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MySpace Organizes Sudan Fundraiser

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the court-of-public-opinion dept.

164

tanman writes to tell us CNN is reporting that MySpace is sponsoring a series of 20 concerts as an effort to raise awareness about the humanitarian relief efforts in Sudan. From the article: "The concerts will take place October 21. Artists include TV on the Radio in Philadelphia, Alice in Chains in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Ziggy Marley in Medford, Oregon, Citizen Cope in Seattle, Gov't Mule in Spokane, Washington, and Insane Clown Posse in St. Petersburg, Florida."

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I only hope (4, Funny)

holdenholden (961300) | more than 7 years ago | (#16373955)

I only hope that the concerts will not be broadcast from the profiles of 400 million users simultaneously.

Re:I only hope (3, Funny)

bblboy54 (926265) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374009)

Damnit! We better break out the lottery balls and round up the horses.... If nothing else clogs the tubes, that will!

Re:I only hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374257)

A Daily Show / Ted Stevens reference? Well done, sir.

I only hope the truth gets out (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375281)

The muslim government is waging Jihad (inner struggle my ass) on the mostly christian south (and on Ethiopia perhaps, we'll see soon enough). If kids were to start spreading that message. That would rock.

But such a thing would be racist. When muslims kill christians for islam, we should stay silent. When christians kill muslims who are shooting at them, we should bomb the hell out of them (see Jugoslavia).

Re:I only hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375643)

I'm sure the Sudan will soon become a thriving civilisation with a massive industrial base, engineers, computer programmers, scientists, a world leader in technology and electronics. Let's just keep throwing money at it, that's bound to work. After all, all the races are the same, aren't they?
The never ending misery in the Sudan couldn't possibly have anything to do with the wonderful people who live there, could it?

Lame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16373971)

Most of these cities get good or at least halfway decent bands, while we in St Pete get Insane Clown Posse?! Hooray, thanks a lot MySpace, I can hardly wait.

Re:Lame (1)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374123)

Yes, it's like the Cold War is happening all over again, only this time we're exporting crappy bands to Russia to undermine you. Oh wait, St. Petersburg FLORIDA?? I don't know what to tell you. Maybe it's your penance for costing us the 2000 election?

By the way, I may be the only person around who has been to every city mentioned in the post. My favorite out of that group was probably Winston-Salem. I really felt like I was in flavor country.

Cheers!

Re:Lame (2, Insightful)

Jack_the_Tripper (878546) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375041)

By the way, I may be the only person around who has been to every city mentioned in the post.
That's funny. Been to pretty much every city in the country...You tend to get around in this truck driving biz.

Re:Lame (1)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16377039)

*Cash impression* You've been everywhere, man...

Re:Lame (1)

xtype2.5 (761755) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376591)

I'm from Winston-Salem you insensitive clod!

For those of us who aren't geography geniuses... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16373973)

Here is a map showing the location of Sudan [wikimedia.org] .

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (3, Insightful)

eln (21727) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374031)

Unfortunately, Sudan exists in that giant blind spot the developed world seems to have south of Europe and west of the Middle East. Sure, we have these benefits which do some good, but meanwhile the governments of the most powerful and wealthy nations in the world are willing to do nothing more than prop up dictatorial regimes by lending them money their countrymen will never be able to repay, while trying to decide what is the least amount of aid they can get away with while still looking like they care.

The way the west has dealt with Africa since pretty much the beginning of time is shameful, and it doesn't look like it's going to improve any time soon.

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374093)

look bud. Africa and surrounding countries are far too freakin out of control. If we wait, all the gangs, regimes, etc will destroy themselves and there will be X less amount of stupid people in the world. If Africa and surrounding countries want to destroy themselselves, let them. They can all fricken starve for all I care. I'm american, we have the best weapons, the best forces, and horde all the food. Screw them. They can all starve, die of ebola, get more HIVs. I don't care. They have bad areas of prostitution, its THEIR fault. If they have morals, or even religion, they'd have sex for children only. Not pleasure!

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374109)

Honestly, for the US to send in troops would be a fool's errand, and as for the UN.....they could send in troops but the problem is that besides the US, not many countries are willing to put forward troops for UN missions. And the UN has worn out their welcome with the US (you can only complain about everything they do for so long until they start to ignore you)

Everyone thinks it's a good idea until the time comes to actually do it, and you have alienated the entity provides 85% of your military support (the US).

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (1)

xappax (876447) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374113)

The west doesn't provide foriegn aid/intervention out of the infinite goodness of our charitable heart - we do it for relatively practical reasons. We want to help the economies of undeveloped nations grow and become more stable, so that first world countries (via transnational corps) have better access to the potential natural resources and cheap labor.

However, poverty, corruption, and strife are so endemic in many parts of Africa that the financial and political investment needed to stabilize and repair the developing nations is far higher than would be "practical" from a business standpoint. Since we can't easily fix the situation, the best alternative is to ignore it as much as possible, and hope that nobody notices this inconsistency in our supposedly humanitarian Western policies.

So, yes, while preventing millions of deaths a year and bringing entire societies out of the dark ages might seem like the "right" thing to do, it really isn't, when you think like a politician or a CEO.

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374857)

Don't forget the foreign aid and intervention is not nessicarily going to have the effect intended. We could be sending aid, and it could be going to a dictator (actually, this is how it happens and it is usually by design, but it can happen by accident or ignorance too). We could subsidize the wrong parts of the economy or the wrong industries and end up killing self-sustaining industries for whatever industry someone in Europe or the U.S. thinks is good for that country (and doesn't compete with European or U.S. economic interests). It is called "paternalism", and it is usually a disaster.

The fact is, the West does not have the skills to fix Africas problems... and we are not trustworthy enough not to use foriegn aid or intervention to further our own interests. So in the meantime, if we can't help Aftrica, we can at least try not to mess them up worse. Leave Africa alone, and keep our hands and noses out. No country has ever gone to war or bore resentment towards another country for not giving enough aid or intervention. At the same time, plenty of countries have grown to hate the countries that they were once dependent on. Paternalism is a nasty thing.

The West should have a strict non-intervention policy with Africa. It is better not to do anything for the time being.

Let me rephrase this for you (4, Informative)

BearRanger (945122) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374143)

The way the west has dealt with Africa since pretty much the beginning of time is shameful, and it doesn't look like it's going to improve any time soon.

The way *Africans* have dealt with Africa is shameful. Sure, we can blame colonialism for many of Africa's problems, but we're more than 40 years on from the last of Europe's colonial possessions. At some point the Africans themselves have to reject corruption, violence and tribalism and begin to work cooperatively for a better life for themselves. No amount of charity on the part of the west can help them with this.

(And yes, I know Africa is a continent and that not all African countries are in this predicament. Still, why have Europe's former Asian colonies done so much better?)

Re:Let me rephrase this for you (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374455)

Exactly! What people seem to avoid mentioning here or everywhere else is that the problem is not European imperialism - not this time - but Arab imperialism. People forget that in Islam, blacks are the source of slaves and are called "raisin heads". I say, that is more relevant to the genocide of the black muslims at the hand of the Arab janjaweeds than European imperialism from 40 years ago. However, criticizing whites and the West in general is acceptable and encouraged while criticizing muslims, Arabs and Islam could get you killed. Welcome to muticulturalism, political correctness and moral equivalency.

Re:Let me rephrase this for you (2, Insightful)

xoyoyo (949672) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376289)

>> Still, why have Europe's former Asian colonies done so much better?

I would say because they are different sorts of colonies. Our Asian possessions tended to be fairly organised nation states before we got there, and our colonialism was more about the control of trade and overseeing the local administration than the wholesale resource stripping we indulged in in Africa. That's not to say that we didn't rip the locals off for what we could, we just couldn't get away with as much as we could in Africa. In Asia therefore we allowed stored wealth to build up: we couldn't treat the people simply as machinery to extract raw materials as we did in Africa (the Belgian Congo being the most notorious example). When the empires were gone therefore there was an economy still running. In Africa we extracted it all and stuck the cash back home, where our no-longer-subjects wcouldn't get their hands on it.

In Africa we imposed nations and borders on the local tribes (sometime squishing antagonists into a single state, sometimes cutting tribes in two) and administered directly. Under the wonderful White Man's Burden we basically gave ourselves largesse to treat the locals as we wanted as we were civilising them along the way.

As to the period of time between decolonisation and now: actually it's just over 26 years since the last European decolonisation (Zimbabwe). The peak year was 1960, which is more than 40 years ago, but there are plenty of examples of decolonisation leading up to the late 70s. I think the point you're making is that forty years should be plenty time to get your nation up and running. I would have thought the experience of the United States, which took nearly 100 years to settle its internal politics and free a sizeable percentage of its population would have shown that politics runs a bit slower than expectations.

Re:For those of us who aren't geography geniuses.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16377387)

When most of the continent is ruled by dictatorial regimes, who exactly do you give money to? Aid agencies have long complained that the governments themselves are the biggest parts of the problem, and prevent them from distributing the sometimes massive amounts of aid given.

A good amount of those loans are forgiven, and the point of those loans is to invest in the country and get a return on that money spent. If they are unable to pay, they probably didn't invest very wisely.

The current methodologies in use by the west today to "nation build" are utter failures and create power vacuums that enable strongmen to take over and carve up an area into fiefdoms. I have no confidence in the US's ability to "liberate" any nation.

Is the situation completely hopeless? No I don't think so. "Microlending" appears to be quite promising. Microlending is the practice of giving out small loans to individuals or small groups of people to start small businesses. Its a "bottom up" approach as opposed to a top-down approach, and in the case of Africa it gives money directly to the people as opposed to a corrupt government that will build palaces instead of sewers. Its a new practice, and it is not going to be a silver bullet. Thus far, it seems to be working best in more stable areas like South America and India where the most basic needs are generally being met (IE no mass famine's, disease and war like there are in Africa). The practice has also been criticized because people who actually receive this money are rarely the poorest of the poor. I personally don't see the problem with that- I would rather see the money go to someone literate who is not spending all of his time just trying to survive. A stronger middle class has never as far as I know been detrimental to a country.

Fox? (4, Insightful)

eurleif (613257) | more than 7 years ago | (#16373983)

Couldn't Fox (MySpace's owner) raise a lot more awareness with their news network than they could with concerts?

MySpace needs the PR. (4, Insightful)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374203)

Sure, but that assumes that the point is to actually do something in Sudan, and not improve the tarnished image of the online service that they forked out a bunch of dough for, and are currently burdened with. It's a little bit of a Hail Mary, but hey, when you've got a web site that most people only know of because they've seen it on the news in the same sentence with "pedophile," you can't really go wrong.

Why would News Corp give a damn about people in Sudan? Here's a hint: they don't.

The only reason they're raising money for people in Sudan is that it's the least-offensive cause some focus group could come up with. Right now, MySpace needs the most heart-warming, family-friendly but not totally-unhip image resuscitation that money can buy.

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (3, Interesting)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374265)

In the news in the UK (not all owned by the same guy who owns Fox and The sun) Youtube and Myspace is the new poster child of the internet. Very rarely does a day go by when youtube is not mentioned on something or Myspace is mentioned. It's even got to the point where live quiz shows have hosts giving out their Myspace URLs and giving away free gifts to random people on them.

While in the US it's "kekeke pedos" here in the UK it has a positive image and is doing "good things"

Makes perfect sense. (3, Interesting)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374359)

While in the US it's "kekeke pedos" here in the UK it has a positive image and is doing "good things"

Explaining why this "fund raiser" is being conducted almost exclusively in the U.S. (It would be exclusive, except for a show in Toronto.)

From TFA:
The concerts will take place October 21. Artists include TV on the Radio in Philadelphia, Alice in Chains in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Ziggy Marley in Medford, Oregon, Citizen Cope in Seattle, Gov't Mule in Spokane, Washington, and Insane Clown Posse in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Other concerts will take place in Sacramento, San Diego and San Francisco, California; Melbourne, Florida; Atlanta; Louisville, Kentucky; St. Paul, Minnesota; Reno, Nevada; Baltimore; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Milwaukee; and Washington, D.C.

A Canadian show will take place in Toronto.

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375271)

What, the UK couldn't resolve geocities.com? Exactly what good things do you all think myspace is doing?

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16376565)

Youtube and Myspace is the new poster child of the internet

And you is the poster child for bad grammar

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (2, Interesting)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374373)

While most of what you speek is probably true, the Fox news channels have been talking about the sudan problems, releif efferts, and possible military actions for a while now. It gets mixed in with all the other problems in that continental area over the last 30 or so years.

The problems seem to be with releif organizations wanting the UN to actualy do something about it. This conflicts with the UN's current agenda of "bitch about yet another US led war" or "something the US has done to destroy the world" or sit around obstructing plans of action while terroist friendly and hostile third world countries get one of the most devestatingly capable military weapons availible or trying to line the pockets of companies associated with the leaders of the UN. Of course, if the UN was concerned about the area(which they should be), they would just send a letter or 400 letters declaring how upset the world comunity are. So it isn't like it would matter too much.

I say the best efforts to help in that area might be a military action by one of the worlds leading super powers. If that isn't possible for whatever reasons, the money for food and cloathing/shelter should go to supporting a private army of mercenaries dedicated to swift insertion actions againt the controling government who is allowing it and exiting the country. Add this to measures to take out thier air capabilities and command centers. If they retaliate by stepping up the violence, take it a step further and set up a fortified perimitor around the refuge camps, arm and train the refugies and release them to defend themselves. Keep them as part of the private army and pay them with the free food and supplies intended for them in the first place.

It sounds harsh but then so does making sure a person had a full meal before they got killed, raped, mutilated, tortured and anything else hapening.

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (1)

killjoe (766577) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375173)

Why would the UN do anything? They could not stop the US from invading iraq. They could not stop israel from setting lebanon back fifty years and displacing a million people.

Didn't the president say he was going to free the people of the world from tyranical leaders and deliver democracy to the world?

Maybe the rest of the world is just waiting for bush to follow through on his word. Why bother doing something when bush promised to do it. He promised in front of the entire world and he is a man of god. He would not lie. He says god speaks through him (yes that's an actual quote).

I love it when the people think the UN is the shits when it comes to darfur but a yoke when it comes to iraq.

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (1)

buckysphere (1011323) | more than 7 years ago | (#16377555)

Why would the UN do anything? Great question with an easy answer...

They won't. The UN is the largest pile of shit that has ever existed. To call them a useless organization or an anti-US organization would be accurate but neither of those descriptions capture the true essence of that organiztion, hence the "pile of shit" comment.

"Pile of shit" is quite a fitting description of the UN. That is, unless you happen to be one of the many anti-US crackpots (well, I should say temporary anti-US crack pots, because we all know that, eventually, all will have to thank the US for saving their whiney asses from _______). To disagree with that fact is to ignore history and to have absolutely no foresight.

I can think of a many other ways to utilize the UN building in NY. I say we never allow another one of those anti-US pieces-of-shit (Wow, that word is awesome, huh? Not only does it accurately describe the UN but it can also be used to describe many other anti-US fscktards.) back into our country to speak about our country or our leaders the way the little monkey-fucker from Iran did or the way Chavez's crazy ass did. Or, if we do allow it to happen, he/she should be returned to his/her respective country is many, many, many, separate but easily identifiable pieces.

Re:MySpace needs the PR. (1)

motank (867244) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374833)

burdened with, what're you talking about? myspace, regardless of all the sex predator stalking high school shooting kidnap stories, is one of the most popular websites on the internet. no one that actually uses the website seems to care that there might be criminals running around. i hardly doubt fox is regretting the buy.

anyways, this is all just myspace trying to be hip by "caring" about something young people think is cool to care about, and the pet humanitarian cause for the fall semester is sudan. everyone can agree that genocide is bad so why not get together for a rock concert? mtv's been doing this for ages, actually all these media companies have been doing it for ages.. why is anyone surprised?

Ahem - IT'S AN AD (1)

mcrbids (148650) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374493)

Look, corporations *never* operate benevolently. Those that do go out of business pretty quickly. They are always out to make a profit.

This fundraiser is not about being nice. It's a deal that they're making with you: They'll do this fundraiser to raise money for a good cause. They're doing it for publicity. You may or may not bite and send some money to Sudan. Who cares?!?!

It's all about profits, and that's not a bad thing - the profit motive is what creates incentive for XYZ corporation to pay attention to little, itty, bitty you. (en masse) So, appreciate the good cause! Send a little money if you approve! The sooner you do away with the "good corp - bad corp" routine, the sooner you can get on to seeing things as they really are.

Insane Clown Posse (1)

juggaleaux (725689) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374003)

Insane Clown Posse was already scheduled to have a concert that day anyway as part of their Hallowicked Clown Tour [insaneclownposse.com] . It's noble of them to go ahead and donate the profits from that show to that cause.

i'm probably the only juggalo here, let me get my armor on ;-)

Re:Insane Clown Posse (4, Funny)

riff420 (810435) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374101)

uhh, armor? i can't imagine that clown makeup has an armor rating above 0.

Re:Insane Clown Posse (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375615)

uhh, armor? i can't imagine that clown makeup has an armor rating above 0.

No, but it does have a psyc attack factor of +6, and is a prerequisite to building the Dream Twister in Alpha Centauri.

ICP (2, Funny)

tyleroar (614054) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374005)

All the ICP fans I know are huge fans care very deeply about humanitarian relief efforts in Sudan. (Oh shit, is that funny because ICP fans don't care about that, or because there are no ICP fans?)

Re: ICP (RFC2186) (1)

thib_gc (730259) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374169)

Insane Clown Posse is also one of the reasons why nobody takes the Internet Cache Protocol seriously. I used to have "Experience working with ICP" on my resume but I have switched to a more conservative "Experience implementing ICP (RFC2186)".

Re: ICP (RFC2186) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374915)

I have the opposite problem... When I put "experience working with ICP" on my resume, they think I am talking about Internet Cache Protocal, when I mean I have experience working with the Insane Clown Posse. :)

The people looking for experience with the Insane Clown Posse are much more interesting than the people looking for experience with Internet Cache Protocal. Perhaps you should reconsider your resume change?

Re:ICP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16376815)

(Oh shit, is that funny because ICP fans don't care about that, or because there are no ICP fans?)
Neither. Your attempt at humor is based upon multiple false hypotheses.

...oh, wait, this is the Internet. What I meant to say was, "ROFL UR MUSIC IS TEH S UCK U R GHEY FUX OFF N DYE BEYATCH"

ICP??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374019)

insane clown posse? i thought they want to attract people to raise money, not scare them away...

1994 called (4, Funny)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374049)

It wants its music back. But keep that Insane Clown Posse CD. 1994 said you could just keep that.

Great. (3, Insightful)

AndyAndyAndyAndy (967043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374071)

So now I can hear from every teenager out there about how important things are in Sudan. And how much it means to them personally. "Hey, put this in your profile if you care about the Sudan cause! But don't forget to comment up. Because it means so much to me." Puke.

Re:Great. (2, Insightful)

rm999 (775449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374357)

Yeah, I really hate it when kids care about world matters and politics.

I bet you you'd be just as dissapointed if those same teens didn't care at all.

Re:Great. (1)

AndyAndyAndyAndy (967043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374389)

Not really, no. The problem is none of them actually care / know what the fuck they are talking about. The vast majority know what they are told from outlets exactly like myspace and from others. Point is, kids "care" so much as they look a bit more interesting to their peers. There are very few who are actually concerned and involved with these issues.

Don't get me wrong, it'd be great if these kids were engaged and involved. It's just not happening.

Re:Great. (1)

rm999 (775449) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374449)

Your basic argument is that kids think acting like they are involved in world politics is "cool." Err... no. I was a child just a few years ago, and I recall nothing of the sort. The people who cared about politics did so because it was in their personalities. Just because they are young and often misguided in how to go about it (holding parties instead of listening to NPR) does not mean they are not trying.

I used to agree with what you are saying regarding Tibet, but I actually found that kids under 21 knew more about Tibet than the typical adult due to "Free Tibet" campaigns. They really do pick something up. Kids can't do much about anything in politics (they're not even allowed to vote), but that doesn't mean we should look down on them for trying. Remember, it sounds corny, but they are the future. By holding concerts and other crap that appeals to kids, this stuff is being made accessible to the youth.

And it's not like older generations are much better.

Re:Great. (1)

AndyAndyAndyAndy (967043) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374495)

But again, you're posting on /.
Chances are, you were/are the exception. And it's not a better-than-you thing, I'm 20. And not claiming to be an exception too, but I can safely say I have a good perspective over the typical myspace 15 year old. I've been there, I've grown up. There are plenty of teens out there that replaced me though.

Re:Great. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374385)

Look at how many people care about what is happening in Palestine? There are marches and protests all around the world, with TONS of coverage. Now compare the plight of the average Palestinian versus the average Sudanese refugee at the hands of the janjaweed militias. Palestinians are effectively living like kings in comparison, Darfur has 100x as many dead from killings in the past year as in the past 50 years in Palestine, over 10x as many refugees pushed out of Sudan compared to Palestine. Sudanese people are living in the shittiest conditions you could imagine in refugee camps, being routinely raped, murdered, brutalized in many other ways and PRACTICALLY NO ONE GIVES A SHIT ABOUT THEM!.


It's super trendy to care about Palestinian rights, while the world turns a blind eye to a whole peoples living in far worse conditions, suffering far greater terrors with far FAR less media coverage, and very few people caring.


It's sad how right wingers claim to care about the poor Iraqis terrorized under Saddam, the left wingers claim to care about poor Palestinians terrorized by Israel, but not one peep from either of these crowds about Sudanese being routinely killed, raped, brutalized by the Janjaweed.

Re:Great. (1)

glesga_kiss (596639) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375891)

Now compare the plight of the average Palestinian versus the average Sudanese refugee at the hands of the janjaweed militias.

The BIG difference is that in Sudan, our own countries aren't on the "bad guys" side. That's why many of us a livid about the Palestine issue. See the cluster bombs that depopulated the south of Lebanon? The ones which were mostly dropped the day before the ceasefire in a callous "hurry while we still can" way? The ones where over 30% now lie unexploded and are killing/maiming today and will be for decades? Well guess what? Your country made them and mine provided the logistics to get them to the warzone. Both of us financed them. The blood is on OUR hands and I have to ask, what the fuck are you doing about it?

On the other hand, Sudan is a civil war. Technically it's their own affair, but I regularly use Sudan to make "liberate Iraq!" nutjobs STFU. We have some bizare rationale for choosing our fights. It's not hard to figure out that it's down the three R's of evil: religion, revenue & racism. Sudan has none of these and won't even get a mention on the news.

Re:Great. (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376381)

The BIG difference is that in Sudan, our own countries aren't on the "bad guys" side.

Wait, so the "good guys" side in the Palestine conflict is the one setting off bombs in shopping malls and buses in Israel, right? Gimme a break. This one's a little tough to turn into a black-n-white kind of issue.

Wouldn't it be more appropriate if... (3, Funny)

Baloo Ursidae (29355) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374097)

...MySpace did a series of benefit concerts for children lured by sexual predators over the Internet, given that they seem to facilitate it more than anyone these days?

Re:Wouldn't it be more appropriate if... (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376415)

Preditors will find picking s very hard on MySpace with statistically only about 300 active myspace users, 0.001173185961207483%, that identify themselfs as 13-15 year old girls. You would have better luck standing at a bus stop.

Marketing (3, Informative)

elucido (870205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374099)

How much money will actually make it to the Sudan?

I don't see how having a concert or two is in any way related to solving real world problems. What? You going to party your way to a better environment?

This is a perfect way to sell tickets and raise profits. It will be like Live8.

Re:Marketing (1)

supremebob (574732) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374183)

Not that it really matters... Any aid that gets to Sudan will probably end up being hijacked by African warlords anyway.

Re:Marketing (1)

elucido (870205) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374527)

Exactly, you cannot give aid to governments, you can only give to individuals, and you have to be precise about it. You give to individuals who want to start businesses.

Re:Marketing (1)

roseblood (631824) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374301)

They aren't working to get money to Sudan. They are working to "raise awareness about the humanitarian relief efforts in Sudan."

So it goes like this:

1) Get a cause
2) get a band
3) sell tickets to band
4) get some thing to the venue to "raise awareness about the humanitarian relief efforts in Sudan." [think posters, a few hippies manning an info booth, the band making a brief comment about "the humanitarian relief efforts in Sudan."]
5) ???
6) profit (if the band can fill the venue with paying customers)

Re:Marketing (1)

SQFreak (844876) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374381)

It's a publicity stunt, of course, for MySpace and News Corp. The difference between this and Live 8 is that the locations they scheduled (with the exception of Philadelphia and Seattle) are pretty small and the bands aren't that popular. Not as popular as the Live 8 bands, anyway. The point is, it's pointless, yet I still want to know why they picked the cities they did (partially because I'm from one of the smaller ones).

Islamic warlords are the real winners here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375207)

>>How much money will actually make it to the Sudan?

More importantly, how much money will be stolen/diverted/given to the same Islamic groups which have CAUSED the crisis. They control the area, after all. The problem in Sudan is as much a problem of transportation of goods as it is a shortage of goods.

(Today's trivia: Even wonder why jeeps with mounted machine guns are called 'technicals'? Because the purchase of these vehicles, sans machinegun, can be made with UN food money -- they are given an "technical exemption" for four-wheel drive vehicles.)

I for one... (1)

fuzzyfozzie (978329) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374107)

I for one would like to be the first to say thank-you Tom. Your contributions to society have affected us all. Thank-you.

Doesn't Matter (2, Insightful)

PWill (1006147) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374139)

MySpace still sucks. This is just like the crap that WalMart and the tobacco do. They do a few nice things, and then publicize the hell out of them, to make them look better. I bet they spend more money publicizing the event than they actually donate...

Next year: Murdoch Family Bake Sale (4, Insightful)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374299)

Well yeah -- I mean, if they really wanted to send money to Sudan, you'd think that one of the brain surgeons there at News Corp would realize that it's a little ridiculous for a giant multinational corporation with $25 billion in revenue to sponsor a fucking fund raiser, in order to get regular folks to send in a couple of bucks here and there, as if they were the Pigs Knuckle, Arkansas Rotary Club ... if the goal of the whole process was "let's send money to Sudan," Rupert Murdoch could probably just cut a check out of his petty cash fund and be done with it.

As they are not doing that and are conducting a fund raiser, however ironic, I think it's safe to assume that the ultimate goal of the process is not, in fact, sending money to Sudan.

As to what the real motive might be, I'll leave that up to you to consider.

Re:Next year: Murdoch Family Bake Sale (1)

LeedsSideStreets (998417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376809)

It probably goes without saying that the same criticism could be applied to most charity events featuring wealthy celebrities and such. They could all just write checks, but instead go for the free publicity and image boost for just showing up.

Sure, Murdoch probably doesn't personally care about the Sudan, but I'd rather MySpace did this instead of some other worthless PR stunt for image damage control.

As with the vain celebrities, I'll take the right thing for the wrong reason over no right thing at all.

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374743)

They do it as a token effort to make people like you happy. Of course those companies could care less about doing charity. They are companies, and they basicly are a social tool used to provide products and services in exchange for money, in order to make a profit. That is the function they serve in society. There are also charities, and they are social tools used to provide aid or further some humanitarian goal in a non-profit manner.

Some people, of course, think that because charities are a good thing (charities help people), that companies should behave more like charities. This is of course, like saying that because a saw cuts wood, and cutting wood is good, a hammer should cut wood too. In reality, like a hammer and a saw, both the company and the charity are social tools that provide specialized functions to society. When you insist that a company should behave like a charity, the results aren't going to be good, because a company is not a charity. A company is a company. Making a company do charity is like making a hammer to cut wood... you might be able to cut wood with a hammer, in a very messed up and crude fashion.

In a sensible society, we would realize that companies and charities are two seperate tools, and they work best when each serves society in the way it was designed to serve society. But, some people don't really understand the purposes of companies and charities, or maybe they think that companies are evil, so token charity acts by companies have become normal.

It would be much better if companies, instead of donating to charity, would simply pass the money that they would have spent on charity back to the consumers in lower prices (after all, the money that companies give to charity come from the consumer in the first place), and then let people donate directly to the non-profit charity that they want.

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375677)

It would be much better if companies, instead of donating to charity, would simply pass the money that they would have spent on charity back to the consumers in lower prices (after all, the money that companies give to charity come from the consumer in the first place), and then let people donate directly to the non-profit charity that they want.

This is one of the most reasonable suggestions I've seen on slashdot this year... I have doubts it would work, though. Although there are some people who'll select a product solely on it's cost/benefit ratio, there's a lot more people (at least, it seems like a lot more from those I meet every time I go shopping in the real world) who let the 'warm fuzzies' dictate most of their buying decisions...

On the other hand, sometimes it does backfire, when a company might pick the 'wrong' charity to give money too. Some of the pro-choice/pro-life groups have gone insane when big companies support the other side with token contributions... got to wonder if they got a negative return on some of those donations...

This Just in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374147)

Got on Vans but they look like sneakers!!!

Re:This Just in (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374933)

The correct lyrics are: "Got my Vans on but they look like sneakers."

Think about the children damnit! (1)

the_last_rites (837649) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374161)

Oh great in addition to being malnourished most underaged kids in Sudan will now have to live with the fact that they're going to be in the radar of Myspace predators now

Because when I think Humanitarian Relief Efforts.. (1)

dreemernj (859414) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374191)

I think Insane Clown Posse, juggalo bitches.

Not this again (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374231)

I already gave all my money to some e-mail dude in Africa who promised to pay me back once I filled out some paper-work for him. He never did.

Sudanly - Billy Ocean (2, Funny)

marko123 (131635) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374237)

I used to think Darfur was just a fairy tale
Until that genocide until that first smile
But if I had to do it all again I wouldn't change a thing
Cause this war is everlasting

Sudanly "gangaweed" has new meaning to me
There's beauty up above and things we never take notice of
You wake up Sudanly you're in poverty

Girl you're everthing a man could rape and more
One thousand words are not enough to say what I feel inside
Holding dismembered hands as we walk along the shore
Never felt like this before now you're dying in Darfur

Each day I pray this love affair would last forever
There's beauty up above and things you never take notice of
You wake and Sudanly you're at war

Every little bit helps (1)

pauljuno (998497) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374273)

Although I think that the organizers are attempting to hitch a ride on a hot-topic issue that celebrities are rallying around, I still believe that it's a good cause and deserves our attention. It's such a shame that organizations like the UN seem unable/unwilling to address these types of problems globally, I'm starting to wonder whether or not the UN still has a place on issues like this. It seems that US billionaires are doing more good in Africa than entire countries, and even small companies are trying to help in their small ways. The US may still suck according to most people in other countries, at least I believe we're still trying to do good, even when the attempt is very naive.

it's the billionaires... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374507)

...that are propping up the slave owning and oil selling* fundy nutjobs in the north who are doing all the genocide action in the south that is the problem. Google around and catch the names of the companies providing funding and support for the north there, you'll see.

*The sudan has oil, that is what is going on. Fight over oil and a major religious split. Here, google already answered it: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=10 44 [google.com]

If you go to fill up your car - just about anywhere - you are most likely supporting genocide in the sudan by funding the fundies. And because it *is* oil, that means it *will be* sold, which means this conflict will not stop until all the oil is completely gone and/or one side or the other is completely wiped out. My best guess is the chinese will be the big winners there eventually, they are providing the most support and sub rosa military aid, but most of europe and canada and the alleged offshore branches of US multinationals are all in there, directly or one or two shell companies away.

They don't give a crap, there's a buck to be made, oil ownership trumps everything in today's globalised economy. It's all abouyt profits. Sudan has oil to sell and they want to buy weapons-so, this gencide on't stop. Now it could be slowed down, by arming the south, via airdrops if nothing else so they could have some self defense, and by restricting trade with the official regime, all the way to sinking their tankers (no matter which capitalist pig flag it is flying under) and establishing no fly zones-but that most likely won't happen, because global oil is calling the shots.

Re:Every little bit helps (1)

chill (34294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374529)

No, every little bit doesn't help for Sudan. Food and relief supplies get to the people who need it only when the Sudanese gov't wants it to. That is to say, almost never. Please explain to me why this deserves our attention. No, I will not accept "so someone will DO something" as an answer.

Do WHAT?

In Sudan it is the government inflicting this genocide on its own people. They are not interested in stopping.

The genocide in the Sudan will stop only with one of three possible outcomes:

1. The Sudanese gov't accomplishes what they are trying to do, and butcher the vast majority of animist and christian peoples in the south. They would need to eliminate them totally as a political and social entity, so I'm talking 95%+ here.

2. A revolution, overthrowing the existing gov't. They tried, and this isn't going to happen. Even if it did, it would be chaos and you'd end up with another Somalia.

3. An invasion, overthrowing the existing gov't. This would need to be done by someone with a backbone and the wherewithal to actually do it right. This leaves out both the U.N. and the A.U. And by "do it right" I mean real 19th-century colonial rule. An iron fist to whip their asses into shape, forcibly establish law and order and then set up a good educational system and get an entire generation into school.

Can you actually see a #4, or are you truely advocating #3 by raising awareness in the U.S. that we just say "enough is enough" and transfer all our troops from Iraq to Sudan?

  Charles

Re:Every little bit helps (1)

Kangburra (911213) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374711)

This leaves out both the U.N. and the A.U.


What's the A.U?

Re:Every little bit helps (2, Informative)

chill (34294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374821)

African Union, a regional force made up of troops from different African nations. The theory is "locals" would be more palatable than former "colonials". They already have a small number of troops in Sudan to help police the issue. However, they have been trying to increase this number but have been thwarted by the Sudanese gov't. Sudan militarized a couple of ports and prevented their entry.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/6033231.stm [bbc.co.uk]

Re:Every little bit helps (1)

Kangburra (911213) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375421)

Thank you. I guess using my country code stopped me guessing another abbreviation.

Helps Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375487)

If you listen to the plethora of liberal activist groups who have adopted Darfur as the new subject of their sermon (with typical missionary zeal), what you generally hear about how the government of Sudan needs to be stopped. Their tactics range from calling for UN intervention to conjuring memories of economic divestment in South Africa. In all of this, what you don't hear about are the people who were living Darfur. If anything, they are simply noted as a large helpless mass of "refugees" who need to "be helped." And by help, they mean receive the treatment activists proscribe.

If you talk with anarchists who have been in Darfur, you hear a different story. You hear about a revolution, and those who were there are not refugees but revolutionaries. This represents one of the fundamental differences between liberals and anarchists: liberals hope to limit the power of those who have it, while anarchists hope to empower individuals.

If you really want to help someone, you need to listen to what they're asking for. Neither of the things that you're proposing do that. The UN is a Union of *Nations*. They do not deal with individuals, and they do not acknowledge communities attempting to live in resistance to a nation. Just as in Haiti, where the UN is currently acting as an occupying counter-insurgency force -- by disarming insurgents and only acknowledging the right of The Government to have weapons, the same would hold true for UN intervention in Sudan. Sudan has authored a bogus peace agreement that says nothing about stopping genocide, much less about the simple disarmament of the janjaweed. The rebels recognize it as bullshit, but the UN does not deal with anyone but nations. If they were to move into Sudan, they'd do what they always do -- enforce the "peace agreement" authored by a "nation." In this case, it'd set Darfur up for whole-sale slaughter.

Your suspicion is correct, the UN does not have a place in this. Nor do they have a place in any conflict that's about power vs. people. But US billionaires don't either. Where do you think money raised "to benefit darfur" is going? To Darfur? What's their mailing address there, anyway? Can we get one of these donors to release the address for 'Darfur'? I'd like to send a postcard.

The money goes to these fucked up liberal groups who haven't been there, don't know arabic, haven't snuck across the border to hear what's happening from the SLA, and are stuck thinking within a context of nations. If you really want to help the rebels, make contact with them and send them money directly. They already have the connections to buy and transport weapons, and a rocket propelled grenade launcher only costs so much.

Re:Every little bit helps (1)

packeteer (566398) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376095)

Are you really saying that we should get behind Myspace' fundraising becuase the UN wont provide aid to Sudan? Where is the closest place for me to puke. This is exactly what they are trying to convince you to feel and its silly to go along with it.

Major Powers Keep UN down. (1)

arthurpaliden (939626) | more than 7 years ago | (#16377009)

Unfortunatly the UN is powerless to do anything meaningful because the major world powers do not want a precident set that can then be used against them in regards to their own internal problems.

What needs to happen... (3, Interesting)

JoeLinux (20366) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374279)

I too, concur that this is a tragedy of epic proportions, but, I think, is being ignored by both sides of the aisle for political reasons.

The Right, unfortunately, knows that our military cannot support serious actions to halt the genocide that is happening. As typically strong supporters of our military, they don't want to see the military face losses on top of what they are incurring in Iraq. Such an act could quickly become a political lightening rod.

In order for the Left to support such an action, they would have to support invading a sovereign nation whose official ties to terrorism are only hints and whispers, and without official UN approval, which is exactly their protest against the Iraq Invasion. Even with knowledge that the Iraqi government was killing their own citizens, The Left opposed invasion. To suddenly support a Darfur excursion would end up making them look like extreme hypocrites.

Also, the lesson we learned from Vietnam is that in order to win the war, we would have to wage war on the "tail" side of the agressors, drawing their front-line troops away to defend their home turf. That turns in a CQB (Close-Quarter Battle), which inflicts heavy losses on an invading force. Or we carpet bomb the mostly muslim north, allowing for the (pardon me for saying this) anti-US Muslim propaganda machine to run at full tilt again.

Remember, these conquering forces have many 10-year-old boys with AK-47s. All you have to do is take away the gun, and suddenly, "THE UNITED STATES MILITARY IS KILLING MUSLIM CHILDREN" shows up on CNN.

Then there will be protests at a University, but that's ok.

If I might suggest a situation for history to repeat itself, I propose Kent State.

I support evacuation. The issue I see is that any provisions sent to the region would just as likely end up feeding conquering Janjaweed forces as hungry Christians.

After evacuation, our forces could carpet bomb at will, knowing that any movement in the area was hostile invaders.

In my opinion, the Sudanese Government is attempting genocide. The ironic part is that it is mostly African (Read: Black) population that is bearing the brunt of this, and the Arab population is causing it. I think this is a problem of politically correct crisis. You can't support one side without appearing biased against the other. No politician will touch it, so no action will happen.

Which is truly unfortunate.

Of course, there is a solution [youtube.com] to all of this, and I think it should be widely deployed after evacuation:

But, I wonder how the people who were opposed to the Iraqi Invasion are going to react. Are they going to admit that invading Iraq for the reasons stated were acceptable after all, or simply wait for the UN to draft up a strongly worded letter to the Sudanese government?

Joe

Re:What needs to happen... (2, Insightful)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374585)

>...admit that invading Iraq for the reasons stated were acceptable after all,

Humanitarian assistance was not one of the reasons stated. Nor was Saddam's ghastly human rights record a reason for the invasion: he was just as bad back at the time of the handshake [gwu.edu] .

>Then there will be protests at a University, but that's ok.

>If I might suggest a situation for history to repeat itself, I propose Kent State.

The people who moderated this up may be unfamiliar with the event he is proposing to repeat. In 1970 the National Guard opened fire on students at Kent State. Not "opened fire on protestors", because they killed and wounded people who were nowhere near the protest. William Schroeder's entrance wound was in the lower back, and his exit wound was in the upper body. This is because he was lying on his face when he was shot, having hit the dirt as he'd been trained to in the ROTC.

Re:What needs to happen... (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374603)

You are thinking too much about the Left, and the Right, and forgetting about other points of view.

Like what about the people who couldn't really care one way or another about Iraqi attrocities, or Sudanese genocide? People who feel the U.S. military should stay out of all conflicts that are not a direct response to an attack or stopping an eminent attack on the United States?

Many of the people opposed to the invasion of Iraq, are just as opposed to doing anything in Sudan. Not everyone opposed to the Iraq war is some bleeding heart hippie. What about the people who believe that if you aren't willing to nuke them from orbit (it is the only way to be sure!), then U.S. should stay out!

Re:What needs to happen... (2, Insightful)

Stalyn (662) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374665)

First off it should be noted that the majority of victims in Darfur are Muslim and this is a case of Arab vs. African violence.

The US doesn't want to send troops because their soldiers would just end up becoming the targets. So instead of pacifying the situation it would only become worse (see Somalia 1993). The UN had promised 20,000 troops in the area but Sudan openly objected and declared that such a force would be seen as invaders. The UN then backed down with the hope the AU would increase its forces and extend its stay.

As far as your argument that the "Left" would appear as hypocrites for a supporting an excursion into Darfur because they opposed the invasion of Iraq, I don't understand your line of thought. Darfur and Iraq appear to be two very different situations.

Re:What needs to happen... (1)

dfenstrate (202098) | more than 7 years ago | (#16375701)

Great post, but you forgot one critical thing that guarantees no one will stick their necks out for those being slaughtered:

They don't matter.

It's harsh, but true. What is going on is a strictly local affair in a place with few if any Europeans, no significant resources that the world still needs, and is too poor to fund terrorist misadventures outside their own border.

No one has any material interest in seeing this stopped. It's morally questionable to put the sons and daughters of any nation on the line to fight in a conflict that the mother country won't benefit from at all.

I say 'questionable' because a moral argument could be made for intervening, and a moral argument could be made for staying out.

The folks who cry out for intervention also need to remember that the only way we can be sure to stop this genocide is to kill enough of the aggressors that they know we're serious. Simply showing up has been proven, time and time again, to not do the job.

Re:What needs to happen... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16377553)

What is going on is a strictly local affair in a place with few if any Europeans, no significant resources that the world still needs, and is too poor to fund terrorist misadventures outside their own border.

Really? Sudan has oil reserves of decent size.

The reason the UN isn't doing anything is that the Arab & Muslim countries are lined up firmly behind Sudan.

And the leftist/radicals don't care, they are far too busy protesting against Israel and the USA. Sudan their own people doesn't fit into their US-imperialist-Bush-Hitler-crusader-Evil-coloniali st world view. So they ignore Sudan.

The racism of these kooks is astounding. There were enormous protests around the world when Israel killed around a thousand people in Lebanon after their soldiers were attacked. Sudan has massacred hundreds of thousands of people with almost no protests.

Re:What needs to happen... (1)

packeteer (566398) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376181)

The Right, unfortunately, knows that our military cannot support serious actions to halt the genocide that is happening. As typically strong supporters of our military, they don't want to see the military face losses on top of what they are incurring in Iraq. Such an act could quickly become a political lightening rod.

In order for the Left to support such an action, they would have to support invading a sovereign nation whose official ties to terrorism are only hints and whispers, and without official UN approval, which is exactly their protest against the Iraq Invasion. Even with knowledge that the Iraqi government was killing their own citizens, The Left opposed invasion. To suddenly support a Darfur excursion would end up making them look like extreme hypocrites.


You frame the arguement in a simplistic way. You say that the right is trying to do what is best but for political reasons they would be shot down. According to you the left on the other hand constantly lives in fear that they will be exposed for the hipocrits they are. I think its obvious that this is an unrealistic scenario but it seems like you took your best chance to call leftists hipocrits without them actually doing anything to back up your arguement.

Also, the lesson we learned from Vietnam is that in order to win the war, we would have to wage war on the "tail" side of the agressors, drawing their front-line troops away to defend their home turf. That turns in a CQB (Close-Quarter Battle), which inflicts heavy losses on an invading force. Or we carpet bomb the mostly muslim north, allowing for the (pardon me for saying this) anti-US Muslim propaganda machine to run at full tilt again.

What are you smoking? We did not learn how to win in vietnam. We fought an unwinnable fight and its not like we now know how to win. Apparently by our actions in Iraq we learned nothing and want to make the same mistakes over again.

You go on to propose using ultra-expensive and ineffective bombs in "wide deployment" to kill people is going to win a vietnam like situation. You also say that Students who are peacifully protesting should be shot? I'm just baffled at how ignorant and bullheaded you are.

Re:What needs to happen... (1)

packeteer (566398) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376223)

The Original poster's home URL leads to a list of files which include an image of a dead student at Kent State and the text "pwn3d". How does this guy get modded +5?

it's rather telling that... (1)

Ender Ryan (79406) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376689)

It' rather telling that you find --> this [pacificnet.net] <-- funny.

You seem so eager to kill people. Are you certain there is not something terribly wrong with you?

We can do better (2, Insightful)

delirium of disorder (701392) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374281)

Want to listen to better music and still help the people of Sudan? Check out the Genocide in Sudan compilation [barnesandnoble.com] . All proceeds go to UNICEF and The UN Refugee Agency. Or you could donate directly to UNICEF [unicef.org] , the UN Refugee Agency [unhcr.org] , or the UN world food programme [wfp.org]

If it were the other way around (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16374321)

That is, if it were the Christians killing the Muslims in Sudan, there would be no such fundraiser. Shame.

Re:If it were the other way around (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374509)

Actually, yes... It was Christians (or at least former-Communists who were traditionally Christian) killing Muslims in the former Yugoslavia (at least that was what the propoganda said), and there were similiar fundraisers.

So quite clearly the fundraiser for Christians killing Muslims came first.

When it WAS the other way around... (1)

patio11 (857072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374783)

... in Bosnia, not only did they get nice little fundraisers, they got a US-lead military campaign. Which was about the only effective part of the operation (and I'm being generous calling it effective), since the UN, as per usual, let the genocide continue in the supposedly safe areas right under their nose. Now the area is mostly lawless, overseen by a toothless UN agency whose only mandate is protecting their mandate, and has a growing Islamic terrorist problem.

All in all, a pretty successful international peacekeeping operation by historical standards. By the way, have you heard about Kosovo in your newspaper in the last, oh, 5 years or so? The answer is probably a "no" for the same reason you hear about Darfur fairly little: it just isn't that useful as a talking point against the US. If you want to get some worldwide attention for Darfur, screw the little MySpace singalong: figure out a way that it reflects badly on Bush and I guarantee you AFRICANS DYING BY MILLIONS AS DUBYA YAWNS will be the headline of half the papers in the free world.

Worthless. (1)

ravenshrike (808508) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374337)

Until the bastards in Khartoum are ousted from power.

MySpace's Response... (2, Funny)

thesimplicity (973644) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374405)

"Is the Sudan a two-door or four-door, and does it have a dock for my iPod?"

Relief efforts? (0, Troll)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374463)

Relief efforts? Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't the "humanitarian problem" in Sudan basicly genocide? Does the relief supplies include AK-47s and rocket propelled grenades?

Sudden fundraiser (1)

mh101 (620659) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374469)

I misread that as "MySpace Organizes Sudden Fundraiser", and was expecting to read that MySpace is in financial troubles and needed to raise some money fast.

Gosh... (1)

photomonkey (987563) | more than 7 years ago | (#16374715)

If only putting an "I support the Sudan thingy" icon in your profile could enter you to win concert tickets AND the option to buy a rubber-ish wrist bracelet in a fashionable color for $3.99, then people would REALLY support the whole Sudan thing and look cool doing it. Plus, good ol' Rupert might be able to make a few bucks in addition to helping their PR image.

Re:Gosh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16375811)

maybe before you put in the few bucks in this Sudan thingy, you should know that this Sudan thingy did not show on the political map until Chevron got the boot out of many oil contracts with Sudan. Guess who won the contracts; You guessed it right; the enemies of the current Bush administration, that is Turkey [sudantribune.com] , Iran [uscpublicdiplomacy.com] , India [mbendi.co.za] , and China [forbes.com] . The report of the human rights groups regarding the "Genocide in Darfur" is very wierd (p.s.Darfur means home of the Fur.). For the first time in the history of human rights groups, they point at the villages that need the intervention of the UN troops, (Led by the US forces of course) that the emptied villages matches the map of oil concessions in south Darfur.

Call me Paranoid,but I think there is a little more to it then just stopping a human rights abuse.

BTW, how come we did not see any dead bodies from this "genocide"? We are seeing all kinds of gore from Iraq on daily basis.

Darfur remained relatively quiet during the dreadful war (two million dead in the past 20 years) between the African ethnic groups of Southern Sudan, where most people are Christians or animists, and the Arabs of the North who dominated Sudans government, army and economy. It was the peace settlement between North and South in 2003 that triggered the revolt in Darfur. That peace deal gave the southern rebels a share in the central government, a half-share of the oil revenues now pouring in from wells that are mostly located in southern territory, and the right to a referendum on independence from Sudan in six years time. So some leaders of the Zaghawa and the Fur decided to emulate the southerners: launch a revolt in Darfur, and try to cut a similar deal with Khartoum in return for ending it.

Question to George Chultz [ucla.edu] of the 1st Bush Administration, who is behind most of this propaganda: Is this another "Slam dunk"?????

Bands will donate "part" of their proceeds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16376299)

C'mon - step up.

Who here couldn't do a free day of work for a cause like Darfur?

DC

When will people learn? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16376877)

That you cannot help what is too weak to survive?
Its evolution baby

Deja Vu... (1)

Skippyboy (978787) | more than 7 years ago | (#16376965)

Does anyone remember something called "We Are the World"? Ever wonder how that turned out? Look up "USA for Africa" on Wikipedia. Seems to me that something similar will probably happen with this. Most of the money/food/medicine/etc will end up in the hands of the government cronies, and very little will help the people.

Local vs National (1)

boyfaceddog (788041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16377033)

Raising money for Sudan is fantastic and I wish everyone all the luck they can handle with this.

On the other hand, This may be one of those watershed events when our culture changes course. In this case it may signal a (very slight) shift from music being national to music being regional. If the USA or even the world can watch a concert without the musicians moving around, then all music becomes local.
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