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Making Computer Memory From a Virus

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the at-the-speed-of-sick dept.

196

An Ac writes, "By coating 30-nanometre-long chunks of tobacco mosaic virus with platinum nanoparticles, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have created a transistor with very fast switching speed. They say it could eventually be used to make memory chips for MP3 players and digital cameras. A device fitted with such a virus-chip would access data much more quickly than one using flash memory."

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196 comments

until you catch the virus (5, Funny)

Loconut1389 (455297) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318197)

What if I drop the thing and cut myself on the memory? Will I get songs stuck in my head forever?

Re:until you catch the virus (3, Funny)

idkk (414241) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318209)

Yes - and they will be faster than normal!

Re:until you catch the virus (5, Funny)

Nocturnal Deviant (974688) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318561)

so you mean Metallica will sound like the chipmunks in your head for eternity....oh great "SANATARIUM" screamed by Alvin, Simon, and Theodore......

Re:until you catch the virus (1, Flamebait)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318933)

I doubt that very much. A transistor with 100 microseconds switching speed is at least an order of magnitude slower than the original ck722 transistor from the early 1950's.

Doesn't anybody ever actually read these links? Oh wait, this is /.

--
Cheers, Gene

Re:Virus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16319071)

What were you thinking? Spraying Lysol around your computer! Are you nuts!?

Nothing can stop Nazi Pope (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318211)

Hi kids, Benedict XVI the Nazi Pope here. Remember to crush the Jews, Islamists, and homosexuals. Thank you and God bless.

Re:Nothing can stop Nazi Pope (-1, Offtopic)

zeropointburn (975618) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318217)

Good to know you're on the job, Pope Palpatine. Now quit posting AC so we know who to bash in return.

Re:Nothing can stop Nazi Pope (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318475)

If crushing jews and homosexuals are signs of nazism, wouldn't your average everyday islamist be as nazi as the most radical firebrand Hitlerjugend you ever could find during the second world war?

Buzzzzzwords! (3, Insightful)

tygerstripes (832644) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318223)

Tobacco, virus, nanotech... oh my!

I can't wait to see how quickly this tech is misunderstood by politicians and eco-warriors!

Last time (3, Funny)

jlebrech (810586) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318229)

The last time I had a virus, I ended up with less memory.

Designer Viruses - extreme weirdness (2, Funny)

spineboy (22918) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318375)

I can't wait until designer prankster viruses come out. Imagine that instead of becoming sick, weird things happened to people. They might really! stink for a day, have their tongue turn numb, develop inappropriate laughter, only want to eat orange colored food, etc.

Might be kinda of fun - it would be like gold(?) kryptonite, but for people. Gold (I think) kryptonite had weird unpredictable effects of Superman. It might make the world a little more fun. Imagine going to some very stuffy conservative place, and everyone was burping all day long.
Abuse potential would be rampant though. Someone from here might want to design a strain to make reallllllly hot chicks want to have sex with smelly fat geeks.

Great (5, Funny)

arun_s (877518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318231)

If you've got any illegal MP3's, your player kills you.
Judge, jury and executioner all in one!

Future trends... (5, Funny)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318533)

If you've got any illegal MP3's, your player kills you.
Judge, jury and executioner all in one!


So what you are hypothesizing is that in a few years we will see a Microsoft Zune or iPods with Sony EbolaFlash® memory chip technology.

Ethical concerns (-1, Redundant)

gnool (1005253) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318233)

This raises an ethical concern for me. I think we should be asking ourselves "Is it really ok to subvert lifeforms like this for our own use?"

Re:Ethical concerns (5, Informative)

jginspace (678908) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318269)

This raises an ethical concern for me. I think we should be asking ourselves "Is it really ok to subvert lifeforms like this for our own use?"


Most would consider a virus to be non-living. See Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus [wikipedia.org]

Re:Ethical concerns (3, Funny)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318351)

"Is it really okay to subvert ' lifeforms ' like this?"

After all, they are trumpeting speed, but won't the legendary instability of the biological world come into view?

"Ooh, look. My memory mutated. It wasn't intelligently designed."

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

hotdiggitydawg (881316) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319025)

Even if the memory did mutate, I'd bet London to a brick it'd still throw fewer errors than the RAM in this piece of s### Dell box...

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

craagz (965952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318721)

WEll there are already so many other places where viruses are used by humans. this is jsut another way. Bacteria are also used..case in point Lacto bacillus.

Re:Ethical concerns (2, Funny)

Sushhh (991088) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318839)

Most would consider a virus to be non-living.

Ah, so virii are like zombies! ...No, I mean, like dead zombies! ...No, wait...

Re:Ethical concerns (2, Interesting)

witte (681163) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318893)

What, you mean like killing animals for food ? (Don't get me wrong - I like dead animal chunks for diner.)
Or having wild animals evolve into domesticated shadows of their former selves just to cater to our emotional needs ?
Or breeding/engineering tomatoes/cows/dolphins that are bigger/juicier/smarter ?
IMO nothing new, really. It's basically just a matter of disccusing which methods of "improvement" are ethically acceptable.
(And even this is circumstantial. In times of crisis, ethics == luxury.)

I'm more concerned about developing self-replicating hybrid tech (the whole mutation/evolution meme).
The thing is, that's exactly where money is to be made. So I guess it will happen eventually. And at some point it will go horribly wrong. And no lessons will be learned.

Yeah, I think that everyday... (5, Funny)

hummassa (157160) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318273)

as I lunch some tenderloin with bacon and after, when I watch TV on my leather couch while drinking some beer. And cheese. :-)

Re:Ethical concerns (4, Funny)

CosmeticLobotamy (155360) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318277)

I think we should be asking ourselves "Is it really ok to subvert lifeforms like this for our own use?"

I'd answer, but my mouth is full of animal and vegetable lifeform. It's delicious.

Re:Ethical concerns (-1, Redundant)

theshibboleth (968645) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318303)

Yes, won't someone please think of the virii!

Re:Ethical concerns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318603)

I will. My rates are very reasonable. $42/hr USD to think of a virus. Discount rates for multi-viruses or multi-virii. Please contact for more details.

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

afa (801481) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318315)

This raises an ethical concern for me. I think we should be asking ourselves "Is it really ok to subvert lifeforms like this for our own use?"
Spare it, please! Just have a count of how many lifeforms have been 'subvertted' for our own use. Hints: your daily food is a good point to start with.

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

gnool (1005253) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318569)

I wasn't saying "this isn't ok", I was *asking* "is this ok?" I wanted to get the critical thought flowing and read some opinions about this. Most people have pointed out that we "subvert" plant and animals all the time, to eat them. I think this is ok, as long as the suffering for the animals involved is kept to a minimum. I also think it's ok to kill bacteria & whatnot that cause human suffering and illness, and within reason to use bacteria for our own purposes (for good, not for evil), etc. My initial question comes from my philosophy about living creatures, which is that everything has a right to live it's own life, free from human exploitation - everything doesn't exist solely for human consumption. Perhaps I'm taking this to an unreasonable extreme applying this to virii, which is why I asked my original question in the first place :-)

Re:Ethical concerns (2, Insightful)

Xiph1980 (944189) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318631)

I wasn't saying "this isn't ok", I was *asking* "is this ok?" I wanted to get the critical thought flowing and read some opinions about this. Most people have pointed out that we "subvert" plant and animals all the time, to eat them. I think this is ok, as long as the suffering for the animals involved is kept to a minimum. I also think it's ok to kill bacteria & whatnot that cause human suffering and illness, and within reason to use bacteria for our own purposes (for good, not for evil), etc. My initial question comes from my philosophy about living creatures, which is that everything has a right to live it's own life, free from human exploitation - everything doesn't exist solely for human consumption. Perhaps I'm taking this to an unreasonable extreme applying this to virii, which is why I asked my original question in the first place :-)

Humans are part of the animal kingdom like any other animal is. We need to eat and need to live.
To do this, certain sacrifices need to be made. If a lion kills for its lunch, he really doesn't think about wether or not the creature aimed for has pain or not. He kills as fast as possible so he can eat as fast as possible, because the hyena's are close to take his food from him.
In this aspect we are much more gentile towards the animals we use for food. We already do much to lower the "terror aspect" that cattle has to endure at the end of their life. No matter though how much we try, there always will be that pain and suffering.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that your philosophy about life, or as you say it: "everything has a right to live it's own life, free from human exploitation" might be stained about that you apparently think that we are much different from other animals. We are not. We love as other animals. We fight as other animals, and we wage war as other animals. We cheat, bribe, and make sacrifices, just as (m)any other animal.

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318653)

So you think everything has a right to live its own life, yet you also think it's okay to eat them?

How is it okay to kill and eat the animals, but not okay to have them suffer beforehand? I don't like being cruel, but it's really stupid saying that it's okay to kill something, but not okay to torture it. I think I'd prefer to experience pain for a little while (as long as there was no serious physical damage) than be killed..

And yes, it's really dumb to try to consider the emotional and social problems that a virus will experience when you take advantage of it.

Re:Ethical concerns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16319143)

My reply is to state that I believe that nothing has an inherent right to life. But if you go there, you have to ask yourself, "what is alive?"

Is a bacterium alive? A viral cell? A foetus (or spermatozoa)?

Where do you draw the line on this?

Every living thing has a right to die, on the other hand...

Re:Ethical concerns (1)

saforrest (184929) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319147)

My initial question comes from my philosophy about living creatures, which is that everything has a right to live it's own life, free from human exploitation

Um, okay, but...

Most people have pointed out that we "subvert" plant and animals all the time, to eat them. I think this is ok, as long as the suffering for the animals involved is kept to a minimum.

With respect, I think you're looking for a way to weasel out of some sort of moral guilt you might have about "suffering", whatever that means when applied to organisms in general.

Look, as biological creatures we are responsible every death for the death of thousands of other biological creatures. Every time you swallow a morsel of food, of whatever sort, your stomach acid destroys thousands of bacteria. This is true of you, me, and the Buddhist monks who go about barefoot so as not to step on any bugs. We can't escape it.

You can't say that everything has a right to live its own life, and yet claim that we can kill whatever we want as long as it doesn't suffer. If suffering is bad in itself, then death is far, far worse.

Re:Ethical concerns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318453)

Don't we already "subvert" other lifeforms like cattle for food and horses for riding? Is this really that different?

Re:Ethical concerns (4, Funny)

famebait (450028) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318609)

This raises an ethical concern for me. I think we should be asking ourselves "Is it really ok to subvert lifeforms like this for our own use?"

Yes, it's a slippery slope. If we allow this, before you know it they will be using higher life forms like plants or even animals to serve human needs.

Self replicating memory is good! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318239)

The people assembling devices with this memory should not forget to install a slot to feed the viruses so they can replicate and expand memory as time goes on.

mp3 players don't ned it (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318257)

Soemthing that typically reads 128kbps doesn't exactly require heaps of bandwidth.

Why isn't this suitable for general purpose memory, or cache?

Re:mp3 players don't ned it (4, Insightful)

dk-software-engineer (980441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318517)

Soemthing that typically reads 128kbps doesn't exactly require heaps of bandwidth.
It does when I update it, or just use it for generic data-transfer.

Re:mp3 players don't need it (1)

aadvancedGIR (959466) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318703)

I see two possible reasons to use the MP3 player in the abstract:
1- it is a non-volatile RAM. Flash is OK, but it has some drawbacks, in particular with the need to erase a full block to revert a 0 into a 1, which is quite long (several ms with the one I worked with). Of course, for a MP3 player, it's not a big problem since the data dosn't change that often.
2- the author can't tell the difference.

So I would tend to agree with you. Either way, MP3 player is very unlikely to be the initial target for any kind of new memory, in particular fast one since what they need is more on the line of something cheap with low power needs (the evolution I saw in telephones was the introduction of mirror bit technology: a slightly slower flash that had twice the capacity for the same price).

Logical evolution (4, Interesting)

zeropointburn (975618) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318265)

DNA on silicon has already been done. Why not use a virus as scaffolding for memory, while we're at it? Granted, the virus' surface proteins are a functional part of the transistor. Given that we can already attach complex proteins (well, acids such as DNA) to silicon, there shouldn't be much trouble finding a method for similar tricks here. In other words, this is more practiceable than it sounds at first. I do wonder whether the virii or silicon traces are more resistant to heat, vibration, and radiation, though.

This thread makes Jamie Lee Curtis sad. (1)

Channard (693317) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318287)

I hear she's campaigning not to have have this technology used in any russian research vessels.

Very fast switching speed???? (3, Insightful)

Maddog Batty (112434) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318325)

100 microsecond switch speed is very very slow for modern transistors (mentioned in article). What am I missing here? Is there a mistake in the article?

Re:Very fast switching speed???? (3, Funny)

noigmn (929935) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318693)

But think about how good it will be when they can do these things with higher level lifeforms. For instance if we could use people to switch things and their brains to do complex calculations and somehow network them together using some form of complex communication made up of various sequences of sound...

Re:Very fast switching speed???? (1)

aadvancedGIR (959466) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318759)

Form the rest of the article (us instead of ms to display and image), that "100 us" switch time is likely to be wrong by at least 6 orders of magnitude (or else the tech is pointless since it couldn't be scalled down in the future).

Re:Very fast switching speed???? (1)

phage434 (824439) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318987)

Apparently they are comparing this transistor speed to the speed of flash memory transistors, which are remarkably slow. I would definitely not get excited about the raw speed of these devices. It is interesting to see discrete biomolecular structures used as an engineering vehicle, and we'll see a lot more of this soon.

Ya know what I'm sick of.. (4, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318339)

the "basic research == future product" meme. For fuck sake. I bet if you were to go back the last 5 years and collect up all these articles and do a little survey of whether or not ANY of these bullshit descriptions of future products have come to pass you would find that NONE of them have. Why? Because if you discover something that could be turned into a product, you don't tell the world; you go find a venture capitalist and make the damn product.

MOD PARENT UP! (1)

MLopat (848735) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318409)

Agreed! Finally, someone else that sees through the bullshit. The science is great, but touting future uses, especially something as specific as an MP3 player, is ridiculous; leave the applications to the engineers.

Re:Ya know what I'm sick of.. (3, Insightful)

teslar (706653) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318523)

You obviously have a point, but I think this (and all previous instances you refer to) is just a spin to keep funding bodies and marketing droids happy. Use your research to answer some fundamental philosophical questions on life, the universe and everything or whatever and you'll get a big yawn. Say that you're using nanotech, use the words "faster memory", "ipod" and "could replace flash" in one sentence, basically make dollar signs appear in the marketing droids' eyes, and you get to be in the news everywhere, people notice you and the next grant application should go a lot smoother.

as run through the academic BS generator (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318683)

That's like that physics article on quantum teleportation. maybe a few hundred people on the planet know anything about it to make heads nor tails from it. They fire up the academic BS generator, whip up an 84 page PDF with weird looking graphs, apply for more funding. Who's to know at the government ministry of spending cash any different?? Looks "academic" to them! Sounds important! Every six months, repeat, add in the new buzz words. Now anything with "security" in it, etc, will sell to the government."secure crypto predictive teleported analysis, now with improved nanoscale!" BS. Ya, right, *sure* it is! Then they go to conferences and once the doors are closed they have the hookers and booze sent in and laugh about stuff and think up the next cycle worth of BS.

Re:Ya know what I'm sick of.. (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318727)

I know this. You know this. Everyone on Slashdot knows this. So why do the, *ahem*, "editors" continue to accept stories that propagate this meme?

Therapy may help you dude (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318859)

Well, if you did some basic research .. and it's novel .. but you can't convince venture capitalists. The only thing left is to announce it and hope someone else sees something you missed, is willing to fund you to do more, or at the very least gets some use out of it. I do agree they should avoid over hyping the damn things though .. cause that's detrimental.

Re:Ya know what I'm sick of.. (1)

ppz003 (797487) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319129)

As someone who is working in a reseach group with people who are actually doing this stuff (but not myself)...

This research is beyond "basic". My own reseach group has developed methods for coating tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with platinum, palladium, nickle, (a few other metals I can't remember) and also silica with metals on top. These things are 18 nm diameter rods that are 300 or more nm long (natural TMV is 300, modified varients can be up to 500nm or so). I believe it was a group in Florida that was sucessful making tiny oxygen sensors using the method our group developed for coating the things. And right now my classmate is working on aligning them in bulk to make wires.

This field is very hot and many groups are working on ways of making these things viable for sensors, wires and the like.

I may not know what technology these TMV will bring us, but they have already brought some things to the table.

who's on first? (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318371)

"you have a virus in memory"

"i know, my memory is made of viruses"

"no, i mean, there is a memory resident virus on your computer"

"no, the memory resides on the viruses"

"let me rephrase: your memory, made of viruses, has a virus"

"so you're telling me i have more viruses... so i have more memory? yeah!"

"no, this is a bad thing, you don't want viruses on your computer"

"you told me last week i want the most memory i can on my computer, and that's made of viruses"

"yes... i mean no, i mean..." (smacks forehead)

Life is about to become more complicated (1)

SanderDJ (1004445) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319061)

From some security web site: "Some scanners claim to be able to disinfect viruses in memory, and they may even succeed in doing so, but it is generally highly recommended that you first make sure that there is no virus in memory before you attempt to clean your computer." Now that viruses can not only be in memory, but be memory itself, it's time to rewrite many books and web pages, before a lot of damage is done.

what's the use? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318393)

will your mp3's start playing a few microseconds faster when you select play? or will we be able to play mp3's in huge bitrates we'll never ever use?

I, for one, (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318413)

I, for one, welcome our new cybernetic exoskeleton virus overlords

Not suitable for Macs (2, Funny)

SanderDJ (1004445) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318493)

Steve (a veganist) won't have any of this. Living creatures serving as memory. Yuk!

Steve Jobs is NOT a vegan! (1)

Slithe (894946) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318889)

From Wikipedia:

Jobs is not a vegetarian or vegan as is often claimed. Although he does not eat mammalian meat, he reportedly eats fish from time to time. This is known as pescetarianism [wikipedia.org].

Lifespan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318505)

If they're planning to use this to make memory chips, based on a living organism, it stands to reason that such a chip would have a "lifespan" associated with it.

Dual-purpose memory (2, Funny)

StringBlade (557322) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318545)

Not only does it run faster than conventional memory, it's an anti-smoking chip: if it catches you smoking at the computer it infects your cigar/cigarette with itself [wikipedia.org]

virus-based memory ? (1)

l3v1 (787564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318563)

Now this gives a whole new meaning to biological warfare, chip-targeting bioweapons on the rise.
 

In other news ... (1)

JumpingBull (551722) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318601)

What about the children?
What if it becomes sentient?
We would have:
  • A Cigarette That Spies!
  • Terrorist Tomato Plots!
  • Substitute Foods Made of Foam Rubber!

No, wait, that last item already happened....

The first? (3, Funny)

gmby (205626) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318637)

So is this the first analog computer virus?

Your search - "analog computer virus" - did not match any documents.

Looks like google agrees.

All this 'biocomputing'... (0, Offtopic)

Wizard052 (1003511) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318639)

...reminds me of an article I read a while ago of some researchers somewhere who had been able to connect a small chip to a cockroach! They were even able to manipulate the cockroach to an extent- move it's legs..etc passing some commands to the chip-effectively rendering the cockroach to become a robot...that was just amazing. Does anyone know of this? I'd love to know more details on this and how it turned out eventually... ..anyone with links to this?

Copyright violation (2, Funny)

Sir Homer (549339) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318685)

If the virus starts replicating, are they commiting copyright violation?

How will the RIAA sue? I'm sure they will find a way.

MP3 player memory for Zune? (2, Funny)

pete.com (741064) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318705)

It will come pre-loaded with viral material saving you the time and effort of gathering it yourself.

It's not a virus... (1)

MrNaz (730548) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318785)

...it's a feature! Although, doesn't Microsoft have a patent on calling a virus a product?

Have you thought of the implications of all this (1)

noigmn (929935) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318793)

Like imagine accidently killing the memory while cleaning. Or the overclockers feeding their memory stuff to help it clone itself.

Smoke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318829)

By coating 30-nanometre-long chunks of tobacco mosaic virus with platinum nanoparticles, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have created a transistor with very fast switching speed.

You mean smoking speed?

Making Computer Memory From a Virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318833)

How perverse!

for use with VLIW CPUs? (4, Interesting)

ratherpedestrian (764909) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318871)

Chemical name of Dahlemense Strain of Tobacco Mosaic Virus is 3rd longest in English language, apparently (not sure I'd want to have a conversation with anyone who thinks this is really a valid English word, but anyway):

        acetylseryltyrosylserylisoleucylthreonylserylproly lserylglutaminyl-
        phenylalanylvalylphenylalanylleucylserylserylvalyl tryptophylalanyl-
        aspartylprolylisoleucylglutamylleucylleucylasparag inylvalylcysteinyl-
        threonylserylserylleucylglycylasparaginylglutaminy lphenylalanyl-
        glutaminylthreonylglutaminylglutaminylalanylarginy lthreonylthreonyl-
        glutaminylvalylglutaminylglutaminylphenylalanylser ylglutaminylvalyl-
        tryptophyllysylprolylphenylalanylprolylglutaminyls erylthreonylvalyl-
        arginylphenylalanylprolylglycylaspartylvalyltyrosy llysylvalyltyrosyl-
        arginyltyrosylasparaginylalanylvalylleucylaspartyl prolylleucylisoleucyl-
        threonylalanylleucylleucylglycylthreonylphenylalan ylaspartylthreonyl-
        arginylasparaginylarginylisoleucylisoleucylglutamy lvalylglutamyl-
        asparaginylglutaminylglutaminylserylprolylthreonyl threonylalanylglutamyl-
        threonylleucylaspartylalanylthreonylarginylarginyl valylaspartylaspartyl-
        alanylthreonylvalylalanylisoleucylarginylserylalan ylasparaginylisoleucyl-
        asparaginylleucylvalylasparaginylglutamylleucylval ylarginylglycyl-
        threonylglycylleucyltyrosylasparaginylglutaminylas paraginylthreonyl-
        phenylalanylglutamylserylmethionylserylglycylleucy lvalyltryptophyl-
        threonylserylalanylprolylalanylserine

Re:for use with VLIW CPUs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16318953)

I once got a result from the

$ fortune

command in Linux, and this is what I got:

methionylglutaminylarginyltyrosylglutamylserylleuc ylphenylalanylalanylglutamin-
ylleucyllysylglutamylarginyllysylglutamylglycylala nylphenylalanylvalylprolyl-
phenylalanylvalylthreonylleucylglycylaspartylproly lglycylisoleucylglutamylglu-
taminylserylleucyllysylisoleucylaspartylthreonylle ucylisoleucylglutamylalanyl-
glycylalanylaspartylalanylleucylglutamylleucylglyc ylisoleucylprolylphenylala-
nylserylaspartylprolylleucylalanylaspartylglycylpr olylthreonylisoleucylgluta-
minylasparaginylalanylthreonylleucylarginylalanylp henylalanylalanylalanylgly-
cylvalylthreonylprolylalanylglutaminylcysteinylphe nylalanylglutamylmethionyl-
leucylalanylleucylisoleucylarginylglutaminyllysylh istidylprolylthreonylisoleu-
cylprolylisoleucylglycylleucylleucylmethionyltyros ylalanylasparaginylleucylva-
lylphenylalanylasparaginyllysylglycylisoleucylaspa rtylglutamylphenylalanyltyro-
sylalanylglutaminylcysteinylglutamyllysylvalylglyc ylvalylaspartylserylvalylleu-
cylvalylalanylaspartylvalylprolylvalylglutaminylgl utamylserylalanylprolylphe-
nylalanylarginylglutaminylalanylalanylleucylarginy lhistidylasparaginylvalylala-
nylprolylisoleucylphenylalanylisoleucylcysteinylpr olylprolylaspartylalanylas-
partylaspartylaspartylleucylleucylarginylglutaminy lisoleucylalanylseryltyrosyl-
glycylarginylglycyltyrosylthreonyltyrosylleucylleu cylserylarginylalanylglycyl-
valylthreonylglycylalanylglutamylasparaginylarginy lalanylalanylleucylprolylleu-
cylasparaginylhistidylleucylvalylalanyllysylleucyl lysylglutamyltyrosylasparagi-
nylalanylalanylprolylprolylleucylglutaminylglycylp henylalanylglycylisoleucylse-
rylalanylprolylaspartylglutaminylvalyllysylalanyla lanylisoleucylaspartylalanyl-
glycylalanylalanylglycylalanylisoleucylserylglycyl serylalanylisoleucylvalylly-
sylisoleucylisoleucylglutamylglutaminylhistidylasp araginylisoleucylglutamylpro-
lylglutamyllysylmethionylleucylalanylalanylleucyll ysylvalylphenylalanylvalyl-
glutaminylprolylmethionyllysylalanylalanylthreonyl arginylserine, n.:
                The chemical name for tryptophan synthetase A protein, a
                1,913-letter enzyme with 267 amino acids.
                                -- Mrs. Byrne's Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure, and
                                      Preposterous Words

greenpeace (1)

Bizzeh (851225) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318873)

i wonder how long it is before greenpeace make up some claim the virus is a living creature, and that this is cruelty to animals.

And when the virus dies? (1)

bluesguy_1 (705652) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318907)

Do I go to the doctor and ask him for some anti-anti-viral medicine to fix my broken mp3 player?

Apple is damned then! (1)

UrLordMafiu (911558) | more than 7 years ago | (#16318961)

Well if we are believe what Apple says about viruses, they cant get them, so this wont work with the iPod. THIS is an iPod killer! Wow!

God, I LOVE babbletech (1)

r_bertram42 (976855) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319033)

Now, if we just harness this transistor's energy to the warp drive, we can produce a warp bubble 3 times the size. And with just a few modifications to the quad-polar phaser array the computer will be able to crash much faster! ...

But it will still be full of viruses.

Temperature? (2, Insightful)

Plutonite (999141) | more than 7 years ago | (#16319099)

Even virus RNA and cell wall can disintegrate at high temps. Will my memory melt if the cooling is not perfect?

It's alive!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16319155)

So let me get this right... It's a virus meaning it lives.

How long is this going to live? - Do we need to feed it?

What happens if it mutates in your MP3 player? - I'm assuming the charts might become highly infectious.
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