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A Buckyegg Breaks Pentagon Rules

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the gotta-break-some-eggs-to-well-you-know dept.

137

Roland Piquepaille writes "Chemists from Virginia and California have cooked a soup of fullerenes which produced an improbable buckyegg. The egg-shaped structure of their 'buckyballs' was a complete surprise for the researchers. In fact, they wanted to trap some atoms of terbium in a buckyball "to make compounds that could be both medically useful and well-tolerated in the body." And they obtained a buckyegg which both violates some chemistry laws and the FIFA soccer laws which were used until the last World Cup. Read more for additional references and a picture of this buckyegg carrying metal molecules."

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137 comments

Wha? (4, Insightful)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256041)

Most confusing /. story blurb evar.

Re:Wha? (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256089)

Most confusing /. story blurb evar.

I'm sure that's not an easy thing to do given Slashdot's high standards. Usually, the confusion is often just bafflement over why it was posted in the first place.

Also, I've ignored Roland so long that I didn't realize he's posting for ZDNet now. I lost hope for Slashdot's editorial staff, I guess I really can't count on ZD to keep the riffraff editors away from them either.

Re:Wha? (5, Informative)

b0r1s (170449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256223)

Definitely above the average story, but should be within the grasp of many.

I was only confused until I realized that the Pentagon in the heading was the shape, not the structure/organization. Then it all made much, much more sense.

Re:Wha? (4, Insightful)

dgatwood (11270) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256319)

Indeed, neat story, terrible Slashdot writeup. If they had said: A Buckyegg Breaks the "Adjacent Pentagon Rule", it would have been much less confusing.

And I couldn't figure out what the heck world cup soccer had to do with buckyballs until I read the fine article, either.

Sometimes, I think the editors post these things just to make people so thoroughly confused that they'll click the article. Makes me wonder if they get a kickback from ads on the article page or something. :-D

Re:Wha? (1)

b0r1s (170449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256357)

No, it seems much more likely that the editor didn't fully understand it, so they didn't try to edit the incredibly confusing intro text.

Re:Wha? (3, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257147)

OMG, what a nightmarish thought! A second Potomac Puzzle Palace, adjacent the first?
That much bureaucratic inertia could slow Earth's rotation and really tear up the weather.

Re:Wha? (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256777)

I was only confused until I realized that the Pentagon in the heading was the shape, not the structure/organization. Then it all made much, much more sense.
Me too. Isn't It Great How Headings Are Capitalized in the English Language?-)

Re:Wha? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256329)

Thank God I'm not the only one... I thought it was that pot...

Re:Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256463)

Agreed, it is quite awful.

Do not click that link at the end! (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256043)

Leads to Rolands blog. He's whoring it again. Don't give him your clickthroughs.

Re:Do not click that link at the end! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257105)

I don't have a problem with the fact that he submits links to his weblog. The problem is that he understands too litle of the sufff he writes about to create a proper summary. This way he waste the time of many people.

Re:Do not click that link at the end! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257181)

I make my living doing nano/bio/chemical research in one of the well-known universities and read slashdot to keep up with more computer-related things. Please let me be the first to agree that Roland is uniquely unqualified to write/post the stories he does.

(yes I did research his background some time ago when I was first offended by his scientific wannabee-ness)

Re:Do not click that link at the end! (1)

radl33t (900691) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258165)

Roland submits fine articles and his summaries are no worse than anything else I read here. I visit his site frequently. I have a hard time believing he generates much cash from slashdot. If he does, kudos to him. I've clicked on about 5 adds total in the last 12 years.

Re:Do not click that link at the end! (1)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257769)

Not to mention the fact that there is a photo in the first link...identical to the one that Roland advertises in the second link.

- RG>

SimCity 2000 (5, Funny)

thisnow1 (882441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256065)

I've been replaying SimCity 2000 lately and that reads like one of the crazy ad-libbed thrown together random newspaper articles, but not quite as coherent.

I feel so dump (4, Interesting)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256067)

What field of science do I have study for how long to understand that summary?

Re:I feel so dump (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256217)

That would be chemistry. I've studied it independently for maybe a year, and I understood perfectly.

Re:I feel so dump (0, Troll)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256251)

To dumb to spell properly too it seems.

Re:I feel so dump (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256339)

I think you'll find that the poster above is TOO dumb.

Re:I feel so dump (1)

unitron (5733) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257063)

"To(sic) dumb to spell properly too it seems."

What does being mute have to do with the ability to spell?

Re:I feel so dump (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256263)

You have to study dumpster diving

Re:I feel so dump (1, Flamebait)

gabriel.dain (928879) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256473)

Chemistry, and high school is more than enough. We studied fullerenes in the first year of senior high school.Its not that hard.
I thought hackers and nerds were reknowned for their thirst for knowledge; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fullerenes [wikipedia.org]
C'mon; you couldn't even be bothered to look it up in wikipedia?

Re:I feel so dump (1)

ABoerma (941672) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256541)

You might have started by paying attention in your chemistry classes at secondary school. Really, it's not that hard.

None, for it is all about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256543)

Scientists have come up with a new way to celebrate Zombie-Christ Day.

Buckyegg hunts! Coming next Easter to a college physics lab near you!

Re:None, for it is all about... (1)

Punt3r (926089) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257531)

No, no... you must study Political Science.

"A. Buckyegg Breaks Pentagon Rules" ... I'm positive from the article title that it's a story about a rogue Pentagon insider. Of course I haven't read the article or summary yet.

Re:I feel so dump (1)

Aceticon (140883) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258181)

No, no, no - you're going at it all wrong.

All you have to do is balance the positive and negative energies in yourself so that you stop felling the need to understand the summary.

Nice... (5, Insightful)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256071)

Way to throw out a completely misleading headline there, Roland. "Pentagon Rules" makes it sound like some sort of government security issue. Add that to the barely intelligible article summary and we've got another bang-up article by the Pipsqueak blogger. At least he's back to linking his own shitty blog articles again, so we're further justified calling him out for his blatant slashvertisments. Zonk, either stop approving this shit, or give us a separate category for articles from Roland so we can remove them from our fucking front pages. Forget the stupid ajaxified comment system, I want to be able to filter articles based on submittor.

Re:Nice... (2, Interesting)

fozzy1015 (264592) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256111)

Fullerenes, sometimes called "buckyballs," are usually spherical molecules of carbon, named after the futurist R. Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome. The carbon atoms are arranged in pentagons and hexagons, so their structures can resemble a soccer ball. An important rule -- until now -- is that no two pentagons can touch, but are always surrounded by hexagons.

More interested about their experiements to put certain metals in buckyeyes for medical scanning. So is the idea of putting radioactive metals in fullerenes to 'insulate' what would normally be dangerous metals in the body?

Re:Nice... (1)

God Of Atheism (1003892) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256325)

Something like that it seems, but I understood that fullerenes are not too healthy for you either, although nothing is mentioned about that here. Still, my guess is that an egg-shaped buckyball would be less stable than a sphere-shaped one and thus more easily react with other compounds.

Re:Nice... (0, Offtopic)

headkase (533448) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256169)

You know, I read the article without noticing that it was yet another Roland article. At least I didn't go to his 'blog. And now after reading your comment I don't even feel like talking about the article anymore. Yay, fun times on /. . Your +5 Insightful is a community arrived at fsck you to Zonk despite his apparent lack of caring. Oh well I'm going to go browse somewhere else for a while.
Cheers.

Lame even for Roland the Plogger (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256183)

Even for Roland the Plogger, this is lame. Does he pay Slashdot to let him through, or what?

The mark of Roland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256255)

He uses the same template for every submission. Look whose blog is the first Google hit for "additional details and references" [google.com].

Hey Roland, don't you think it's about time you came up with a new phrase to link? You're in a bit of a rut.

Re:Nice... (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256581)

And? Had you read the summary it'd be clear to you we're talking about chemistry and that the pentagon rule obviously refers to the pentagons that appear in fullerenes. Even if you've never seen a fullerene there's the reference to the old football layout.

Am I the only who chuckled... (4, Funny)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256079)

.... when coming across the name of the scientist - Mrs Beavers? The jokes are endless. :)

Re:Am I the only who chuckled... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256139)

You pretty much are. I think most of the rest of us are over fifteen years old.

Re:Am I the only who chuckled... (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258467)

.... when coming across the name of the scientist - Mrs Beavers? The jokes are endless. :)

Hey, leave Beavers alone, they are Canada's national animal. Though not sure what that means now? :)

Pentagon rules? (1)

SecaKitten (925554) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256083)

Don't tell the Pentagon, or those science guys will be in Guantanamo!

Re:Pentagon rules? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256119)

> Don't tell the Pentagon, or those science guys will be in Guantanamo!

Totally off topic, but I need to vent. I visited family last week, 3 states away. Got into a conversation with my parents' bush-supporting neighbours about the whole iraq business and got called a conspiracy theorist after mentioning Guantanamo Bay.

Not because of anything to do with what's happening there, but the neighbours genuinely didn't believe guantanamo existed.

Ignorance worries me. /rantoveryoumaymodmedownnow

My understanding... (4, Interesting)

Toba82 (871257) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256093)

IANAOC (I am not an organic chemist), but the way I see it, previous buckyball compounds needed to have the soccer ball shape because of the number of free electrons in the molecular bond didn't allow the adjacent pentagon structure to exist. Is it possible that the shell may not have a neutral charge? The molecule within could compensate and that might allow this 'impossible' set of bonds to work.

Re:My understanding... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256157)

using acronyms doesn't help if you have to explain what it means

Re:My understanding... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257687)

So true. Please don't fucking bother with the cute acronym bullshit

Re:My understanding... (1)

itwerx (165526) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256199)

Is it possible that the shell may not have a neutral charge?

Certainly possible (IANAOC either) but I'm actually thinking this could also have implications for string theory (a horrible misnomer IMNSHO) if there is no charge as the deformation could then only be explained by the chemically uninvolved contents of the Bucky-egg.

Re:My understanding... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257737)

ISIDUYA (I'm sorry, I don't understand your acronyms) can you please point me to an acronym reference site? Thanks

Re:My understanding... (3, Informative)

zrobotics (760688) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256297)

I recently took college chem, and if I recall correctly, 'Buckyballs' can actually be made into tubes, which have been used in some nanotech applications. Geometrically, if you were to take a soccer ball/buckyball, cut it in half along the seams, and then add in alternating rows of hexagons and pentagons, it forms a tube with hemispherical ends. It's hard to explain, but here's a link: http://www.azom.com/details.asp?ArticleID=1295 (sorry, no html).

Considering the shape of these tubes, I wonder why an egg-shaped buckyball is so odd...it seems like a very short (i.e. 1-2 rows between the ends) buckytube would approximate an egg shape fairly well. If it is truly egg-shaped, then it isn't a buckyball at all as it isn't carbon-60, but rather is another form of carbon with an entirely different bonding pattern.

Re:My understanding... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256451)

Just wanted to point out that the "tubes" you are referring to are what are more commonly referred to as carbon nanotubes [wikipedia.org], i.e., the material people are envisioning using for the tether of a space elevator.

Re:My understanding... (1)

BKX (5066) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256689)

For future reference, HTML links are easy as balls to write and remember. You just toss in an anchor tag which looks like this (write this down):

Shit that isn't a link. <a href="http://www.whateverthefuck.com/buttfuck/your ass.html">Link Text Goes Here.</a> More shit that isn't a link.

Which will look like this on the page (but in the normal font):

Shit that isn't a link. Link Text Goes Here. [whateverthefuck.com] More shit that isn't a link.

See? Now wasn't that easy? In fact, wasn't that less extra typing than your lame apology for not using HTML? (And, yes, you got off light. This isn't 1999. You should know how to write an a tag.)

Re:My understanding... (iaaoc) (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256447)

i refuse to give roland any clickthroughs and thus didn't read the story but i do large molecule chemical research for a living so i have an idea what's going on here. you are on-target, any disparity in symmetry of a buckyball will cause odd strains to occur in the lattice which will surely cause a correspondingly non-symmetrical charge distribution on the molecule surface. the resulting charge separation may not qualify according to the classical definition of a 'polar molecule' but a dipole would be observed which would probably cause the molecules to mostly align at some lowered temperature similar to the molecular arrangement which occurs in an LCD display. as such, i would expect some charge separation on the surface but would not expect the molecule to maintain a non-neutral charge as a whole. Further, trapped molecules will no doubt respond to the native surface charge distribution but also note that thermal energy will also cause the trapped molecule(s) to likewise interact with the bulk carbon surface which will also affect surface charge.

Re:My understanding... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256645)

Grats, you are the only person in this thread who knows wtf this post is about. "Stuff that matters?"

Re:My understanding... (4, Funny)

IainMH (176964) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256711)

Just because you don't understand it, it doesn't mean it doesn't matter.

Re:My understanding... (2, Insightful)

IainMH (176964) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256729)

I don't think it's anything to do with charge. Each intersection of the picture of the molecule represents a carbon atom. Even when you break the isolated pentagon rule, each carbon atom is still only connected to 3 other carbon atoms - just like in graphite.

It's more to do with the angles those bonds are forced to take on by the structure. Having the other elements within the cage will allow different angles to occur.

Also, I think it's more likely that the chemists involved are inorganic. :-) Fullerenes are just a way of getting them to think about carbon again. ;-)

Re:My understanding... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257501)

IANAOC (I am not an organic chemist)


If you have to explain the acronym, what's the point of using it - or does this clarification that your not an organic engineer come up really really frequently?

The title is confusing... (0, Troll)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256097)

Bob Woodward is coming out with a new book about the Bush Administration, so the Pentagon is laying rotten eggs for everyone to see? No wonder there's so much swamp gas in Washington.

Ba-a-a-a (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256427)

When you capitalize "administration" like that, you look like a sheep. Stop it.

Re:Ba-a-a-a (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258169)

I wonder why Anonymous Cowards have this fascination with sheep? Either they can't sleep or they're thinking of their girlfriends out on the farm.

FIFA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256187)

...which both violates some chemistry laws and the FIFA soccer laws which were used until the last World Cup

Parse error: just too fucking stupid.

nano tubes (3, Interesting)

Blighten (992637) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256191)

This is actually a pretty interesting break-through, given that carbon nano-tubes (the discovery of bucky balls lead to the formations of them) are somewhat limited in their capabilities to form certain angles. I'm wondering how stable these 'deformations' are in accord to the whole system... as bucky balls are very stable.

CGB says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256209)

Worst... summary... ever.

Can't wait for the bucky chicken! (4, Funny)

Deflatamouse! (132424) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256225)

But this time we know the egg definitely came first!

Pedantic mode on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16258373)

Of course the egg came first. Dinosaurs were laying eggs long before there were chickens. And they weren't even the first.

A Buckyegg Breaks Pentagon Rules ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256321)

Buckyegg sat on a wall.
Buckyegg had a great fall.
All the Pentagon's horses and all the Pentagon's men
Couldn't put Buckyegg together again.

Can we remove Zonk? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256371)

I'm just noticing I don't like this anymore. Can his stuff be filtered or removed permanantly?

Am I one of the few that at least sorta understood (1)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256377)

Just so you know, no I didn't RTFA. Oh ya, and I can't guarantee anybody will understand this (even the people that know what buckyballs are) since I'm by no means a chemist, physicist, etc, and therefore there is a good chance I haven't got a clue what I'm talking about... you have been warned...

Am I one of the few that at least sorta understood?

Just myself being a nerd and having one day randomly stumbled upon "Buckyballs" (Buckminsterfullerene [wikipedia.org] - and this was actually before Wikipedia). If I remember right, the stuff is basically a bunch of carbon atoms arranged in hex shapes, then the edges of the hex's are stuck together and wrapped up to make a ball. Since the hex's are pretty much perfectly symetrical, the ball oughta stick together fairly evenly and make, for the most part, a perfect sphere.

This is where the article starts to mean something, because the buckyball they produced broke that perfect sphere, so I would assume either the side(s) of some of the hex's are longer than other sides on those hex's, or some of the side's are not connected at the vertices

Re:Am I one of the few that at least sorta underst (3, Informative)

bladesjester (774793) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256563)

Buckyballs are made of pentegon and hexagon formations of carbon atoms (look at a soccer ball. same basic pattern). What's different here is that two of the pentagons are touching, which scientists previously thought could not happen.

I first learned about buckyballs in my college chem classes back in 98 or 99 so I thought this article was actually pretty interesting.

yay Davis :D. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256379)

yay for UCD :D! boo for a miserable blog that never mentions why the pentagon has issiues with anything. again Cool science discovery and yay UCD :D!.

ain't really laws then are they? (1)

Delusionist (187003) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256493)

If they were such great "laws" then I guess they aren't really laws if they were broken and thus been proven wrong eh? ;)
I think they'd be better off calling them "hypothesis" or "theories" then since they obviously aren't "laws"... :P

Re:ain't really laws then are they? (1)

Aussie (10167) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256995)

Maybe they are more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

Stupid title, summary, and link... (0, Offtopic)

posterlogo (943853) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256525)

...Basically, the unholy trifecta which sucked the soul out of the original discovery made here. Bravo Slashdot, bravo.

Re:Stupid title, summary, and link... (1)

N. P. Coward (953833) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256695)

I have often in the past wondered what all the Piquepaille hubub was about. The implication that the Pentagon (U.S. Military) is governed by mere "rules" while FIFA (soccer) clearly makes immutable "Laws"? Now it's clear and and y'all were right.

Unpredictable (1)

presidentbeef (779674) | more than 7 years ago | (#16256683)

I find it funny that this unexpected and unpredicted result came from experiments attempting to find more predictable ways of making fullerenes.

article link & text (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16256759)

http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.las so?id=7891 [ucdavis.edu]

E-mail this story
Printable version
Improbable "Buckyegg" Hatched

September 28, 2006
        graphic: purple and blue balls inside an egg-shaped structure
        Buckyegg (Christine Beavers/graphic)

An egg-shaped fullerene, or "buckyball egg" has been made and characterized by chemists at UC Davis, Virginia Tech and Emory and Henry College, Va. The unexpected discovery opens new possibilities for structures for fullerenes, which could have a wide range of uses.

"It was a total surprise," said Christine Beavers, a chemistry graduate student working with Professors Alan Balch and Marilyn Olmstead at UC Davis. Beavers is first author on the paper, published this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Fullerenes, sometimes called "buckyballs," are usually spherical molecules of carbon, named after the futurist R. Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome. The carbon atoms are arranged in pentagons and hexagons, so their structures can resemble a soccer ball. An important rule -- until now -- is that no two pentagons can touch, but are always surrounded by hexagons.

The "buckyegg" compound was made by collaborating scientists at Virginia Tech, led by Professor Harry Dorn. They heated a mixture of carbon and other ingredients under special conditions to make a mixture of fullerenes, then shipped the products to UC Davis, where Balch's group worked on characterizing their structures.

When Beavers started to map out the structure, she found two pentagons next to each other, making the pointy end of the egg. Initially she thought that the results were a mistake, but she showed the data to Marilyn Olmstead, an expert on X-ray crystallography, and they decided that the results were real. The egg contains a molecule of triterbium nitride inside.

The experiment was actually part of a project to find new, more predictable ways to make fullerenes, Beavers said. The researchers were trying to make fullerenes with atoms of terbium, a metal from the lanthanide series of the periodic table, trapped inside. Metals similar to terbium are used as contrast agents for some medical scanning procedures. By putting these metals inside fullerenes, the researchers hope to make compounds that could be both medically useful and well-tolerated in the body.

The other authors on the research paper are Tianming Zuo and Kim Harich at Virginia Tech and James Duchamp at Emory and Henry College. Funding was provided by grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

How stable is this? (2, Interesting)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257029)

It looks like there's a lot of internal energy in such a system, especially when there is something inside. Couldn't you do some neat energy tricks with this?

Oops, WTF is that?! (1)

6Yankee (597075) | more than 7 years ago | (#16257103)

TFA: The experiment was actually part of a project to find new, more predictable ways to make fullerenes

...and then this happens. Back to the drawing-board, guys!

I guess that's the nature of science, though - it's the surprises that are most interesting.

Stupid blogs! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257151)

A link that links to a link that links to a link, which has "DIGG THIS!!!!" in screaming letters at the top? Could this be even more pathetic? Why doesn't slashdot just link to the actual story rather than letter other people generate ad revenue?

And, a wonderful statement "The carbon cage has a distinct egg shape due to the presence of a single pair of fused pentagons at one apex of the molecule,". Yet this picture, shows it from the side so you can't even tell what the hell they're talking about! Good job!

Roland Piquepaille Junk Science (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16257233)

Another Roland Piquepaille junk science article gets ad clicks again. This is the 3rd in a week. No more subscription money from me Slashdot, you were warned. Hope he is worth losing 33 users for.

Nice picture. (1)

wkitchen (581276) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258113)

> west
You have entered the laboratory.
> look
There is an image of the buckyegg here.
There is a door to the east.
> _

An appropriate response.. (1)

Frightening (976489) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258293)

..is hard to put in words.

First you have a very informative title, which got me wondering what kind of assasin/agent/geek would call himself buckyballs and annoy the Pentagon.
Then I got hit by this Jewel:

Chemists from Virginia and California have cooked a soup of fullerenes which produced an improbable buckyegg.
and I felt like a new man. There's a name for this kind of catch-phrase whoring, I just can't remember it right now.

Then I realised it wasn't over yet. submitter was just getting warmed up. Fifa, eggs (get it? balls and eggs?) and plenty more to come. All you have to do is follow the link to..you guessed it! Roland's blog!

I'm sorry, but trolling becomes mandatory in these circumstances. If we don't troll insightfully, what meaning does democracy have?
LAME

Sounds like Nanotech (1)

xate (784379) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258421)

I don't want any nano molecule cages floating around in my blood stream. Cancer could only get worse with wierd stuff like this in medical use, right?

What do you think they'll be useful for? (1)

Telastyn (206146) | more than 7 years ago | (#16258537)

No offense to PHDs involved, but wouldn't the eggs be very useful because of their inherent lack of symmetry, similarly to how water is useful because one side is very electro-negative? Depending on the properties of the contained metal, I imagine the eggs would produce very similar effects.
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