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Listening for Cancer Cells

ScuttleMonkey posted about 8 years ago | from the sorry-to-hear-that dept.

74

Roland Piquepaille writes "According to researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia, it's now possible to detect skin cancer cells present in blood samples by listening to the sound of melanoma cells. The scientists have used a method named photoacoustic detection, which uses a laser to make cells vibrate and ultrasound techniques to pick the sound of cancerous cells. This technique is so precise that it's possible to identify the spread of cancer even if there are only ten melanoma cells in a blood sample. Still, large clinical tests must be done before this method can be widely used."

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Listening for Roland Piquepaille Crap (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16475463)

So the editors won't listen to the readers to stop posting Roland's crap, can we at least have a feature to filter him and other annoying submitters out please?
Suck it Roland. Suck it long, and suck it hard.

Re:Listening for Roland Piquepaille Crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16475577)

I agree, and Roland will mod you down with one of his many accounts. And Slashdotters, don't tell use to use that greasemonkey crap. Even mozilla says it fucks up the browser.

Re:Listening for Roland Piquepaille Crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16476255)

And Slashdotters, don't tell use to use that greasemonkey crap. Even mozilla says it fucks up the browser.
If that were true, you would show us where they said that or give some kind of proof. Greasemonkey has nearly 400,000 downloads and I'm sure Mozilla never said that.

G*D-damned anonymous nimrods! (3, Insightful)

mmell (832646) | about 8 years ago | (#16475803)

Did you even read the article? It seemed to be from a reputable source, reporting current, important information of interest not only to /.'ers but to the world community. The article was concise, reasonably well written and dealt not with some incredibly distant possible technology but rather with a technology which could very soon be in routine use in oncology centers around the world.

I don't care if Roland Piquepaille is a shameless whore, trying to drive hits and business to his website (although I didn't see any of that in this article). In this instance, he has posted an article which is reasonably intelligent, reasonably presented (clicked through thirty pages of NYT to read thirty paragraphs of a story lately?), and likely to be of interest to /.'s target audience. What's your major malfunction, maggot?

Then again, I suppose the name "anonymous coward" says it all, eh?

Re:Listening for Roland Piquepaille Crap (0)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 8 years ago | (#16475841)

At least he's linking to the real source these days, as opposed to some summary on his site.

He also doesn't account for the high percentage of total stories that he used to.

Article is good, remeniscent of Raymond Royal Rife (0)

NRAdude (166969) | about 8 years ago | (#16476679)

The difference between this article and the studies of Raymond Royal Rife is those are researches that are discussing their speculation on being able to detect cancer cells, while the Raymond Royal Rife produced actual equipment that disrupts and unmaterialized foreign matter by a unique resonant frequency of energy.

I heartily thank Roland Piquepaille for inducing the post of that article, because I have posted similar subject matter and consistently denied it appearing. Look into an effect discovered by a scientist known as Raymond Rife; he is prominantly known as the first man to view a virus under a microscope, and his mode of that microscope is known to have credited him as the inventor of the first electron microscope.

The truth of the matter is all matter has a resonant frequency. The experimentation and invention of Raymond Royal Rife was concluded that the contagen of invading foreign matter in the flesh of a man can be reduced by finding the resonant frequency and causing the matter to violently materialize until it no longer functions. The same effect also can be used to "train" the Immune System of a host.

Much of the independent radio networks, primarily accessible on internet service streaming, are actively advertising these and related inventions. Try a stream from FIRSTAMENDMENTRADIO.COM or NFOWARS.NET, and one will eventually occur at least every hour.

Re:Listening for Roland Piquepaille Crap (1)

stinerman (812158) | about 8 years ago | (#16480579)

Whatever happened to the *beatles-beatles* guy?

This one's go (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about 8 years ago | (#16475481)

This one's got the Rockinpneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flue

Re:This one's go (3, Funny)

thewiz (24994) | about 8 years ago | (#16475603)

Actually, I'd bet cancer cells play the Imperial March from Star Wars.

Plus Darth Vader breathing noises.

Re:This one's go (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 8 years ago | (#16475827)

Actually, I'd bet cancer cells play the Imperial March from Star Wars. Plus Darth Vader breathing noises.

It would be nice if they did, then they'd really stand out. You'd know it was time to visit your oncologist if George Lucas sent you a C&D letter or showed up on your front step with a hammer

It's great to detect the stuff spreading, but the real trick is to catch it before it does. Santa Cruz is littered with memorials to young people who've died from malinoma. Too bad some didn't take a little better care with waterproof sunscreen, a few less days in the sun and giving up that infectious feeling youth have of immortality. Get your skin checked now and then. It doesn't hurt.

Re:This one's go (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | about 8 years ago | (#16478701)

or showed up on your front step with a hammer

Actually sir, you are mistaken - I believe he is holding a walkie-talkie.

Re:This one's go (1)

Hogwash McFly (678207) | about 8 years ago | (#16476997)

Nah, that's for Type 2 Diabetes.

Re:This one's go (1)

Kesch (943326) | about 8 years ago | (#16476163)

Thank God, it wasn't Disco Fever.

Prediction (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16478943)

We will find that almost everyone over forty has enough cancer cells that the detection is meaningless. The real question is, "why do some people's cancer cells replicate at high rates, causing what we call cancer?'

Re:Prediction (1)

Ginger Unicorn (952287) | about 8 years ago | (#16482949)

why is that modded insightful? how do we know it's an insight? the tone of the statement strikes me as being plucked out of his ass.

They also found a new way to kill the cells too (3, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | about 8 years ago | (#16475491)

they just tell the RIAA that they are infringing on their copyrighted "sound of cancer" Clean them up real quick :P

Re:They also found a new way to kill the cells too (1)

Chacham (981) | about 8 years ago | (#16475751)

they just tell the RIAA that they are infringing on their copyrighted "sound of cancer" Clean them up real quick :P

Originally, they asked the RIAA to "shoo" them away. The RIAA told them to get the H out of there, and they decided to "sue" them out of there.

Talk about celling out.... (or is that shelling out?)

Re:They also found a new way to kill the cells too (1)

Chacham (981) | about 8 years ago | (#16475787)

"sound of cancer"

The cells are a-dead with the sound of ca-a-a-ancer.

Re:They also found a new way to kill the cells too (1)

8ball629 (963244) | about 8 years ago | (#16476327)

Why do I suspect a Weird Al song coming?

Perhaps "The Sound of Cancer" instead of "The Sound of Silence".

Re:They also found a new way to kill the cells too (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16476425)

I wish that MU could have used this "laser" to intercept a couple of Texas A&M's passes this past Saturday. It would have been handy to "hear" the play calls as well. :-P

Re:They also found a new way to kill the cells too (4, Funny)

stunt_penguin (906223) | about 8 years ago | (#16477053)

And in the naked light I saw
Ten rounds of chemo, maybe more

Tumor growing without shrinking
Pack a day, what was I thinking?

Things are going wroooong,
I'm loosing all my hair....
It's not fair

This is the sound... of Cancerrr

Moo (1)

Chacham (981) | about 8 years ago | (#16475499)

I don't like the sound of this; making light of an otherwise dead issue.

Re:Moo (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | about 8 years ago | (#16475573)

I don't like the sound of this; making light of an otherwise dead issue.
Light causes melanoma, you insensitive clod!

Re:Moo (1)

ultracool (883965) | about 8 years ago | (#16476743)

Not all light. Only ultraviolet.

Re:Moo (1)

SnoopJeDi (859765) | about 8 years ago | (#16475999)

I think you mean otherwise dead tissue

Thank you, I'll be here all week.

Re:Moo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16476237)

You know, I have one simple request and that is to have white blood cells with frickin' laser beams attached to their heads! Throw me a bone here!

Checkup (2, Insightful)

Raynor (925006) | about 8 years ago | (#16475531)

"In fact, the blood-test procedure could be performed regularly such as in screenings for high-risk patients, requiring just a small sample of blood, and its results would be almost immediate. "It could take just 30 minutes to find out if there are any circulating cancer cells," Viator said."
With how long many medical tests take, this should have definately made it into the brief...

Re:Checkup (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16475689)

They didn't mention sample size. What's the volume those 10 cells are in. If it's small, that means you have LOTS of melanoma cells in your blood, which means you are probably arleady in for a world of hurt if it has metasticized that badly.

Re:Checkup (1)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | about 8 years ago | (#16476149)

"The scientists have used a method named photoacoustic detection, which uses a laser to make cells vibrate and ultrasound techniques to pick the sound of cancerous cells." ...I wonder if that's how medical tricorders work...

And if not, let's get this down to a portable size soon. The 23rd Century isn't far off.

Re:Checkup (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16476543)

...I wonder if that's how medical tricorders work...

You know that show was fiction, right? Medical tricorders don't work. They're just props.

Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy also don't exist. Sorry, man.

Re:Checkup (1)

From A Far Away Land (930780) | about 8 years ago | (#16476999)

"Medical tricorders don't work."
Next you'll tell me that Bones wasn't a real doctor. :-(

For those of you wondering (2, Informative)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | about 8 years ago | (#16475549)

It only works on melanoma (skin cancer) cells, which answers the question of "How do they know where to shine the laser?".

Re:For those of you wondering (2, Informative)

Stile 65 (722451) | about 8 years ago | (#16476179)

They shine a laser at a blood sample, actually. This is only useful for detecting melanoma at an early stage of metastasis, where it's made it into the blood, but hasn't yet formed any noticeable tumors in areas of the body other than the skin.

Re:For those of you wondering (1)

TheMeuge (645043) | about 8 years ago | (#16476471)

I guess it's important to know... but the overall implications of such a detection method are almost nil, given the fatality rate of malignant melanoma. The idea is to catch it before the metastasis.

Re:For those of you wondering (2, Informative)

javiator (1014907) | about 8 years ago | (#16479497)

This test can determine the relative number of circulating melanoma cells, so it can indicate response to treatment, remission, or relapse, so it may have value to the oncologist managing treatment of Stage IV melanoma patients. You are right, catching melanoma before metastasis is key, but for the advanced cases, this could be an important test. There's lots of work to do, but I think this is a promising technique. There certainly is a lot of clinical interest in my work. John Viator Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering and Dermatology University of Missouri, Columbia

Re:For those of you wondering (1)

TheMeuge (645043) | about 8 years ago | (#16479999)

Thank you for your reply. It's both surprising, as well as encouraging to see the originators of the work here on Slashdot.

I did not mean to diminish the significance of this work. Certainly, it's a revolutionary technique... one that is likely to have an even wider impact in the future.

And certainly any additional test is welcome in an oncologist's arsenal. I am considering specializing in Oncology, and I am anxiously watching every development... because with every new test and treatment, Oncology steps further away from end-of-life management and towards being able to conclusively affect the final outcome... which makes it more likely to become my final choice.

Re:For those of you wondering (1)

TheLink (130905) | about 8 years ago | (#16481379)

Just curious - have you heard about people using dogs to detect cancer (by smelling)? How effective is that method?

Re:For those of you wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16482709)

Mod parent up! This is the real deal and he knows what he's talking about.

Re:For those of you wondering (1)

fastgood (714723) | about 8 years ago | (#16487061)

Couldn't another searchpoint for cancer cells be
that they are the only cell types that do not die
off regularly and naturally in the human body?

No death, grow endlessly without aim or purpose:
it also seems like a good definition of nihilism.

Applicable to other cells? (1, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 8 years ago | (#16475555)

The sound waves produced by melanin are high-frequency ultrasounds, meaning that they cannot be heard by the human ear, even if amplified. However, researchers can pick them up with special microphones and analyze them with a computer. Other human cells do not contain pigments with the same color as melanin, so the melanin signature is easy to tell apart from other noises, said John Viator, a biomedical engineer at Missouri-Columbia and a coauthor of the Optics Letters paper.
You know how they tag cancer cells with a (radioactive) dye injection?

Well, what if they could find a dye that responded in the same fashion.

Suddenly, the technique could apply to a range of cancers.

Re:Applicable to other cells? (2, Informative)

Stile 65 (722451) | about 8 years ago | (#16475707)

TFA talks about gold nanoparticles being attached to cancer cells and used the same way. It's fairly standard for the new nanotech-based imaging modes (attach a magneto- or photo-responsive molecule to a ligand that attaches itself to a surface protein that's overexpressed in cancer cells, and see where the molecule attaches). Targeted drug delivery is being done the same way.

Re:Applicable to other cells? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 8 years ago | (#16475727)

You know how they tag cancer cells with a (radioactive) dye injection? Well, what if they could find a dye that responded in the same fashion. Suddenly, the technique could apply to a range of cancers.

It isn't really cells responding to dye, it's that many cancers when they spread are transported by the lymphatics system. I had a Lymphangiogram, back in June 1986 and it wasn't a very fun experience, but they made insicions in the tops of both feet after injecting some coloured dye between my toes (a very effective means of torture, I assure you) to make tiny lymphatic capilaries stand out. They picked one in each foot and inserted tiny needles in and pumped, for about 45 minutes, an iodine dye into them with a very patient little pump. Cancer cells consume disproportionate amounts of 'food', which may be one way to have them stand out, but this dye was to light up the entire lymphatic system, like a big ol' neon light sign and look for anomolies, which could indicate tumours.

The sound.... of cancer (1)

MBCook (132727) | about 8 years ago | (#16475571)

Hello darkness my old friend,
I've come to hear from you again.
Because a paitent softly weeping,
Wants to know if cancer is creeping.
Is the sound of the cancer coming from her brain?
Will it remain?
As we listen... to the sounds... of cancer.

I've got to say, this is a pretty amazing idea. Plus it would make detecting some cancers an easy part of your yearly physical.

Re:The sound.... of cancer (2, Funny)

LordPhantom (763327) | about 8 years ago | (#16475597)

Uh, yeah, like if they were detecting prostate cancer.....
"You want me to stick the speaker WHERE????"

Re:The sound.... of cancer (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | about 8 years ago | (#16476845)


Uh, yeah, like if they were detecting prostate cancer.....
"You want me to stick the speaker WHERE????"

Reminds me of this cat [imageshack.us]

Hrm... (3, Interesting)

Stile 65 (722451) | about 8 years ago | (#16475581)

From TFA:

Because of melanin, melanoma is the only type of cancer whose cells will strongly absorb all wavelengths of light, emitting ultrasounds that stand out from those of other cells.

How difficult would it be to modify melanin to produce electricity (or even sugar) from light? It sounds like it has a much wider absorption spectrum than chlorophyll, which could make things very interesting for genetic engineering and/or solar power!

Re:Hrm... (1)

Stile 65 (722451) | about 8 years ago | (#16475641)

And of course, that's what I get for not hitting "Preview" before "Submit." Imagine a </i> after "cells."

Re:Hrm... (1)

modecx (130548) | about 8 years ago | (#16476295)

How difficult would it be to modify melanin to produce electricity (or even sugar) from light? It sounds like it has a much wider absorption spectrum than chlorophyll, which could make things very interesting for genetic engineering and/or solar power!

Damnit, Jim, this must be how the Breatharians do it!

Their ability to live without eating must be offset by the fact that they will die of skin cancer before they starve!

Melanoma cells required (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 8 years ago | (#16476395)

You'll need to use cancer cells for your photolysis tank. Ordinary cells will die.

Re:Melanoma cells required (1)

Stile 65 (722451) | about 8 years ago | (#16480059)

I was thinking about engineering plants or algae to use a derivative of melanin instead of chlorophyll... or using a derivative of melanin grown with genetically engineered yeast or bacteria and extracted and purified as something to print on thin-film solar cells or something.

Re:Hrm... (1)

Fanro (130986) | about 8 years ago | (#16480849)

organic substances that absorb light are a dime a dozen. Generating electricity from this light is a *lot* harder

That's going to be in the Matrix prequals (1)

trigggl (758335) | about 8 years ago | (#16483119)

That's why we took out the sun. Whole batches were lost. On a serious note, cancer is no joke in any of it's variations. I had a year of chemo to treat a brain tumor. I was one of the lucky ones. Most people that get a brain tumor are only treated for 3 months. A brain tumor is a death sentence most of the time and even when the treatment works the first time, there is a 98% chance of a recurance. Tick, tick, tick,... Way to go Mizzou! Don't let all the jokesters dampen your spirits.

One must wonder (3, Funny)

nizo (81281) | about 8 years ago | (#16475611)

Do they make little screaming noises or evil laughing noises?

Re:One must wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16476391)

My bet is evil laughing noises, since cancer is basically a bunch of cells who have attained immortality. NOTHING CAN STOP US NOW! MWAHAHAHAHAHA!!! oh shit here comes bleomycin-man

lasers? (2, Funny)

aaronots (997327) | about 8 years ago | (#16475733)

unfortunalely the lasers used actually cause skin cancer in the process

Re:lasers? (2, Informative)

javiator (1014907) | about 8 years ago | (#16479557)

We actually used an optical parametric oscillator pumped by the third harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser...meaning the laser wavelength range was from 410-710 nanometers. You'd only get mutagenesis from a UV light source so we couldn't cause cancer in the sample. Besides, the laser irradiates a portion of cells separated from the blood sample. So the patient would never be exposed to the laser light. John Viator Assistant Professor, Biological Engineering and Dermatology University of Missouri, Columbia

Shhh be werwy werwy kwiet (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16475793)

I'm melanoma hunting hehehehe

hey this is cool! (1)

Dangolo (974232) | about 8 years ago | (#16475873)

will the many new amazing and exciting breakthroughs in laser usefulness never cease!?! Is there anything they can't do? Bravo, good sirs, Bravo!

I'm Buck Melanoma! (1)

heauxmeaux (869966) | about 8 years ago | (#16475947)

I'm Moley Russels Wart!

very impressive (1)

Liveandletlive (841246) | about 8 years ago | (#16475977)

I hope they find something small and easy enough that can be used as a home kit for regular checkups

what do they sound like? (4, Funny)

revery (456516) | about 8 years ago | (#16475993)

Apparently cancer cells sound very much like the Starland Vocal Band [wikipedia.org] and can frequently be heard singing "Afternoon Delight" while carrying out their destructive task.

Which is just one more good reason to eradicate cancer once and for all...

So I Heard You Have Cancer! (1)

BigAssRat (724675) | about 8 years ago | (#16476053)

So I heard you have cancer!

Luke, use photoacoustic detection... (4, Funny)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | about 8 years ago | (#16476111)

  • Luke: How was your chemotherapy treatment?
  • Obi-Wan: It's as if millions of cancer cells suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.

Roland Piquepaille Blocker (1)

brendandonhue (582910) | about 8 years ago | (#16476181)

I realize that the summary doesn't link to Roland's blog this time, but any Firefox users that want to hide his submissions can use this Greasemonkey script: http://userscripts.org/scripts/show/5738 [userscripts.org]

Good news for us Basal Cell Pxs too. (1)

fuego451 (958976) | about 8 years ago | (#16477897)

As a basal cell carcinoma patient I stand a greater risk of developing a melanoma in the future. It is nice to hear that new tests and treatments are being developed which could save lives.

I am paying for a lifetime of fun in the sun. This month I had Mohs [wikipedia.org] surgery for a deep rooted basal cell cancer on my nose, which left a nice crater, and will receive skin grafts in a few weeks to make me handsome again. But this is a cake walk compared to melanoma.

Protect your skin.

Re:Good news for us Basal Cell Pxs too. (1)

javiator (1014907) | about 8 years ago | (#16479801)

I'm glad you're doing well. We are also working on a method to more precisely define basal cell carcinoma borders so that when a patient needs such a lesion removed, we can preserve as much healthy skin as possible.
John Viator
Assistant Professor
Biological Engineering and Dermatology
University of Missouri, Columbia

Re:Good news for us Basal Cell Pxs too. (1)

fuego451 (958976) | about 8 years ago | (#16480851)

We are also working on a method to more precisely define basal cell carcinoma borders.

Well, this is good news as well. I have some pretty gnarly scars on both shoulders from excision, burn and scrape removals of BCC. Not a big deal to most men, probably, but I can see where many women and some men might be upset with the result of EBS. On the other hand, not even I can see the scar from the excision of the basal cell cyst under my right eye.

Being a neighbor, you may have heard of my doctor for the Mohs surgery; Carlos A. Garcia, M.D.(plus long credentials) from the University of Oklahoma, Department of Dermatology. Great guy.

Thank you for the reply and please keep up your great work which so many of us appreciate. Oh, and please don't move to a coast. You would probably receive more fame and I know you would reap much more fortune but we really need you here in the central US.

~robin

Re:Good news for us Basal Cell Pxs too. (1)

javiator (1014907) | about 8 years ago | (#16489999)

I moved here two years ago from nearly a lifetime on the west coast, most recently Portland, Oregon. I love Missouri and the midwest. In fact, I don't think I would have come upon this area of research if I hadn't been at the University of Missouri. The spirit of collaboration is so great here, I routinely work with people in the College of Agriculture, Engineering, Arts and Sciences, Veterinary Medicine, and School of Medicine. It's a great environment and I think the openness and friendliness of the people of the midwest has a lot to do with it.

Haven't heard of Dr. Garcia, but I hope to cross paths with him as I continue my work in Dermatology.
John

Kill em... (1)

suv4x4 (956391) | about 8 years ago | (#16478023)

If it can make cancer cells vibrate and the rest not.. can a vibration strong enough kill them?

There was an allegedly "quack" treatment of cancer and bacteria revolving around this technique several decades ago.

Now it suddenly resurfaces... You can't stop science with misinformation and lawyers can you...

Re:Kill em... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16480171)

If it can make cancer cells vibrate and the rest not.. can a vibration strong enough kill them?

There was an allegedly "quack" treatment of cancer and bacteria revolving around this technique several decades ago.

Now it suddenly resurfaces... You can't stop science with misinformation and lawyers can you...

It was Royal Raymond Rife's invention, the Rife Microscope. See Wikipedia. [wikipedia.org]

The people still surviving who fought against Rife's invention and managed to outlaw it should be presented to the surviving family members of cancer victims.

Dogs for sniffing prostate cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 years ago | (#16479779)

Not a joke. I saw a documentary on this; was on BBC/SBS/ABC(*) or something like that. (*=Not the Right-wing Pro-war Disney one :-|)

They trained dogs to sniff urine to detect protstate cancer. It worked! Encountered a lot of institution resistance, but several scientists tried it and finally got a paper published on it.

Dogs have an awesome sense of smell; big noses and more brainpower devoted to it than the naked apes. "Humans can smell a spaghetti sauce. Dogs can smell the hundreds of compounds within it"

Pssffft... (1)

nanoakron (234907) | about 8 years ago | (#16480343)

That's the sound of vapour-ware my friend!

So, I Hear You Have Cancer. (1)

BigAssRat (724675) | about 8 years ago | (#16489435)

So, I hear you have cancer.
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