitive clods (1)

rcamans (252182) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085629)

That would be the slashdot audience, right?

Re:Gray screen of death (1)

cailyoung (898949) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085696)

This is why you don't use boundless capturing; it's why Final Cut Pro limits 'Capture Now' to 30 minutes by default and strongly recommends you do not turn off the limit. It's much smarter to use bounded capturing (i.e. Capture Clip) where the system knows the size of the file you're capturing before it starts so it can preallocate the space.

Re:Gray screen of death (0)

jez9999 (618189) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085704)

Hang on. Please tell me your OS does not allow 3rd party software to write a large file on the hard drive that causes system files to be overwritten. If so, I suggest you get in touch with the OS vendor as it sounds like a pretty serious vulnerability.

Re:Gray screen of death (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085721)

It doesn't. Now if the disk is full then the OS may not boot because it cannot get sufficient resources to do its normal boot.

Re:Gray screen of death (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085723)

I'm sure you've been told a dozen times by now - don't capture video on your system drive. But let me add to that list: you should also use the native codec of your capture device, rather than a nigh-uncompressed codec.

My hopes are with you that this doesn't happen a third time.

Ultimate joke.... (4, Funny)

ROMRIX (912502) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085553)

"The article also shows the ultimate joke is to upload an actual BSOD image for authentic Windows looking panics right inside of OS X."

Ya! and then we could like, (snicker, snicker) we could like, bring up pictures of toilet paper on the monitor (snicker, snicker) and they would think (hehe, snicker) they would think they got T.P.'ed! HAHAHAHA!!!!!111!!!

Did anyone else just develop a twitch in their left eye?

Hmm.. poster hasn't used osx much (1, Interesting)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085562)

It already has a black screen of death. Favourite for causing it is to plug in certain brands of firewire hard drive (once did it with a USB network card too).

If the OS itself hasn't failed just the GUI you get the spinning wheel of death..

Never heard of any kind of option that "hides the ugly kernel panics behind a nice looking GUI".. possibly a 3rd party app he's installed.

BSOD (1)

belmolis (702863) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085574)

Maybe Linux needs to adopt this so as to ease the transition from MS Windows.

Oligatory Monty Python Reference (3, Funny)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085590)

If the aptly named blue screen of death is indeed the ultimate joke, people should die laughing at it.

Another promise Microsoft didn't keep... (3, Funny)

spywhere (824072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085611)

There were rumors, before XP came out, that they were going to respond to the iMac by making the Blue Screen of Death available in five designer colors.

Bah! You young punks! (4, Funny)

rocjoe71 (545053) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085637)

You young punks and blue-screens-of-panic blah, blah blah!

...In my day, we didn't even HAVE screens, just a blinking light and if that light ever stopped blinking, you knew there was trouble, boy...

Re:Bah! You young punks! (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085702)

I still have that. On my switch. I wonder if I could get VMS to run on it?

Re:Bah! You young punks! (1)

darkjedi521 (744526) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085822)

Might be better off with RT-11 or RSX-11

Re:Bah! You young punks! (2, Funny)

Centurix (249778) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085737)

Blinking lights? Luxury! In my day you had to keep the abacus lubricated, otherwise the beads would just stop!

BSOD (1)

derniers (792431) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085645)

sometime ago I used BSOD as the screen saver on a Mac (for a short time, on a G3?)

Redmond... (3, Funny)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085650)

Redmond, start your photocopiers!

Maybe someday we'll actually SEE it? (1)

wardk (3037) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085659)

doubtful. been on OS X now for a number of years, not one single kernel panic.

Cool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085668)

Cool! But I think I'll die of old age before I see one of those in real life.

I've had... let's see... (2, Interesting)

Swift2001 (874553) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085736)

Maybe half a dozen? That's since 2000, when I installed the Beta, and then 10.1. Two causes: when I installed Panther, I got a new USB hub at the same time. Half my kernel panics right then. It was a bad hub that delivered less than its rated power. BAM! Later, when I moved up to the G5, I moved my old OS over from the G4. I used Carbon Copy Cloner, but I screwed up something -- I now use SuperDuper! because it's a real Mac app -- and something got really screwy about root and my admin account. Again, another three reboots. Did a fresh erase and install, no problems since then.

That's about 6 years now.

only one OS X kernel panic for me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16085746)

I've only ever had one OS X kernel panic. It was the first day I owned my Mac and I was furiously moving around files in Finder windows. I didn't own all of the files so periodically I had to authenticate myself. Then I accidently moved my /System folder to the trash. I realized what I was doing right after I hit the enter key.

So I guess you could say my only kernel panic was due to carbon unit error.

Its all good, but... (1)

Ziwcam (766621) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085756)

I would sure hate to put the effort into creating a OS X BSOD, especially because I would never see it.

no news? (1)

keytohwy (975131) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085764)

A thus, a VERY slow news day...

Moo (2)

Chacham (981) | more than 7 years ago | (#16085849)

BSoD is for the NT (and XP) lines. Win9x is a blue screen, not a BSoD.

The *reason* it called a BSoD, is because the computer will not do *anything* without a reboot. This is not usually the case under 9x.
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