×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

If Not America, Then Where?

Cliff posted more than 7 years ago | from the a-new-home-for-the-free-and-brave dept.

2349

Wellington Grey asks: "Often during our heated political discussions on slashdot, several people will mention their desire to leave the country. As an American living in England, which sees much the same problems as the US, I often wonder where these Americans would go. So, I pose two questions for the restless: 1) Where would you live, if not in America and 2) What's stopping you from going?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

2349 comments

The Netherlands (3, Insightful)

Sinryc (834433) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572684)

The Netherlands. The fact that I couldn't become a citizen and I can't speak the language stops me. Oh yeah, plus I like America still. :-)

Re:The Netherlands (3, Informative)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572754)

According to wikitravel [wikitravel.org] if you can find a job that promises to pay you at least 45k euro then you don't need a work permit, or if you are under 30, then you only need a job that promises to pay you 33k euro.....

Re:The Netherlands (1)

Sinryc (834433) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572856)

I would like to get a way to get permanent citizenship and all that jazz. Plus for my girlfriend as well.

Re:The Netherlands (2, Interesting)

medtest9 (1017832) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572968)

It is my understanding that residing legally in the Netherlands for 5 years or more makes you eligible to apply for citizenship. As mentioned above, if you can find a company registered with IND for knowledge immigrants, who will offer to pay you a sufficient wage (a bit over 43K euro last time I looked), obtaining a visa is a simple process.

Re:The Netherlands (2, Informative)

Bios_Hakr (68586) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573014)

I thought about moving to Italy once. Actually, I lived there for several years while working for an American company. When I looked at my Italian counterparts, I thought about having a go at it.

Then I found out they pay almost 50% income tax. On top of that, there is a 20% VAT on most items. On top of that, gasoline was almost $5 per gallon (a few years ago...almost certainly more now).

The high taxes were there to support their social services. Free medical. Free dental. Good unemployment and retirement. Almost no chance of getting fired. 6-hour work days and 30-days of vacation. Virtually no concept of sexual harassment or workplace misconduct.

Then you realize that the social services suck. Want a painkiller for your broken leg? Tough. Want an annual dental checkup? Tough. Want a cop to investigate repeated break-ins? Tough.

Europe is great if you are young or unemployed. Europe sucks if you actually want to make something of yourself through hard work.

Personally, I couldn't live if I worked 6 days a week knowing I'd only get 3-days pay after taxes just so some 22-yo punk could sit in the park all day and smoke pot.

Re:The Netherlands (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573118)

Yeah, the tax rates [forbes.com] for many European countries is sort of ridiculous. Japan looks good but it is very difficult to get citizenship. Anything down from Canada in the table in table I linked would probably reasonable for someone used to low taxes in the US. I can't tell you how the immigration standards work though (though Japan and the US still win on the opportunities to earn a boatload of money).

I'm sort of a patriotic American and I don't think I would ever leave give up my citizenship, but in the hypothetical case that I had to and was able to pick any country to move, I would select Canada followed by Japan.

Re:The Netherlands (2, Insightful)

Chi-RAV (541181) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573184)

If only your hypothesis would be correct (i'd be sitting in the park smoking pot daily). However, most of those taxes go towards creating social constructions to make sure the weakest links in society dont fall through the cracks. These weakest links aren't the young people (in fact in the netherlands its impossible to apply for social security under 24 atm, and it will be raised to 27 within 2-4 years). They are the elderly people (your grandma!) and physically and mentally handicapped people.

Yes, you pay a SHITLOAD of money to the gov't for the purposes of make sure you never fall very low, BUT if done right, you can have a lot of benefits as well.
(now if only it were done right)

Re:The Netherlands (1)

cerberusss (660701) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573278)

The fact that I couldn't become a citizen and I can't speak the language stops me
I don't know about becoming a citizen, but the language barrier simply isn't. Not a single English-speaking white-collar worker I know has bothered to learn Dutch.

Hell...... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572686)

1) Hell
2) Hell :-)

Re:Hell...... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572998)

So you want to stay in Texas then?

Re:Hell...... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573256)

It is hot as hell there, but not has hot as Iran. ;-)

The future (5, Insightful)

A nonymous Coward (7548) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572698)

I always kinda liked the idea that I get to live in the future just by staying alive.

Re:The future (1)

cooley (261024) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572870)

Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk,
Im a woman's man; no time to talk.
Music loud and women warm,
I've been kicked around since I was born.

Re:The future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573194)

...Stay'in aliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiive, OW!

Obvious (5, Funny)

eclectro (227083) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572704)

Warm beach with girls. Money.

This thread is now closed. Please submit next Slashdot story.

Re:Obvious (2, Funny)

cooley (261024) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572928)

Related to parent:

Although I love living in the USA and have no plans to leave any time soon, I've always thought that the city of Merida (the capital of the Yucatan state in Mexico) would be an excellent place to retire. Cheap, lovely weather, p nice people, pretty girls, low crime, I could go on and on....

As much as I hate to say it though, anyplace I move has to have one thing for sure: BANDWIDTH, and plenty of it.

Re:Obvious (2, Funny)

MikeFM (12491) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573154)

Girls that date for money? Heck, can get all that in Mexico and be within a short drive of the US. I think a tropical island with a secret volcano lair is more my thing tho.

Re:Obvious (2, Insightful)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573222)

So you're a Brit in the south of Spain. Great. And I suppose since you can't speak the language, you'll just create your own bars/restaurants and only hang out there. You realize you're every bit as bad as us Americans, right?

I'm only half joking.

I know, it's old fashioned and out of date (4, Interesting)

Hawthorne01 (575586) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572706)

But I'm in America by choice, and will be for a loooooong time. I friggin' love it here, warts and all. Lived in Latin America, raised in Canada, and there's no place I'd rather be.

Re:I know, it's old fashioned and out of date (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572788)

Traitor.

Re:I know, it's old fashioned and out of date (1)

FuturePastNow (836765) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572858)

We tend to forget that the warts have always existed, and always will. Specific problems are exaggerated by their contemporaries and forgotten within a generation or two.

I was born here, so I didn't have a "choice" in that, but I can't imagine leaving permanently. Canada sounds like a nice place, though.

Re:I know, it's old fashioned and out of date (4, Funny)

thegamerformelyknown (868463) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572962)

I've lived in Canada all my life, and I've seen many good things, with near 100% of the bad things coming from or influenced by the US. It's a great place to live, and things can only get better from here :)

Link? (1)

HoosierPeschke (887362) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572712)

Not sure if the link is broke or if it's my work proxy but here's the Google Cache [72.14.209.104] .

More on topic, most people won't/don't leave due to funds of moving. The closest place I'd venture most would move to is Canada.

It's obviously the best solution (5, Insightful)

Dr Reducto (665121) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572720)

It's obviously best to simply give up and leave, rather than actually stand up and do something about changing your country.

Re:It's obviously the best solution (1)

fj3k (993224) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572886)

I quite like living in my country (Australia); it's got a lot going for it. The government is trying to wreck this, of course, but we've had just enough good leadership in the past to make this a difficult task.

Much more relevant, though, is that I've always said two things:
1) I'd always choose not to live in the U.S.
2) No matter how rotten it is I'd rather be my home country fixing it than running for the nearest exit.

I don't know where those rules leave you guys.

Re:It's obviously the best solution (1, Insightful)

stony3k (709718) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572920)

What you do need to remember is that in some countries, staying back and trying to fix the system in an easy way to land up in jail or even dead. Be thankful that you live in America or any other civilized country - you could have been living in much worse places.

Re:It's obviously the best solution (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573064)

Would you call America civilized? It seems to put more emphasis on the armed forces and less on healthcare and education than other civilized countries

Re:It's obviously the best solution (4, Insightful)

dafoomie (521507) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573008)

Mexicans do it all the time. But if I dare criticize them, I'm a racist.

I fully agree with your statement, by the way. Mexico would be a far better place if more stayed and tried to make it a better place. By leaving, they only ensure that their corrupt government stays in power, this is why they encourage it so much (not to mention remittances). Not that I can blame them, leaving is certainly the path of least resistance.

Re:It's obviously the best solution (2, Insightful)

Infernal Device (865066) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573138)

I've thought about that, but it all boils down to: the more things change, the more things stay the same.

The advantage of moving to a foreign country is context. You live somewhere else, you can be someone else. You practically have no choice.

Would I bail - sure. I'm only going to live another 40-50 years. Why not enjoy it someplace where I'm discovering new things daily, rather than stuck here where I'm pretty sure of my surroundings.

Why do I stay - same as everyone else. Money. Inertia.

I moving to central america in ten years (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572724)

Not because of this pipe dream bullshit of leaving the US because it "sucks", but because I can retire 20 years earlier than I could if I stayed in the US. I've even bought land. Better than my $400K house in the city now at 1/100th of the cost.

Visa, borders, etc. (3, Insightful)

Peter Cooper (660482) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572732)

In almost every case it comes down to visas and border controls that stop humans freely moving around their planet. On the surface it looks like a good idea, but it's absolutely ridiculous that a human shouldn't be able to freely roam the public spaces of their own planet!

I'd rather go live out in the nowhereness of Canada or Australia or something and get out of the way, but there's no hope for any of that in the near future as countries have lots of quirky requirements, laws, and rules for gaining entry :)

Re:Visa, borders, etc. (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572762)

I'd rather go live out in the nowhereness of Canada or Australia or something and get out of the way, but there's no hope for any of that in the near future as countries have lots of quirky requirements, laws, and rules for gaining entry

Alaska could be a good bet. You wouldn't have any more (nominal) freedom, but at least there'd be fewer goons around to enforce the latest order from Herr Bush.

Re:Visa, borders, etc. (1)

Who235 (959706) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572772)

And have Ted Stevens for a legislator??

Forget it.

Re:Visa, borders, etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572956)

If you lived there, though, you could not vote for him. You'd be doing the country a service.

Re:Visa, borders, etc. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573002)

You don't get it...the pork he creates goes to create jobs in Alaska. If you live there, that's a good thing. The Alaskan voters aren't stupid, they know that he's bringing money to them.

Re:Visa, borders, etc. (2, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573180)

In almost every case it comes down to visas and border controls that stop humans freely moving around their planet. On the surface it looks like a good idea, but it's absolutely ridiculous that a human shouldn't be able to freely roam the public spaces of their own planet!

No more ridiculous than you not being allowed to walk into someone's home, eat their food and sleep in their bed without their permission...

Everywhere and anywhere (2, Insightful)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572734)

Well, not really, but by the time I was 25 I have had tech jobs in both Japan and Germany(I'm currently in the fatherland). While there certainly are some good aspects to living abroad, being away from home can kind of suck. My mom was hit by a car recently, she is ok but the feeling that you are so far away never helps the situation.

My advice to Americans is to learn another language and to not rule anything out. Though I would suggest Asia, because that seems to be where the future is headed. I plan on going back to the states for a few years to get my PhD then heading out somewhere in Asia(probably not Japan because although they have had some nice growth recently, the sun is setting. Plus white fanboys give foreigners a bad name there).

Oddly enough - Austria (3, Interesting)

Salvance (1014001) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572740)

I love America, and don't want to leave; however, I see multiple reasons why I may be 'forced' to leave: the impact of our massive debt on the future economy, the shift to a stronger executive branch (and what this might yield), and the impact of a swelling unsupported lower/debtor class. If in a situation where I felt I had no other options, I'd move to Vienna, Austria. Every time I've been there, I've been enthralled by the people, the cleanliness, the relatively hands-off government (at least compared to some European and particularly Scandinavian countries), the wealth of job opportunities, the high proportion of English speakers, and the area's focus on health and fitness. It has always seemed like a home away from home.

Come to the World Next Door (5, Funny)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572744)

Living just to the north of much of the United States, I often offer Stateside friends crash space in my basement in the event that things go completely pear-shaped where they live. Sure, we could be violently annexed in a depressingly short amount of time (and our supplies of uranium, oil, fresh water and lumber might make us a delectable target), but it's a relatively short trip. Besides, beyond Canadian Bacon [imdb.com] , there hasn't really been any real effort to add us to the Axis of Evil.

Re:Come to the World Next Door (1)

gbobeck (926553) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572846)

Besides, beyond Canadian Bacon, there hasn't really been any real effort to add us to the Axis of Evil.

What about South Park: Bigger Longer & Uncut [imdb.com] ?

Re:Come to the World Next Door (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573096)

Dude, that's just a cartoon. Everyone knows that Canada isn't real.

Welll..... (4, Insightful)

MrAnnoyanceToYou (654053) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572766)

If it were not for the money, language, and responsibility issues, I'd move to a Scandanavian country in a heartbeat.

As it is, I believe that America is exporting its culture at an incredible rate, and the best way to stop what I see as an unbelievably bad world situation is by attempting to modify it from within the States. I'm not doing a great job, but just being here and dissenting my little piece has more of an impact than living outside the country and bitching to other people that aren't there about how much my country sucks.

I lived overseas, and found that there were a few things true about me personally - 1) wherever I went, I was the same person. Ergo, I was pissed off and unhappy because that's what I started out as. I've attempted to change that. 2) wherever I went, I was followed by the influence of the things I had left the country to avoid, one way or another. Thus I am back here to attempt to modify the things about both me and the world around me that irked me so much when I was not living in the States. I don't know if I'll manage to change the world enough to make any sort of difference should I leave again, but by the time I can afford to leave again for any extended period of time, I will be able to say that I'm at least trying to alleviate certain negative influential factors that result from our social structure.

Re:Welll..... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573244)

How many kebab stores do you find in Paris?

How many McDonalds, KFC and Burger King (combined) do you find in Paris?

I find the notion that 'Americans are destroying world food culture' with demonstrations destroying McDonaldses quite interesting - if you want to burn a store for infringing on your country, burn a kebab store. Except that would be racist, of course. So if you want to stay 'amongst the company of good men', break a McDonalds instead.

Even better - 'McDonalds out of the Middle East' - count the number of McDonaldses in Riyad versus the number of kebab stores in Paris. Whichever there is more of, burn them. Is this acceptable to you?

Canada is Full! Go home! (5, Funny)

Goalie_Ca (584234) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572774)

To immigrate to canada you must speak french, eat poutine and KD, and watch HNIC. It snows all year long and sorry we're full!

Hows about... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572776)

* a country where the media and the politicians don't do their best to induce fear and unrest from relatively minor threats (lightning, I believe is still a bigger threat to the average american, than terrorism)
* a country where the most popular news feeds are actually independent
* a country that wouldn't embarras me with a completely selfish and brutally violent foreign policy

Quebec (1)

nightfire-unique (253895) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572778)

I follow world politics carefully and am generally politically active. While it frightens me to see what's been happening in Canada lately (closely mirroring the US), we in Quebec have managed to avoid a lot of the nonsense using French as a form of natural encryption (allowing us to talk about things we're not supposed to talk about in English). I'm not kidding.. :) Our media here is much more aggressive.

We have a strong local economy (despite the reports you may happen to read in Ontario and Alberta) and relaxed attitudes about work and "sins" (quickest declining religious affiliation in North America).

Good, polite, and fearless Americans: come visit Montreal, meet a Quebecois girl, and enjoy a multicultural, free and well educated people.

Re:Quebec (1)

j-pimp (177072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572990)

We have a strong local economy (despite the reports you may happen to read in Ontario and Alberta) and relaxed attitudes about work and "sins" (quickest declining religious affiliation in North America).

Ok I'll give the religious/sin argument some merit. However, what is wrong with wanting to work. I want to be found dead in my cubicle (hopefully office by then) at 80. Now, a 40 hour work day is a good idea because it allows you time to start your own business and do non traditional work (charity and open source projects). However, anything less than that is just damn lazy IMHO.

Now, if you don't want to work, and can do so without costing me money, its your right as a human being. If you can find a company that gives you 6 weeks of vacation, and can stand being away from the office for more than a week, by all means go do it.

I'm not saying don't enjoy your leisure time. I can get piss drunk like the best of them and just got back from 12 days in the Phillipines. It would have been 5 days, but the g/f put her foot down. She gave up 2 weeks of pay to stay down there a whole month herself. Thats her choice and she paid for it, rightfully so.

Re:Quebec (1)

nightfire-unique (253895) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573072)

Ok I'll give the religious/sin argument some merit. However, what is wrong with wanting to work. I want to be found dead in my cubicle (hopefully office by then) at 80. Now, a 40 hour work day is a good idea because it allows you time to start your own business and do non traditional work (charity and open source projects). However, anything less than that is just damn lazy IMHO.

Well there are two things here - one is a question (what is wrong with wanting to work?). Of course, nothing is wrong with that. I work a good 40-50 hours a week on average as a sysadmin. I know a few coders who work 70. You can work to your heart's content.

But the other is a statement. "Anything less than that is just damned lazy" Well.. everyone has the right to their own opinion. But in general here, we don't frown upon people who choose to do things other than work their asses off (unless they become a burden on society). My boss works 30 hours a week so he can spend more time with his family. He makes a decent living. Can't complain about that, and he's the last person in the world I would call lazy.

Is going back in time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572792)

to Bill Clinton's America an option?

Well... (1)

BrynM (217883) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572796)

I've given this a lot of thought and time over the years actually. The conclusion? I don't know. There's either too many trade-offs or differing but equivalent moral quandries for every destination I've thought of. At least some of the most obvious countries (the UK, Canada et al) are starting to suffer some of what we've seen here in the US. Misery, company and all that.

Good question. If you find an answer, let me know.

Don't come to Australia (4, Insightful)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572824)

We do everything America does, only we do a worse job, less efficiently, and with none of the individual rights in our Constitution* that you enjoy in the United States which allow the courts to pull the executive and congress back into line every now and then.** Although we have no president or equivalent, our parliament is a virtual dictatorship at present and crossing the floor on the basis of principle is almost entirely unheard of and considered to be little better than treason. We lack media diversity, and general awareness of political and human rights issues is virtually non-existent in the wider populace even by US standards.

In addition we are extremely poorly placed in relation to the most likely theatre of any future world war, and we have large quantities of uranium and natural gas which makes us an important strategic target.

* disclaimer, before someone who knows about Australian law attacks - we arguably have freedom of religion and a right to vote, and a limited right to freedom of 'political' speech, but all can be infringed on by federal laws with a legitimate other purpose

** yeah yeah, I know how politicised the courts are, but every now and then you DO get a decision like Hamdan in which the Supreme Court clobbers the executive for overstepping the line

Re:Don't come to Australia (2, Interesting)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572986)

Having moved from England I love it here in Australia, and I've found the people here to generally be much better informed than those in England.

Re:Don't come to Australia (5, Funny)

MikShapi (681808) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573104)

Shush you idiot! Don't you understand what parent post is doing?
Don't bloody tell everyone on /. the truth! They'll start coming here en-masse!

Re:Don't come to Australia (1)

fj3k (993224) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573110)

I have to agree, we're not that bad yet. And all we need to stem the flow of further decline is a decent opposition party, unlike other places where a head of state has influence over the direction of the government's decisions.

Re:Don't come to Australia (2, Funny)

riprjak (158717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573120)

And, frankly, we would rather have a pom who loves the country than the whinger who rekons life here is soooooo bad. Frankly, this is the side of the fence where the grass is greener.

Come to Australia, we have plenty of land; though we could stand some more water. But, please, only if you dont plan to sit around on your fat arse and whinge about everything. Cant stand bloody whingers. We all have to vote here, so any problem you have with your own reality is entirely your problem.

If you dont like it, fix it, if you cant fix it, deal with it, if you cant deal with it, piss off :)

err!
jak.

Re:Don't come to Australia (1)

TheSeer2 (949925) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573252)

There is one bad thing.

In Australia we only have only have an _implied_ right of free speech.

Mod down troll (2, Informative)

zaxios (776027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573122)

"our parliament is a virtual dictatorship"

If by "dictatorship" you mean elected body, then yes.

"crossing the floor on the basis of principle is almost entirely unheard of and considered to be little better than treason"

The last time a member of the ruling Coalition -- and not the opposition parties, which vote against Coalition legislation frequently -- crossed the floor was about a year ago [abc.net.au] , but internal dissent scuppered some immigration laws this year. Anyway, since when was the measure of a democracy the lack of discipline of the ruling party? What's undemocratic about an elected ruling party voting for its own legislation? On the contrary, if, after being elected with a majority in both houses, the government were unable to make new laws, that would be a failure of democracy.

"with none of the individual rights in our Constitution"

Our constitution may suck, but Australia is still a free country. Freedom House rated us a 1 1, meaning we have an excellent record on both civil liberties and political rights.

Come to Australia. Our GDP per capita is higher than the major European countries', and our Human Development Index is third in the world -- behind only Iceland and Norway.

Re:Don't come to Australia (1)

scoot80 (1017822) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573262)

Surely our PM is a puppet, and even coucils in Sydney are starting to be called "precintcs", but Australia is still a great place to be. I would not go anywhere else - especially America.

To the moon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16572842)

Bang zoom.

Austria (2, Insightful)

bhima (46039) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572874)

I moved to Austria.

I'll admit that the problems in the US weren't the only reason but they were a big motivating factor.

In general (1)

JanneM (7445) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572930)

Countries and societies differ from one another (this is generally a good thing). So do people. Even without dissatisfaction with current events there's nothing strange about perhaps fitting in better in some other place than where you happened to be born. Just like a country boy may be happest in a major city or lifetime city dwellers can find their true life on a farm, so can people find that they're happier in some societies than in other.

Me, I have lived in several countries, and found myself happiest in one of them - and that's not where I was born and raised.

If you want to move, do move for a year or two only at first. You can't know what a place really is like to live in after just a few weeks or a month. The best way to get the opportunity is probably to get a serious education. Many countries welcome specialists like scientists or health-care workers even if they're very closed otherwise. And once you're "in" it becomes easier to stay permanently if that's what you want; a lot of countries will give you a permanent residency or similar if you've been there long enough, have steady empleoyment and so on.

Off of Earth! (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572934)

Off of Earth on another habitable planet or place. Of course, that's not easily possible for us people to do that at this time. ISS (not the one from MS) is not suitable. :P

France (1)

GiovanniZero (1006365) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572964)

I know people think its silly but I love France. It's a nice place, I've lived there before and I like it. I mean, Paris is beautiful and chicks dig my accent.

Whats stopping me? I like America, my family is here, my job is here, my studies can't be carried over right now. Oh yeah, and I'm really poor :)

Canada (1)

bunions (970377) | more than 7 years ago | (#16572980)

> 1) Where would you live, if not in America

Canada.

> and 2) What's stopping you from going?

Immigration Canada is pretty slow, and they want a TON of paperwork. Seriously, a letter from every employer I've ever had? Are you kidding me? I'm looking at about another 3 years before I get in.

Its the goods (1)

Gay for Linux (942545) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573000)

I am currently living in Japan but looking forward to going back to the US once my school term is over. The lack of Wild Cherry Pepsi here is atrocious and I could never again live in a country without it.

I don't run (0)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573020)

Only cowards emmigrate. I have been TOLD to leave the US by many a neo-con, but there are only a few places I would move, and I do not desire to do so. But to answer the qustion...

Sweden
Norway
Japan

All I can think of really, and in that order.

Easy one. (1)

deepb (981634) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573036)

I decided years ago that if I ever had to leave (for whatever reason), I'd head for Belize -- a beautiful, low-key, English-speaking country -- can't go wrong as far as I'm concerned.

I have been told to avoid the drug cartels in Belize City, but that's certainly not a deal-breaker.

Belize Motto: Sub Umbra Floreo ("Under the Shade I Flourish")

nippon (1)

theNetImp (190602) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573070)

Japan, I love being able to take a train where ever I want to go, and think it's absolutely wonderful there. I know it has it's problems, but at least as a noncitizen I know I'd have no control over it anyway, so it wouldn't bother me so much.

The reason why I have not gone there yet is simple. There's this thing called a work visa, and I don't meet the requirements for it. It requires a 4 year degree or 10 years of work experience in the field that you are going to work in, in Japan. I have 1 year to go before I hit 10 years. I've been working on collecting documentation for that.

O Canada (1)

eastbayted (982797) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573086)

Were I to move, I'd head to Canada. My girlfriend's a Canadian citizen, and she has family and friend there, plus she's hankering to move back eventually. Also, it's an absolutely beautiful country; the people seem nice, friendly, and well-educated; it's safe; and I prefer their form of government to that of the U.S. The fact that it's a neighbor to the U.S. is another plus; I'd certainly miss my own family and friends, so being just north would make visits easier.

Aotearoa (1)

Aurostion (740363) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573102)

New Zealand and money (but I'm working on that). I've actually wanted to move their since I was a young boy, so it seemed the logical choice when politically motivated to start looking elsewhere. It has one of the most transparent govnerments in the world. Further, and more importantly in my mind, land is cheap there, and as soon as I have enough saved I want to purchase enough to have a vineyard/farm. I am, after all, part of the "technofreak-hippie" culture (or I just want to live away from teems of humanity, and be as self-reliant as possible.)

Re:Aotearoa (1)

Velocir (851555) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573250)

Don't come to New Zealand. Our gov't spends all their time arguing pointlessly among themselves, unless they're talking about pay raises for themselves, which they don't have any trouble agreeing on. There are already craploads of vineyards (I've worked on at least 20 of them) and there's no money in growing grapes: The money is made by the wineries. Also, your skin will fry because of the high UV levels caused by the ozone hole (itself caused by the USA). There are laws against foreigners buying land etc (eg, Shania Twain wasn't allowed to build a house on land she'd bought). Plus we're already sick of Americans, unless they're celebrities. Sorry...

Costa Rica (3, Interesting)

budword (680846) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573146)

Costa Rica. They don't hate Americans. You can drink the water (if you were wondering).Great weather. No army. Easy immigration. Democracy. Universal health care. I'm leaving because I was arrested and held in jail for 2 days for not having my dogs licensed in a town they didn't live in. Yes, you read that right. I had already been convicted of not having my dogs licensed, with no notice even of any infraction, much less a trial. Had no right to appear before a judge, or even call a lawyer. That's for people who haven't already been convicted. Welcome to the law for and by bored small town cops. Northern Wisconsin, for any who were wondering.

wait for the '06 elections (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573148)

The United States will be having Congressional elections in a few weeks. Hopefully the dems will get control and do something about the White House.

Relevance? (1)

jasonla (211640) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573152)

Since when did Slashdot become a political forum? Questions like that are usually somehow related to technology. This seems more like a baited question.

All talk, no action. (1)

imstanny (722685) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573156)

My parents emmigrated here when I was seven. I am almost 24 now. There's a reason why America is so diverse; people from all over the world want to live here. There are two types of people that don't like it here; either they are Americans who are ignorant about life outside of America or they are ignorant because they don't live in America (government censorship/propaganda). Don't get me wrong; there are many things wrong with they way our government is run. Nevertheless, in response to the original post, I wouldn't want to live anywhere else. Vacation; well, that's a different story.

Will be more interesting after the election (1)

FreeIX (1011833) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573164)

I for one am eagerly awaiting the Nov. 7 elections to see what this country's future is going to look like.

Some are predicting 1994 all over again -- I at least am fairly confident the Dems will get the House.

But regardless, I will not be leaving America because I am committed to the FSP [freestateproject.org]

Why is it? (1)

wdr1 (31310) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573166)

Often during our heated political discussions on slashdot, several people will mention their desire to leave the country.

Off the cuff, I can think of specific names of prominent lefties who've said they want to leave the country (generally based on condition -- e.g., Bush winning again in '04), but I can't think of any people on the right.

Is it just I can't think of them/haven't heard of it? Are there prominent conservatives who declared they'll leave the country if ______ happens?

-Bill

No doubt redunant - but... your back yard. (1)

awehttam (779031) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573170)

"a-new-home-for-the-free-and-brave dept."

If American's are so free and brave, why don't they step up to the plate and fix the problems in their own back yard?

Seriousley. You live in a democracy. You have a lot of problems. Fix it yourself. Not sure how? Ask for help.

Those of us in our own home regions have our own problems, and every country and collective of residents faces problems of their own.

Israel (1)

Yonkeltron (720465) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573178)

I would go to Israel.
Problems? You bet. Worth it? For sure.
I'd go if I could be guaranteed a lifestyle comparible to one obtainable here in America. I love my countries but I do wonder sometimes...

Re:Israel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573270)

Israel rocks. I went there on holiday last November and loved it. Great country, great food (which caught me by surprise), great people.

Changes (1)

Wellington Grey (942717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573234)

It's always interesting to see how the Slashdot Editors modify story submissions. In this case they left out my link to a boing boing story [boingboing.net] that might be useful for those trying to get out of America. What's the matter guys? Do you think of boing boing as a rival?

-Grey [wellingtongrey.net]

Please don't come to Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16573264)

It's horrible up here. You Americans would hated it here. Don't come up here. There's nothing here and it's cold as ice. And our official language is French. You won't understand a word we say. Oh and we make new immigrants wear silly beaver hats for the first year so we can identify and ridicule them. It's all very horrible. No human rights at all if you know what I mean. You Americans should head down to Mexico. There's already tunnels in El Paso dug for you by poor Mexicans. Just pack up and you are ready to go.

Not Australia (1)

tezbobobo (879983) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573274)

In Australia we've just passed a law yesterday putting the burden of proof on the parent that they've not abused their children. That's right - presumed innocence is gone. I you're arrested for sedition you aren't allowed to tell anybody. If you do, they can be arrested as well as anyone they've told.

I would - and am - moving to a lesser developed country. I've decided not were yet, I am to become a missionary. The money is building in the bank as I write and I'll be leaving when my lease runs out in July '07.

I'm not telling (4, Funny)

Heir Of The Mess (939658) | more than 7 years ago | (#16573276)

Because I don't want a bunch of Americans following me, and I'm leaving just a soon as I tidy up a few personal things. Adios Amigos. But hey, you could always try Australia.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...