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2006 Ig Nobel Prizes Awarded

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the best-of-the-worst dept.

167

davidwr writes "The Ig-Nobel Peace Prize went to Howard Stapleton for his groundbreaking research in teenager-repellent technology. D. Lynn Halpern won an award for research into why fingernails on a chalkboard are almost as annoying as teenagers. Ivan Schwab garnered his award for research into avian headacheology. Two french researchers cooked up a medal for spaghetti research. Read more about these and other prizes here and at the Improbable Research official web site. To those Slashdotters who were expecting an award, better luck next year."

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Aww... (5, Funny)

Jello B. (950817) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332789)

I thought my death clock would win this time... Maybe if I make a Smelloscope...

fap fposest (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16332791)

lol pee frewst

bird eyes? (4, Informative)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332849)

His research, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology, followed studies of head injuries in woodpeckers from the 1970s. The answer lies in how a woodpecker's skull and brain are arranged: the muscles around the sensitive brain tissues make the woodpecker's head function like a perfect shock absorber.

shouldn't that be Ornithology?

Re:bird eyes? (5, Funny)

Skidge (316075) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332933)

Maybe he started out researching injuries due to woodpeckers pecking out human eyes and one thing lead to another....

Re:bird eyes? (1)

muttsnutman (997560) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333979)

No, it was originally about how some people "Can't see the Wood for the trees..."

Re:bird eyes? (4, Informative)

ian_mackereth (889101) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333027)

Only eventually... he started out by wondering why woodpeckers' eyes don't pop out. (The nictating membrane tightens just before impact, if you're interested...)

Re:bird eyes? (1, Redundant)

Matt Edd (884107) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334457)

Parent should be +1 informative not +1 funny... unless it's +1 funny 'cause it's true.

Re:bird eyes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16334487)

Well, seeing as he is an Ophthalmologist, probably not.

wow, that was lame. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16332859)

Slashdot proves once again that it is full of rusty ugly nerds. thank god for kevin rose and digg

Re:wow, that was lame. (2, Informative)

chawly (750383) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333307)

A lot of AC posts is what I see on Slashdot. God has nothing to do with it - he is too far away to help you - even if he cared. You are an Anonymous Coward, sir - God doesn't want you.

Re:wow, that was lame. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16333675)

ok faggot

time to use my mod points! (3, Funny)

arun_s (877518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332873)

electronic teenager repellant: -1, Troll
work on the mystery of why fingernails being dragged down a blackboard produces an excruciating sound: -1, Stupid
how woodpeckers avoid headaches: +1, Interesting
why dry spaghetti breaks into more than one piece when it is bent: -1, Lame

Re:time to use my mod points! (5, Insightful)

anagama (611277) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332975)

electronic teenager repellant: -1, Troll

Unfair mod. Should be +5 fucking brilliant.
Now, if we can just herf all those thumpmobiles ....

Re:time to use my mod points! (-1, Offtopic)

Baloo Ursidae (29355) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332997)

The great thing about replying to a thread is that you disqualify yourself from moderating that thread, and lose your moderator points that you used on the thread already! You might have known this if you had read the moderator FAQ [slashdot.org] like you were told.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

superiority (892798) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333781)

Huh-what? First, he didn't actually moderate anything — it's a joke. Second, these people didn't publish their research here, so he couldn't moderate them if he wanted to.

You might have picked up on this if you had actually read the comment like you were supposed to before replying to it.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

Lex-Man82 (994679) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333843)

Slashdot becomes peer reviewed journal.

Worst experiment ever!

Re:time to use my mod points! (5, Funny)

grammar fascist (239789) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333009)

electronic teenager repellant: -1, Troll

Give it five years, and you'll be wondering how you can possibly get along without one.

Re:time to use my mod points! (5, Insightful)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333029)

why dry spaghetti breaks into more than one piece when it is bent: -1, Lame

    Apparently someone doesn't know how interesting this problem is. Feynman spent a lot of time on it. It's much, much harder than, say, showing that a tall, skinny brick structure will break 1/3 of the way up from the ground if it's slowly tipped to one side (or if a demolition charge makes it crumble). Though that research certainly isn't Nobel-winning stuff, it's a remarkably difficult problem with a lot of applications (including, methinks, applications to space-station engineering and probably nanostructures).

Re:time to use my mod points! (4, Informative)

arun_s (877518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333121)

Apparently someone doesn't know how interesting this problem is.
Very interesting indeed, it appears I have been too [sciencenews.org] hasty [psu.edu] .

Re:time to use my mod points! (4, Funny)

theonetruekeebler (60888) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334811)

it's a remarkably difficult problem with a lot of applications (including, methinks, applications to space-station engineering
Due respect, gard, but I'm not worried about whether my space station breaks into two pieces or three and I'm not going to spend much spare time trying to snap space stations in half. Any event such that my station is in N > 1 pieces has produced N - 1 too many pieces.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333155)

I'd have given it to the person who invented the cell phone ring tone that only kids can hear. Due to frequency types that most adults lose the ability to hear, only children know if their cell phone is ringing. It's supposedly quite useful in the classroom.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

arivanov (12034) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333249)

Most, but not all.

I am approaching 40 and can hear all the way to the 20KHz border. I know at least 5-10 more people who have comparable or better hearing after the age of 35.

So from my perspective both the ring and the repellent are flawed day one. None of them works as advertised.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333947)

And let's not forget the kids who are half deaf after listening to music at 120dB all day.

Re:time to use my mod points! (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334801)

I can still hear those supposedly only-heard-by-teenagers tones. When Radio 4 played it, a large number of people (some in their 60s!) called in and said they could still hear the 'Mosquito'. Certainly, the percentage of people over a certain age who can hear these frequencies falls off, but for the frequency this ring tone and the 'Mosquito' operates at, anecdotally, at least a third of people over 30 can still hear them perfectly well.

Getting replies like these... (3, Funny)

davidwr (791652) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333647)

+5 priceless

Re:time to use my mod points! (5, Funny)

brown-eyed slug (913910) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333657)

electronic teenager repellant: -1, Troll

No, it really works! I've seen no electronic teenagers round here...

Sorry.

Re:time to use my mod points! (5, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334113)

why dry spaghetti breaks into more than one piece when it is bent: -1, Lame

You seem to miss the significance of that research. Note that the article mentioned the physics Nobel price for big bang research. This spaghetti research is of course very related to the question of how the universe was created. After all, we know it was created by the FSM, and surely bending and breaking spaghetti was an integral part of the act of creation.

as colbert says... (-1, Flamebait)

AIM_is_t3h_sux (891192) | more than 7 years ago | (#16332953)

whoooo usa, usa! with the economy booming, bush might even win the nobel prize in economics

No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (5, Funny)

atomicstrawberry (955148) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333025)

The winner of the medicine prize got it for ground breaking research into curing intractible hiccups by sticking his finger up a patient's anus [newscientist.com] .

He also suggests that sex is the most potent cure for hiccups, but that won't really affect anyone on slashdot.

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (2, Funny)

cgenman (325138) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333131)

After the awards he was giving away kits with rubber gloves, lube, and directions. Does anyone have a scan of the directions? They went quickly, and I've had these hiccups for days...

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (4, Funny)

Dorceon (928997) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333157)

Now that's the kind of DRM we can all enjoy!

But... (2, Funny)

interactive_civilian (205158) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333527)

But, isn't that what DRM has always stood for?

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333603)

What sound do people on rollercoasters make? Hint: it's not Xbox 360.

In what room does your wii belong? Hint: It's not the lounge.

New tag: digitalrectalmassage (1)

infolib (618234) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334235)

n/t

They always said the anal (4, Funny)

The Creator (4611) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334447)

-ouge hole whas the answer to DRM.

Attention Mods! (1)

pixr99 (560799) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334643)

The parent post is utterly brilliant! Where are the mods?!

Digital? (1)

Toutatis (652446) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333639)

It isn't analog?

Re:Digital? (1)

superiority (892798) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333907)

As in "with your digits", digit meaning a finger or a toe.

Re:Digital? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16334135)

Woooosh!

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (2, Interesting)

renoX (11677) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333759)

So this means that the next time one's wife has the hiccup, you can suggest to her anal sex to cure the hiccup?

This would work best!

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333961)

He also suggests that sex is the most potent cure for hiccups, but that won't really affect anyone on slashdot.

It sounds like masturbation would work just as well.

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (1)

volpe (58112) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334509)

Which one had the hiccups? The doctor or the patient?

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (1)

Secrity (742221) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334561)

In San Francisco, you could probably find an anal massage by placing a red handkerchief in your left hip pocket and visiting the Lonestar Saloon or the Eagle Tavern.

Re:No mention for Digital Rectal Massage? (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334571)

Well I can stop my fiancee's hiccups by kissing her very passionately. Changes her breathing. Works every time. Mind you if I stuck my finger up her anus I'm pretty sure it would be me that was permanently cured of the condition known as living *smirk*.

Another teenager repellant (5, Insightful)

ringmaster_j (760218) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333215)

At Bathurst subway/streetcar/bus station in Toronto, they play classical (well, baroque actually) music on the PA to keep teenagers away. It seems to work quite well, actually. It's only at that station, and since classical music is only annoying to teens (at least to the point of forcing them from the building) it doesn't trouble other patrons. One caveat: if you (like me) are one of those Classical Punks- who follow their own rules, and wear all the lead-based makeup and penny loafers they want- it doesn't work.

Re:Another teenager repellant (3, Insightful)

JamesD_UK (721413) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333783)

They have one of those teenaged repellent devices at my local shop. It's been several years since I was a teenager and I can hear the noise perfectly well. It's not enough to stop me going into the shop if I really wanted to but it's sufficiently annoying that I now spend my money elsewhere. It doesn't really appear to have had too much effect on the teenagers who hang around on the street either - they don't have anywhere else to go.

Re:Another teenager repellant (1)

njdj (458173) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333867)

the teenagers who hang around on the street either - they don't have anywhere else to go.

Translation: they're too stupid or unimaginative to think of anywhere else to go, or anything to do except "hang around on the street".

Re:Another teenager repellant (1)

Bertie (87778) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334729)

Or they don't have the means, or the money.

Hanging around in the street isn't indicative of a lack of imagination. Many a rapper, breakdancer or graffiti artist learned their trade doing just that.

Re:Another teenager repellant (1)

badzilla (50355) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334379)

I tried to reduce the acoustic noise on one of my PCs since it was annoying the rest of the family. My first brilliant idea was to replace the PSU with a "quiet" one - instead of two small fans it has one larger and therefore quieter fan. I was pleased with the subsequent noise reduction until the kids complained it was "even louder now." Turns out the switching electronics in the PSU could be producing a high-pitched whistle but darned if I can hear it. I'm still trying to decide if the whistle is really there or whether the kids are seeing how long they can keep me fooled...

Re:Another teenager repellant (1)

Alioth (221270) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334831)

I've been building a switch mode power supply recently (to step 12 volts DC up to 170 volts DC), and the inductor will make a high pitched whistling noise - the frequency being the switch's frequency (and the more power you dump into it, the louder it gets).

The answer: ageism (4, Insightful)

Valacosa (863657) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333257)

Why is it something that could be offensive (like sex and violence in movies) is generally regarded as bad, whereas something designed solely to be offensive (The Mosquito) is regarded as a good thing?

Mr Stapleton deserves the Ig Nobel.

Re:The answer: ageism (1)

Teppic_52 (982950) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333995)

Being in the security industry I learned of this device some time ago (early this year), and I find it fucking abhorrent.
Don't get me wrong, the systems that can confuse and disorient burglars etc using similar technologies I have no problems using, but to purposefully induce discomfort in anyone under the age of ~25, in a public place, for no explicit reason?
Apart from that, I am privy to the number of complete fukwits who work in the industry, and probably don't fit a timeclock, leaving these things on all the time.

I find it, at the least, morally reprehensible and am supprised it does not contravene some kind of human rights law.

Re:The answer: ageism (1)

badfish99 (826052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334069)

Most places have got laws against things like "causing a public nuisance" or noise pollution.

On the other hand, if I were the sort of teenager who hangs around street corners, and I were annoyed by a thing like this, I would think smashing it with a brick would be my first line of defence.

Re:The answer: ageism (4, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334343)

Being in the security industry I learned of this device some time ago (early this year). . .

I first experienced it more than 40 years ago; so I'm not sure why it's news now. Drove me fucking nuts. Store that used it is now bankrupt and a parking lot.

KFG

Peace Prize? (1)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333273)

Since when are Peace Prizes given out to people who invent phyological/sonic/whateveryouwanttocallit weapons?? What's next, Peace Prize for the nuclear bomb? They certainly bring peace...

Re:Peace Prize? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16333293)

Judging by history...

Yes, yes it does.

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

nametaken (610866) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333511)

"Ig Nobel Prizes Awarded" != "Nobel Peace Prize Awarded"

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333581)

Erm... I guess this will teach me to RTFA, or at least GTFT (Google The Fucking Topic).

Re:Peace Prize? (5, Interesting)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333681)

What's next, Peace Prize for the nuclear bomb? They certainly bring peace...

There was this guy named Bertrand Russell.

At the end of World War 2 when the 'allies' had the nuke and the Soviets didn't, he advocated a pre-emptive nuclear strike against the Soviet Union.

As soon as the Soviets developed their own nukes, he became an anti-nuclear peace activist.

For him, it was all down to game theory.

So yeah in a sense nukes may brought peace -- if the Soviets hadn't developed them, Eastern Europe and Russia would quite possibly have been nuked into submission. I think that would have been less 'peaceful' than the cold war.

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

codecracker007 (789100) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333831)

This is what Ignobles are supposed to be for, infact they awarded the 1st ignoble peace price to Edward Teller, the 'father' of hydrogen bomb. Here's the interesting peace prize list: 1991: Edward Teller, father of the hydrogen bomb and first champion of the Star Wars weapons system, for his lifelong efforts to change the meaning of peace as we know it. 1992: Daryl Gates, former police chief of the City of Los Angeles, for his uniquely compelling methods of bringing people together. 1993: The Pepsi-Cola Company of the Philippines, for sponsoring a contest to create a millionaire, and then announcing the wrong winning number, thereby inciting and uniting 800,000 riotously expectant winners, and bringing many warring factions together for the first time in their nation's history 1994: Presented to John Hagelin of Maharishi University and The Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy, for his experimental conclusion that 4,000 trained meditators caused an 18 percent decrease in violent crime in Washington, D.C. 1995: Presented to the Taiwan National Parliament, for demonstrating that politicians gain more by punching, kicking and gouging each other than by waging war against other nations. 1996: Presented to Jacques Chirac, President of France, for commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Hiroshima with atomic bomb tests in the Pacific. 1997: Presented to Harold Hillman of the University of Surrey, England, for his report "The Possible Pain Experienced During Execution by Different Methods." 1998: Presented to Prime Minister of India, Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Prime Minister of Pakistan, Nawaz Sharif, for their aggressively peaceful explosions of atomic bombs. 1999: Presented to Charl Fourie and Michelle Wong of Johannesburg, South Africa, for inventing the Blaster, an automobile burglar alarm consisting of a detection circuit and a flamethrower. 2000: Presented to The British Royal Navy, for ordering its sailors to stop using live cannon shells, and to instead just shout "Bang!" 2001: Presented to Viliumas Malinauskas of Grutas, Lithuania, for creating the amusement park known as "Stalin World". 2002: Presented to Keita Sato, President of Takara Co., Dr. Matsumi Suzuki, President of Japan Acoustic Lab, and Dr. Norio Kogure, Executive Director, Kogure Veterinary Hospital, for promoting peace and harmony between the species by inventing Bow-Lingual, a computer-based automatic dog-to-human language translation device. 2003: Presented to Lal Bihari, of Uttar Pradesh, India, for a triple accomplishment: First, for leading an active life even though he has been declared legally dead; second, for waging a lively posthumous campaign against bureaucratic inertia and greedy relatives; and third, for creating the Association of Dead People. Lal Bihari overcame the handicap of being dead, and managed to obtain a passport from the Indian government so that he could travel to Harvard to accept his Prize. However, the U.S. government refused to allow him into the country. His friend Madhu Kapoor therefore came to the Ig Nobel Ceremony and accepted the Prize on behalf of Lal Bihari. Several weeks later, the Prize was presented to Lal Bihari himself in a special ceremony in India. 2004: Presented to Daisuke Inoue of Hyogo Prefecture, Japan, for inventing karaoke, thereby providing an entirely new way for people to learn to tolerate each other. 2005: Presented jointly to Claire Rind and Peter Simmons of University of Newcastle, in the U.K., for electrically monitoring the activity of a brain cell in a locust while that locust was watching selected highlights from the movie "Star Wars." looks like the improb.com site has been slashdotted, so had to resort to shamelessly rip the info off wikipedia.

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

codecracker007 (789100) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333849)

sorry for the screwed up formatting, not my fault!!!!new /. system somehow didnt show me the preview :(

RTFA (2, Funny)

njdj (458173) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333935)

Since when are Peace Prizes given out to people who invent phyological/sonic/whateveryouwanttocallit weapons?

If the teenager-repellent were designed to exterminate teenagers, you'd have a point. But it isn't. It's just designed to persuade them to go somewhere where they don't annoy people. It's not a weapon of any kind.

You do understand the difference between insecticide and mosquito repellent, don't you?

Re:Peace Prize? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16333975)

Why not? Kissinger and Le Duc Tho got it. Arafat ...

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

SamSim (630795) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334093)

I seem to recall the first Nobel Peace Prize was awarded for the invention of dynamite.

Re:Peace Prize? (2, Informative)

mgblst (80109) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334145)

Close:

"Nobel's inventions including dynamite and Ballistite led to the death of millions of people, so he created the Nobel Prizes in an effort to make up for these perceived evils."

from wiki.

Re:Peace Prize? (2, Insightful)

SamSim (630795) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334445)

I often find a good way to find out the truth about something is to put a statement online in public which is which is definitely wrong, then wait for somebody to correct you :)

Re:Peace Prize? (1)

KokorHekkus (986906) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334151)

I seem to recall the first Nobel Peace Prize was awarded for the invention of dynamite.
Not quite, Alfred Nobel who founded the Nobel Prize invented dynamite which was one of the things he made a lot of money of.

Re:Peace Prize? (2, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334377)

Since when are Peace Prizes given out to people who invent phyological/sonic/whateveryouwanttocallit weapons??

If I were awarded a Nobel Peace Prize I would consider it a public embaressment. Have you checked out a list of the winners?

On the other hand, the igNobel Peace Prize is supposed to be a public embaressment.

KFG

Teller won an igNobel... (1)

nweaver (113078) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334565)

Edward Teller won an ig Nobel for his work on the hydrogen bomb, star wars, etc etc etc...

Don't miss the past winners. (2, Interesting)

mrcaseyj (902945) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333295)

Don't miss the list of previous winners. It's full of hilarious and sometimes interesting stuff.

Re:Don't miss the past winners. (2, Funny)

KokorHekkus (986906) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333803)

My favourite past winner is the 2003 Physics Prize: "An Analysis of the Forces Required to Drag Sheep over Various Surfaces". Real research... just sounds funny. Imagine being at a party "....interesting, so what kind of research do you do?" "Currently I'm investigating the frictional coefficients of sheep on different surfaces"

Boo! (-1, Flamebait)

Golias (176380) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333337)

I was all set to complain that the summary sucked because nowhere is it mentioned exactly what the fuck the "Ig Nobel" awards are.

So I RTFA, even though it meant following a link to the Guardian, quite possibly the worst newspaper in the entire world. ... And I still didn't even know what the "Ig" stands for after reading the entire article! The fonts of both ./ and the Guardian make it look like lower-case "LG" rather than a capitalized "ig"

Thank God for wikipedia.

The Ig Nobel Prizes are a parody of the Nobel Prizes and are given each year in early autumn -- around the time the recipients of the genuine Nobel Prizes are announced -- for ten achievements that "first make people laugh, and then make them think." Organized by the scientific humor journal Annals of Improbable Research (AIR), they are presented by genuine Nobel Laureates at a ceremony at Harvard University.

The Guardian shared about half of that information... buried deep within the article.

More importantly

The name is a play on the word "ignoble" and the name "Nobel" after "Alfred Nobel". The official pronunciation used during the ceremony is "ig no-BELL" (IPA:) "?g n?? b?l" it is not pronounced like the word "ig-noble" -- but this distinction eludes many people.

A quick Google news search [google.com] provided dozens on non-Shitty news sources you could have gone with on this one. Why link to a fish-wrapper like the Guardian???

Re:Boo! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16334407)

The Guardian is a high-brow newspaper by comparison with most of the others out there. I'm guessing that the root of your hatred lies more with their politics than their quality.

YOU FAIL It (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16333403)

200 running NT of e7ents today, Claim that BSD is a has steadily OS. Now BSDI is playing so it's

PC? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16333509)

chalkboard
Is this a politicly correct blackboard or something?

Re:PC? (1)

dk-software-engineer (980441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333723)

Around here blackboards are usually green. I almost bought a black whiteboard untill I saw they don't sell white whiteboard-markers seperate.

"Blackboard" and "whiteboard" are nearly meaningless terms. I like "chalkboard" (as a term, I hate the boards), but I have no idea what to call "whiteboards".

Re:PC? (1)

Fred_A (10934) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333897)

Penboards ?

Re:PC? (1)

fruey (563914) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334115)

I believe the ultra-politically correct term would be "dry-wipe board".

Re:PC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16334573)

What's your problem with dry-wipers ?

Re:PC? (1)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334597)

For a black whiteboard (Dry-wipe board) you will need to use liquid chalk pens. Google them, you can get them quite easily and they have the benefit of being able to write on any non-porous surface (So blackboard, whiteboard, glass, plastics...)

Re:PC? (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334085)

Is this a politicly correct blackboard or something?

They haven't made blackboards since the 1970s. The new ones are green. So instead of saying "Greenboards and blackboards", one merely has to say "chalkboards".

I know you're trolling, but I felt like explaining.

LK

Limburg Cheese experiment (3, Interesting)

morie (227571) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333629)

A Dutch group won the IgNobel for their work on malaria mosquitos and limburg cheese. In a more serious experiment, they found the smell of feet is one of the main attractions to malaria mosquitos. They then tried Limburg Cheese because it smells, well, like feet.

They are one of the leading institutes in mosquito research in the world.

Great.. (1, Informative)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333651)

So we give it to a guy who's abusing technology to deal with a social problem? Yes I get that teenagers can be annoying, but using things like this could cause long term damage (don't say it can't, we have a good decade to go before any major signs will show up if it rolls out majorly this year). I can see the use at some places but I can also see it pissing off some kids will will go out of their way to damage any places with one of these things to "get revenge".

Either way bad invention and even worse for awarding him a prize for it. People are still people and when we start making weapons to use on 1 subgroup it's only a step away from becoming a welcome against all.

Re:Great.. (2, Insightful)

anagama (611277) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333735)

you realize he won an ig-nobel prize. It's the booby prize of science.

Re:Great.. (1)

mgblst (80109) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334155)

What, is it open day on slashdot or something. All the newbie are coming out of the woodwork. Look mate, sure we don't read the articles, but at least read the headline.

Dealing with the mosquito... (2, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333683)

Okay - I'm 30 with averagehearing for my age, so it isn't going to affect me. But it still seems a little unfair to ignore noise poluution if it only affects teenagers - most of whom are not doing any harm, and just want to hang around with mates. Do noise pollution laws only apply if they affect adults?

So how do we solve it? Nobody is going to listen to a bunch of kids. Could simply disable it. Nobody would know. Any other ways to deal with it?

Re:Dealing with the mosquito... (1)

ThomsonsPier (988872) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333827)

In addition to this, it appears that my hearing is not degrading at the rate these chaps currently claim. As a result, I can still hear these damned frequencies.

And if they're used on me, I'm calling the police.

Re:Dealing with the mosquito... (1)

Tim Browse (9263) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334099)

And if they're used on me, I'm calling the police.

It's an interesting question actually - in the UK at least, you're generally not allowed to make as much noise as you like at your home/business. Noise and Statutory Nuisance Act, and all that. The fact that only some people can hear the noise does presumably not excuse it from being subject to the law. So the mosquito is probably illegal in England and Wales, or at least the teenagers affected could report the business owners for the violation and have it removed/disabled.

Re:Dealing with the mosquito... (1, Troll)

dk-software-engineer (980441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334349)

most of whom are not doing any harm, and just want to hang around with mates.

As far as I understand, a bunch of kids hanging around the store is the problem. I'm not defending the noise, but I'm not defending the kids either. I don't believe they have any right to hang out at the store.

Re:Dealing with the mosquito... (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334471)

It does depend on where they are. If they're on the premises, then fair enough, but if they're just nearby, then the store owner is annexing the territory outside his shop as well, and maybe even driving business away from his neighbours.

Re:Dealing with the mosquito... (1)

AlecC (512609) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334943)

Add another noisemaker at a slightly higher frequency, inaudible even to teenagers. They beat to create an unpleasant tone audible to all. When the original is turned off, unpleasant noise disappears. Proprietor of original thinks it doesn't work and disables it.

Links to stories botched and slashdotted (3, Informative)

davidwr (791652) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333705)

I don't know what happened to the news-story link, I know it was there when I submitted it. Anyhow, Google News has many more [google.com] stories to choose from.

The Improbable Results site I linked is very slow due to media attention. I'm sure Slashdot didn't help :).

Here's a Coral Cache version of the Improbable Results [nyud.net] website and the list of present and past winners [nyud.net] .

If Coral doesn't work, here's a MirrorDot [mirrordot.org] version of the Improbable Results main page.

Uhm... (0, Offtopic)

wolf369T (951405) | more than 7 years ago | (#16333765)

The guys from Niels Bohr Institute in Denmark recently just teleported a macroscopic object of a few hundreds atoms over a half a meter, using light as a carrier.
And they give this years Nobel prize for proving the existence of Big-Bang, who took place 13.5 bilions years ago (and a half a century old theory)... I thought Nobel prize were for experimental accomplishments, not for theories. Because I really expect the day when Prof. Stephen Hawking will get one for his radiation. There is nothing experimental in _understanding_ how galaxies were formed...

Besides, the WMAP mission brought images with a lot higher quality then COBE... Am I confused, or what?

2001 Astrophysics Ig Nobel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16334137)

My favourite Ig Nobel laureates still have to be Jack & Rexella van Impe, who won the 2001 Astrophysics Ig Nobel [improbable.com] ". . .for their discovery that black holes fulfill all the technical requirements to be the location of Hell."

That's some peace (2, Interesting)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334589)

If someone intentionally plays high pitched unbearable sounds in attempt to "repel" me like a friggin insect, I'd feel compelled to put some earplugs on and come wreck his shop with my friends.

That's the kind of peace we're talking.

Re:That's some peace (2, Insightful)

Detritus (11846) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334719)

You, and your friends, are exactly the sort of hooligans that inspire the invention of devices like these.

Re:That's some peace (1)

aadvancedGIR (959466) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334883)

Moreover, the teens who overuse MP3 players are somehow immune to that system since their ears are already damaged, so it mostly targets teens that do not have that particular self-destructing habit (I don't know if there is a correlation with being a shoplifter, but I would bet for a negative one) and kids.
I just hope a mother sues that guy into bankruptcy for having hurt her baby, that would refrain others to invent even nastier way to hurt their potential clients.

The Quickest Way to Clear Out the Mall: (4, Funny)

aquatone282 (905179) | more than 7 years ago | (#16334865)

Send in a pair of Army recruiters.

Works like a champ.

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