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China Seizes 13 Million Pirated Discs

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the everything's-bigger-in-china dept.

197

TechFreep writes "The Chinese government is waging a 100-day battle against software and media piracy, the largest such effort ever conducted. After launching the effort on July 15, Chinese police and copyright officials have raided 537,000 illegal publication markets and distributors in major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, and Liaoning Province. Of these, government officials have closed down 8,907 shops and street vendors, 481 publishing companies and 942 illegal websites." This article in China Daily quotes vendors of legal media products gushing over their increased sales.

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But Remember Kids... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132175)

File Share'ers are the REAL evil villans!

um, that seems high (4, Interesting)

svunt (916464) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132184)

537,000 illegalmarkets and distributors? I know there are a lot of people in China, but damn, can that possibly be right? If they bust everyone, the US could lose its coveted "most behind bars" status.

Official statement from the pirates themselves (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132272)

We so horny. We only use software for porn. Solly cholly. We boom boom long time.

High? Maybe Because It Has Another Use? (5, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132303)

Oh, don't forget this article [slashdot.org] that states they were going to send out one million spam warnings to spammers. One million spammers? Here in the United States, it seems to be 9 or 10 parties that create 99% of the spam. Why is it so different in China? Is one in every thousand Chinese citizens a spammer?

Perhaps this is just another law that China will use to silence people (like I mentioned here [slashdot.org] )?

Speak out against the government and have your apartment ransacked for pirated DVDs. They find them everytime and you don't have to worry about a trial -- you were ready to distribute them! Makes the government look good and invites companies to come to China. Win-win situation for the government!

Re:um, that seems high (1)

O'Laochdha (962474) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132396)

Yeah, well, in China they don't stay behind bars as long...

In other news... (3, Funny)

goombah99 (560566) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132453)

Ebay, announces the cancelation of 537,000 auctions for "genuine" dvds by the seller for "item no longer available"

Re:um, that seems high (1)

dvice_null (981029) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132622)

That would be about (537000 / 1300000000 * 100% =) 0.04% of the population.

Re:um, that seems high (1)

brusk (135896) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132843)

Yes, it could be accurate. On city streets in China, there are lots of vendors with a tableful of DVDs and CDs, and they also have stalls in markets, storefronts, etc... all selling pirated materials. If you add the whole supply chain supporting that, it doesn't seem implausible.

My problem with this (1, Interesting)

donatj (815865) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132189)

My biggest problem with this is that the majority of this stuff is american, and its banned over there. They litterally can't get this stuff any way other than piracy, and yet the american movie companies are all for it. I don't understand it. I say if we're going to bring down communism we should do it via undermining their contries authority and showing them now the non-commies have it...

Re:My problem with this (2, Insightful)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132429)

I say if we're going to bring down communism we should do it via undermining their contries authority and showing them now the non-commies have it...

Have you ever considered the possibility that the huge multinational corporation that produce movies want to keep things the way they are? China's slave, er, child, er inexpensive labor force helps them to maintain their astronomical profits.

LK

Re:My problem with this (3, Insightful)

Bertie (87778) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132594)

China's not communist by any reasonable definition of the word. Their welfare state makes America's look comprehensive - no state education, no state healthcare, no unemployment benefit. You're on your own, pal. Private enterprise is common and becoming more so, and people have the right to own property. It's not communist, it's just got a very authoritarian government that calls itself communist.

Re:My problem with this (2, Insightful)

kabocox (199019) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132897)

China's not communist by any reasonable definition of the word. Their welfare state makes America's look comprehensive - no state education, no state healthcare, no unemployment benefit. You're on your own, pal. Private enterprise is common and becoming more so, and people have the right to own property. It's not communist, it's just got a very authoritarian government that calls itself communist.

Shh, I hope our government doesn't take any lessons from them. Though we'll just arrange our system where people still have freedom of speech, and can blog and complain on the internet with all the millions of other US residents. Heck, we can even still do our voting along our tradional lines since it's understood by those in power and it's hard for your average disgrunted citizen to actually change anything. They have to form a group or party and go through our organized political process. That weeds out all the lazy right there. Everyone who won't go through the "democratic" process can just be labeled an extremist and ignored by most of the citizenery.

Re:My problem with this (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132932)

Did you see me use the word "Communist" in that post?

China uses slave labor. Political prisonors who are forced to work are modern day slaves. China uses child labor. That's what I was talking about.

LK

Re:My problem with this (4, Insightful)

orasio (188021) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132449)

I say if we're going to bring down communism we should do it via undermining their contries authority and showing them now the non-commies have it...


China is not a communist country. They are an authoritarian fascist regime.
The soviet union with Lenin was an example of something a bit more communist, and Cuba regime resembles communism even more.
All of them share some degree of authoritarism, but that is not a needed or unique characteristic of a communist country.

Aside from the clarification... why would you want to bring down communism in another country?
Do you think that the autodetermination principle is not a good thing to respect?
It's one thing to choose to trade with countries with which you share ideology, but trying to force other independent countries into doing things the way you do, looks pretty authoritarian itself. And it would be hilarious to do that, in the name of democracy.

Re:My problem with this (2, Funny)

rtjohn (672608) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132755)

"Aside from the clarification... why would you want to bring down communism in another country? Do you think that the autodetermination principle is not a good thing to respect? It's one thing to choose to trade with countries with which you share ideology, but trying to force other independent countries into doing things the way you do, looks pretty authoritarian itself. And it would be hilarious to do that, in the name of democracy." You must be new here. Let me welcome you to the US.

Movie companies care about dollars, not politics (2, Interesting)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132476)

Movie companies, software companies etc, are more interested in dollars than some cold-war era politics. So you can't sell to them legally now? So what! In a few years things will likely soften and you'll be able to sell movies etc to China. When that happens you don't want a strong culture of copying. Besides, by ganging up with the regime, you're more likely to get a softened response and get the markets going sooner rather than later.

Re:Movie companies care about dollars, not politic (1)

donatj (815865) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132651)

Charging $15.99+ for movies though, only the richest of chinese would even be able to afford movies, when the average yearly income is $800

Re:Movie companies care about dollars, not politic (1)

Jace of Fuse! (72042) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132794)

when the average yearly income is $800

Hey, according to Sony that's no excuse.

They should just work longer hours even if it means getting another job.

Re:My problem with this (1)

Kainaw (676073) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132743)

"showing them now the non-commies have it"

I agree, but are our movies the best way to show how the non-commies have it? Tomorrow's DVD releases:
  * "Stay Alive": Americans are so bored with serial murder that they use video games to spice it up.
  * "Grease": Yes, Grease. Americans stay in high school until they are well past 30 and sting songs while doing heavily choreographed dance numbers.
  * "Avatar: The Last Airbender": How Americans view China - I bet they'll get a kick out it!
  * "Stick It": Home, family, country - nothing is as important as winning a gymnastics competition.

What surprises me is that none of tomorrow's releases are the "blow 'em up big" movies. Was Miami Vice already released on DVD?

537,000 down... (2, Interesting)

192939495969798999 (58312) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132191)

only 90 bazillion more to go! That picture from TFA is wild, though (mountain of CDs being crushed by steamrollers). That looks like some kinda explosion at a CD store.

Re:537,000 down... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132780)

That picture from TFA is wild, though.
Wow, they finally figured out how to put pictures in intertube news?

For those who don't get it, check the last few dozen linked articles... 90% of them are pure text (sometimes spread over a few pages to increase ad revenues).

Re:537,000 down... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132823)

... and what's with websites that have underline text for mouse-overs on regular text?!?

Shit! (1)

slummy (887268) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132195)

I wonder if my "The Shield - Season 5" bootleg is still going to ship!?

Awww... come on (5, Funny)

1010110010 (1002553) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132203)

Where else are we going to see blurbs like this [boingboing.net] on DVD covers?

Re:Awww... come on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133014)

It's even scarier than Orwell.

Apparently all those 1.3 million CDs were Britney Spears albums!
*;-O

/.edness protection (4, Informative)

Toasty16 (586358) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132215)

full text:

The Chinese government is waging a 100-day battle against software and media piracy, the largest such effort ever conducted.

After launching the effort on July 15, Chinese police and copyright officials have raided 537,000 illegal publication markets and distributors in major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and Liaoning Province. Of these, government officials have closed down 8,907 shops and street vendors, 481 publishing companies and 942 illegal websites.

Two of the largest pirated media operations in Liaoning Province, one located near Shenyang's Sanhao Street, the other in the Science and Technology Park of Liaoning University, were among those targeted.

These two centres provided over 90 per cent of all pirated compact disks to the city residents, said Wang Hongyu, head of Shenyang Anti-Pirated Enforcement Team. But now you can hardly find any pirated products there.

The crack down was initiated by more than 10 ministries and national departments, including the Ministry of Culture, the Ministry of Security, the State Administration of Press and Publication, and the National Copyright Administration. Each of the 13 million illegal CDs and DVDs that were seized up to this point in the raids were destroyed on September 16th.

Give me a break (1)

tsunamiiii (975673) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132224)

Ive got nothing against China, hey I love their food. But why every few years when they roll out the steamroller and drive over a pile of software and music, is it such big news. All of the warez sites there are up and running just fine, its such a transparent attempt at fending off trade lawsuits its not funny.

Re:Give me a break (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132339)

cheap-oem-software.org is down. so are a few others.

Re:Give me a break (1)

Kenja (541830) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132377)

Warez sites dont charge for the product. These are black market items, sold for profit.

Keep going... (5, Insightful)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132232)

It is suicidal for America to not tie very strong IP enforcement to its trade agreements with countries like China. Most of what we produce domestically is IP from music to code to drug designs. We are at an inherent disadvantage then, if we allow them to dump tens of billions of dollars of cheap crap in our stores, but allow their locals to run wild with our IP.

I don't like it, but that's just the way it is.

If you want to reduce our dependency on IP and strong foreign IP laws, go start a manufacturing business that produces in America at rates that can replace China and Taiwan.

Until then, I am glad to see China stepping things up, as it means we aren't getting shafted so badly anymore.

Re:Keep going... (2, Interesting)

syntaxglitch (889367) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132355)

Yes, but how much paying for American IP can China really support? I can't imagine that most users of pirated software over there could afford to pay full price for a legit license. Eliminating a lot of piracy seems like it would either wreak havoc on China (they won't push it that far, I'm sure) or, to take the typical /. angle, drive people towards other alternatives like open source (or perhaps local IP industries?).

More likely I think is that it's mostly a loud show of effort and piracy in China will continue unabated once the current effort quiets down.

In the end, we still need China more than they need us. :(

Re:Keep going... (1)

brianosaurus (48471) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132958)

I sure hope so. I love cheap chinese products. My garage is stocked with all sorts of tools that would have bankrupted me if I had to spring for even the Craftsman versions at sears. Especially the specialty automotive tools that I've only needed to use once or twice. I never would have bought them, except they were like $10-$15 at Harbor Freight.

I think American IP laws are ridiculously imbalanced. If American companies can't come up with a better business plan than "rip off the consumers", they deserve to be beaten down. I really hope China "plays along" just long enough to get accepted into WIPO.

On the other hand, its nice to see authorities going after the real criminals (the ones making massive quantities of bootlegs that are actually stealing sales and without a doubt actually violating copyright laws). Its a refreshing change from the ridiculous tactic of suing customers the RIAA has been using here. At least one country is finally getting it right!

Re:Keep going... (5, Insightful)

fuzznutz (789413) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132452)

If you want to reduce our dependency on IP and strong foreign IP laws, go start a manufacturing business that produces in America at rates that can replace China and Taiwan.
No problem. Can I sign you up to work for me for $3.00 a day?

Re:Keep going... (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132477)

If you want to reduce our dependency on IP and strong foreign IP laws, go start a manufacturing business...

What America needs is an IP-manufacturing based economy, not a IP-distribution based economy.

We need to start selling the service of creating IP directly instead of indirectly funding it by charging for distribution. Since distribution is essentially free, thanks to the net, and it's clearly impossible to compete with free, then we need a new system. Not legal protectionism that conflicts with one of the most key elements of human nature -- the desire to share knowledge.

Re:Keep going... (1)

s20451 (410424) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132569)

Not legal protectionism that conflicts with one of the most key elements of human nature -- the desire to share knowledge.

In what way does the copyright on a book prevent you from going to the library and learning all you want for free?

Re:Keep going... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132859)

In what way does the copyright on a book prevent you from going to the library and learning all you want for free?

Which is exactly why linux is developed on paper amoung the moldy stacks across the four corners of the world. Who needs this damn interpiratenet anyway!?!

Re:Keep going... (1)

s20451 (410424) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132935)

Where did I mention software in my original post?

Linux is also copyrighted. It just happens to be distributed with a reasonably permissive license, but one that is enforced from time to time.

Re:Keep going... (1)

russ1337 (938915) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132700)

t is suicidal for America to not tie very strong IP enforcement to its trade agreements with countries like China. Most of what we produce domestically is IP from music to code to drug designs. We are at an inherent disadvantage then, if we allow them to dump tens of billions of dollars of cheap crap in our stores, but allow their locals to run wild with our IP.
You are right, you cant 'depend' on IP. China is really just going through its 'modern industrial age' and sure, right now its making more - cheaper.... Give it 10 to 15 years and China will be kicking arse on research into tech and medicine. I believe China's IP has the (future) potential to be more valuable than the US's. America's economy is afloat due to the Medical world and while China can make drugs under licence cheaper than the US can, it would have to pay huge IP rates to the US companies. If China gets into the buisniness of developing their own drugs, they could very likley be more effective than 'current' (US) drugs, AND they'll be making them cheaper. If this eventuates, they'll suck money out of the US pretty fast. (Of course they would have to get new drugs past the FDA and a US company or government aint going to let that happen if it damages the economy - even if it is better for the health of its citizens.) But that is where the pressure from the WTO comes back on the US...

My point is this: When China 'catches up' they will invest in the 'IP' approach and have the ability to make it cheaper. China's 1.3 Billion vs USA's 0.3 Billion people has the potential to yield far more value in IP. It all boils down to their people being willing to work harder for less.

Re:Keep going... (2, Interesting)

Astro Dr Dave (787433) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132703)

It is suicidal for America to not tie very strong IP enforcement to its trade agreements with countries like China. Most of what we produce domestically is IP [...]
...which just goes to show you that our economy is based on a house of cards. Seriously - an IP economy is inherently unstable, because it depends on the cooperation of everyone else (never mind that it also works better in a police state). So we strong-arm other nations to get their cooperation, but countries and people don't like having laws dictated to them via trade agreements. And for rapidly developing countries like China, it isn't in their best interest to have strict IP laws, which probably explains why this is only a "100 day" crackdown.

Re:Keep going... (1)

Znork (31774) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132785)

"go start a manufacturing business that produces in America"

The indirect taxation effects of US IP legislation on American workers is part of why it's too expensive to produce in the US.

"as it means we aren't getting shafted so badly anymore."

Actually, it just means the Chinese will get shafted as badly as Americans. The economic impact of intellectual property is comparable to communist-era state factories; one protected business form has just been replaced with another, both are more or less equivalent drains of inefficiency on the economy as a whole.

Protect companies from competition and they will quickly cease to be competetive.

And please. Dont kid yourself that the actual production of intellectual monopoly material wont be moved to lower cost countries. At which point the US will really get screwed every way and backwards, unless the US politicians imagine they'll be able to extricate themselves from the IP nightmare they've built at that point.

Re:Keep going... (1)

s20451 (410424) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133164)

The economic impact of intellectual property is comparable to communist-era state factories; one protected business form has just been replaced with another, both are more or less equivalent drains of inefficiency on the economy as a whole.

Do you have data to back up that rather sweeping statement? A more supportable view would be that the USA has both some of the world's strongest IP protections and one of the world's highest rates of investment in research, which is probably no coincidence.

The Price of Slavery (1)

twitter (104583) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133093)

Book burnings are never a good sign. This is a deal between thieves and is hollow throughout. From the Article:

"If piracy can be controlled and more customers purchase our copyrighted products, we can provide more of these products for cheaper prices in return in the future," said Feng Hongtao, manager of Dongke Audio and Video Chain Store.

Translation: If you let us own your culture, despite all previous behavior and evidence to the contrary, we promise to be nice and sell it to you cheap.

You:

It is suicidal for America to not tie very strong IP enforcement to its trade agreements with countries like China. Most of what we produce domestically is IP from music to code to drug designs. We are at an inherent disadvantage then, if we allow them to dump tens of billions of dollars of cheap crap in our stores, but allow their locals to run wild with our IP. ... If you want to reduce our dependency on IP and strong foreign IP laws, go start a manufacturing business that produces in America at rates that can replace China and Taiwan.

Any trade with China is immoral, impractical and threatens our freedom. It is impractical to compete with slave labor, which is what China has to offer. It is immoral and impractical to support trade which destroys your own free industrial base. It is further impractical to expect co-operation from leaders who enslave their own people. The more dependent we are, the more power they have. Unless the free nations agree that it's wrong to help China's leaders, we will all end up like China's people. Finally, there is no greater threat to your freedom than embracing "strong IP laws" as a substitute for moral government.

There is no such thing as IP and general statements are meaningless. To make sense, you must address the real issues of trademark, copyright and patents. The general urge to strengthen IP laws has given us disastrous legislation which has outlawed legitimate domestic competition. Even if China was free, their abuse of patents and trademark would put us at a tremendous disadvantage. Factories in China will continue to disregard patents and violate trademarks at peak efficiency because they have no respect for such things to begin with. This little DVD burning show only punishes the people forced to work in those factories who won't be able to afford US and European entertainment for a while because their masters don't pay them well enough. Copyright enforcement will not effect the balance of trade and can do more harm than good by eliminating a press that was reproducing US propaganda outside of government control.

Re:Keep going... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133211)

You say that as if America still holds all the power.

Considering how much debt America has that is held by countries like China, you really can't call the shots except with nations that are much smaller and unimportant (see Australia).

Re:Keep going... (1)

plague3106 (71849) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133233)

If you want to reduce our dependency on IP and strong foreign IP laws, go start a manufacturing business that produces in America at rates that can replace China and Taiwan.

Of course that is impossible, since America has strict labor rights laws, whereas China does not. The only way to compete 'fairly' would be to setup a tarrif on imports which makes up for this gap as long as China does not have similar worker's rights laws.

Illegal Websites? (1, Flamebait)

celardore (844933) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132239)

government officials have closed down 8,907 shops and street vendors, 481 publishing companies and 942 illegal websites.

Shutting down 942 'illegal' websites means nothing purely because it's China. Wikipedia is illegal there, so is Slashdot probably.

Re:Illegal Websites? (2, Insightful)

O'Laochdha (962474) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132433)

The difference is that those websites are illegally maintained as opposed to just illegally accessed. Jimbo sits comfortably in the U.S., and there's nothing China can do about it but block his site. These people are actually breaking the law, and that's a bit more serious.

Re:Illegal Websites? (1)

Schraegstrichpunkt (931443) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132559)

I remember reading somewhere that the Chinese censors don't care all that much about English-language content, so Slashdot is probably exempt. This [slashdot.cn] might be, however.

100 0 (2, Funny)

webrunner (108849) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132249)

100day vs 0day

Hmm, at least numbers are on their side.

Re:100 0 (1)

kentrel (526003) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132568)

If 1 billion people actually paid for their software, music, games etc just think of how many more jobs that would create in the West. Not quite sure why you're on the side of 0day. If nobody pays for someone elses hard work, what have they done to deserve keeping it?

Re:100 0 (1)

webrunner (108849) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132782)

100 is clearly a larger number than 0, that's all I'm saying.

A gold star for effort, but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132252)

... what about all the online illegal p2p'ing going on? If the Chinese government could establish caps on that, it would be much more effective since the pirated data will just be transcribed onto a CD/DVD and sold.

This is good news! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132269)

DVD-R is the future! You can put 7(!) times the AVI on it than on CD-R!

I really like it that the Chinese care as much about quality as I do. Screeners are often to big for single CD-R these days...

Chinese math (1)

nuzak (959558) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132293)

So after shutting down those 8,907 shops and street vendors, 481 publishing companies and 942 illegal websites, what are the remaining 526,670 all about? Are they counting individual disks?

Time to buy MSFT? (1)

DebianDog (472284) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132306)

With Vista coming out and the Chinese having to actually purchase software can we expect revenue to grow again? [google.com]

Re:Time to buy MSFT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132387)

You seriously think they will spend something like $200 (1600+ yuen) on an OS? That'd be at least 3/4th of the monthly salary of an average blue-collar worker. More likely we'd see an explosion in the use of Linux, which is perfectly fine by me :)

Re:Time to buy MSFT? (1)

DebianDog (472284) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132484)

Agreed I think you will see an up shoot in Linux but I thought Microsoft had a different pricing ladder over there.

Re:Time to buy MSFT? (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132512)

I think what's more likely is that they'd continue to use their pirated copies of XP Corporate and keep pumping out seeminly valid VLKs.

LK

Counterfitting != Piracy (5, Informative)

c0d3h4x0r (604141) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132328)

I hate it when the media misuse the word "pirate". You'd think Slashdot could at least get it right.

Illegal copies sold at retail are counterfit copies, not "pirated copies".

Piracy is when you copy content yourself for free. With piracy, no one profits off someone else's hard work.

Counterfitting is when someone runs illegal copies and then sells the copies for their own profit.

It's a subtle difference, but an important one.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (1, Funny)

Shadyman (939863) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132370)

In Communist China, Media Couterfeits YOU!

nah (4, Informative)

Cybert4 (994278) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132465)

Counterfitting is passing it off as genuine. If the customers knows it is copied and still buys it--that's just for-profit piracy.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132467)

"It's a subtle difference, but an important one."

Important only because the RIAA and MPAA (and amusingly enough, other organizations - there are publishers of books who would love to see libraries razed to the ground, for example) would love to see that difference be erased.

Copying for personal use and copying to make a profit off of someone else's work are two very different things - this is obvious to anyone with a braincell. But remember, laywers don't have many of those to spare.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (5, Informative)

O'Laochdha (962474) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132481)

No, piracy is the misappropriation of a sea vessel with or without intent to return. Copying without profit is intellectual property infringement.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132591)

Thats funny.

The British have used the term Piracy in the terms of meaning copyright infringement for almost 400 years...since about the time of the cheap printing presses.

Why after a few centuries should we be forced to use another word for it because some fucking moron child that wants to cloud the water says so. Copyright infringement is piracy. Piracy can be copyright infringement.

Just because RMS wants to change the meaning of words to his own intent in his great and unfailing manafesto, don't feel the need to suck his cock.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (1)

McDutchie (151611) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132773)

No, piracy is the misappropriation of a sea vessel with or without intent to return. Copying without profit is intellectual property infringement.

That's just as wrong, but more subtly so, and therefore more damaging. There is no such thing as "intellectual property infringement" because the term "intellectual property" is newspeak made up by the publishing industry in attempt to muddy the distinction between patents, copyright, and property. The proper term for the misdemeanor in question is copyright infringement.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132679)

It's a counterfeit only if the sellers were claiming it was an authorized copy ("the real thing"). I think most buyers would know that a $2 DVD is not such a thing.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132981)

The original poster was definitely off and I agree that you've got it right. Counterfeiting and piracy are not mutually exclusive. Counterfeits are specifically meant to trick someone into thinking they're "the real thing". Piracy is simply a type of theft, independent of whether it was meant to look like an original. (Of course the definition of theft of intellectual property varies a lot depending on who you ask.)

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (1)

kabocox (199019) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132774)

Piracy is when you copy content yourself for free. With piracy, no one profits off someone else's hard work.
Counterfitting is when someone runs illegal copies and then sells the copies for their own profit.


Dude, I've never heard of counterfit used in the manner you believe. I have seen in many places for piracy and pirated copies being used in that manner. I've always been told that Piracy is copying media and then selling it. Copying content and not selling it isn't piracy. It may be copyright infringement, but it isn't piracy.

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (2, Informative)

bdonalds (989355) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132907)

I don't like to be pedantic, but if you can't even spell it, it takes the edge off of your lecture about it's definition. (It's "counterfeit", BTW)

Pffft (1)

canadiangoose (606308) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133229)

You don't like to pedantic? On Slashdot? C'mon man, sure you do! It's fun!

Re:Counterfitting != Piracy (2, Informative)

value_added (719364) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133048)

Counterfitting is when someone runs illegal copies and then sells the copies for their own profit. It's a subtle difference, but an important one.

Err ... that's counterfeiting.

Subtle difference, but an important one.

China??? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132352)

What about the NYC subway? That's where I... um, that's where I see a lot of people buying screeners.

Please make the most important division (2, Insightful)

Cybert4 (994278) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132361)

Pirating for money is a far different thing than copying for free. That includes Pirate Bay, as they seem to have ads on their site. I have a real problem with people copying music/games/etc and selling it. If they choose to put it up for free--I have a lot less of a problem with that.

Re:Please make the most important division (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16132468)

There are no ads on TPB.. you must have had your browser hijacked and are infested with adware.

Re:Please make the most important division (1)

killeroffoil (971229) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132776)

Yeah people who give it away for free are more like modern day Robin Hoods, stealing from the rich and giving to the nerdy. Although I wonder if any of these would be Robin Hoods have a Maid Marion as well.

Pirate Bay is not pirating any content (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133106)

It is the users of Pirate Bay who are pirating content.

Pirate Bay itself is just telling the users where they might look to get some content to pirate, which (so far) is not illegal in Sweden.

Still up (1)

Psykosys (667390) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132444)

*checks favorite Chinese "freeware" site* Sweet.

Alternative work programs? (1)

cwgmpls (853876) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132483)

So what is the plan to provide daily subsistance to the millions of people who rely on selling pirated disks for buck or two on the street? Millions of people have found a sustainable enterprise by re-selling the popular songs and movies that flood the world, and they rely on it for their daily food and shelter. If this enterprise is taken away, what alternatives are there for these people to survive?

Sonmay? (1)

Pengunea (170972) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132527)

Do any of these raided companies include Sonmay?

On one hand I'd like to see Sonmay go down because it takes away profits from legal retailers by making the packaging look similar to a legit copy. On othe other hand, where am I supposed to get copies of the long out-of-print Orchestral Game Concert CDs now?

Re:Sonmay? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133148)

Sonmay (and I think most of the other CD bootleggers) is in Taiwan, not mainland.

Very old news (2, Interesting)

! (169862) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132607)

Looks to me like TechFreep doesn't deserve to be slashdotted.
The article they are referring [chinadaily.com.cn] to was last updated on 2006-02-06! Which also means TechFreep edited the story considerably to add mention of recent dates. They even used the same Febuary photo.
Therefore I would not be trusting any information from this source.

Only on SlashDot: "China Daily"=reliable source (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132614)

Only on SlashDot: "China Daily"=reliable source. Notice the "*.cn" extension; if you buy the crackdown, I know a rich, recently widowed friend in the Congo who needs your help. (Also, any time you see a "100-day" anything, that's a clear sign that it's pure PR.)

Re:Only on SlashDot: "China Daily"=reliable source (1)

! (169862) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132763)

In this case it is TechFreep which is the unreliable source. Notice that the original article doesnt mention the 100 day thing and also is actually from Feb 2006. They even used the same photo.

woohoo! 13 million! (1)

N3wsByt3 (758224) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132649)

Only 987.000.000 to go!

china police smoking weed agina? (1)

shareme (897587) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132653)

537,000 markets raided but they only came up with 10,000 shops to raid? Who is lying here? or maybe we should ask why BSA's biggest office is not in China?

Yeah, yeah... (1)

Dread_ed (260158) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132673)

"...government officials have closed down 8,907 shops and street vendors, 481 publishing companies and 942 illegal websites."

Sure they closed them now, but in a few days they will be back at their old tricks, albiet under new management. I bet you my entire collection of bootleg anime that a well placed bribe or the guaranteed employment of some politician's or magnate's mongoloid cousin will earn these pirates a clean bill of health from said "government officials."

Remember that this is a nation that won't let it's districts/states perform their own productivity audits because they tie the magistrate's pay to economic performance. Needless to say that when they did allow these provinces to do their own evaluations they made Arthur Anderson's accounting practices seem conservative. The last year that they did it the national aggregate GDP was several points higher thant he official numbers from the central accounting office. WOW!

Off with the old.. (1)

pickyouupatnine (901260) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132680)

.. versions and on to upgrade all the shops to the latest version of pirated software ;)

One question? (1)

eclectro (227083) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132708)


Does this mean that my chinese source for windows XP might go from $10 USD to $15 USD?

Oh! (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132711)

So that's what happened to the 12,999,999 copies of Gigli for HD-DVD!

Great! (1)

bendodge (998616) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132714)

Much as I don't like it myself, it is a good thing. Thieving needs to stop.

It just doesnt matter at all (1)

EGC (1003628) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132799)

let me bring u guys some insight of this crap as a chinese its purely a show, and thats it no one buys this discs anyway. the main consumers of intellctual property in china are aged between 15 - 35, and for these ppl, as long as they hv broadband access, they know how to load up their harddisc with p0rns frm da internet. watching japanese av frm a disc was so old school ... jst some rural ppl mite still doing that.

i wonder.. (1)

Brian-esser.com (933429) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132834)

I wonder if it has anything to do with the US.EU and others filing a suit against China for unfair trade balance and trade practices. USA Today had a story about it yesterday.

When asked for comment... (1)

fr175 (999487) | more than 7 years ago | (#16132924)

"Arrrr, me disks!"

another raid... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133013)

Just another raid...

If you haven't noticed the police in china regulary does raides in china.

Usually prostitution have been the prime target since it have been a problem through out the country since the 90's. But other types of crimes, of wide dispersion can be targeted, the most unusual i've experienced is the act of crossing the street...but.. it was never successful ;-) however, even though the police targets crimes, the goverment program of "cleaning up" regions is the main act that should be discussed. "cleaning up" would mean rebuilding about a 1/3 of a region (consider that a region keeps from 4 to 30 mil. people), this usually causes problems and can be seen as the major task of the police.

Basically, that is the only task of the police, keeping the calm when rebuilding. Contrary to western belief, this isn't done by force but by replacing the standard force with uncorrupted officers that files, and keeps a steady eye on all disturbances happening on *all* streets.
Removing prostitution, illegal street sales, like crapy CD's is just a welcomed side effect.

That said, the effect of the "raids" are generally weaker then the economically forces. Prostitution in shanghai have never declined and sales in beijing keeps a steady going, but in this case a real change have been seen and i would guess it will keep a decline in illegal cd sales in up to 5 years, that's the effect of the tough penalties..

In unrelated news... (1)

Temujin_12 (832986) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133016)

In unrelated news, Chinese P2P traffic and writable CD/DVD sales both sky-rocket.

13 million discs.... (1)

Seraphim_72 (622457) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133223)

...and about an hour later you find yourself hungry for more pirated material.

Sera

Seize discs? Seize the day. (0, Offtopic)

rice_burners_suck (243660) | more than 7 years ago | (#16133235)

If China is seizing illegal CDs, maybe you should seize the day and have an adventure in Israel this winter... free. And unlike pirated discs, this is a perfectly legal way to have a great time. Taglit-birthright israel with Sachlav Educational Experience. [birthrightisrael.com] Registration is right NOW, and will close in less than a week. If you're eligible (click the link to find out), you can have an amazing and uplifting experience in Israel this winter, instead of downloading MP3s and breaking the law. Hey, this post ain't offtopic: I used the words "China" and "CDs" in this post, not to mention that I talked about MP3s, all of which are definitely technical subjects that belong in this thread. Heh heh heh...

Compact Disk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16133247)

Looking at the picture from the article, now I understand why they call it "Compact" Disk ;-)
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