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OpenBSD 4.0 Pre-orders are Available

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the come-and-get-it dept.

163

fuzzyping1 writes "Pre-orders for OpenBSD 4.0 are now available in the online store. Five architectures on three CDs in a soft-shell DVD case. Check out the highlights of OpenBSD 4.0. This new release includes support for many new wireless chipsets, the UltraSPARC III platform, a new load-balancing feature for network trunks, and much, much more."

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we will be right back after this commercial break (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151254)


BSD must be dying

Re:we will be right back after this commercial bre (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151321)

BSD has been dead for years you slug-fisting cunt-felcher.

Re:we will be right back after this commercial bre (-1, Offtopic)

Horse Rotorvator JAD (834524) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151476)

BSD has been dead for years you slug-fisting cunt-felcher.

Although I am still on the fence about the whole slug-fisting fad, I am wondering what exactly is wrong with cunt-felching?

OpenBSD 4.0! (-1, Troll)

saleenS281 (859657) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151272)

OpenBSD 4.0, now with more arrogance than ever!

Karma be damned!

Netcraft has confirmed it... (0, Troll)

xquark (649804) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151275)

OpenBSD 4.0 is the beginning of the end... :)

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (5, Insightful)

ntgs (1004196) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151300)

OpenBSD is actually turning into a very usable OS. I find it funny when I hear criticism of OBSD, it usually comes from people that have never tried using it. If you have never tried OpenBSD I suggest you start here: http://www.openbsd101.com/ [openbsd101.com] Then make your judgements.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (1)

xquark (649804) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151343)

I love it, I use it whenever I can and whenever it makes sense.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (1)

ntgs (1004196) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151349)

Interesting. Though you have to admit, it has made more and more sense over the last few years.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151601)

Not where I live, which is in The Real World. You know, the one where performance matters, and where you can't simply get away with toting your lack of functionality as a 'security feature'. As an OpenBSD user you may not remember this world, having long since forsaken it for a land ruled by a myopic tyrant who decrees what is and is not secure based on nothing more than his whims.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151827)

"Not where I live, which is in The Real World."

Make sure in your Real World you don't use OpenSSH, OpenSSL, OpenNTPD or OpenBGPD then. Get a grip. Not everything is performace oriented.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (3, Insightful)

yo_tuco (795102) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151795)

"it usually comes from people that have never tried using it... Then make your judgements."

I suspect that won't do any good. The ones yelling the loudest most likely only see computers/operating systems as a comsumer desktops. Though OBSD can be used as a desktop, I don't think they would find it meets their expectations. And if any Window's user did, they'd experience culture shock. Thus, all the bad-mouthing.

However, there are other uses for an operating system and in this area OBSD has value. But I don't think many of these critics will be building routers, bridges, wireless AP's and writing filtering rules enough to make a judgment tempered with experience. But to each his own. OBSD continues to improve and that is a plus.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (1)

kjart (941720) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152253)

Long story short: tried it, was easier than I expected, went back to Debian. With my brief experience I cant fault anyone for sticking with it.

Re:Netcraft has confirmed it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16152270)

Actually, the only complaint I have is the lack of support of UTF8. It's a pain when interacting with other OS'es, NFS mounting file sysstems, editing remote files etc.

ripoff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151276)


50$ or 50euros is not the same thing

50euros is 63.57 USD so why does it cost more in Europe ?

Re:ripoff (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151302)

50euros is 63.57 USD so why does it cost more in Europe ?

Laziness and fondness for round numbers... particularly those that are even multiples of 50.

Re:ripoff (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151897)

And I thought the difference was just about equal to import tax + VAT.
YMMV, but just about everything imported seems to have such rounded prices these days.

Re:ripoff (2, Informative)

OttoM (467655) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152163)

European prices INCLUDE 21% VAT.

Re:ripoff (1)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152256)

It makes me wonder what incentive Europeans would have to pre-order it, then. VAT is cheaper than 21% in 18 of the 25 [europa.eu] (PDF) member states.

Re:ripoff (5, Funny)

lars_boegild_thomsen (632303) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151542)

That's ok - it's not uncommon that software is priced cheaper in third-world countries.

Re:ripoff (1, Interesting)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151668)

why does it cost more in Europe ?
If you have a problem with that, why aren't you buying copies in the US and selling them in Europe?

Re:ripoff (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152044)

This is actually pretty common practice. At least it doesn't cost _more_ euros than dollars; that's common, too.

Marketshare will skyrocket! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151282)

OpenBSD has heard the voice of the people, and its screaming for FREE STICKERS!!!

Only 10 comments... (0, Troll)

malraid (592373) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151303)

...and the site has already been hacked by some script kiddie. How lame!

Re:Only 10 comments... (0)

Tharkban (877186) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151413)

Troll? That's the funniest thing I've heard all day! :)

uh oh.... (-1, Troll)

rune2 (547599) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151305)

Netcraft surrenders...

VAX (0)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151326)

Complete with four changes specifically for the VAX architecture. I myself have one or two alphas but why put so much effort into (for example) getting X11 to run on VAX? Its not as if anybody is going to run Gnome or anything. The vax is (probably) equivalent to a 386.

Re:VAX (5, Insightful)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151387)

My guess? The people who actually have VAX machines and care about them, made the changes. Not some guy who has one or two alphas.

Lots of other folks wrote new bits that work fine on x86, etc. It's not like the VAX updates were the only ones made. Why complain about people writing additional features for machines they use just because you don't use them?

Re:VAX (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151930)

Because if they weren't adding features no one cares about they would most likely have spent that time making (a) feature(s) everyone wanted that/(which) didn't make it into this release

Re:VAX (4, Informative)

urlgrey (798089) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151596)

Aside from the joy of it for those that are so inclined, the main reason for working on other architectures is because it often brings to light subtle errors in code--particularly in the compiler--because of the differences in the hardware's instructions and such.

In the case of the VAX and Alphas, both out-dated platforms to many people, they've both been quite good at making coding errors surface, so they're very useful for that if nothing else.

If memory serves in fact, one of the OpenBSD devs, Miod, fixed such an error in the compiler that was picked up because the VAX puked in building X on the same compiler instructions that other platforms were perfectly willing to tolerate.

In the end it produces a better product for all of us since it can often help developers find and fix bugs--especially the hard-to-find and hard-to-duplicate varities. That's pretty cool.

Re:VAX (1)

kwark (512736) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151872)

OpenBSD is the new NetBSD?

But there is more old hardware in the newly supported list, atleast the
"New pgt(4) driver for Connexant/Intersil Prism GT Full-MAC IEEE 802.11a/b/g wireless." caught my eye. A wireless card that hasn't been sold for a couple of years (sadly enough).

Re:VAX (4, Insightful)

kv9 (697238) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152221)

OpenBSD is the new NetBSD?

perhaps you meant the old NetBSD? with 17 supported platforms [openbsd.org] (as opposed to 60 [netbsd.org] ) it aint king of portability.

Re:VAX (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152268)

The people who are writing for the VAX platform are probably doing it because that's what they enjoy. It's not like there is a tradeoff - they are working on VAX and so not, say, working on feature du jour on i386 - because they have no interest on i386 (or other platforms) they wouldn't be working on it anyway.

The VAX is a well built older machine which was absolutely awesome in its day, and it's good to see that people still interested in the VAX are keeping at least one new operating system running on the machine.

Better RAID support than Linux? (4, Informative)

Craig Davison (37723) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151341)

One thing that bothers me about hardware RAID support in linux is the lack of a single set of management/monitoring tools that will work with every driver. With OpenBSD 4 you can just use sensord.
OpenBSD doesn't have quite the hardware coverage Linux does in this area, but who wants to use stuff like aacraid anyway when you have to troll the net for closed-source Dell tools to check your array status?
Anyway, thanks again, OpenBSD team. Good work.

I'm holding off buying for now (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151348)

I'm waiting for the edition with the genuine Corinthian leather DVD case.

I heard rumors on teh intartubes that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151536)

...them corinthian folks are getting mighty T-eed off over being harvested for leather all the time...

Preorders (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151353)

They like to get a bunch of preorders so the guy burning the DVD's knows whether to go buy a 50 DVD spindle or a 100 DVD spindle.

Re:Preorders (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151527)

I should be offended, but I can't stop laughing.

Re:Preorders (1)

toadlife (301863) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151678)

I'm a *BSD user and fan myself...but that there was *funny*.

Orders might be delayed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151702)

Also, the orders may be slow to ship. The Taiyo Yuden media is on backorder, so the DVDs have to be burned at 4x.

OpenRCS (3, Informative)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151359)

GNU RCS has been replaced with OpenRCS. [opencvs.org]

Interesting. the GNU RCS code is kind of an ugly mess (one reason it's stagnated, one reason it's had so many vulnerabilities). For local stuff, RCS is nice and simple, but I don't know why anyone would use CVS when much better alternatives now exist.

Re:OpenRCS (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151420)

I wasn't aware anyone used RCS. Personally I'd rather use bzr or svn, even for local only use.

Ya know what would absolutely rock? OpenMTA. I recently did a survey [blogspot.com] and there's nothing good with an open license, unless you like Java.

qpsmtpd (1)

ZeekWatson (188017) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151873)

Take a look at qpsmtpd:

http://smtpd.develooper.com/ [develooper.com]

Re:qpsmtpd (3, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152328)

written in Perl

Get. Away. From. Me.

Re:OpenRCS (2, Interesting)

Ed Avis (5917) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152225)

RCS can be quite handy to use for configuration files, so you can have /etc/fstab and /etc/fstab,v. It's also used as a backend for other programs, like CVS (in the early days - CVS still uses RCS format files in its repository but has its own code to handle them) or to provide version history in TWiki.

Re:OpenRCS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151814)

I don't know why anyone would use CVS when much better alternatives now exist.

Mostly because it works fine and the impact of moving an existing project to a different system is somewhat unknown. For brand new projects, yeah, maybe it's worth learning SVN or something else that's newer.

DVD distributions. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151366)

Not bad but I would have preferred a single DVD. DVD drives are now so cheap that there's no longer any reason to offer CDs. Plus the shipping costs can be lower.

Re:DVD distributions. (3, Insightful)

darkjedi521 (744526) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151412)

Not every architecture they support can take a DVD drive. Also, can you imagine trying to get a single DVD that is bootable on PPC, i386/amd64, and sparc/sparc64? A lot of us run OBSD on Sun gear.

Re:DVD distributions. (1)

hey (83763) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151996)

Well, PCs support it. That a pretty significant market.

Re:DVD distributions. (2, Informative)

kv9 (697238) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152346)

Well, PCs support it. That a pretty significant market.

if you look at OpenBSD's mission statement you'll see that their goal is to build a free secure stable operating system -- and not cater to the needs of whiny people that sound like broken records. you honestly think that OBSD/i386 users will feel left out because their toy didn't come on a DVD and flee to some sort of Fedora/Ubuntu point-click-drool affair? dollars to donuts, they gonna do a netinstall like any normal person while waiting for the CDs to come in the mail.

Re:DVD distributions. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151415)

Plenty of systems still do not include DVD drives, including *brand new* servers. The numbers just do not add up to make it worthwhile to have a DVD set.

BSD Section (4, Interesting)

dokebi (624663) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151382)

Why isn't the BSD section no longer listed on the left hand Sections menu? The Slashdot bias against BSD has gone on far too long. Editors, bring back the BSD section!

Re:BSD Section (1)

larry bagina (561269) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151600)

They don't include 'dead' topics like geeks in space [slashdot.org] or apache [slashdot.org] , but BSD [slashdot.org] gets more action than backslash [slashdot.org]

Re:BSD Section (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151657)

It's still there, it was just renamed when a corporation was allowed to steal your userland and close it up because of your license. The BSD section is now called Apple. Remind me why I would want to release code under the BSD license anyway? Good code in use, etc... Yeah, I have heard them all before. But there is a sig on /. somewhere, "A republic is two hungry wolves and sheep. Freedom is a well armed sheep." The GPL gives us the armament we need to stop predators who would co-opt what was developed by us and use it as a marketing ploy against us. So, which OS is more popular, *BSD or OSX? They just beat you at your own game. They took what you had, and gave you no credit or compensation (not monetary, code wise, share and share alike stuff). Remember, we only see far because we stand on the backs of giants, because they didn't pantent the piggy back ride.

Re:BSD Section (0, Offtopic)

Liquid Len (739188) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151878)

Didn't you hear the news ? It's now official: Netcraft confirms it...

Sorry

Re:BSD Section (1)

dghcasp (459766) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152161)

They obviously took it away to make room for backslash...

And that section is sooooo popular... I mean, there's not enough dupes on /. already; let's make a section where we dupe comments!

oh boy, pre-orders! (0, Troll)

Wizzerd911 (1003980) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151404)

$10 says it gets more pre-orders than Vista and the PS3 combined. Any takers? No? aww :(

New Song? (1)

Rylz (868268) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151421)

Where's the new song?! (http://openbsd.org/lyrics.html [openbsd.org] ) Usually it comes out before the new release, and I only have an OBSD 3.6 server which I never plan to have to upgrade, so an update to me means a new fun song!

Re:New Song? (1)

gwk (1004182) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151465)

To commemorate 10 years of OpenBSD the project is also selling an Audio CD with all the release songs from 3.0 through 4.0, also has some cool extras including a bonus track and a 11cm silver-on-clear die-cut wireframe Puffy sticker, for $15. OpenBSD Audio CD [openbsd.org]

OpenBSD is NOT open source software (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151432)

Although licensed under the BSD license, the developers have made it clear that they expect payment, especially from the larger users. Failure to pay the arbitrarily determined fee will mean that bug and security fixes may be withheld from you.

Re:OpenBSD is NOT open source software (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151440)

This is complete and utter bullshit. But not surprising for a post on Slashdot.

Re:OpenBSD is NOT open source software (5, Informative)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151480)

Wow. Seriously, wow. That MUST be deliberately misleading.

The BSD licence means that the authors can't, even if they wanted to, withhold security patches from you and nobody else. You can just get the patch from someone else who has it.

Furthermore, OpenBSD asking for donations is no difference from Mozilla getting donation, OpenOffice getting corporate support or MySQL having a corporate company employing its development team. In fact OpenBSD's model is probably less influenced by profit agenda than all of the abovementioned projects.

What's more, they manage to keep up with OpenBSD's reputation of begin perhaps the most secure operating system available to consumers, bar none. And all this in their spare time, putting up with FUD like what you've just spouted, and not getting half the recognition they deserve. If you ask me, they are the knights of the open source world. Or something.

Re:OpenBSD is NOT open source software (3, Insightful)

cerelib (903469) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151635)

Actually, if the developers write a bug fix, they can withhold security patches from you. The BSD license gives them the power to distribute patched software in any way they please. This means they could fix a bug and decide to relicense the fixed release in whatever way they see fit, even as closed source proprietary binary blob. In general the BSD license lets people do with the software whatever they please. In the case of GNU/Linux, if any group distributed a patch to any of the GPL software included then they would be forced to release their code under the GPL(because it would be considered a derivative work) and therefore have no real control over distribution. I am not familiar with what the OpenBSD people do, although it seems they have a firm commitment to open source software, but I did want to point out what the BSD license actually gives you the right to do. Some people see BSD style licenses as more open source than the GPL because it allows more freedom, but, because it allows almost complete freedom, many people don't like it because that means nobody is obligated to give anything back.

Re:OpenBSD is NOT open source software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151710)


This means they could fix a bug and decide to relicense the fixed release in whatever way they see fit, even as closed source proprietary binary blob.


I guess all that effort clearing out incompatible licenses were for naught, then.


I am not familiar with what the OpenBSD people do, although it seems they have a firm commitment to open source software...

and

In general the BSD license lets people do with the software whatever they please.


Right, it's Free Software.


Some people see BSD style licenses as more open source than the GPL because it allows more freedom, but, because it allows almost complete freedom, many people don't like it because that means nobody is obligated to give anything back.


One's copyleft, the other's permissive. Being held to an obligation seems a whole lot more different than just letting people contribute at thier own whims, but that's just me...

Does it still drag ass in performance? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151514)

The last time I checked out OpenBSD it was glaccially slow. Maybe it's 'secure by default' because by default any IO operations go so slow that the script kidz finish high-school and college and are well on their way towards their doctorate by the time the operation has completed! In benchmarks against linux, freebsd and netbsd openbsd finished dead last, oftentimes crashing before the benchmark was finished! And the ports tree? Ugh, they've got the dubious honor of being the only Free OS which has packages even older than what debian ships by default! NetBSD 4.0-Release features GCC4, what does OpenBSD 4.0 have...gcc3...gcc2?!?!

What a POS. No wonder no one has found any holes in it -right next to no one would use such a steaming pile in a production enviroment!

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151539)

Slashdot never fails to come through with the most retarded people on this planet. It is like there is this big sign at the front door that says retards please post here...

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151552)

Since the best retort you can come up with is 'lol retards' I'm going to assume that OpenBSD retains its' technically inferior posistion in the OS field.

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (2, Informative)

abigor (540274) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151613)

Nope, he's right. This tells the sad story of OpenBsd very well. http://bulk.fefe.de/scalability/ [bulk.fefe.de]

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (1)

westyx (95706) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151685)

OpenBSD may very well drag ass in performance, but to cite something last updated in Nov 3 2003 with OBSD v3.4 is hilarious (and wrong)

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151714)

Given OpenBSD's track record of performing 'audits' instead of adding features or optimising algorhythms, the sad truth is that in the main it's doubtful that 4.0 is signifigantly any different or more apt to perform any better than 3.4

replacing a traditional system call here with one you wrote yourself there does not innovation make, neither does re-inventing the wheel (especially when you reinvent it poorly!)

Re:Does it still drag ass in performance? (3, Informative)

shking (125052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151746)

OpenBSD got a real boost in performance at spring 2005 Hackathon, when a subtle bug in the virtual memory code was found and corrected.

Another world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151540)

I appear to have ventured into a parallel universe. Thus far, the most startling difference has been that people here appear to try to sell open source software, rather than making it available for free. I intend to document these differences as they come up, in the hopes of further study when (if ever) I return home.

Re:Another world (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152048)

Thus far, the most startling difference has been that people here appear to try to sell open source software, rather than making it available for free.

Are you really that surprised?

https://www.redhat.com/apps/commerce/ [redhat.com]
https://shop.mysql.com/ [mysql.com]
http://www.novell.com/linux/ [novell.com]
http://www.cafepress.com/officialgentoo/1227454 [cafepress.com]

etc...

And if you prefer the free approach:

ftp://ftp.openbsd.org/ [openbsd.org]
 

Relevance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151554)

Seriously, why bother with OpenBSD anymore when there's such a push towards Linux uptake?

BSD has about as much relevance in modern times as running an Amiga; relics of the past.

(Posted AC because KCG will kill me otherwise)

Re:Relevance? (4, Insightful)

keithmo (453716) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151624)

FWIW (not much) I usually buy one copy of OpenBSD whenever a new version is released, if for no other reason than to support OpenSSL development. You may not be an OpenBSD fan, but if you're running Linux, you're probably also running OpenBSD-derived software.

Re:Relevance? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151660)

Actually, OpenSSH, along with Sendmail, tends to be one of the first things I make a point of disabling on any new installation that I make. Every time I read a security alert, they're either talking about one or the other.

I laugh at the idea of giving one thin dime to theo OR his elitist superstructure!

Re:Relevance? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151693)

Fuck you Linux lover!

-Raadt

Re:Relevance? (1)

XoXus (12014) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151709)

So how do you remotely access your new installations? Via telnet?

Re:Relevance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151725)

VNC

Re:Relevance? (1)

Xipher (868293) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151800)

Ew, clear text crap

Re:Relevance? (1)

HSpirit (519997) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152031)

RealVNC Remote Authentication Bypass Vulnerability [securityfocus.com]

RealVNC is susceptible to an authentication-bypass vulnerability. This issue is due to a flaw in the authentication process of the affected package.

Exploiting this issue allows attackers to gain unauthenticated, remote access to the VNC servers.

Not to mention by default VNC is unencrypted... unless you tunnel it - and how might one tunnel it? Hmmmm...

Re:Relevance? Ask the folks at SDF.LoneStar.org (1)

ivi (126837) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151752)

The free shell folks at sdf.LoneStar.org once had somebody
break through their Linux security (years ago already), so
they went to NetBSD, I think (from memory).

They might have something to say about Linux -vs- [Net]BSD

Re:Relevance? Ask the folks at SDF.LoneStar.org (1)

delirium of disorder (701392) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151836)

Your history of SDF is correct, but this particular case does not prove that Linux is less secure than BSD. Depending on how you configure your system, either OS can be rock solid impenetrable, or more exploitable than an unpatched Windows98 box. Very few successful break ins are due to kernel flaws; usually the problem is an application bug, bad configuration, or incorrect policy. I also run a public shell service [no-ip.org] , and it too often comes under attempted exploit and DoS attacks. I've successfully managed to run it using Linux. I also run OpenBSD on another machine. Linux and BSD both have strong security as strengths, if you use them correctly. However, there is something to be said for OpenBSD's policy of "secure by default".

George Says (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151579)

It is now official. Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be the Amazing Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

Network "trunk" (1)

slidersv (972720) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151588)

From the description it sounds like an extended version of 802.3ad standard, which is great. But under "trunk" most network admins imagine interface that tags VLANs as per 802.1q. Great feature nevetheless.

Re:Network "trunk" (1)

tek.net-ium (841449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151863)

I don't think I've heard "trunking" being used as "vlan tagging," but 802.1q is available via the vlan interface nonetheless. It's quite simple: just "man ifconfig" and "man vlan". The quality of the documentation, in particular the man pages, in OpenBSD was really refreshing when I started using it after coming from Linux.

International Orders (2, Interesting)

nighty5 (615965) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151722)

Anyone outside the US / Canana know how much to send the CDs? The website doesn't say - and this is even right up to supplying your CC information.....

I would prefer to know.. even a rough guide how much.... because I've seen cases (on other sites) were the shipping costs outweighs the cost of the product!

Re:International Orders (2, Interesting)

raffe (28595) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151877)

It wasnt very expensive to send it to europe. They send it from belgium to sweden for a few euros. At least this was the case for 3.2...:-D

Java, coming soon? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151758)

I would love to use OpenBSD for more things, but I can't until I have a solid way to run Java apps on it. gcj is promising, but it won't run my real-world Java apps that I need, like NetBeans and JBoss. Likewise for Apache Harmony, Kaffe, and all the others. I'm hoping that Sun will come through with its promise to open source Java, and that there could be a native-compiled Java 6 for OpenBSD, which would let me switch over to it. Any ideas on this?

Re:Java, coming soon? (3, Informative)

tek.net-ium (841449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151849)

Linux binary support under OpenBSD is surprisingly good; you might give that a whirl. Just install the port emulators/redhat, execute 'sysctl kern.emul.linux=1', and change /etc/sysctl.conf. Then use a Linux JRE.

Re:Java, coming soon? (4, Informative)

Geekboy(Wizard) (87906) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151903)

java 1.5 is native on openbsd/i386. it works as fine as you can expect java to run.

Sound Support ??? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151928)

Can somebody using openbsd tell me if they have got their sound card working in it?

I do not want to get left out from hearing my music while using openbsd as a desktop.

Any resources to tweak the sound will be welcome.

pwns (1)

n3v (412497) | more than 7 years ago | (#16151945)

OpenBSD fucking rocks. [period]

gcc 2.9.x?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16151973)

Why are they still shipping with gcc 2.9._? It would be nice if they would try out gcc 4._ sometime. That comes with a fairly usable gcj that would let us do some Java things in OpenBSD.

OpenSSH (1, Redundant)

hey (83763) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152011)

The OpenSSH improvments should help us all...

# OpenSSH 4.4:

        * Conditional configuration in sshd_config(5) using the Match directive. This allows some configuration options to be selectively overridden if specific criteria (based on user, group, hostname and/or address) are met.
        * Add support for Diffie-Hellman group exchange key agreement with a final hash of SHA256.
        * Added a ForceCommand directive to sshd_config(5), similar to the command="..." option in ~/.ssh/authorized_keys.
        * Added a PermitOpen directive to sshd_config(5), similar to the permitopen="..." option in authorized_keys, to allow control over the port-forwardings that a user is allowed to establish.
        * Added an ExitOnForwardFailure option to cause ssh(1) to exit (with a non-zero exit code) when requested port forwardings could not be established.
        * Added optional logging of transactions to sftp-server(8).
        * ssh(1) will now record port numbers for hosts stored in ~/.ssh/authorized_keys when a non-standard port has been requested.
        * Extended the sshd_config(5) "SubSystem" directive to allow the specification of commandline arguments.
        * Many manpage fixes and improvements

Re:OpenSSH (1)

cyberkahn (398201) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152463)

Thanks for the awesome OpenSSH summary. :-)

I hope they took permission... (2, Informative)

rsidd (6328) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152120)

...before using Asterix imagery: those people are pretty litigious [tuxmobil.org] .

Re:I hope they took permission... (2, Informative)

nickname_unique (701073) | more than 7 years ago | (#16152394)

This question already arrised on the misc@ mailing list. Theo's answere, quoted below, sounds quite reasonable to me:
"Our releases are thematic parodies, specifically permitted by law."

Truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16152405)

I am a system administrator for a small-medium ISP. I setup an OpenBSD machine more than 2 years back as a firewall/router that sometimes even did load balancing. The only time it failed was... when the electricity went down.

As advertised.. it IS rock solid!

USB support - FRITZ!Box Fon modem/router? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16152470)

Can one use the USB version of aDSL modem/router FRITZ!Box Fon under OpenBSD 4.0? The hardware support pages at openbsd.org are not clear to me as to whether one can use this router (even post-installation) or not.
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