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The Future of ReiserFS

timothy posted more than 7 years ago | from the strange-days dept.

459

lisah writes "With the announcement of Hans Reiser's arrest this week, many people have been wondering what this will mean for his company, Namesys, and the future of his filesystem work. According to a report at Linux.com, employees at Namesys are circling their wagons and plan to continue working on the project 'in the short term.' One employee admits, 'we are rather shaken and stressed at the moment, although I cannot say we didn't see it coming.'"

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We saw it coming?? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406433)

They knew he was going to kill his wife? Isn't that a felony itself?

Re:We saw it coming?? (5, Informative)

MartinG (52587) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406467)

Nobody knows if he did kill his wife.

I assume they meant that they saw his arrest coming. (Since when wives disappear, husbands routinely get arrested or at the very least intensively questioned by police)

Re:We saw it coming?? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406567)

I now qualify for meta-moderation.
Why do I have to post a comment before I get the meta-moderate link?
Because I'm not a subscriber?
Fuck that shit!

Re:We saw it coming?? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406633)

Nobody knows if he did kill his wife.

Well, one person most likely knows for certain...

Re:We saw it coming?? (2, Funny)

jobsagoodun (669748) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406727)

Didn't AOL PUBLISH [slashdot.org] this a few months ago?

Re:We saw it coming?? (2, Informative)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406695)

No they don't routinely get arrested. To arrest someone you have to have evidence - this means the police have evidence that he *did* kill his wife. They're only now trying to get a confession or enough to convince a jury.

Re:We saw it coming?? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407019)

The alternate hypothosis is they have no idea what happened and are hoping for a confession.

The circumstances surrounding her disappearance are so strange that I wouldn't assume anything.

Re:We saw it coming?? (5, Insightful)

Rumagent (86695) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407089)

this means the police have evidence that he *did* kill his wife


Or think they do. Or hope they do. Or just don't care if they do. The police is not exactly an organization which is known for its infallibility.

Re:We saw it coming?? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407221)

You sure about that? The US government is big enough now (*) to detain innocent people indefinitely without due process. As we speak, there are hundreds (thousands?) of people sitting in jail who haven't been formally charged with anything. I don't know the first thing about this particular case, but it seems pretty clear to me that due process is gone.

(*) This isn't the result of terrorism or any one particular event; it is simply the inevitable consequence of government expanding its power year after year. (The US government of today dwarfs the US government of 100 years ago, both in revenue and power over the people, but only a fraction of that growth was achieved pre-Bush or post-9/11.

"I didn't kill my wife!" (5, Funny)

BeeBeard (999187) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406765)

Well no, Hans Reiser didn't do it. A one-armed man sent by a pharmaceutical company did it.

Re:We saw it coming?? (2, Funny)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407107)

There was a news story that Reiser was a suspect several weeks ago.

In the office meeting 3 weeks ago, we joked about the advantages of switching to Reiser FS, now that Reiser was going to jail. He'll have plenty of time to work on it, after all.

Re:We saw it coming?? (1)

BSOD DOC (1008507) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406503)

I thought that one was presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, or has he already been tried and convicted here?

Re:We saw it coming?? (5, Informative)

Koroviev (892052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406585)

He meant the arrest. This is the full quotation:
Yes, we are rather shaked and stressed at moment, altough I can not say, we didn't seen it coming. I, personally, really like how US police acted exactly like their russian counterpart: e.g. sitting on their ass for whole month, waiting, so they can declare person officially missing and then just press charges against whoever looks most vulnerable. Well, probably I am wrong. Time will show.

Re:We saw it coming?? (3, Interesting)

Speare (84249) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406795)

I think the "We saw it coming" quote was not in reference to the actual crime, but in the downwardly spiralling finances the group knew about. I hadn't even seen anything about this story until the LAST slashdot article, and someone linked some public emails that showed that the group was quite aware that doom was approaching.

Re:We saw it coming?? (4, Funny)

Aethedor (973725) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407213)

Why doesn't the police use Hans' Journal to recover his lost wife?

As expected (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406435)

This is as expected. Just because Hans probably murdered his wife, this is no reason for all the other devs to stop work on the system. It's not a one-man job, after all.

Re:As expected (4, Insightful)

MartinG (52587) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406479)

Hans probably murdered his wife

Not sure if I'm feeding a troll here, but the man has BEEN ARRESTED! That is all!

If you have any evidence that he killed his wife, be sure to let us know. (and let the police know of course)

Re:As expected (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406551)

Since when is expressing an opinion on the likelihood of something a "troll"? Show some maturity, please.

Re:As expected (4, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406649)

And now that he's been arrested, the police have described some of their evidence against him [mercurynews.com] . They found her blood in his house and in his car.

We don't know if he did it - yet - but we know more than enough to say that it's most probable that he did. It is, of course, possible he didn't, and we all hope that Nina will be found alive somewhere, but the most probable outcome is that Hans Reiser has, in fact, murdered Nina.

Re:As expected (5, Funny)

denebian devil (944045) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406877)

They forgot to mention the most important piece of evidence in their arsenal: They reviewed the AOL search records that were released and identified record #456365 as likely to belong to Reiser, and noted many suspicious searches such as "I hate Nina Reiser" and "how to kill Nina Reiser without getting caught".

The most offensive part of this evidence of course is that Hans Reiser uses AOL Search....

Re:As expected (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406723)

If you have any evidence that he killed his wife, be sure to let us know. (and let the police know of course)

Oh, you mean like the blood splatters that were found in HIS car that has been confirmed as HER blood?
And the fact that the rear seats are missing from said car?
And the fact that he actively attempted to hide the car from police?
And the fact that he had books on how law enforcement handles homicide investigations?

Now, it could be the case that his wife had a nose bleed or had suffered a paper cut while riding with Hans, and it could be true that the whole hiding the car things was a misunderstanding (or fearing that the missing rear seat would look bad, he actually did try to hide it in panic), and it could be true that he purchased the books knowing that he would be a likely suspect so he wanted to know what was coming. However, the above taken with other observations about his behaviour does not paint a rosey picture. Sure, he is innocent until proven guilty, but there is at least enough evidence so far to strongly implicate him. It's not one of these "heck, we have no evidence and no clue, so lets just arrest the husband" deals.

Re:As expected (4, Insightful)

DagdaMor (518567) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406741)

All of which is Circumstantial Evidence, and a bit flimsy to prosecute on when no one has found a body yet.

Re:As expected (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406975)

All of which is Circumstantial Evidence, and a bit flimsy to prosecute on when no one has found a body yet.

Err, didn't I conclude"Sure, he is innocent until proven guilty, but there is at least enough evidence so far to strongly implicate him". I didn't say he was guilty, just that there is at least enough evidence to arrest him and to make him the primary suspect. Is there enough to garner a conviction, hard to say, likely not from what has been disclosed to the public so far, but who knows what other evidence the police have that they are not sharing. Plus it's been proven time and time again that you don't need a body to convict, if the quantity and quality of circumstantial evidence is strong enough, one's ability to properly dispose of a corpse no longer becomes a valid way to avoid conviction.

Re:As expected (1)

gellenburg (61212) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407191)

Tell that to Scott Peterson.

But wait, he *did* kill his wife, didn't he?

At least a Jury said so.

But *he* was tried on circumstantial evidence, too.

Re:As expected (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406913)

I wonder if he was the one who was doing the searching on AOL on how to kill his wife.

Anon

Re:As expected (3, Insightful)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407219)

Investigators have also recovered books on how police investigate homicides, which were obtained by Hans Reiser a few days after his wife's Sept. 3 disappearance, the sources said.
I don't know a lot about the other stuff, but this seems to be on HIS side, rather than against him. He acted like I would act, like a geek would act imo in this respect. To put it into geek terminology, he read the HOWTO after he discovered a bug. This would rather point into the direction he didn't knowingly create the bug in the first place.

My point is, if you'd want to kill your wife, you'd obtain these books BEFORE you kill your wife, study them thoroughly for a long time and then despose them. Hans Reiser is not stupid. Of course it is all possible that if she were murdered by him, it was an impulse murder. Who knows. We have no evidence and facts.

Re:As expected (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407055)

In a forum full of ReiserFS fanboys this may be a dissenting opinion, but it's certainly no troll.

Fabulous quote (1)

joaommp (685612) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406439)

"I can't say I didn't see it comming"...

Re:Fabulous quote (1)

ReidMaynard (161608) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406525)

I think Lyamin meant the arrest of Reiser not the disappearance/murder of his wife. Of course, I'm probably bitting the troll.

Re:Fabulous quote (1)

epiphani (254981) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406615)

After reading the article, the context isnt quite clear. I dont think the speaker was saying "I cant say I didn't expect Hans to kill his wife." We should probably avoid assuming as much.

Re:Fabulous quote (2, Insightful)

jimicus (737525) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406755)

Hans' wife has been missing for some time.

In these cases, spouses and ex-spouses are always the first suspects.

Regardless of whether or not Hans has done anything wrong (and the public have no evidence either way), it was pretty much a foregone conclusion that unless convincing evidence to the contrary turned up, he'd be arrested.

Buttsecks? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406447)

OMG LOL!

They saw a murder coming? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406449)

I don't know about you, but if I had reason to suspect my boss wanted to kill his wife outside of the regular jokes this might be a slight reason for concern.

Re:They saw a murder coming? (4, Insightful)

MartinG (52587) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406499)

The way I read it, they saw an arrest coming.

You know maybe... (5, Funny)

ellem (147712) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406453)

maybe she should have been so enamored with GFS. How about that? Huh? How about she just stop talking about how great Google's File System is FOR ONE MINUTE? Did anyone think bout that?

It's not Tuesday! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406489)

[nt]

Re:You know maybe... (0, Redundant)

Goaway (82658) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407293)

I award you one not-allowed-to-moderate-any-more point!

Keep working. (0, Redundant)

suntac (252438) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406459)

I do not think they will stop working on the projects however I think that if he is convicted this will have a serious drawback to the project and the developments will slow down for some time.

But in the end they will keep working on it,.... I think and I hope.

who's going to pay them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407265)

They'll probably just get other jobs...

Not Surprising? (1, Troll)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406469)

One employee admits, 'we are rather shaken and stressed at the moment, although I cannot say we didn't see it coming.'

Your boss is arrested for killing his wife, and nobody in the office is surprised? You know, I've worked in some pretty annoying companies before, but I've never been able to say that. Nor would I want to. If anyone else is in the same position, I strongly suggest that you get off your ass [monster.com] and jump ship. Low standards is one thing, but c'mon guys. I don't care how sweet their after-hours-pizza-reimbursement policy is, that's just fucked up.

Re:Not Surprising? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406587)

Ever considered that this investigation has been going on for well over a month?

If he was the only real suspect they had, and they had no reason to assume that he hadn't done it, why wouldn't they arrest him? "We saw it coming" refers to him being arrested, not to him (possibly) killing his wife.

Re:Not Surprising? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407067)

No I'm sure GP didn't consider it. Why would a /.er consider facts when he has the chance to take a jab to get a +1 Funny?

Re:Not Surprising? (1)

Calinous (985536) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406589)

He might have been rich as Bill Gates, and he still should have been a suspect. Anyway, I've read one of the previous articles about the arrest, and I was awed at how much information was available in posts (some probably from complete strangers) It would be possible for an employee to heard as much in gossips, and draw its conclusions about what the police would do

Re:Not Surprising? (2, Insightful)

rjstanford (69735) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406631)

He might have been rich as Bill Gates, and he still should have been a suspect.

Oh, absolutely. But most suspects don't get arrested. Suspects against whom the prosecution feels that it has enough evidence to make a strong case get arrested. Being an estranged spouse isn't usually, in and of itself, damning evidence in a murder trial. Prosecutors don't generally play the "let's just arrest everyone we can think of and see which case will stick," method.

Re:Not Surprising? (1)

chrismcdirty (677039) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407267)

But that's how they do it on Law & Order and CSI! Are you telling me TV has been lying to me all these years?

Re:Not Surprising? (2, Insightful)

oyenstikker (536040) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406591)

After the disappearence of his wife, they saw the arrest coming. (If your estranged wife disappeared you would be the number one suspect.) He did not say that he saw him killing his wife coming, or that he even thinks he did it.

Re:Not Surprising? -- read the story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406665)

Maybe you should read the story before you go half cocked next time -- "Hans suspected that he would be suspected from the very beginning,"

Re:Not Surprising? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406749)

Common. Give me a break.

All they would have to have done to not be surprised/see this coming was read the news. I could entirely believe Hans is innocent and the best boss in the world (etc, etc), and I still would not be surprised when he was arrested if I was also aware that the police believed he was a prime suspect.

Hell, on the flip side, how many people do you think are out there that think OJ was guilty? Now, how many of those do you think would claim to be totally surprised/didn't see it coming that he was not convicted?

Re:Not Surprising? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406759)

Well ...
1. Mrs. Reiser has been missing for some time
2. Close relatives are *always* the first suspects
2.1. Especialy if they are in the middle of ugly divorce
2.1.1 AND there is some other pending litigation

Please look up some relevant news about this unfortunate case.

ANYBODY should have seen *some* unspecified problems comming
in this situation.

Re:Not Surprising? (1)

orangesquid (79734) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406849)

I think what the employee meant was that *after* his wife went missing, it was obvious that he would be suspected of something, since he was the last to see her, IIRC. "see it coming" -- "it" wasn't Mr. Reiser murdering his wife -- "it" was Mr. Reiser being arrested given that his wife had disappeared.

Last months media coverage (2)

btarval (874919) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406897)

Oh please. The reason why it's not a surprise is probably because lots of people knew about the situation beforehand. This has even been mentioned on some Linux mailing lists already, so it's really no surprise if you've been following this.

Here's a link to some of the media coverage from last month:

http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=local&id= 4558883 [go.com]

Can you say "subpoena"? (0)

OpenBSD101 (1009477) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406475)

"although I cannot say we didn't see it coming."

I hope that was taken out of context.

In other news... (4, Funny)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406483)

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer reminded corporate customers that the Open Source model is dangerous to their business.

"I squirt a picture to you, you squirt multimedia back to me," said Ballmer. "Sure, boom boom boom, we can do that and we ~do~ do that. In fact, no one squirts better than we do. But with Open Source, you don't know whose rights you are violating when you squirt.

And worse, open-source programmers tend to have police records. I'm just sayin'."

Re:In other news... (5, Funny)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406735)

>no one squirts better than we do
The thought of Balmer saying that just makes me shudder and not in a good way.

Who cares? (0, Flamebait)

kirk26 (811030) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406491)

Another Linsux user in jail. Score: Microsoft-1,00000 Linsux-0

Re:Who cares? (4, Funny)

Lord Bitman (95493) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406535)

Yeah, I know; but, http://www.mugshots.org/misc/bill-gates.html [mugshots.org]

Re:Who cares? (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406767)

Wearing that shirt, alone, should be an arrestable offense.

Re:Who cares? (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406919)

He must have been stoned or something, because judging by that enormous goofy grin, he is having waaay too much fun for someone who had just been arrested.

Yesterday's joke... (0, Redundant)

solevita (967690) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406517)

Good news for a killer file system.

Sorry...

For shame! (0)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406519)

None of this would have happened if devs had just included Reiser4 in to the kernel....

Open Source doesn't kill people (-1, Troll)

everphilski (877346) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406521)

Reiser: I kill people!

OS Developers arrested (3, Interesting)

uneek (107167) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406527)

Hi:

This makes me wonder how many other primary authors of open source projects have been arrested in the past and how this has affected their projects?

Uneek

Re:OS Developers arrested (3, Informative)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406663)

This makes me wonder why they didn't put a link to info about his arrest in the article. Not everyone knew this, and it is just sloppy of the editors to NOT include a link to give a bit of context about the arrest.

I found info here [geekzone.co.nz] , here [arstechnica.com] , and here [nbc11.com]

Re:OS Developers arrested (1)

rsidd (6328) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406731)

This makes me wonder why they didn't put a link to info about his arrest in the article.

The link does contain info, as well as further links.

it is just sloppy of the editors to NOT include a link

Slashdot is sloppy; if you want examples you can find plenty. But, on this occasion, the sloppiness is on the reader's part.

I found info here, here, and here

You could have found more and better info by just typing "reiser" into Google News.

Re:OS Developers arrested (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407157)

What is this "google" of which you speak?

Re:OS Developers arrested (2, Informative)

Mike89 (1006497) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406857)

Was it too much for you to even glance at the title of the ONLY Related Story - you know, right below the summary?

Re:OS Developers arrested (1)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406733)

Hmm, right now, the only name that springs in mind would be Alaa [slashdot.org] , who runs Egyptian LUG. Not sure if he developed anything though =)

Re:OS Developers arrested (4, Insightful)

$1uck (710826) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407059)

Doesn't this highlight another positive for OS? No seriously, so the lead developer is arrested/killed/in a coma. This means the project *is* not dead, someone somewhere can pick up where he/she left off. If it was closed source, and the lead developer was more than just a cog in a large corporation, who could/would pick up the slack? The source code could conceivably being floating in legal limbo until the affairs are settled. Or am I just being myopic?

Re:OS Developers arrested (1)

jalefkowit (101585) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407129)

If you're curious, why limit the inquiry to just open source projects? Surely you'd be concerned if the primary developer of a commercial product you depend on was arrested on the same charge, right?

This actually brings up one of the strongest points in favor of open source -- even if Hans Reiser never walks free again, if there's enough people who find value in his work they can pick it up themselves and continue moving it forward. If ReiserFS was a commercial product, that wouldn't be possible.

Finally, Linux has its killer app. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406581)

And Netcraft confirms it.

Personally... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406629)

I find this more interesting: http://lkml.org/lkml/2006/10/12/16 [lkml.org]

Problems for Namesys? (5, Insightful)

NekoXP (67564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406647)

"I do not think that just being arrested will affect anything so long as Hans is not actually convicted," says Oleg Drokin, the former release manager at Namesys. "If he is convicted, that might cause problems for Namesys [because] it is operated solely by Hans."

I don't understand. If the guy who runs the company goes away usually it's fairly easy process (albeit longwinded and boring) to get a new general manager, CEO or whatever. Namesys isn't a public company, so they could name their Thanksgiving turkey the CEO. The problem might be, if Hans acted as accountant etc. and did some funny number crunching that is going to drive them into the dirt; of course that would add to Hans' problems, too, if they were ever revealed :D

Is Hans really that important to ReiserFS? Isn't this the whole beauty of GPL code, that there are thousands of people out there who can pick his work up without even involving him, Namesys etc., and continue the 'legacy'?

Re:Problems for Namesys? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406805)

Is Hans really that important to ReiserFS? Isn't this the whole beauty of GPL code, that there are thousands of people out there who can pick his work up without even involving him, Namesys etc., and continue the 'legacy'?

Can't speak for how important Hans was to ReiserFS and Namesys, but NO, it's not the beauty of GPL code, it's the beauty of Open Source code, of which GPL is a subset. Call me pedantic, but it's an important distinction here.

Re:Problems for Namesys? (3, Interesting)

jimicus (737525) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406825)

Depends how large the company was and how big a role the CEO has in running it.

In larger companies, the CEO generally plays golf most of the time.

In smaller companies, it's quite common for the CEO to be designing the products in great detail, and many a promising open source project has withered for lack of a leader - though I can't see that happening in the case of ReiserFS because it's too big and important.

Re:Problems for Namesys? (2, Informative)

swv3752 (187722) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406843)

Hans is that important to Namesys and Namesys is the only group really working on ReiserFS. It is possible for some other group to pick up the project, but Hans aggravated alot of other developers, so...

Re:Problems for Namesys? (1)

Rambo (2730) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407027)

I don't understand. If the guy who runs the company goes away usually it's fairly easy process (albeit longwinded and boring) to get a new general manager, CEO or whatever.

    If the company is founded as a sole proprietorship and the owner/proprietor disappears things can be very difficult. I was part of a company that started that way and once they got big enough they had to register as a corporation to avoid having the company dissolved if something happened to the owner. I'm unclear on why this happens but I expect it has something to do with the idea that the owner literally owns the company's assets and if they should die the state may try to claim those assets.

Re:Problems for Namesys? (1)

ball-lightning (594495) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407051)

so they could name their Thanksgiving turkey the CEO.


I think that's the problem, there IS no they. Without Reiser, there is no one with the authority to name a ceo, or even pay the bills.

Of course, he could always name someone to take over, but I don't think anyone at the current company can...

Re:Problems for Namesys? (2, Insightful)

revery (456516) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407143)

Is Hans really that important to ReiserFS? Isn't this the whole beauty of GPL code, that there are thousands of people out there who can pick his work up without even involving him, Namesys etc., and continue the 'legacy'?

I think Hans might very well be just that important to ReiserFS. I've worked at companies where if a certain person died or decided that they didn't want to work there any longer, it would be very hard to replace them.

There are some tasks wherein the set of people who are both qualified and interested is quite small. This might well be true of the ReiserFS internals.

Re:Problems for Namesys? (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407173)

I believe Reiser owns Namesys, he's not just the guy who runs it.

As such, his disappearance, for whatever reason, will have a profound effect on the company if he doesn't take steps to ensure otherwise. And he may not be able to take those steps at all if he's convicted.

Even if not guilty (3, Interesting)

L-s-L69 (700599) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406667)

The loss of his wife is likely to have a profound impact upon his work and any future development. I can only hope the community and the other developers are able to step up and carry on the work.

Re:Even if not guilty (0, Troll)

JonathanR (852748) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407021)

Does the open source development model now extend to housework?

Re:Even if not guilty (3, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407087)

his ex-wife.. who's contribution to his work was to claim that he was earning money that he wasn't paying her to raise their children, when actually he was $100k in debt (yeah, couldn't see that coming "let's make a filesystem!" "let's give it away for free!" how could you lose money on that?!) This is one of the reasons why the cops didn't mind arresting him. He really does look like he wouldn't mind seeing her dead.

Then again, who doesn't feel that way about their ex-wife.. except, ya know, those few freaks who part on good terms and have each other over for dinner with their new partners. *shudder*

Can't live with them... (1)

taff^2 (188189) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406717)

Can't kill them.

Last I had heard though, she was missing, and the evidence was only circumstantial. Have they found a body?

Re:Can't live with them... (1)

craagz (965952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407169)

or the murder weapon..

now, i wonder what Mr. Reiser cud have used if indeed he committed the crime. Xkill?

Some Related Reading (5, Interesting)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406801)

I've been reading a bit, trying to get a handle on what's been happening and what may be next for the people involved in this (I trust the filesystem will be fine). Here are the most interesting parts of what I've read:

AUTHORITIES SEARCH HOME OF MISSING WOMAN'S HUSBAND [cbs5.com]

ATTORNEY: HANS REISER 'DISTRUSTFUL' OF OAKLAND POLICE [cbs5.com]

UPDATE: POLICE CHARGE HANS REISER WITH MURDER [cbs5.com]

Missing woman's blood found in husband's house [mercurynews.com]

All in all, it's very disturbing. I get the impression at least one of the people involved in this is completely insane.

Re:Some Related Reading (4, Informative)

jackbird (721605) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407063)

Wow, completely insane doesn't even begin to describe it. My favorite line:

"In addition, Reiser alleged that Sturgeon wrote into a contract that Reiser must participate in 'Death Yoga,' which he said has the purpose of 'slowing down one's heart to the point of death.'"

Re:Some Related Reading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407233)


Missing woman's blood found in husband's house


You got to be shitting me, they found his wifes blood in his house! Must clearly be guilty. I mean i cant think of any way her blood would be in his house unless he murdered her by carving her into chunks with the blunt and rusty end of a circular saw.

Open and closed case chief... chocolate or sprinkles?

Steve Ballmer Vs. Hans Reiser (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406853)

I was going to do a google fight but the original version appears to have been replaced with some javascript bogosity. I guess we should put it to an open vote instead.

Good thing he's not in texas (0, Troll)

bahwi (43111) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406909)

Because down here we ain't got no good judges.

http://www.dallasobserver.com/Issues/2006-10-05/ne ws/feature.html [dallasobserver.com]

From the article:
An examination of the trial transcript, witness statements, police reports and appellate briefs reveals something even more shocking.

Except for an alleged motive, there was no evidence against Karage.

"I couldn't believe it," says Lawrence Mitchell, one of the top criminal appellate attorneys in Dallas, who represented Karage on appeal. "There's not a shred of evidence he committed the crime. I don't know how Karen Greene came to the conclusion he was guilty. It's bad judging all the way through. I think a first-year law student would have seen he wasn't guilty. I have never seen a case this egregious."

The project is GPL right, so it will go on anyways, perhaps a new name, but, that wouldn't be right either.

Strange way to prosecute in the US (1)

kooky45 (785515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406921)

Perhaps someone can explain how homocide cases in the US go? Here in the UK it's unusual for the police to make blatant press conferences announcing the evidence they have against a suspect and why it must point to him being guilty, but in the US it seems commonplace. Often the public in the UK don't find out about crucial evidence until the trials are over. The US police try the suspect in front of the media before going to court. Are they trying to have public opinion sway the court process in their favour?

Re:Strange way to prosecute in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407073)

Here in the UK it's unusual for the police to make blatant
press conferences announcing the evidence they have against
a suspect and why it must point to him being guilty


You don't use Stockwell tube much, do you ..

Actually, here in the US... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407259)

The US police try the suspect in front of the media before going to court. Are they trying to have public opinion sway the court process in their favour?

Actually, here in the US, it's more like *THE MEDIA* who tries the suspect in front of the public before going to court. The media thrives on sensationalism, and since it is they who control what gets published with whatever spin they desire to put on the story, they are very expert at making it artificially look like it is the police who are conducting the media trial and the media is just there merely reporting it. Sadly enough, most Americans are so gullible they easily fall for this.

Re:Strange way to prosecute in the US (1)

david_g17 (976842) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407277)

Are they trying to have public opinion sway the court process in their favour?

You missed the OJ Simpson trial, didn't you?

Re:Strange way to prosecute in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16407283)

Yes, this happens all the time in the US. I don't know if it's the police so much as the prosecuting attorney's office that leaks the information. News agencies thrive on these kinds of details, as well as the public here, so there is a lot of pressure to release information as it comes in. There police will generally release information only if there is a continuing danger to the public.

Hmmm. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406963)

So now we're on the lookout for the next killer app?

screw reiserfs... it's fucked... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16406987)

now i'll have to turn terrabytes of warez from reiser4 to ext3... because of some stupid bitch ran away...

women are there to get fucked and reproduce yourself... computers are made for a relationship... didn't you know that, hans???

all this "get a life" nonsense is said by frustrated people who have been using 08/15 shit all their life... but believe me, hans, a hooker is all there is about "life"... for the rest.. a computer is alright!

About the company (2, Funny)

joaommp (685612) | more than 7 years ago | (#16406997)

The company and the project should continue to run. A persons "personal life" should not be an excuse until the moment he/she is being missed in the project beyond reasonable.

This was posted under "Hardware"? (2, Funny)

david_g17 (976842) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407201)

what? are people hardware or something?

I think the most shocking thing about this is (5, Funny)

le0p (932717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16407241)

that a Filesystem designer actually had a wife.
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