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The 13 Enemies of the Internet

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the we-get-to-pick dept.

203

Hennell writes "Reporters without borders has just released its annual list of internet enemies, a list of countries 'that systematically violate online free expression.' A couple of countries have been removed, but Egypt has been added. A detailed summary can be read on the BBC Website." From that article: "The blacklist is published annually but it is the first time RSF has organized an online protest to accompany the list. 'We wanted to mobilize net users so that when we lobby certain countries we can say that the concerns are not just ours but those of thousands of internet users around the world,' said a spokesman for RSF. Many of those on the internet blacklist are countries that are regularly criticized by human rights groups, such as China and Burma."

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Oblig. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751329)

Burkina Faso? Disputed Zone? Who called all these weird places?

Burkina Faso explained. (0)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751447)

"Burkina Faso?"

She played Dorothy in that "Return to Oz" sequel movie.

Re:Burkina Faso explained. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751729)

Burkina Faso?

Yeah, you remember Upper Volta, don't you?

Dear Fellow Americans, (0, Offtopic)

xtracto (837672) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751459)

Although we know you are sorry [sorryeverybody.com] and even more people than the ones who voted against your current regime are sorry now, now it is the time for you to make the difference.

Please go out and vote, and if you know someone who does not want to vote please convince him/her to vote. It is on your hands the power to finish the war and terrorism. Vote to remove the totalitarian regime from your beautiful country and to start restoring the rights your government has removed from you.

I am not from USA, but I KNOW there is good people there. Please go out and vote, we need you, people from the USA, we need you to stop the injustice.

Re:Dear Fellow Americans, (-1, Troll)

InsaneProcessor (869563) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751577)

Yes, there are good people here. That is why we voted to continue the war on terror and screw those who oppose said war!

Re:Dear Fellow Americans, (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751647)

I would be, but I fucked up and disenfranchised myself by not getting my address changed soon enough. There wouldn't even be enough time for me to fill out a provisional ballot and actually have it mean something. My absentee ballot is sitting at home right now while I'm halfway across my state with no way to get it.

Re:Dear Fellow Americans, (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751865)

Okay, I fully accept that I'm going to be modded off-topic, too, but...

Who are we supposed to vote for? Bush is out of office no matter what we do, and you can bet the 2 running for office will be about equals in terms of good and bad. There's no other -serious- contenders out there.

In short: You're wasting your breath. Go away.

Re:Dear Fellow Americans, (1)

ehrichweiss (706417) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752823)

Doug Stanhope, the comedian, is running for President in 08. He's serious and I'm seriously voting for him since he's not going to waffle or lie if he doesn't yet know what to do about an issue. http://www.dougstanhope.com/ [dougstanhope.com] for more info and links to his myspace pages that tell more than I can.

First Posting..... (2, Funny)

Lissajous (989738) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751333)

the enemy to all of t3h interwebs!!!

Oh crap......

Some missing (1)

jackharrer (972403) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751341)

And where is RIAAstate and MPIAcountry?

Re:Some missing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752189)

And the nation of Microsoft? What of King Bill I??

Re:Some missing (0, Troll)

Ant P. (974313) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752989)

Good point. Where is America on that list? It should be #1.

I am not surprised... (4, Funny)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751349)

that those Uzbek assholes are on the list. Their potassium is vastly inferior to the potassium in the great nation of Khazakistan.

Re:I am not surprised... (2, Funny)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752053)

Their potassium is vastly inferior to the potassium in the great nation of Khazakistan.

High five for portassiam! Very nice.

Re:I am not surprised... (1)

StCredZero (169093) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752909)

Is this the new "In Soviet Union..."?

find the fish fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751353)

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Why only countries? (4, Insightful)

MECC (8478) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751361)

Why only include countries? Why not include companies as well? Some of them are gunning for 'the Internet' either intentionally, or just as a side-effect of unethical practices.

Re:Why only countries? (3, Funny)

massivefoot (922746) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751489)

One would hope that large companies would consider close collaroration with the government of a country on the list something of a blemish on their character. However, I doubt this will be the case. What is needed is for consumers to start considering the ethics of those they purchase from. We need to give companies a choice - you may act unethically, however doing so will cause a large number of people or organisations with more moral fiber to cease doing business with you.

Re:Why only countries? (3, Insightful)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751883)

you may act unethically, however doing so will cause a large number of people or organisations with more moral fiber to cease doing business with you.

Moral fiber and psychic powers. There simply isn't enough transparency in corporations to figure out whether they are acting ethically or not in most cases, unless they do something really reprehensible and a government gets involved and compels transparency, or someone on the inside finally decides that having a job is no longer worth it.

Avoid the veal. (5, Insightful)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752291)

you may act unethically, however doing so will cause a large number of people or organisations with more moral fiber to cease doing business with you.

Hello! May I be the first to welcome you to our planet. You may find things here a little unsettling, coming from your obviously very advanced civilization and culture; in the meantime I recommend you don't try to make sense of anything.

Oh, and be sure to try the pastrami, it's excellent here.

Re:Why only countries? (1)

jimstapleton (999106) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751615)

really! I can think of two companies I want to add to that list...

Paging mister Thierry Schmurr (1)

TheManFromTheWoods (1024085) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751795)

Just wanted to say hello.

Oh, and wandering why you are sitting naked in your office, with door wide open, if you don't want to be seen in such state of undress by happy men ;-)

Or are you happy yourself?

Sorry, _Tristan_ Schmurr (1)

TheManFromTheWoods (1024085) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752245)

(n/t)

Can't declare war on companies (0)

msobkow (48369) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751839)

In case you hadn't noticed, there is a heavy overlap between this list and the infamous US "axis of evil" list.

As I've worked with people from some of the nations on the list, I consider it far more likely to be a fluff piece to get the techies voting for continued US warmongering, given it's fortuitous release on the day of an important US vote.

Thumbs down on clumsy propaganda.

Re:Can't declare war on companies (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752641)

I consider it far more likely to be a fluff piece to get the techies voting for continued US warmongering, given it's fortuitous release on the day of an important US vote.

Reporters Without Borders is the organization that keeps downgrading the US on "press freedom" because the US government seems to think that journalists aren't above the law. By its past behavior, they're much more likely to be spreading anti- rather than pro-American propaganda.

Believe it or not, just because somebody doesn't always call the US the ultimate evil doesn't make them a mouthpiece for the White House.

Re:Why only countries? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752985)

well the obvious reason is that we cant really know about what what companies do what since there are alot of them with different rules in each country, the good part is just jump onto http://anonet.org [anonet.org] and learn how to get around certain _road blocks_ :) unethical practices can also be met with unethical practices. FWIW if you live in Australia now you download the pRon at work!

win win

Shame on some of those countries, if only china would stop filtering, perhaps our efforts should be like spammers, create a lot of junk to the point it breaks the effectiveness of the spam filters.

p

What about the Vatican? (1, Interesting)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751407)

I spent a day there earlier this year, and could not find a single cybercafe in the place.

Re:What about the Vatican? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751443)

at least the ATMs are in Latin.

Re:What about the Vatican? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751491)

It's right next to the condom machine.

Re:What about the Vatican? (2, Insightful)

Asrynachs (1000570) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751633)

I went to Antarctica for vacation. I couldn't find a single cybercafe there either.
They should be on the list too.

Re:What about the Vatican? (2, Funny)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751653)

"I went to Antarctica for vacation. I couldn't find a single cybercafe there either. They should be on the list too."

Not surprising, really. The tubes are all frozen solid.

Re:What about the Vatican? (1)

Asrynachs (1000570) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751695)

Saying that made you stupid

Re:What about the Vatican? (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752195)

How so?

Re:What about Livingston? (1)

Asrynachs (1000570) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752445)

You can't ask me to elaborate on my unfounded opinions. I say things like that when people don't agree with me. It's funny how stupid you are in that respect.

Re:What about Livingston? (1)

Skim123 (3322) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752711)

Zing!

Re:What about the Vatican? (1)

The_Wilschon (782534) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752999)

You mean Argentina [wikipedia.org] ?

Re:What about the Vatican? (2, Funny)

Fozzyuw (950608) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752421)

I spent a day there earlier this year, and could not find a single cybercafe in the place.

They don't need the internet to look at pr0n they have... [ERROR: USER HAS BEEN SMITTED]

What about USA ? (1)

ookaze (227977) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751409)

For the DeCSS code censorship ?
What is the status of that ?
I hope it's not applied anymore, or this smells hypocritical.

Re:What about USA ? (2, Insightful)

ajs (35943) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751629)

For the DeCSS code censorship?


You can hardly compare the civil attacks on one piece of software that was designed to allow copying of content which the seller had restricted (no matter how right you might think that is, and I'm not arguing the point) with the systematic censorship of any political or otherwise controversial electronic communication. The fact that you would even bring that up in this context demonstrates that you MUST live in a country which is shockingly low in censorship when compared to the rest of the world.

Re:What about USA ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752237)

Yeah, those guys at Reporters sans frontières sure are hypocrites for not including the US.

Dumbass.

What,, no US? Cuba? (0, Troll)

russotto (537200) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751419)

I thought journalists thought the US was the root of all evil and Cuba was a paradise with wonderful medical care whose only problems were caused by US oppression? Something's wrong here.

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (1)

Iphtashu Fitz (263795) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751743)

You're just trolling by asking about the US, but Cuba is a valid one that I was going to question myself. At the recent UN summit on internet access, it was alleged that "Zero percent of Cubans are connected to the Internet [com.com] because of the censorship hold that the authorities there have over their people.

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (1)

Amazing Quantum Man (458715) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751831)

Anecdotal evidence, but...

Recently on USENET, on comp.lang.c++, there was a post by someone claiming to be from Cuba, with a .cu address.

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751899)

I hope it was a good one, because you won't be seeing any more posts from that guy.

Also, please do not mention the service you mentioned in your post on Slashdot again. You know why.

Well that's obvious. (2)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752389)

Well, what else do you think Fidel had to do when he was laid up?

Funny he'd go for C++ though. I always figured him as a C# .NET kind of guy.

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751857)

Cuba is a great place where every citizen is taken care of. It is the exact opposite of the US under Bush. What is the point of your hateful troll? To show just how little you understand about Cuba?

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751965)

Cuba is a great place where every citizen is taken care of. It is the exact opposite of the US under Bush.

And the Mafia is a wonderful organization where every squealer is "taken care of."

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (1)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752001)

Cuba is a great place where every citizen is taken care of. It is the exact opposite of the US under Bush. What is the point of your hateful troll? To show just how little you understand about Cuba?

My only question, El Presidente, is where you sent that post from, since your nation has no internet.

Re:What,, no US? Cuba? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752943)

cuba does have the internet, but its very controlled and access outside of public terminals, universities, and 'computer clubs' is forbidden. It is possible he posted from one of those

Re:What, no US? Cuba? (1)

vfp_guru (667579) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752549)

Kinda like the former Soviet Union under Stalin, where every citizen that still remains is taken care of?

Vile! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751453)

These countries are so vile...you might just say they are the Axis of e-Vile!

Re:Vile! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751941)

Yeah, but if you try something to change their regime you'll experience your eBay of Pigs.

Chinese and non-chinese treated the same (1)

cucucu (953756) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751497)

TFA says
Visitors to the RSF website are also invited to leave a voice message for Yahoo's co-founder Jerry Yang, expressing their views on the firm's involvement in China
Interestingly enough, you don't have to be a Chinese reporter [bbc.co.uk] for Yahoo to give away your private info. For every email you send from Yahoo mail, the IP address from where you sent is is disclosed to the receiver.

Re:Chinese and non-chinese treated the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752513)

This is entirely normal.

Enemies (0, Flamebait)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751501)

Many of those on the internet blacklist are countries that are regularly criticised by human rights groups, such as China and Burma

First of all, it's Myannmar, not Burma. Second of all, I hope that the USA is on the list...it's one of the "countries that are regularly criticised by human rights groups" for such things as torture, racism, warmongering, profiteering, and so on. (I can't read the linked article - it appears to be blocked by the Great Firewall of China)

It's Burma (1)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751617)

"First of all, it's Myannmar, not Burma"

For one who is so particular, you mispelled "Myanmar". Burma is actually a legitimate name to call the nation, even if it is not the single "official" name.

Re:It's Burma (1)

Rocketship Underpant (804162) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752167)

"Burma is actually a legitimate name to call the nation."

Precisely, Burma is its name in English. It's name in Burmese might approximate the sounds "myanmar" but that only matters when you're speaking Burmese.

Re:Enemies (1)

borawjm (747876) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751637)

(I can't read the linked article - it appears to be blocked by the Great Firewall of China)

Speaking of the Great Firewall of China, I guess we can't criticize what we do now know, right?

Re:Enemies (3, Interesting)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751659)

They're probably calling it Burma [wikipedia.org] in protest of the military government there, one of whose changes was the name. It's not uncommon. For example, this [mises.org] non-crank author does it.

And I seriously doubt "human rights groups" put "profiteering" on the same level as e.g. torture and racism. Where are the human rights protests over Microsoft?

I feel so.... (1)

Karl Cocknozzle (514413) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751511)

...Presidential... right now. Just think, ME, Karl Cocknozzle, with my own enemies list! And on Election Day to boot!

I feel very Nixonian right now. ...Not sure if that's a word or not but there it is.

well.. (1)

thejrwr (1024073) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751543)

that makes my moving list just a little smaller

enemies? (3, Insightful)

darkwhite (139802) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751559)

Countries which censor or curtail Internet usage (with the obvious exception of China, with its staggering size and mobility) are hardly "enemies" of the Internet - they can't attack it and expect any degree of success. Instead they're foolishly short-sighted, unable to comprehend the massive technological disadvantage any such action entails in the long run. The problem is, this usually correlates with general incompetence, which means many of these countries will become (or already are) failed states which require outside assistance.

Re:enemies? (2, Insightful)

honkycat (249849) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751811)

A great many of the small countries on the list have detained citizens for expressing themselves freely online. Even if the country is small, that is another part of the world where people are not free to share ideas. That is the basic freedom that made the Internet what it is.

Individually, it would be difficult for these nations to have an impact on the Internet as a whole. However, it sure puts a damper on it for its own citizens. Many of these people are not free to leave their country to find an unfiltered pipe. For some it's because they can't afford to uproot their family, for many it's because the oppressive government won't allow its citizens to leave.

Furthermore, the list is not short, and it includes the most populous country on the planet. That could result in the norm world-wide being heavy Internet censorship. Any country, of whatever size, that engages in this behavior is an enemy of the Internet as a whole.

Re:enemies? (1)

icedcool (446975) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752333)

Mod parent up.

Article Text (3, Informative)

loimprevisto (910035) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751561)

Already slashdotted, here's the mirrordot link (http://www.mirrordot.com/stories/037ac2605c402c45 d6ddcfb790b9ead6/index.html [mirrordot.com] )

The list of 13 Internet enemies

Three countries - Nepal, Maldives and Libya - have been removed from the annual list of Internet enemies, which Reporters Without Borders publishes today. But many bloggers were harassed and imprisoned this year in Egypt, so it has been added to the roll of shame reserved for countries that systematically violate online free expression.

Countries in alphabetical order :

- Belarus

The government has a monopoly of telecommunications and does not hesitate to block access to opposition websites if it feels the need, especially at election time. Independent online publications are also often hacked. In March 2006, for example, several websites critical of President Alexandre Lukashenko mysteriously disappeared from the Internet for several days.

      Burma

The Burmese governments Internet policies are even more repressive than those of its Chinese and Vietnamese neighbours. The military junta clearly filters opposition websites. It keeps a very close eye on Internet cafes, in which the computers automatically execute screen captures every five minutes, in order to monitor user activity. The authorities targeted Internet telephony and chat services in June, blocking Googles Gtalk, for example. The aim was two-fold: to defend the profitable long-distance telecommunications market, which is controlled by state companies, as well as to stop cyber-dissidents from using a means of communication that is hard to monitor.

      China

China unquestionably continues to be the worlds most advanced country in Internet filtering. The authorities carefully monitor technological progress to ensure that no new window of free expression opens up, After initially targeting websites and chat forums, they nowadays concentrate on blogs and video exchange sites. China now has nearly 17 million bloggers. This is an enormous number, but very few of them dare to tackle sensitive issues, still less criticise government policy. Firstly, because Chinas blog tools all include filters that block subversive word strings. Secondly, because the companies operating these services, both Chinese and foreign, are pressured by the authorities to control content. They employ armies of moderators to clean up the content produced by the bloggers. Finally, in a country in which 52 people are currently in prison for expressing themselves too freely online, self-censorship is obviously in full force. Just five years ago, many people thought Chinese society and politics would be revolutionised by the Internet, a supposedly uncontrollable medium. Now, with China enjoying increasing geopolitical influence, people are wondering the opposite, whether perhaps Chinas Internet model, based on censorship and surveillance, may one day be imposed on the rest of the world.

      Cuba

With less than 2 per cent of its population online, Cuba is one of the most backward Internet countries. An investigation carried out by Reporters Without Borders in October revealed that the Cuban government uses several levers to ensure that this medium is not used in a counter-revolutionary way. Firstly, it has more or less banned private Internet connections. To surf the Internet or check their e-mail, Cubans have to go to public access points such as Internet cafes, universities and youth computer clubs where their activity is more easily monitored. Secondly, the computers in all the Internet cafes and leading hotels contain software installed by the Cuban police that triggers an alert message whenever subversive key-words are spotted. The regime also ensures that there is no Internet access for dissidents and independent journalists, for whom communicating with people abroad is an ordeal. Finally, the government also relies on self-censorship. You can get 20 years in prison for writing counter-revolutionary articles for foreign websites. You can even get five years just for connecting to the Internet illegally. Few Internet users dare to run the risk of defying the regimes censorship.

- Egypt

Aside from a few sites linked to the Muslim Brotherhoods religious movements, Egypt does little online filtering. But President Hosni Mubarak, who has been in power since 1981, displays an extremely disturbing authoritarianism as regards the Internet. Three bloggers were arrested in June 2006 and were held for two to three months for calling for democratic reforms. Others have been harassed, such as Coptic blogger Hela Hemi Botros, who was forced to close down her blog in August under pressure from the police. Finally, a Council of State administrative court recently ruled that the authorities could block, suspend of close down any website likely to pose a threat to national security. This could open the way to extensive online censorship.

- Iran

Repression of bloggers seems to have declined in 2006. Whereas around 20 were imprisoned in 2005, only Arash Sigarchi is in jail at the moment. But Internet filtering has stepped up and Iran today boasts of filtering 10 million immoral websites. Pornographic sites, political sites and those dealing with religion are usually the ones most targeted. But since the summer of 2006, the censors have concentrated on online publications dealing with womens rights. The authorities also recently decided to ban broadband connections. This could be explained by a concern not to overload the very poor-quality Iranian network, but it could also be motivated by a desire to prevent the downloading of Western cultural products such as films and songs.

      North Korea

Like last year, North Korea continues to be the worlds worst Internet black hole. Only a few officials are able to access the web, using connections rented from China. The countrys domain name - .nk - has still not been launched and the few websites created by the North Korean government are hosted on servers in Japan or South Korea. It is hard to believe this is simply the result of economic difficulties in a country which today is capable of manufacturing nuclear warheads. The North Korean journalists who have found refuge in South Korea are very active on the Internet, especially on the www.dailynk.com website.

- Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia does not hide its online censorship. Unlike China, where website blocking is disguised as technical problems, Saudi Arabias filters clearly tell Internet users that certain websites are banned. Censorship concentrates on pornographic content, but it also targets opposition websites, Israeli publications, or sites dealing with homosexuality. Blogs also pose a problem to the Saudi censors. Last year they tried to completely block access to the countrys biggest blog tool, blogger.com. But they backed off a few days later and now they just block the blogs that are deemed unacceptable. In June of this year, for example, the intimate diary of Saudi Eve, a young woman who dared to talk about her love life and criticise government censorship, was added to the blacklist.

- Syria

Syria is the Middle Easts biggest prison for cyber-dissidents, with three people currently detained for criticising the authorities online. They are systematically tortured and subjected to inhumane conditions. The government bans access to Arabic-language opposition sites and sites dealing with Syrias Kurdish minority.

- Tunisia

In 2005, Tunisia had the honour of hosting the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), a big UN event about the Internets future. Yet President Zine el Abidine Ben Alis Internet policies are among the most repressive in the world. All the Internet cafes are state-controlled. They filter web content and are under close police surveillance. It is, for example, impossible to access the Reporters Without Borders website from inside Tunisia. The security services also constantly harass independent bloggers and opposition website editors to ensure that self-censorship prevails. One cyber-dissident, Mohammed Abbou, has been imprisoned since March 2005 for criticising the president in an online newsletter.

      Turkmenistan

With less than 1 per cent of the population online, this is one of the worlds least connected countries. President Separmurad Nyazov is a central Asian Kim Jong-Il, wielding total control over the media. Not only is the Turkmen Internet censored, it is also forbidden territory for the vast majority of the population.

- Uzbekistan

Official censorship seems to have become even tougher since the bloody crackdown on the pro-democracy protests in Andidjan in May 2005. The iron-fisted government led by President Islam Karimov blocks access to most independent websites dealing with Uzbekistan, which are usually hosted on servers in Russia, and to NGO websites that criticise its human rights violations.

- Vietnam

The Vietnamese government is negotiating its admission to the World Trade Organisation and is in the uncomfortable position of being squeezed by the international community. Unlike neighbouring China, it is unable to completely ignore the demands of foreign diplomats. It therefore seems to be tending to soften its control over news and information, and hesitates to crack down on dissidents. Several cyber-dissidents, the most famous of whom was Pham Hong Son, were released in 2005 and 2006. This relative forbearance seems to have breathed new life into Vietnams pro-democracy movement, which is making admirable use of the Internet to organise and circulate independently-sourced news domestically. A group calling itself 8406" even launched an online petition in the summer of 2006, signed by hundreds of people using their real names, calling on the government to begin political reforms. This use of the Internet by young democrats alarms the authorities, who are still often ready to use force to silence these cyber-dissidents. Ten people have been arrested this year for what they said on the Internet. Four of them are still detained.

Countries removed from the list

- Libya

Reporters Without Borders confirmed, during a fact-finding visit, that the Internet is no longer censored in Libya. Furthermore, no cyber-dissident has been detained since Abdel Razak Al Mansuris release in March 2006. Reporters Without Borders nonetheless still regards President Muammar Gaddafi as a press freedom predator.

      Maldives

No cyber-dissident has been imprisoned in the Maldives since Fathimath Nisreen, Mohamed Zaki and Ahmad Didi were released between May 2005 and February 2006. President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom is still viewed by Reporters Without Borders as a press freedom predator but his policies towards the Internet no longer justify keeping his country on the list of Internet enemies.

- Nepal

Reporters Without Borders has observed a marked improvement in freedom of expression since King Gyanendra backed down and democratic rule was restored in May 2006. The Internet is no longer censored and no harassment or arbitrary detention of any blogger has been reported.


Lets see... Cuba, Syria, Saudi Arabia, North Korea, China... seems they're going after some low-hanging fruit here. I'm more interested in reports about censorship and repression by countries that pretend to value free speech. I'll dig up some links I have laying around if anyone else is interested- and I'd love to see yours too. Please, link sparingly on the unsubstantiated/tinfoil hat stuff though. A little bit of that stuff goes a long way...

The 13 REAL enemies of the Internet (5, Funny)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751567)

1. Microsoft Internet Explorer 7
2. The MPAA
3. The RIAA
4. Flash
5. Javascript
6. Pointless registration screens [nytimes.com] .
7. Content blocked for certain regions.
8. Spammers
9. Phishers
10. Senator Orrin Hatch
11. Nigeria (I mean, come on, how many millionaire spam scams emails have you ever gotten from Belarus or Burma?)
12. Senator Ted. "Tubey" Stevens
13. Bears (Not sure on this one, but Colbert insisted it belonged here)

Re:The 13 REAL enemies of the Internet (1)

ronanbear (924575) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751671)

No 13 is a vicious lie! There's no truth in it whatsoever

Re:The 13 REAL enemies of the Internet (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752315)

>No 13 is a vicious lie! There's no truth in it whatsoever

Of course. Bears are always the threat number one.

Re:The 13 REAL enemies of the Internet (5, Funny)

karlfr (897006) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752005)

You forgot "backhoes".

Re:The 13 REAL enemies of the Internet (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752665)

What's so wrong with Javascript? Overused, yes, but not bad. Otherwise I'd shuffle it around a bit, put spammers at the top, and add virus writers in general, Microsoft Windows (particularly pre-Windows XP SP2), IE6, Netscape 4, and ISPs that block port 25 and 80. Oh, and that Fark "HA HA" guy, 'cause I've seen him say "HA HA! I broke the internets!!!!11!eleventy!"

Well guess who didn't make the list? (0, Troll)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751623)

The United States. God bless our founding fathers for writing the first amendment so clearly. It makes targeting scoundrels that much easier. Anyone who gets fundamentally confused by it is either too stupid to function or evil. Makes fighting back a lot easier because unlike in Europe, if the day ever comes, patriots here could shoot the censors with a clear conscience.

Re:Well guess who didn't make the list? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751829)

>> patriots here could shoot the censors with a clear conscience

For that to happen, they'll have to understand the second amendment too.

Befor you criticize... (0)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751639)

My fellow slashdotters, before you criticize, just remember that the countires on that list are there according to a select group's opinion. It does not mean it's the truth. Even if it were, freedom and liberty also include the freedom and liberty to do as one wishes, even if we might not agree with what a particular entity does.

That's why for example, China, Iran, Burma and the USA are in the same group of countries that execute "criminals" yet the USA champions itself as a defender of rights...including the right to life!

On this one thing, Iran, which calls the US "The Great Satan" and the USA, which calls Iran a member of the "Axis of Evil," are in the same group! Ironic? You tell me.

Re:Befor you criticize... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752121)

Freedom and liberty come at a cost and with responsibility, #sswipe.

Re:Befor you criticize... (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752351)

Freedom and liberty come at a cost and with responsibility, #sswipe.

Says who? I could also say that Freedom and Liberty come with no appendages whatsoever.

This post obviously censored by his government. (1)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752917)

Obviously the poster lives in one of the 13 countries. I managed to get ahold of the uncensored version, posted below.


My fellow slashdotters, this article couldn't be more right! The censorship in China is known by everyone, and is largely effective. It's the absolute truth. Freedom and liberty are severly curtailed in China, anyone that speaks out against the government is rounded up and never heard from again. Sorry, I must go now. It took a bit of doing to get past the firewall to even read the slashdot article, but surely they'll plug the hole soon enough.

Awesome (1)

kassemi (872456) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751643)

FTA: Iran today boasts of filtering 10 million immoral websites.

Seems like a great place to raise a child! /sarcasm

Re:Awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752593)

Its spelled raze, "a good place to raze children". I guess it is kind of dry.

But I thought? (0, Troll)

argStyopa (232550) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751663)

Wait, I thought that the United States was the world's worst police state? Der Fuhrer George Bush and his Goebbels-analogue Rove, along with their glassy-eyed and jackbooted minions crushing all internal dissent with waves of black helicopters or stampeding Religious Fundamentalists?

I say: WTF?

Clearly, they 'got to' RSF and co-opted them. It's a tragedy when attention-whores, er, I mean "journalists" are afraid to 'speak truth to power'.

I know, I know......-842 Troll.

Re:But I thought? (3, Insightful)

RsG (809189) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751955)

I've not yet seen anyone argue that the US is currently worse than China. I've seen the occasional moral relativist argue that it isn't possible to judge the Chinese government, but that isn't the same position to take, and in any case few people these days take moral relativism very seriously.

What I have seen argued is that the US is slipping. What gives most Americans the high ground when comparing the US government to the PRC's? The fact that the latter espouses censorship, torture, invasion of privacy, strongarm military policies, and general human rights and due process violations. Americans are protected by the constitution and a multitude of checks and balances. Erosion of those protections is the concern.

If the US loses that high ground, you've got a problem. Do you really want your country to only be no worse than China? It would be one thing if that meant that the Chinese government had decided to treat its citizens better, but it's quite another if the US drops down to their current level of rights.

America isn't there yet, not by a long shot, and the constant cries of "OMG, Orwell" do grow a little tiresome, but the underlying concern is completely valid. It is easier to protect your rights in the here and now than it is to try and fight for them once they're gone.

Re:But I thought? (1)

Gospodin (547743) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752931)

You think we're slipping? Maybe, but consider our past: black slavery, Red Scares, HUAAC, "separate but equal", Prohibition, and on and on. I think the US is arguably freer than any time in its past. But if you think more clearly-written federal guidelines on the ability to subpoena library records and similar changes are at all comparable to our past, then I guess you're right.

No, +1 Funny (0, Troll)

aquatone282 (905179) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752097)

I know, I know......-842 Troll.

I'd give you a +1 Funny, but I blew all my points down-modding the "Progressive" trolls that flocked to the "HBO's Hacking Democracy Available Online [slashdot.org] " yesterday.

Thanks for the laugh though.

Another fun list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751735)

Posting anonymously because I have mod points at the moment.

The list is from the Privacy International site and features the "Leading surveillance societies in the EU and the World".
http://www.privacyinternational.org/article.shtml? cmd%5B347%5D=x-347-545269 [privacyinternational.org]
The original article from the Reg provides some background.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/11/06/privacy_us _china/ [theregister.co.uk]
If you value your privacy, it looks like Canada and Germany are the places to be.
Depressing that there are so few places.

This reminds me (1)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751837)

If anyone here knows the UK's Channel 4 series 'Fr Ted', then lemme say this: this list reminds me of fr Noel Furlong priest when he goes to put Tony on his little 'list of enemies'. I guess you had to be there at the time,

Funny funny show [youtube.com]

Interesting Fact to observe (1)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751845)

With the exception of Burma (which has long been a pariah military dictatorship), all the countries are either ruled by a communist party (or direct sucessor) or they are from an islamic culture.

Re:Interesting Fact to observe (1)

VolkerLanz (1005127) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752441)

With the exception of Burma (which has long been a pariah military dictatorship), all the countries
As many others have already noted, the USA is obviously missing from the list...

are either ruled by a communist party (or direct sucessor) or they are from an islamic culture.
... so, make your pick ;-)

Also, what's "pariah military"? Isn't that just a little bit tautological?

Re:Interesting Fact to observe (2, Insightful)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752809)

And why would the USA be on the list and not Germany or France? Germany outright bans certain speech and political thought (i.e. Nazism). France bans both Nazism and denial of the Armenian genocide. Such bans are unconstitutional in the USA.

Neither the USA, France, or Germany deserve to be on this list, because their restrictions, such as they are, are rather mild. I think your anti-Americanism has gotten the better of you, or you're trolling.

And as far "pariah" being a tautology for "military", that speaks for itself. Societies do not ostracize those who sacrifice for the community, but honor them.

Need to add one honorable mention (1, Troll)

Quila (201335) | more than 7 years ago | (#16751859)

The United Nations, because censorship will be world-wide if it does get control of the Internet.

Thats not close to the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16751929)

Thats a list for ASIA countries only...

Re:Thats not close to the world (1)

zeromorph (1009305) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752111)

Thats a list for ASIA countries only...

Belarus? Egypt? Tunisia? Cuba? ... Go, buy a new globe!

Re:Thats not close to the world (1)

krell (896769) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752669)

"Belarus? Egypt? Tunisia? Cuba? ... Go, buy a new globe!"

I'm almost willing to spot him Egypt. The Sinai is sometimes, but not usually, considered to be part of Asia, since it is at the continental split.

Slashdot Subjective "Scoring" = Censorship (0, Troll)

cannuck (859025) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752223)

The intellectual geniuses who score posts here are the best example of censorship on the net - censorship that fascists could only dream about. It's time to dump Slashdot's so-called "scoring". Which in fact is an effort to censor.

Just in case you-all don't know - scoring in North American schools was brought in as a replacement to whipping for not knowing the right answer in the school room. Seems like the intellectual geniuses here - the whipping people - like to whip people by low scores - when either they don't agree with a post or don't like the "tone". In either case it's censorship.

Re:Slashdot Subjective "Scoring" = Censorship (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752541)

You might take another look at the top of the page. Slashdot is about "stuff that matters". Your unsubstantiated rants are not appreciated. In particular, when you deliberately attempt to discredit people who are far better than you'll ever be, using old information that's already been debunked. I'd say "silly", but your posts are simply paranoid delusions based on fantasy, not reality.

Cite credible sources if you think otherwise. And try to raise the level of discussion, not lower it, by character assasination.

China (1)

javelinco (652113) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752267)

Dude, China says they don't censor the Internet. This list is bogus! Down with the Man!

Question (2, Funny)

Shadow-isoHunt (1014539) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752491)

Do the pyramids' get broadband, or is their wiring too old?

gambling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752495)

The US prohibits gambling on the internet. It arrests people who run gambling sites.

US Not on List (1)

finity (535067) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752539)

I thought for sure we would be.

What about the UIGEA? (1)

QuesoKid (945569) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752553)

The U.S. government recently passed the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act. In fact they snuck it in at the last minute of the legislative session by attaching it to a port security bill. The UIGEA is meant to impair U.S. citizens' ability to gamble online. This is effectively limiting the freedom of U.S. citizens to do what they want with their own hard earned money, and is ultimately restricting free trade on the internet. For that I think the U.S. should be on this list.

Re:What about the UIGEA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16752691)

A site like this: www.betfair.com [betfair.com] can't be hosted in the US.

It is basically the same as trading in options; futures should be forbidden also.

Ooh! A protest! That will be effective! (1)

edunbar93 (141167) | more than 7 years ago | (#16752581)

"We wanted to mobilise net users so that when we lobby certain countries we can say that the concerns are not just ours but those of thousands of internet users around the world," ... Many of those on the internet blacklist are countries that are regularly criticised by human rights groups, such as China and Burma.

Hmm. Let's see what the tradeoffs for China are in this situation.

On one hand, they have total control of 1 billion human beings if they control what they read, hear, and say.

On the other hand, they have a few thousand people whom they can ignore simply by not reading some web page.

I dunno man. Those few thousand people hold a lot of power over the guy who weilds more power than any other person on earth. They might even be able to hurt his feelings and make him look bad to the people who he's controlling, if only he doesn't censor the internet...
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