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Analog Revival Means Vinyl Will Outlive CD

CmdrTaco posted more than 7 years ago | from the cdrs-are-toast-next-thursday-anyway dept.

800

An anonymous reader writes "In the age of the iPod, an unlikely revival is taking place — kids are turning to 7" vinyl to get their kicks. Sales of 7" singles are apparently through the roof. Bands like the White Stripes are releasing thousands of new singles on the format, and record purchases have risen by over a million units in the last year — back to 1998 levels. NME told CNET: "it's very possible that the CD might become obsolete in an age of download music but the vinyl record will survive,". The article explains how indie kids are drawn to vinyl because "the tactile joy of owning a physical object that represents your attachment to a band is infinitely more enjoyable than entering a credit card number into iTunes.""

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Sliders (5, Funny)

MindStalker (22827) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145824)

Its all like a bad episode of Sliders.

Re:Sliders (5, Funny)

dolson (634094) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145853)

Was there a good episode of Sliders?

Re:Sliders (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145875)

Certainly.

Best Episode (1)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145900)

Double Cross [wikipedia.org] from 1996, Season 3

Re:Sliders (1)

Lobo42 (723131) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145882)

Many.

Re:Sliders (1)

CrackedButter (646746) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145937)

The first episode was quite good.

Re:Sliders (1)

MindStalker (22827) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145980)

Wasn't the first episode the one where they said CDs are gone Vinyl is here to stay.

Re:Sliders (0, Offtopic)

repruhsent (672799) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145883)

Parent poster is a homosexual. I know this because he tried to pick me up at a bar once.

Re:Sliders (0, Troll)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145983)

Was he any good? C'mon, we want details.

Bah! Vinyl will never replace (5, Funny)

Snarfangel (203258) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145827)

...the wax cylinders on my Gramophone

Re:Bah! Vinyl will never replace (4, Funny)

theguru (70699) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145881)

You play wax cylinders on a gramaphone? I play gramaphone records on mine, and put the wax cylinders on the phonograph. Much easier on the media that way.

Re:Bah! Vinyl will never replace (5, Funny)

Snarfangel (203258) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145938)

Hmm, no wonder the cylinders keep falling off the platter.

Re:Bah! Vinyl will never replace (-1, Troll)

Otter (3800) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145965)

In all seriousness -- where does a hipster idiot -- errr, sorry -- "indie kid" get a device on which to play these vinyl records? It's not like you can go into Best Buy and purchase one. I guess they can appropriate their grandparents' old record player along with their glasses and pants. (They'd do better to take the records, too -- maybe we could return to that brief period when Louis Prima drove Green Day off the radio for a few months in the 90's?)

As long as I'm posting, I also have to laugh at the spin on this story relative to last week's "People buy CDs instead of online tracks because of ideological opposition to DRM!" story.

Re:Bah! Vinyl will never replace (4, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145982)

The band His Name Is Alive [hisnameisalive.com] , around the time of their 1995 album Stars on E.S.P [amazon.com] , actually did produce a number of wax cylinders due to frontman Warren Defever's interest in retro recording technology. Too bad the average joe doesn't have a player for them.

Bell bottom jeans are back! (0)

Iamthefallen (523816) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145829)

This time, they're here to stay.

Or, it could just be a nostalgic fad.

Re:Bell bottom jeans are back! (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145935)

Wow, who looks at a fad and thinks that it's a long-term trend? I've never read NME.com, are all of it's writers as vapid as this Alex Needham character? I love that this [p3r.net] is the 2nd entry when you search for him on Google. He must love that.

Re:Bell bottom jeans are back! (5, Informative)

hkgroove (791170) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145954)

Vinyl is still huge in DJ/hip hop culture. Especially Jungle / DnB genres of electronic music. In the U.S. however, prices for vinyl imported from UK/EU have skyrocketed due to many reasons, primarily the Dollar's strength compared to the Pound or Euro which then push consumers to more wallet friendly downloads. At my vinyl buying peak, I would spend $60-100 per week for 5-9 tracks. Now I spend $25/week for 12-15 tracks at full .wav (~1411kbps) quality.

But vinyl won't die and with the latest download sites, independant labels have found a happy medium of producing less vinyl and offering their tracks online. Many labels are vinyl purists and haven't yet entered the digital realm. Some label owners whom I've talked with have had increased profits but most said it stays about the same margin-wise without as much overhead.

How is that any different... (5, Insightful)

jcarkeys (925469) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145839)

... from purchasing a CD?
"the tactile joy of owning a physical object that represents your attachment to a band is infinitely more enjoyable than entering a credit card number into iTunes."

Re:How is that any different... (2, Insightful)

brunascle (994197) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145887)

How is that any different from purchasing a CD?

i dont understand it either, but i know what they're talking about. the punk scene has had a fetish with vinyl since the beginning, and i dont understand why. but because certain albums are only released on vinyl, i had to get a turntable. and, i have to say, there is an inexplicable feeling that comes from the ownership of a vinyl record, rather than a cd.

it probably has something to do with an elitist attitude.

Re:How is that any different... (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145922)

it probably has something to do with an elitist attitude.

Naturally you need a valve amp to plug your turntable into, and hand-wound speakers to make the sound.

Probably kills brain cells, too. (3, Informative)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145949)

there is an inexplicable feeling that comes from the ownership of a vinyl record, rather than a cd.

It's the smell.

(sniffs record) Sweet, sweet acetate...

Re:How is that any different... (1)

NekoXP (67564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146006)

> it probably has something to do with an elitist attitude.

Or some kind of toxic fumes coming off them? :D

Re:How is that any different... (2, Insightful)

Nos. (179609) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145888)

Well, you get your music on a medium that is less portable, bulkier, and is arguably easier to damage. Don't you see the benefits?

Re:How is that any different... (2, Interesting)

GreyPoopon (411036) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145894)

... from purchasing a CD?
I would guess it's cheaper. The 7-inch vinyls are singles. And it just goes to show that nothing has changed. People want to buy songs individually for $1 or $2 rather than paying $15 or $20 for a whole album with only one or two songs they like. Start distributing singles in ultra-cheap but modern media format that works in most players and systems, and I'll bet you'll see people gravitate towards that instead of the vinyls.

Re:How is that any different... (2, Insightful)

dolson (634094) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145903)

Well, vinyl doesn't have DRM, and I don't see how it could possibly. I would welcome a return to vinyl, personally, although I think that this article is stupid, as you have certainly pointed out... That is not a reason to buy vinyl at all. People just do what other people do, and this all started with one kid showing his friends his grandparents' record player, and then they started buying it up. And everyone followed suit because people do that kind of thing. That's my theory.

Re:How is that any different... (1)

russ1337 (938915) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145959)

Well, vinyl doesn't have DRM, and I don't see how it could possibly.
Vinyl IS DRM. Its a pain in the arse to rip, it'll only rip at 1x speed, you cannot get the computer to automatically fill in the meta data... and the act of ripping it actually degrades the quality of the audio! (unless you have a laser record player).

This makes me think the record companies are behind this promotion of vinyl!

Re:How is that any different... (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145981)

Well, vinyl doesn't have DRM, and I don't see how it could possibly. I would welcome a return to vinyl, personally [...]
A real Red Book audio CD doesn't have any DRM either. Depending on the DRM used, it can even break the Red Book specs and result in a "fake" audio CD.

I, for one, don't want vinyl. How the hell am I supposed to rip that to put on my computer and iPods?! Sampling? With all the resulting noise? No thanks!

Re:How is that any different... (1)

ack154 (591432) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145907)

Exactly... why does the joy of owning a physical attachment have to mean that they are buying specifically vinyl? I certainly won't be buying any vinyl anytime soon - buy I'll buy a CD if the music is worth it - for the reason of having something physical and a collection.

Re:How is that any different... (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146028)

Yes, but can Sony put a digitial copyright or root kit on an analog 45?

Re:How is that any different... (2, Insightful)

REBloomfield (550182) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145943)

It's not, but a pretty coloured 7" or awesome artwork on a 12" picture disc is much much more interesting that just the shiny side of a CD..... Even the covers are better, Iron Maiden artwork was not meant to be squeezed onto a CD cover....

Re:How is that any different... (1)

soft_guy (534437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145961)

Vinyl has certain quirks to it that CDs don't have. The packaing is different from record to record. There is enough room for things like liner notes.

When I was a teen, I collected vinyl mostly from Indie punk bands. I don't anymore, but I still have my collection. I was very surprised that my daughter (who is eleven going on twenty) is actually very into it and thinks those records are much cooler than CDs.

Re:How is that any different... (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145966)

Vinyls don't rootkit your PC. Plus you can "scratch" them.

Re:How is that any different... (1)

Pinky3 (22411) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145976)

... from purchasing a CD?

1) Because you don't have to buy the whole album

2) It is cheaper

3) You put the needle on the record yourself (try that with a cd)

4) You can watch the record spin (possible with some cd turntables, but not most players)

5) Profit!

Re:How is that any different... (1)

1010110010 (1002553) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145993)

I can't explain it really, but it seems to me (I don't actually own any vinyl records myself) like CDs are just too small. There's something about grabbing that giant vinyl record and placing it onto the player that feels different.

From a collector's standpoint I can totally understand wanting vinyl instead of CDs. Vinyl covers are big and the art is prominently displayed. CD cases are small, break all the time and they certainly don't look as good on a shelf.

Re:How is that any different... (4, Insightful)

thelost (808451) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146022)

I live in a City of Vinyl, Bristol in the UK. The reason that vinyl is prevalent here is two-fold. Firstly we have a massive tradition of DJs in Bristol. Secondly we have a massive tradition of good music and people who are passionate about it.

Passionate music lovers do enjoy having a physical object that represents a link between them and the band they love. More than that there is a massive amount of street cred in owning and listening to vinyl, it's just cool. Also, a great many people feel that Vinyl just sounds better than CD. Finally, people enjoy the size of the cover art. Cover art died with the CD, a great many people believe that. The revival of Vinyl means the potential of new and great cover art.

Buying vinyl is massively different from buying a CD.

Re:How is that any different... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16146024)

It's better because it is DRM free, and warmer sounding? CDs are definitely more versatile than records, though, so I guess it's a trade off. btw, love that deviant art, good work

Re:How is that any different... (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146032)

For many, if not most, the difference is zilch. I suspect that for others, being able to see the music as a squiggly engraving is worth something.

If it's not a law, it should be (4, Insightful)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145840)

The stupidity of consumers is directly proportional to the perceived cool factor of the product.

Cost of the 7'' Vinyl Single (1)

neonprimetime (528653) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145851)

Those Vinyl SINGLE for White Stripe's [wikipedia.org] Denial Twist [wikipedia.org] costs about $8-9 [google.com] which seems a bit steep for a single! But for those addicted to vinyl, I guess it's worth it?

Re:Cost of the 7'' Vinyl Single (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145884)

Your sig is sooo yesterday.

Easy.. (3, Interesting)

bigattichouse (527527) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145852)

You release albums as individual cartridges for portable players... it gives you a tactile "thing" with a label, contains mp3's in a generic format, is in a durable case .. can even contain games and whatnot. The ultimate packaging. I still have sega carts I can look at and remember the hours of fun playing Sonic, or Toe-Jam and Earl (panic on funkatron)...

Even better, you release "blanks" EPROMs that can be burned once (or maybe twice - in case of an error) to integrate with all the online purchasing. (print the label too)

ROM cartridges would defy the point (1)

zoeblade (600058) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145947)

You release albums as individual cartridges for portable players

Replacing the flash memory in portable hardware MP3 players with tangible ROM cartridges containing albums is about as convenient as using a MiniDisc player. It takes away the sole advantage of these MP3 players in the first place - the promise of letting you take your whole CD collection (not to mention a fair few audiobooks, games, TV shows and films) with you wherever you go. If you had to bring a few dozen cartridges with your player, you've reduced it to having none of the advantages over old formats again.

Re:Easy.. (1)

howlingmadhowie (943150) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146020)

i think the move to vinyl (if indeed there is such a thing) has more to do with an attempt to escape technology in one part of your life. retro-chic in other words.

call me cynical, but it's a bit like saying 'my computer my be infested with DRM, the secret service may have complete records of my whereabouts ever since i've had a mobile phone, all my text messages are recorded, and my computer regularly phones home to tell the manufacturer personal data, but i'm turning my nose up at this brave, new world by listening to vinyl'

howie

Is 1998 anything to brag about? (4, Funny)

spookymonster (238226) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145854)

Hey, remember back in the '90s, when you thought vinyl was dead? Well, we're selling just as many now as we did then! Hoopla, Janet!

Does it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145858)

Does your iPod break in two if you drop it?

Re:Does it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145914)

from how high and onto what surface?

5,500 copies must look big these days (1)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145863)

The latest White Stripes' single, The Denial Twist, was helped into the Top 10 by 7-inch vinyl sales -- the band sold 5,500 singles in the format.

5,500 seems pretty tiny in the grand scheme of things. It must be that CD sales are so low that just a handful of singles can make a difference. Everyone else is just downloading the songs from their favorite torrent site and putting it on their iPod.

Will only collectors buy music in the future?

Re:5,500 copies must look big these days (1)

charliebear (887653) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146010)

PIPBoy3000 The latest White Stripes' single, The Denial Twist, was helped into the Top 10 by 7-inch vinyl sales -- the band sold 5,500 singles in the format. 5,500 seems pretty tiny in the grand scheme of things. It must be that CD sales are so low that just a handful of singles can make a difference. I would guess that there aren't too many CD singles sold, and the Top 10 they refer to is for singles, not albums/cd's

I think they ment top-10 singles (1)

moosehooey (953907) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146012)

Later in the article it mentions the singles top-ten list. Since very few singles are sold these days, 5,500 would be significant.

CD's not physical items? (1)

charliebear (887653) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145865)

"the tactile joy of owning a physical object" Why not just buy a CD if you are looking to get that "tactile joy?" /I'd rather get my tactile joy from a chick

Re:CD's not physical items? (1)

teamabunai (827236) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146011)

I don't understand why the tactile part of this is so important. For me, I purchase vinyl records because the sound quality is superior to CDs in many ways. CDs bit-depth and sample rates leave a lot to be desired. And the great thing about records is they're designed for the home. It's more of an appreciator's format....throw a record on and hang around your house and enjoy it without the distraction. And one thing that the Touch and Go record label has been doing lately which I love is releasing the vinyl records with a download code to download the whole album in MP3, super convenient....

Not to mention cover art (1)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145868)

The cover art was often an essential part of the listening experience for isolated teenagers. If I had a dollar for all the hours I spent memorizing song lyrics and pondering whether David Bowie was really gay/bi or was just wearing a dress...

Re:Not to mention cover art (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145974)

If I had a dollar for all the hours I spent memorizing song lyrics and pondering...

then... you'd have a dollar!

Trendiness (1)

techstar25 (556988) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145869)

It has less to do with music and more to do with trendiness. Along with the sales of these records, we're seeing an increase in sales in black low-top Converse All-Stars, super small tight jeans, extra-small black t-shirts, studded belts, and thick black plastic rimmed glasses. ;)

Re:Trendiness (4, Insightful)

photozz (168291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145897)

I guess the one thing that never goes out of style is blinding stupidity.

The Return of REAL Cover Art (5, Insightful)

Picass0 (147474) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145871)

One thing I've missed with CDs is the smaller form factor has led to less inspired covers. Less Detail. Fewer painted covers. It's an art that faded away without nearly enough notice. Replacing cover art is most cases are vanity portraits of the artist or band, with poor photoshop work to tie into a marketing theme.

If vinyl makes a comeback, I hope new talent following the footsteop of Roger Dean take up this opportunity.

Re:The Return of REAL Cover Art (3, Interesting)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145908)

I've always found Pearl Jam to do a good job with their CD albums' art. In several of them they even include a collection of pictures that accomodate the music of the album.

Unfortunately I think their music has been on a steady decline for some time now.

Re:The Return of REAL Cover Art (1)

jrumney (197329) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146001)

Except the article was about 7" singles, which traditionally came in plain paper sleeves

DRM (1)

Speare (84249) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145872)

So when will DRM-infected phonographs be released, to thwart all those filthy vinyl-ripping pirate scum? It's darned well impossible to burn a BOOT.INI file on those discs, and the macrovision-style distortion versions just don't seem to sell to anyone who looks sober.

Oh, and where do you get those little three-legged plastic adapters that convert a vinyl single spindle to a vinyl long-play spindle? Talk about your analog hole!

Re:DRM (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146026)

DRM &mdash "D" for "digital", init? No-one's invented ARM yet. Might not be far off, though.

I dont get this statement (1)

falcon5768 (629591) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145877)

"the tactile joy of owning a physical object that represents your attachment to a band is infinitely more enjoyable than entering a credit card number into iTunes."
annnnnnnd a CD is not a physical object that represents your attachment? Honestly this is nothing new, records come and go with the croud. Grunge fans will remember how many of those albums where released on CD and record, I actually own Nevermind and the Rear View Mirror single myself. But then they faded away. This is nothing more than a revival the likes of the new style radios made to look like the 1920's models or the like.

More the death knell of digital physical media (1)

QuatermassX (808146) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145880)

Since this is from a UK news source, let's just assume they have it in for the iPod. UK publications do, admit it. Whenever I open the Guardian / Times / Telegraph / etc I see yet another PR-planted story about the downfall of the iPod and iTunes.

It seems to me that the return to records really reflects the lack of excitement of redbook audio CDs as well as the onslaught of silly new disc-based media.

I **think** I've gone through something similar with my photography. I was there at the start of the digital revolution and now ... well ... I'm back to shooting film. Whereas I use digital technology to 'print' my negs now, the storage medium is analogue.

Just an idea.

Re:More the death knell of digital physical media (2, Interesting)

zoeblade (600058) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146035)

It seems to me that the return to records really reflects the lack of excitement of redbook audio CDs as well as the onslaught of silly new disc-based media.

It is possible people are harking back to the olden days when music they bought would actually play on their hi-fi. Redbook CDs are also flawless in this respect, but I suspect the average person on the street doesn't realise that DRM encumbered CDs aren't actually real CDs at all, and therefore the redbook CD format isn't actually to blame at all. (This is the reason I like the idea that Philips won't let any DRM encumbered CD have the official Compact Disc logo. Sadly, I doubt anyone actually looks for it.)

Maybe everyone has their own cutoff point of which was the last "good" format that they want to stick to.

Wow (1)

misleb (129952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145889)

I have some DJ friends who buy vinyl, but I thought that was merely a practical thing... the only way they can effectively syncronize songs in real-time and all that. I had no idea that lots of other people were buying vinyl because it is cool. I guess I need to get out more.

-matthew

Now possible to "turntable" CDs just like records (1)

EVil Lawyer (947367) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146046)

The Pioneer CMX-3000 [pioneer.co.uk] , among other makes and models, allows for effective synchronization of songs on CDs in real-time. Pop a CD in both sides, and work the turn-tables to your heart's content. You literally spin the controls as you would spin a record, and the software makes sure the output corresponds. A whole new meaning to "scratching" a CD.

Physical Objects? (1)

macaddict (91085) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145890)

The article explains how indie kids are drawn to vinyl because "the tactile joy of owning a physical object that represents your attachment to a band is infinitely more enjoyable than entering a credit card number into iTunes."

CDs aren't physical objects?

Re:Physical Objects? (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145950)

i would guess that it would be something about the being able to really feel the disc, the grooves and such, without having to worry about fingerprints screwing up the playback.

just my $0.02.

Save for... (1)

darkrowan (976992) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145893)

Save for turntablism, I don't see a market vinyl. And even for that, useable mp3/cd turntable mixers are coming down in price that can make that obsolete.

Analog[u][e] (2, Insightful)

crazyjeremy (857410) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145898)

Absolutely insane. This isn't a comparison of apples to apples. The reason people want the vinyl has nothing to do with Analog[u][e] verses digital. It's just a "cool thing to do at the time". It's in now, but like all fads, it will go out again soon. We just live in a soceity big enough that whatever you're into, there is probably a following of someone else who is into it. The novelty of the fad can catch like wildfire, but in the end the only reason people will stay with a technology is because of ease of use, necessity or monetary gain. Vinyl isn't easier to use. It's harder to back up digitally and there simply aren't enough people big enough to carry around the vinyl record changer ipod. Thus, there's not enough long term money in this fad.
NME's Alex Needham is championing the format to supersede CD. "I think it's very possible that the CD might become obsolete in an age of download music but the vinyl record will survive,"
The format has already been "championed" then IT was superceded. I'll keep my cd's at home, then carry one digital music device that holds everything. Leave the vinyl for the novel enthusiasts. They will have their fun. Soon enough even they will start buying cd's, dvd audio, or whatever else comes around the block that's better.

the 8 track cant be far behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16145901)

Glad I saved mine :)

Owning something physical (1)

darjen (879890) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145909)

I personally don't care if I am physically connected to the band by actually owning something. I am a musician and as long as I can listen to the music, that's all that matters. Yeah vinyl sounds great, but it is so bulky and causes clutter. I hate having too much stuff around, and being able to have everything on my ipod is a godsend for that. If I have to move, the last thing I want to do after moving my furniture is lug around a huge record or CD collection.

For me the purpose of having music is to listen to it and nothing more. One possible benefit of vinyl though is of course the DRM factor. You will always be able to make a recording of your material for backups. Despite the DRM of buying music from Itunes, as long as I can listen to it on demand from my music player I am still mostly happy. It would be nice to share music I enjoy with my friends but that is secondary to its main purpose for me.

Anyone else get MP3 fatigue? (1)

yams69 (986130) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145910)

I'm no audiophile, but it seems to me that I get tired of listening to MP3s more easily than I do listening to CDs. The MP3 just don't seem to have the "life" of a [relatively] lossless recording. I doubt I could really tell the difference between vinyl and CD (and I prefer the lower noise levels of CDs anyway), but it seems that there is still a valid audio reason to continue getting your music on disc (apart from the usual DRM and compression arguments, of course).

Re:Anyone else get MP3 fatigue? (1)

fartymenams (890764) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145960)

Have you ever tried ABXing good quality encoded MP3's (as in, with LAME) against a lossless source? You might be surprised...

This has already happened (4, Insightful)

spyrochaete (707033) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145911)

Vinyl has already outlived 8-tracks and cassettes. Why is it surprising that it will outlive CD?

Back to 1998 Levels! (1)

Vinnie_333 (575483) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145912)

Wow, back to 1998 levels! ... which was what? 1,000 copies sold? These are novelties. And they are sold in such small numbers that a popular release by 1 band could easily throw the sales stats way off. How many of these kids actually even have turntables to play them on? I'll be impressed when they go back to 1977 levels and the zombie Bee Gees release a new double live album in a gatefold cover.

i only buy Vinyl or used CD (1)

musikit (716987) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145915)

near me is a comic book/music store. they have tons of used vinyl records and used CDs. i typically buy the records and rarely buy the used CDs. but why buy led zeppelin II on CD for $15 when you can get the record for $3 and then buy 4 other records.

Used vinyl? Ew. (1)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146018)

Used CDs I can understand ... but used vinyl?

That seems like buying somebody's used underwear or something. It's a consumable product. Any given record can only be played a certain number of times before it's worn out. Each time you put the stylus through the groove, it destroys a little of the information that's there.

With a CD, it either plays or it doesn't. Provided that there aren't any scratches or fingerprints or other problems with the disc, the 1,000th play will sound exactly the same as the first. Thus the value of a "virgin" CD is basically nil. However, I'd never buy a used record, particularly without knowing the source and how well they've taken care of it. How are you supposed to know what you're buying?

Now this would be different if everyone was using laser turntables [elpj.com] , but sadly they arrived on the scene a little too late to replace mechanical styli, they're too entrenched and the economy of scale will never exist to bring down the price of contactless 'tables. Pity, too: DRM free, analog music, with the never-dimishing quality of digital. Doesn't get much better than that.

Tamagotchi were also big sellers... (1)

Ivan Dobsky (989109) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145917)

I saw this same story on the bbc news the other day. As they interviewed a trendy young chap in the record shop, I wondered what would go out of fashion first, the vinyl he was spending his pocket money on, or the ridiculous cravatte he was wearing.

It makes sense to me (2, Interesting)

waif69 (322360) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145918)

A friend of mine was looking at a USB turntable just the other day. As he was discussing it with me, I was pondering the archival potential of CDs as compared to records. IMAO, I was thinking that vinyl would last longer than the pits in a CD.

Their opinions... (5, Insightful)

M0bius (26596) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145919)

Their opinions will change the momment they want to move out of their parent's house and have to carry boxes of vinyl up any number of flights of stairs.

Vinyl has better audio quality (1)

LPlasma (1004063) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145920)

People who buy vinyl don't just buy it for the "physical object", they also buy it because vinyl has better audio quality. By a long shot. It isn't just a 'fad', it is getting a true analog representation of the audio, not some DRM-infested poorly encoded garbage.

WTF is an "indie kid?" (1, Informative)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145924)

WTF is an "indie kid?" (I'm thinking this is a marketing term for high schooler with too much of his parents' money in his pocket, but let me know.)

Vinyl was already immortal... (1)

shotgunsaint (968677) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145925)

... it's just that kids are finally figuring out what DJ's already knew... records sound better than cd's and mp3's. It's the physical response of the medium, the warmth of the needle moving with the grooves, as opposed to the cold laser scanning data. Plus, analog media capture a much higher range of supertones and subtones beyond the human range of hearing, which nonetheless change and enhance those sounds that are within our range of hearing.

A consumer backlash against DRM... (1)

ArthurYarwood (539110) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145927)

With damn near every digital format seemingly infected with DRM these days, maybe this is just consumers protesting with their strongest weapons yet - their wallets. Its seems rare these days to find a cd without a rootkit on it, without some crappy media player software need to play the tracks, or just a plain old redbook cd with the offical cd logo on it to prove it.

A vinyl disc is just pure audio, ain't no other crap on there, trying to stop you enjoying the music or ruining your PC. Sure ripping is a little more hassle, but with a good deck the results could exceed any cd rip.

7-inches of Pure Joy (1)

dolson (634094) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145929)

How delightful that a new generation is discovering the joy of 7-inch.

Couldn't have said it much better myself.

Re:7-inches of Pure Joy (1)

Phu5ion (838043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146048)

Ah, I remember my GF's delight the day she discovered my big 10".

sound (1)

Chicken04GTO (957041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145946)

Not to mention vinyl often sounds better to those audiophiles with top end equipment.

Exclusively on vinyl (1)

McNihil (612243) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145958)

so it will be "harder" for the kiddies to put it on mp3 and share for free. How this was news is beyond me... or am I such a cynic that I don't see the coolness and nesworthyness? Taco did you get paid to say that it is the new fad and o-how-wonderfull it is with Vinyl. Early CDs were much worse than vinyl I whole heartedly agree BUT the quality of CDs produced in the last ten years are lightyears ahead of any Vinyl kan ever be. But then again listening to punk records and the like you don't need the full spectrum.

Copyright worries? (2, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145964)

See? Those RIAA people should have known that people still want to buy and own their media. The fact that MP3s are out there and are being passed about liberally is irrelevant to the fact that people want to buy and own. The reason for MP3 sharing, in my opinion, is partly convenience and partly to address the problem of scarcity and availability.

It's also nice to hear that the indy crowd is growing in force. It is about the only way, shy of legislation, to put the power back into the hands of the artists.

low tech revolution (1)

captain_cthulhu (996356) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145977)

didn't Einstein say something like: "World War 3 will be fought with iPods and World War 4 will be fought with wax"?
maybe I got that wrong...

Article misleading and underwritten (1)

Jorack (991421) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145991)

Yes vinyl is cool, but it's not just cool for the sake of cool. The reason vinyl will come back is much more detailed than that article suggests.

1) You own vinyl. Ever read the licensing rights when you buy a song off the iTunes store? What happens if you lose your hard drive?
2) Better quality. Vinyl is great quality - better so than iTunes songs. If you like to play music loud, it's very important that your source is of good quality or your audio will start to clip once you reach the upper limits of your equipment.
3) Shelf life. Vinyl records have an expected lifetime that is much longer than a CD.
4) 4track recording. Most vinyl records are made with four seperate tracks that play simultaneously. If you have a record player that is capable of toggling the tracks on and off, you can do some interesting things with your music. Ever try to take the vocals off an MP3?

Think about it. If you want portability, why get something physical instead of downloading to your iPod? If you want quality, why go for a CD when vinyl boasts superior quality. The quality is especially noticable in the low range.

If you're looking to do any DJ work you use vinyl. There's no ifs ands or butts about it. MP3's will sound like shit when you put them through kilowatt powered speakers. You CAN get some really high qual MP3's but for the most part, vinyl is a safer bet.

Hooray for vinyl! (1)

oberondarksoul (723118) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145994)

This pleases me mightily, since I've been a fan of vinyl for several years now. (I'm 19, so when I started buying music CD sales were well and truly eclipsing the good old 45s) There's something special about vinyl that you don't get with digital media, or even CDs - something about gently lowering the stylus, hearing the opening crackles before settling down to listen. Even the size of the medium's part of the pleasure - you actually feel you own something, especially with an LP or a 12" single. Plus, the cover art's nicer too.

One other little thing that pleases me is the price; a 7" single costs 99p in my local HMV. The cheapest CD singles are £1.99.

Really? (1)

east coast (590680) | more than 7 years ago | (#16145998)

it's very possible that the CD might become obsolete in an age of download music

Well, let me just bust out the Motorola and install it in my new car... or how about I install a record player on my PC so I can load the new EQ2 expansion pack?

What is missing, from a mostly technical aspect, is that CDs have the advantage of being a larger "platform" simply because of it's versatility in the types of data it can contain and the number of different gadgets that will play CDs. Not even to mention that I can create my own CDs on the cheap.

A record player can do one thing well, play records. CD players have a ton of uses. There will probably be more devices capable of playing CDs made this year than the number of record players ever produced. While some audiophiles will still turn to analog for some time to come I feel that this upswing will dwindle when older turntables bite the dust and people are simply unwilling to invest in a new one.

For further proof of this go look for laserdiscs. They can still be had, used ones are a dime a dozen but, unfortunately, when mine dies I'm not replacing it. The discs will fall somewhere between ebay and the circular file.

but my CDs? Are you kidding? I have no less than 10 devices I can play CDs on in my home (including the laserdisc player) and considering I can buy a new CD player now for what? 20 dollars? Maybe 30? Try picking up a new turntable for those prices.

Sure, I use mp3 in my car (CD based) and my cellphone and "walkman" but I still buy CDs to rip them from. As many naysayer out there are chanting the old pressed music CD is dead I simply don't see it.

the age of analog audio is far from over (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16146005)

analog audio is a good example of a more mature technology

my phonograph and tube amplifier system simply sounds much better than any of my friends' solid state systems

so there ;~}

Quite common in the hardcore/punk scene (1)

scenestar (828656) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146014)

I have about 50K plus mp3s, but i still buy alot of music.

Local distros sell 7" singles for about 3 to 4 euros and full records for 9.

A 7" has about 5 to 6 songs on it. Not only is this cheaper than Itunes, i also get to OWN my music + artwork, lyrics or coloured vynil presses.

It's alot more bang for buck and I really enjoy taking some occaisional time off to sit down, put on a record and listen to some sweet tunes.

Wait a sec.... (2, Funny)

Churla (936633) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146019)

You mean they're enjoying the concept of OWNING music they like. Dude.. You just can't do that, the music wants to be free!!! FREE I TELL YOU!!!..

Oh... um... wait... I just got a memo from the RIAA, they say that they had dinner with "Music" last night and after a few drinks Music agreed that it would much rather simply be rented.

Can we put something in vynil records that will make them dissolve after 30 or 60 days?

The Ritual of Vinyl (1)

wirefarm (18470) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146027)

What I miss about vinyl is the ritual surrounding it.

There's this whole process of "playing a record" that simply doesn't happen when playing a digital file. There's the special way of opening the cover and sliding the platter out into trained fingers that touch only the edges of the disk, the optional puff of air to dislodge any dust from the surface and the trained flip or two to choose a side before carefully placing a tiny diamond in the first groove to release the sound.

A record, too, has a limited number of plays, I'd guess--a couple hundred at best? very time you play an album for friends, you're sharing one of those limited plays. When I used to have a collection of Jazz records, there were a few very pristine original pressings I had that each play was like opening a good bottle of old wine.

There is a very real, very human need for ritual in life, be it religious sacraments, a tea ceremony, playing a record or even the way some people barbecue or fill a bong. It's a way of making a situation more significant and feeling some continuity with the past.

iTunes just can't compete with that experience.

FUD (1)

elronxenu (117773) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146033)

The first scratch which causes the needle to jump the groove will kill this "phenomenon".

They might be buying vinyl for the "look", and listening to the music on MP3s. There must be more useful artefacts they could purchase. Buying vinyl is like printing out the band's website.

Thousands of new singles? (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146036)

I didn't know that the White Stripes even had more than two thousand new singles. They must be in the studio all the time.

Because I'm hardcore! (1)

Gerocrack (979018) | more than 7 years ago | (#16146041)

I'm going to get my copy of Half Life: Episode 2 on a spool of magnetic tape!
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