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NSA Publication Indices Declassified

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the waiting-game dept.

76

Schneier is reporting that a 3 year old freedom of information act request has finally come to fruition showing us indices from the NSA Technical Journal, Cryptographic Quarterly, Crytologic Spectrum, and Cryptologic Almanac. From the article: "The request took more than three years for them to process and declassify -- sadly, not atypical -- and during the process they asked if he would accept the indexes in lieu of the tables of contents pages: specifically, the cumulative indices that included all the previous material in the earlier indices. He agreed, and got them last month. Consider these bibliographic tools as stepping stones. If you want an article, send a FOIA request for it. Send a FOIA request for a dozen. There's a lot of stuff here that would help elucidate the early history of the agency and some interesting cryptographic topics."

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76 comments

Pirst fost? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209341)

n/t

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209345)

Am I the only one who doesn't understand what's going on here?

Re:What? (2, Informative)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209379)

Now you can look up the documents you can't get a copy of because they're still classified.

Re:What? (4, Funny)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209407)

To find out what the article is on about, you must file a Form 9923479821789123 (Freedom of information request) to the Government and wait upto 3 years for delivery of said document.
Please note however that the document will be placed on public display in the basement of the town hall at the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard'.

Re:What? (0)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209919)

And watch your step on those stairs!

Re:What? (0)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210309)

What stairs?

Re:What? (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#16216351)

Exactly.

(Aside: what kind of dumbass modded us 'overrated?' People who haven't read The Guide shouldn't get mod points!)

Re:What? (2, Funny)

Majik Sheff (930627) | more than 7 years ago | (#16223199)

We probably failed to conform to some groupthink standard. Ok, gotta get some karma back...

Linux rocks and Microsoft sucks!
DRM and RFID are evil in every incarnation!
Sony sucks!
Halliburton!
The US is fucking up the world and George W. Bush is the devil!
There is no God and evolution is the absolute final answer to our origins!
If I'm American then Democrats are the only hope for our future!
Halliburton!

That should put me in good standing with the mods around here.

Re:What? (2, Funny)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 7 years ago | (#16211267)

To find out what the article is on about, you must file a Form 9923479821789123 (Freedom of information request) to the Government and wait upto 3 years for delivery of said document.

Actually, that form has been revised. Twice.

Revision history:

9923479821789123.b: Changes word "requires" in "Submission of this form requires a signature" to "necessitates", as is "Submission of this form necessitates a signature".

9923479821789123.c Changes word "a" to "your", as "Submission of this form necessitates a signature" to "Submission of this form necessitates your signature".

You'll need form 9923479821789123.c. Due to important wording changes, the older forms cannot be used. And don't confuse that with form 9923479821749123.c: "Freedom of information query", which is a whole 'nother ball of wax....

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16212371)

Please tell me you're not serious.

Your and my tax dollars at work.

Wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16212727)

Are you fucking retarted or what?

Re:Wow... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16213859)

Wow... Why am I talking to myself?

Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (2, Interesting)

dshaw858 (828072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209359)

It's kind of disgusting that it takes so long for documents to be declassified and released to the public, but I understand that there is always the imminent threat to national security and these things can't be rushed. I understand why many of these documents simply *cannot* be released to the public, but this indexing is truly whetting me appetite for what I cannot have! I would love to read almost any of the articuals in the NSA Technical Journal, and some articles such as 'BS: Dealing with Beaurocracies' sound quite entertaining. Come on, can you really say that What Every Cryptologist Should Know About Pearl Harbor doesn't make you want to storm the NSA headquarters and grab a few copies?

Sigh, such is life... still, this declassification is the first step to a full release of these documents.

- dshaw

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209717)

Actually, the NSA is one of the better government organizations on this sort of thing. The Military and related agencies (NSA being one of them) take FOIA requests seriously. Most of the rest of the government agencies don't.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1, Interesting)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210811)

I would argue that any Government entity that assumes that because they have not published something it is still a secret from any enemy that matters is so naive as to be a threat to national security on a far greater scale than any release they could possibly do. (Since you can only know for sure what such an enemy has published, you cannot - by definition - know everything they have acquired from you and have not published. Whatever intelligence you gather by any other means is guaranteed to be partial and is necessarily whatever said enemy was sufficiently unconcerned with you knowing that they didn't take better care of it.)


For this reason, "national security" has no validity as a reason to withhold information, as it is impossible to know what measure of security you are achieving for the nation by withholding it. This doesn't mean they should publish everything, and there are plenty of times when it would be far more hazardous for the public to know something than any perceived or real enemy. After all, there are far more corporations investing in Congressmen than foreign Governments.


There are some things that are secret out of habit and for no legitimate reason at all. Ciphers and hashing functions, for example. Those secure information in transit, but it's insane to assume the plaintext is secure at either end - the US caught an Israeli spy in the highest echelons of the DoD, and they're an ally! (And, from what was published, it sounds like the guy got careless, and that was the only reason for being found out.) You've then got to consider that each and every cryptoanalyst on your side that is testing for vulnerabilities could either deliberately or accidently expose any such weakness, or that the if an enemy obtained the algorithm, they could figure it out and not tell you they'd done so. (You think they would?!)


For these reasons, keeping algorithms secret really doesn't buy you a whole lot. Again, it prevents Joe Public from using those same codes to keep commercial information private, but the NSA really should stop spending so much time on Airbus. There are genuinely important things to be watching, guys! If the NSA and DoD published all of their cryptographic functions tomorrow, the risks of any serious damage being done that wouldn't have happened anyway would be minimal, and the added attention may even serve to boost the security of such algorithms. That does happen. Rarely, bit it does happen. Even the RSA has released bugfixes and dropped methods, and they're far from stupid.


I can see some of the apparently "nonsense" papers being more of a concern. ET messages are unlikely as a reality, but as a scenario designed to study information extraction from an undecrypted message in an unknown language - damn, that's potentially hot. If the NSA can extract meaningful amounts of information from something that cannot be decrypted or interpretted directly, or even has a working group studying methods of doing so, then that is something that the NSA probably wouldn't want to publish. In a case like that, then Joe Public is most definitely a major threat, as there are far more paranoids than there are Governments, and even protecting the slimmest chance of such a method from leaking to even the friendliest of nations would definitely have some major advantages.


Historical texts, such as Pearl Harbour intelligence failures/successes, disinformation in the Vietnam era, the menu at the caffeteria during the NSA's opening ceremony, etc, are probably someting that barely need glancing at before releasing. If there's any substantial lesson unlearned after 50 years, nobody is going to suddenly learn it tomorrow, and the odds are high that most organizations being monitored learned it by rote the day after whatever the disaster was. And, again, if they didn't, they're too stupid to learn it now, so screw 'em.


Of course, none of my conjectures or speculations here are worth a damn. We know the NSA reads Slashdot, 'cos their museum curator was going to do a Slashdot interview and IIRC said as much. (However, he never publicly answered the questions. Maybe we should do a FOI on that.) We also know that affiliated organizations read Slashdot and are openly involved in Open Source, as they've said as much when Slashdot has discussed things like SELinux and the declassifications of SHA and Skipjack. We also know that they're not stupid enough to blindly follow the recommendations of a Slashdotter, no matter how low their UID or how high their karma. Finally, we definitely know that organizations such as the NSA are far too conservative to dream of opening anything up further than they absolutely have to - and even then, probably under protest - no matter what the arguments are for or against. Were every God and Goddess drempt of by humanity over the past 10,000 years to go to Congress and validate every single point I've made, my bet would be on the NSA refusing on the grounds said deities weren't US citizens and didn't have the proper security clearance. (See: "Dark Teatime of the Soul" for details.)

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (5, Insightful)

AJWM (19027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210909)

Your analysis makes the mistake of assuming that there's only one enemy (or "potential opponent", if you prefer that term). You also underestimate the value of doubt.

Even if nations A, B, and C know your secret, there's still D thru Z that don't unless you publish it. Furthermore, A, B and C may not know for sure that they know your secret until you confirm it by publishing. Confirming it tells them not only your secret, but it also tells them that the channel by which they obtained it originally is reliable. At least, assuming you're not just publishing the phony secret that you already know they've obtained, in order to "confirm" a tainted channel.

MOD PARENT UP DAMMIT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16211041)

Fucking mod fucking parent up. Good fucking post. Fuck.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16211931)

It's kind of disgusting that it takes so long for documents to be declassified and released to the public, but I understand that there is always the imminent threat to national security and these things can't be rushed.

Actually that's not the reason for the delay. The policy of the Reno DoJ on FOIA requests was, "Absent a national security issue, disclose" Almost the first act of the bastard Ashcroft was to change that policy of openness to, "Absent a court order, withhold." Between the request and the court order, it was understood that any amount of foot-dragging and stonewalling was to be encouraged.

The current administration constantly bitches about leaks and spends untold millions tracking down leakers instead of dealing with the problems the leak discloses.

This week, we have the spectacle of the cynical shits in the administration, faced with a leak, suddenly "partially declassifying" a NIE to counter the leak. Note that the tightlipped (and tightassed) bastards only declassified enough to make their case and still hold the rest classified.

This is the most closed administration in American history. I just hope that a future administtration will have the balls to reverse the current policies, most especially the one where the coward-in-chief retroactively closed off all public access to the contents of all the presidetial libraries.

Personally I can't understand why Clinton won't come out and publicly declare that he wants the contents of his library (at last) open to the public and state that he is willing to go to the Supreme Court to force it open.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (3, Insightful)

hcob$ (766699) | more than 7 years ago | (#16213199)

Yeah, Let's feed the trolls...

The current administration constantly bitches about leaks and spends untold millions tracking down leakers instead of dealing with the problems the leak discloses.
When Plame's name was released... the media went apeshit when the leaker WASN'T found. (He ended up revealing himself)

This week, we have the spectacle of the cynical shits in the administration, faced with a leak, suddenly "partially declassifying" a NIE to counter the leak. Note that the tightlipped (and tightassed) bastards only declassified enough to make their case and still hold the rest classified.
Of course, the excerpts that were to be published before the partial declassification were to be on just enough to prove the democrat's case.

This is the most closed administration in American history. I just hope that a future administtration will have the balls to reverse the current policies, most especially the one where the coward-in-chief retroactively closed off all public access to the contents of all the presidetial libraries.
Well,as for openness(not that FOIA is a really good judge of the administration, but here's some numbers).

Clinton Admin full grants over his 8 years: 249,457
Bush Admin full grants over his 6 years: 323,055

Granted these are not percentages, ratios of requests to grants, anything of that nature. These are just the raw data, but feel free to look it up yourself.

For the yearly FOIA reports totaling every request and action see the DOJ Archive of reports [usdoj.gov] .

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1)

spikedvodka (188722) | more than 7 years ago | (#16215731)

Well,as for openness(not that FOIA is a really good judge of the administration, but here's some numbers).

Clinton Admin full grants over his 8 years: 249,457
Bush Admin full grants over his 6 years: 323,055

Granted these are not percentages, ratios of requests to grants, anything of that nature. These are just the raw data, but feel free to look it up yourself.


also I'd be interested to know, on average, how much of the Complied with requests had been redacted

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1)

hcob$ (766699) | more than 7 years ago | (#16218797)

also I'd be interested to know, on average, how much of the Complied with requests had been redacted
!!!WARNING!!! ASSUMPTION ALERT !!!WARNING!!!

That is specifically why I chose the "full grants". I assumed that "Full Grants" are the documents in the clear while "Partial Grants" are Redacted/Only Some documents that were requested.

!!!WARNING!!! END ASSUMPTION ALERT !!!WARNING!!!

My guess is that we'll have to go read the law pertaining to the reporting of the FOIA activites to know exactly.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1)

cyberon22 (456844) | more than 7 years ago | (#16216655)

Those statistics are really interesting. Just looked at the total number of FOIA requests made. You can see them climb slowly through 1990-1994 and then start going through the roof 1997-2000. Then downhill again.

Was it Clinton? I can't imagine any other reason why the requests would skyrocket in 1998 except for the Lewinsky scandal. But even that doesn't explain the climb in the number of requests under Clinton and recent fall.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16219945)


Clinton Admin full grants over his 8 years: 249,457
Bush Admin full grants over his 6 years: 323,055


It would also be helpful to note which grants were started under clinton and finally granted under Bush. I don't think that the 3 year lag is too uncommon.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (2, Insightful)

Yfrwlf (998822) | more than 7 years ago | (#16213897)

All citizens should have the right to know what their leaders know. Anything less isn't fair. The only reason for secrecy is perhaps during times of war, when and where the next attack will occur. Doing anything to get an upper hand against an enemy is naturally sought, but a government isn't or shouldn't be at war with it's citizens. Hiding truths only slows the progress of intelligence and breeds ignorance.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1)

bhiestand (157373) | more than 7 years ago | (#16226957)

All citizens should have the right to know what their leaders know. Anything less isn't fair. The only reason for secrecy is perhaps during times of war, when and where the next attack will occur. Doing anything to get an upper hand against an enemy is naturally sought, but a government isn't or shouldn't be at war with it's citizens. Hiding truths only slows the progress of intelligence and breeds ignorance.

I'm amazed this passes for "Insightful" these days. Let's start out with an imaginary scenario to prove why this is harmful, with the assumption that, when 260 million people know something, it's not going to remain an international secret.

-The Petorian embassy uses secure telephones called PETOs.
-Petoria sells their encryption technology to several other imaginary countries which share similar hostile attitudes against the United States.
-Petoria is beginning to assume a hostile posture towards the United States and is assessed to be on the verge of launching an attack.
-The NSA manages to find a flaw in their encryption.
-The NSA is using this, in conjunction with an undetectable wiretap, to monitor the supposedly secure, encrypted communications of the ambassador.
-The government shares this knowledge with the public, inherently disclosing their ability to break Petoria's PETO encryption. This may or may not stop Petoria from launching their attack.
-Every country using Petorian encryption technology switches to a more secure means of communication, eliminating the NSA's ability to protect the country with this method.

The above may be an extreme example, but a lot of classified information really could be a threat to national security, or would have been back when it was classified.

Even if the NSA simply shared their [imaginary] amazing 100% secure encryption technology that required only 20 flops to encrypt anything, it'd be a threat to security because everyone else would switch to this technology, rendering the US incapable of monitoring any communications.

I've always been fascinated by encryption and signals intelligence, so I've read at least one book on every war I know if it being used in. That being said, it's been extremely beneficial and saved our asses in nearly every war. If you read some of the recently-declassified spy work done during the cold war, you'll be amazed it's not still classified. You can easily see how it would have been dangerous for that kind of information to be released. I wouldn't want the US to sacrifice whatever abilities it has just to help Joe Sixpack make sure his wife can't read his emails to his mistress.

I think you've watched too many movies about the NSA/CIA/TLAs being at war with Americans.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (1)

Yfrwlf (998822) | more than 7 years ago | (#16238517)

You make a good point, and I understand it, but I already did. Yes, secrets will help give you the upper hand over your enemies. So rather than just not sharing information about an attack planned for the next day, you could not share encryption information, and lots of other things as well, because doing so will give you even more cards in your hand. If you go even further with that idea, you could pretty much seal off everything that happens anywhere at anytime, because it ALL could in some way give a potential current or future enemy knowledge that they could use for their advantage. The phrase "it's a matter of national security" is a well-known one. The problem is, and I know you aren't saying there isn't a problem, but it can and has been used by governments to cover up oppressive secrets. I know this is a fantasy, but it's too bad the U.S. won't stand up against war by having a no-secrets policy. Having secrets creates tension and leads to misunderstanding and war. Not having secrets means you have a fair and free system where anyone can look at what is going on and voice their opinion. Not having secrets means your enemy has several less reasons to not like you. It makes you more of a friend rather than a shady neighbor. I wish all countries would adopt to be more free and friendly by adopting such a policy. Then, if someone were to go to war against you, everyone could more easily say "hey, they didn't do anything wrong, and they've got nothing to hide" and could be more likely to help you and join your cause. Sure, I'm probably attacking an effect and not a cause here, but I think it'd help, and our current setup sucks.

Re:Ancient Documents *Should* Be Declassified (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16213913)

dshaw858 wrote:
>
> It's kind of disgusting that it takes so long for documents to be declassified and released to the public,
> but I understand that there is always the imminent threat to national security and these things can't be
> rushed. I understand why many of these documents simply *cannot* be released to the public, but this
> indexing is truly whetting me appetite for what I cannot have! I would love to read almost any of the
> articuals in the NSA Technical Journal, and some articles such as 'BS: Dealing with Beaurocracies' sound
> quite entertaining. Come on, can you really say that What Every Cryptologist Should Know About Pearl Harbor
> doesn't make you want to storm the NSA headquarters and grab a few copies?


What makes you think these are real articles? They're probably making them up just for the FOIA requests.

Remember, propaganda and disinformation are the stock tools of spy agencies.

Freedom? (1, Insightful)

mbulge (1004558) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209387)

3 years is a long time to wait for "free" information.

A damn good start. (4, Interesting)

glittalogik (837604) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209537)

A huge part of the effectiveness of FOIA legislation is in knowing what there actually is to ask for in the first place. I can just imagine the flood of new requests they're going to be receiving over the next couple of weeks.

a real WTF moment... (4, Interesting)

VoidEngineer (633446) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209621)

- "The Arithmetic of a Generation Principle for an Electronic Key Generator"
- "CATNIP: Computer Analysis - Target Networks Intercept Probability"
- "Chatter Patterns: A Last Resort"
- "COMINT Satellites - A Space Problem"
- "Computers and Advanced Weapons Systems"
- "Coupon Collecting and Cryptology"
- "Cranks, Nuts, and Screwballs"
- "A Cryptologic Fairy Tale"
- "Don't Be Too Smart"
- "Earliest Applications of the Computer at NSA"
- "Emergency Destruction of Documents"
- "Extraterrestrial Intelligence"
- "The Fallacy of the One-Time-Pad Excuse"
- "GEE WHIZZER"
- "The Gweeks Had a Gwoup for It"
- "How to Visualize a Matrix"
- "Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"
- "A Mechanical Treatment of Fibonacci Sequences"
- "Q.E.D.- 2 Hours, 41 Minutes"
- "SlGINT Implications of Military Oceanography"
- "Some Problems and Techniques in Bookbreaking"
- "Upgrading Selected US Codes and Ciphers with a Cover and Deception Capability"
- "Weather: Its Role in Communications Intelligence"
- "Worldwide Language Problems at NSA"

Re:a real WTF moment... (4, Interesting)

chill (34294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209693)

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

Say what?!

Re:a real WTF moment... (1)

E++99 (880734) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209907)

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

I think this proves that the guys at the NSA have cooler jobs than the guys at Google. (This is relevent to Signal Intelligence because the theoretical question is the same -- how do you look at apparent noise and determine if there is a signal in it?)

Re:a real WTF moment... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210595)

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

Say what?!


That one had a picture on the cover of an offended alien pointing at a book titled "How to Cook for Forty Humans".

that article is after the quasar discovery (1)

SaberTaylor (150915) | more than 7 years ago | (#16224571)

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages" (1969)

Mentioned in my blog [livejournal.com] that it is the same year as the quasar discovery that was mistaken as signals from Little Green Men (LGM). src [indiana.edu] .

Re:a real WTF moment... (5, Funny)

Keebler71 (520908) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209701)

I think there is a mistake... "Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages" and "Cranks, Nuts and Screwballs" are really part of the same title: "Cranks, Nuts and Screwballs: Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

Re:a real WTF moment... (5, Interesting)

uufnord (999299) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210051)

Actually, it's not.

Here's a link to Crank, Nuts, and Screwballs:
https://www.cia.gov/csi/kent_csi/docs/v09i3a09p_00 01.htm [cia.gov]

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages" hasn't been declassified. However, in a different paper, "The Intelligence Revolution and the Future", the CIA has this to say:

"Should project SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) ever receive a signal from outer space, there will be yet another role for intelligence services, not in arming the lasers, but in trying to decode the messages."

You can see this link for that quote: https://www.cia.gov/csi/kent_csi/docs/v37i4a04p_00 06.htm [cia.gov]

It looks like they got the messages, AND THEY FOUND THE KEY TO DECODE THEM!

[cue 50's theremin music]
WooOOoooOOOooo-ooooOooooooOOOoooo..

Re:a real WTF moment... (1)

electrosoccertux (874415) | more than 7 years ago | (#16211461)

Wow. Way to quote out of context. Perhaps you should have read the editors note, right under the title:
Editor's Note: This article originally appeared in the summer 1993 issue of Queen's Quarterly, a Canadian publication.

Re:a real WTF moment... (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209945)

"Cranks, Nuts, and Screwballs"

Jeeeeeeeeesus Christ! I hate it when I find out the spooks have been talking about me behind my back; again.

KFG

Cover Stories from the NSA Technical Journal! (4, Funny)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209639)

* Build a waterboarding setup using common household items!

* Exclusive interview with ECHELON! The Journal: Boxers or Briefs? ECHELON: Beep...beep...

* The top ten things not even the President knows!

* Keith Alexander's Beauty Tips!

* More inside!

Re:Cover Stories from the NSA Technical Journal! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16210125)

Build a waterboarding setup using common household items!

NSA gave a presentation on that at my local BDSM chapter.

Re:Cover Stories from the NSA Technical Journal! (1)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210415)

Mine too. Oh well, I'll just have to assume that some humorless, pro-torture nut modded me down.

Re:Cover Stories from the NSA Technical Journal! (1)

arexu (595755) | more than 7 years ago | (#16212663)

Nah, you just weren't funny. Maybe if you had added ninjas or monkeys to your message...

Re:Cover Stories from the NSA Technical Journal! (2, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 7 years ago | (#16214253)

"How to lose 10 terrorists in 10 days!"

"Secrets to pleasing your President in the pressroom"

-Eric

NSA does classifieds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209651)

No wonder they took over Newspapers

or take the easier route (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209689)

Or you could just join the agency and get access to the full articles. I'm sure they would love to have access to some of the brightest new minds out there.

And in light of this article, I wonder if I could make a FOIA request to get to your coupon book, since it seems we now have a right to get to any information out there.

Re:or take the easier route (3, Insightful)

Morphine007 (207082) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209869)

no, just government information.

You see, a transparent government is the key to a successful democracy. Someone realized that they need to do everything in their power to make the government at least appear to be transparent or they wouldn't be able to keep the proles down.



After re-reading this comment, I have to say that it was intended to be a joke... but it appears to go beyond the "funny cuz it's true" realm and into the "yer not funny anymore" realm... /sigh

Re:or take the easier route (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209885)

Or you could just join the agency and get access to the full articles. I'm sure they would love to have access to some of the brightest new minds out there.

I considered it, not too long after 9/11. But I couldn't shake the concern that what talents I have would be employed against my own countrymen, leveraged in unproductive and possibly unconstitutional ways.

As it turned out, my concern was valid. But I still don't know if I really did the right thing by walking away.

Re:or take the easier route (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16210197)

Does a police officer walk away from his line of work because he is worried he may be at some point "pitted against his countrymen?" I understand your point and it is valid especially considering some of the NSA's work, but I find it a bit like throwing the baby out with the bath water. But that is why personal opinion is just that, perfectly valid and fine for each individual person.

But i would hope if you really have the talent to help our great nature, you would not let the misallocation of a few projects taint an entire agency and profession.

Re:or take the easier route (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16214211)

You did. I got a job offer from the NSA in 2003 to work in the International Cyber-Threat Assessment area, and I turned it down. Forget my countrymen, I don't want to place of employment spying on *me* 24/7. And believe me, they would have.

Re:or take the easier route (1)

chialea (8009) | more than 7 years ago | (#16215011)

And in light of this article, I wonder if I could make a FOIA request to get to your coupon book, since it seems we now have a right to get to any information out there.


That FOIA request will take O(n lg n) time to process.

Subscription? (2, Interesting)

xanthines-R-yummy (635710) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209695)

I'm not TS cleared but just for argument's sake, how does one about getting a subscription to a classified journal? Do they mail it to you? Is it in one of the black pastic bags like my "gentleman's" magazine? Is it an electronic system? Internet? Are the little cards that fall out classified too? Etc etc.

Re:Subscription? (1)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209753)

The most clever way of doing it is to send it electronically in encoded form--and then leave it to the codebreakers who read the Journal to decode it ;)

Re:Subscription? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16210107)

fedex

Re:Subscription? (1)

(H)elix1 (231155) | more than 7 years ago | (#16211067)

how does one about getting a subscription to a classified journal? Do they mail it to you?

Inter-office mail?

Re:Subscription? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16224125)

You would need a NDA (non disclosure agreement) the approrpriate security clearance, and the need to know. For instance where i work, i need to be escorted in because i only have a secret clearance, and the area is for top secret and yankee white, us. presidential stuff. but most of the people cleared to do their job in the area, cannot know what i work on specifically, as they are cleared, but do not have a need to know.

YUO FAIL IT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209749)

ope8Ating systems

You can tell they're geeks.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209881)

"Boners Wanted"

Indexes to NSA Publications Declassified and Onlin (1)

rk077346 (1006263) | more than 7 years ago | (#16209937)

Congratulations NSA, this journal really good to the people who want the information about Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). People can take this journal as a reference of cryptographic topics. Especially for the student who learn about the data security. This journal should be done early, but now still not to late. I hope there is more jurnal will be published by the FOIA.

so when will memorial services be held (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16209975)

for the successful FOIA requester?

Look at the reading list! (List of Books Reviewed) (1)

SallyShears (451561) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210113)

Use the links to get the indexes... In the by-title list in the B's is a whole series Book Review: (title). I believe most of the books are plain old published books. For anyone interested in the history of this stuff, it's interesting to see what books got enough attention to get reviewed here. I think it could be a very interesting reading list! Of course, we've all read David Kahn's The Codebreakers, right?

so... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16210133)

"Extraterrestrial Intelligence"

"Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

so basicly... Aliens DO exist?

Some titles are encrypted (5, Funny)

Black Sabbath (118110) | more than 7 years ago | (#16210589)

Some titles are obviously encrypted, such as:
    "Extraterrestrial Intelligence",
    "Key to the Extraterrestrial Messages"

which, when decyphered are:
    "IT lie alters electing Rex* in Terrae#",
    "Relax, see eager tits stroke thy master"

* Rex = latin for King
# Terrae = latin for Earth

One is obviously describing the manipulation of the electoral process and the other describes the appropriate response.

How to Make a FOIA Request (3, Informative)

El_nino_raj (1004995) | more than 7 years ago | (#16212043)

A FOIA request can be made for any agency record. This does not mean, however, that the Department of Justice will disclose all records sought. As noted above, there are statutory exemptions that authorize the withholding of information of a sensitive nature. When the Justice Department does withhold information from you, it ordinarily must specify which exemption of the FOIA permits the withholding. You should be aware that the FOIA does not require agencies to do research for you, to analyze data, to answer written questions, or to create records in order to respond to a request. Although, as discussed immediately below, certain information may be required from a FOIA requester, no special form is required by the Justice Department. Requests must be in writing, either handwritten or typed. While requests may be submitted by fax, most components of the Justice Department have not yet developed the capability to accept FOIA requests submitted through the World Wide Web. In order to protect your privacy as well as the privacy of others, whenever you request information about yourself you will be asked to provide either a notarized statement or a statement signed under penalty of perjury stating that you are the person that you say you are. You may fulfill this requirement by: (1) completing and signing Form DOJ-361 (2) having your signature on your request letter witnessed by a notary, (3) including the following statement immediately above the signature on your request letter: "I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed on [date]." If you request information about yourself and do not follow one of these procedures, your request cannot be processed. This requirement helps to ensure that private information about you will not be disclosed to anyone else. Likewise, files relating to another person regarding a matter the disclosure of which would invade that person's privacy ordinarily will not be disclosed. For example, if you seek information that would show that someone else (including even your spouse or another member of your immediate family) has ever been the subject of a criminal investigation -- or even was mentioned in a criminal file -- you will be requested to provide either: (1) a statement by that other person, authorizing the release of the information to you, that has been signed by that person and either was witnessed by a notary or includes a declaration made under penalty of perjury (using the language quoted in the preceding paragraph), (2) evidence that the subject of your request is deceased -- such as a death certificate, a newspaper obituary, or some comparable proof of death. Without the subject's consent or proof of death, in almost all cases the Justice Department will respond to a request made for information concerning another person's possible involvement in a law enforcement matter by stating that it will "neither confirm nor deny" the existence of responsive records. Such law enforcement information about a living person is released without that person's consent only when no personal privacy interest would be invaded by disclosing the information, such as when the information is already public or required to be made public, or when there is such a strong public interest in the disclosure that it overrides the individual's privacy interest. In making your request you should be as specific as possible with regard to names, titles, dates, places, events, subjects, recipients, the component(s) likely to maintain that record, etc. In addition, if you want records about a court case, you should provide the title of the case, the court in which the case was filed, and the nature of the case. If known, you should include any file designations or descriptions for the records that you want. You do not have to give a requested record's name or title, but the more specific you are about the records or types of records that you want, the more likely it will be that the Justice Department will be able to locate those records. For example, if you have been interviewed by a law enforcement component of the Justice Department (such as the FBI) in connection with a law enforcement investigation and you wish to request a copy of the interview report, your listing of the date and location of the interview, and the name of the interviewing agent and subject of the investigation, if known, will be helpful to the component in determining where to search and in determining which records respond to your request. Additionally, you should be aware that Justice Department components ordinarily will use the date upon which they begin a record search as the "cut-off" date for determining the records that are responsive to a FOIA request. In addition to the statements or information that already have been discussed, some components of the Justice Department require additional specific information in order to process a request for particular types of records. These special requirements are noted, where applicable, as part of the descriptions of components. When a Justice Department component receives your FOIA request, it ordinarily will send you a letter acknowledging the request and assigning it an initial request number for continuity and tracking purposes. If you do not provide the necessary information, the component will advise you of what additional information is required before further processing your request. Under certain circumstances you may be entitled to receive more information under the Privacy Act of 1974 (a separate federal statute) than under the FOIA. Under the FOIA, generally anyone can request access to any agency record. Privacy Act requests are more limited and can be made only by (a) U.S. citizens or aliens lawfully admitted for permanent U.S. residence, (b) who are seeking information about themselves, (c) which is in a system of records maintained under their names or other personal identifiers. Even if a request does not mention the Privacy Act, however, the Justice Department automatically treats requests as being made under both the FOIA and the Privacy Act whenever it is appropriate to do so. In this way, requesters receive the maximum amount of information available to them under the law.

Re:How to Make a FOIA Request (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16221345)

l2paragraph

Communication With Extraterrestrial Intelligence: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16214297)

One of the published documents in the index: Communication With Extraterrestrial Intelligence: http://www.nsa.gov/ufo/ufo00034.pdf [nsa.gov] Quoting from it: "And after we resolve our pressing scientific questions, it might be appropriate to make discreet inquiries as to how we could live in harmony and peace with our fellow man..." -- This made me LOL.

I and solved it for you Americans, so you don't need to ask any aliens for help on it. The answer is: Communication. Learn how to communicate better. You can't communicate with aliens if you don't have the simplest of understanding for your fellow man and species on this planet. Understanding and compassion of others is crucial. And by communication and compassion, I don't mean the George W(MD) Bush style diplomacy that consists entirely of sending battle fleets to bomb people and NOT TALKING to each other. If you want to avoid problems, you need to talk and solve the perceived injustices. Cosistent Paranoid delusions of WMD threats without any kind of proof is a sickness, and the current US government is very sick. There are no serious military threats to USA on this planet. Nobody benefits from attacking USA. The only motivation attackers have is REVENGE for what US military is doing abroad. Agressive and pre-emptive warfare is unnecessary, and resulting only in the creation of more terrorist threat to USA. Motivation for war of course lies in the US military corporations' self-interested profit seeking. This behaviour is sick and needs to stop.

To avoid species-wide catastrophies, it helps to look at bacteria on a dish. Some backteria poison each other. Some eat each other. But what forms a stable system that stays alive? Continuous self-mutilation of our planetary environment and species in pursuit of short term corporate profits is sick. Poisoning our environment, destroying our climate and driving nations to destructive, non-productive wars will not bring a higher civilization into existence. It will bring about our own destruction and decline. Humans on Earth are similar to the bacteria on the dish. We will drown in our own environmental destruction, waste and poisons unless we learn to cooperate globally. And to that end, USA needs to stop the short term corporate profit seeking through destructive wars. You have no enemies here but the ones you create yourselves through your deeds.

Interesting echoes! (1)

mveloso (325617) | more than 7 years ago | (#16215013)

Browsing through the titles is really fascinating, because it gives you a bit of what the NSA was working on, or what that particular researcher was thinking about. It can even, depending on the title, give you a bit of a window into how that particular researcher thinks.

To someone who has a clue, this stuff must be a gold mine. Heck, I read the "adam and eve" article, and found out that the US was decrypting Enigma messages all the way back in 1943...and that's in the brochure section. Just looking at the prevalence of traffic analysis in the historical documents shows how message volume can be an event indicator.

What I haven't found yet is any indication that the NSA was using its decrypting information in a counter-decryption sort of way. I haven't found a title that says "thwarting traffic analysis with coherent noise," or "generating false positives can be more useful than generating false negatives."

Then again, there are titles like "Assignment of Storage Space in Rapid-Access Memory Systems, 1957." Whoa, that's a long time ago to be thinking about storage in RAM.
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