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Shedding Light On the Black Art of IT Management

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the that-web-fad-will-never-catch-on dept.

57

Cathy writes "An article by Harvard's Andrew McAfee tells nontechnical managers how not to get overwhelmed by the 'drumbeat' of IT projects. McAfee breaks down IT into three categories — functional, network, and enterprise — and says that this framework 'can also indicate which IT initiatives are going to be relatively easy to implement and on which projects executives should focus. In that light, IT management starts to look less like a black art and more like the work of the executive.'"

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Tunnel Vision (3, Insightful)

parvenu74 (310712) | more than 7 years ago | (#16776865)

The "black" part of the art: the inability of managers to adequately know everything they need to know about the projects for which they are responsible.

Re:Tunnel Vision (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777089)

McAfee breaks down IT into three categories -- functional, network, and enterprise

I break down Russian into three categories: criminals, ugly faggots and criminal ugly faggots.

Re:Tunnel Vision (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777235)

Ah, but then you haven't broken them down into three categories, as you will discover should you feel inclined to draw a Venn diagram or possibly fire a few more synapses simultaneously.

Re:Tunnel Vision (2, Insightful)

Soko (17987) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777101)

The "black" part of the art: the inability of managers to adequately know everything they need to know about the projects for which they are responsible.

Sure about that? My boss answered your post with "Maybe I'm not the greatest technical mind, but I know what I need to - to trust in the people I hired to do these IT projects, that they'll make sure there's enough return on each dollar spent. Pretty simple."

One of the reasons I work here.

Soko

Re:Tunnel Vision (2, Insightful)

Heembo (916647) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777687)

Bullshit! Managers need to participate in the design process of IT projects, especially applications that they their departments will be depending on. I hate managers who "iterate with programmers" on an actual application, spiral style - that is SO expensive and less secure (a highly refactored system is less secure that one that was done right the first time) You iterate with design docs, get involved early. Once you (as a manager) have a good design in play, then set your IT people loose. If you do not have at least a minimal understanding of the basics of how the web works, yet you are spending a million on a large enterprise web project, then shame on you or the board that hired you!

Re:Tunnel Vision (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16778847)

"My boss answered your post with"

Gosh, aren't you quite the little IT 'bot? So, does he let you spit it out, or make you swallow? Does he provide kneepads, or do you have to?

"One of the reasons I work here."
Oh, I'm sure :)

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

Heembo (916647) | more than 7 years ago | (#16800780)

*ROTFL* I want that managers job! Let me run big IT projects with having any real technical clue. Sounds like a dream, does it come with a company car? And hey, I wouldn't even have to use email - I just tell one of my cronies to do it for me! NICE!

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

Skadet (528657) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777399)

Oh, I see, inadequacy, inability, and stupidity are the "black" traits, huh? If it weren't for the glass ceiling, we'd learn, too! It's a conspiracy of menthol cigarettes and government-sponsored crack! You racist! I demand an apology and reparations in the form of Apple Cinema Displays!

Hmmph.

Re:Tunnel Vision (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777453)

Here are the real parts of IT management:

1) Risk aversion: throw amazing amounts of cash at an external vendor to manage "risk". This way, when something goes wrong, you can point your finger outside of your domain.
2) Kickbacks: because you are throwing tremendous amounts of money around in step #1, you'll quickly find that the external vendors are willing to throw some back - strictly off the record. They'll also pay for your prostitutes.
3) Blind decision making: since you've paid external vendors to take on the bulk of the risk, there is little reason for your reward (see: risk/reward). This means that you can NOT delegate decisions to the people who have the knowledge to make them as you would be left to do nothing at all. Instead, subscribe to Gartner. They'll tell you what to do. They'll even tell you what to do after you realize that what they told you before was wrong (see: outsourcing, buy instead of build, etc).

Rinse and repeat. Posting anonymously for obvious reasons.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16776931)

gnaa sux gnaa is dead to me gnaa flew into the WTC

india launches an indian onto the moon to start an aol call center there

Not for slashdot audience (2, Insightful)

Zo0ok (209803) | more than 7 years ago | (#16776965)

I dont think this article says much to the Slashdot audience. It is really targeted at poeple who find IT confusing and needs to get an idea of what it is. It categorises and simplifies - maybe in a useful way for people who need an introduction. But again: not for the slashdot audience. Move on.

Re:Not for slashdot audience (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16778479)

Or mayhaps it can help slashdotters to explain the complicated processes to the uninitiated.

Re:Not for slashdot audience (5, Interesting)

mritunjai (518932) | more than 7 years ago | (#16779491)

It is really targeted at poeple who find IT confusing and needs to get an idea of what it is. It categorises and simplifies - maybe in a useful way for people who need an introduction. But again: not for the slashdot audience. Move on.

Read the article again, it's focussed on the non-technical people managing technical people. Yeah, right - one of the "people who find IT confusing" can be YOUR boss tomorrow !! (Surprize!!!!)

When the sh*t hits the fan, you'd need to know what to point her to, and more-importantly - to know what the hell she's been reading!

When you need to babysit your boss, every bit of knowledge helps :-)

Metaphor overload alert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16780109)

Anyone who says "Shedding light" immediately loses all credibility with me, since they obviously copy from others instead of saying anything original.

Re:Not for slashdot audience (1)

daHIFI (458710) | more than 7 years ago | (#16786343)

Or maybe for someone who has been a geek for years and is now coming into the business oriented side of things this is a good read.

Black Art? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777169)

Most of the techniques for managing IT Operations have been known for decades. It's just that each generation seems to insist on learning everything the hard way. Believe it or not, the mainframe folks in the 1970s really did know a lot about IT Operations.

Other than thst, the biggest problem I see today is middle managers on up not bothering to talk to their technical people and wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars on poorly configured equipment.

Re:Black Art? (4, Insightful)

itwerx (165526) | more than 7 years ago | (#16778849)

biggest problem I see today is middle managers on up not bothering to talk to their technical people

Indeed, the whole article scores a giant, "DUH!"
      The real problem with IT project management is that very few people can functionally integrate management/business skills with IT skills. They are fundamentally different ways of thinking and not very many folks are that flexible upstairs.
      So you generally end up with one of two types of project managers, those who can manage but don't know enough about IT to read between the lines and translate a programmer's estimate of 1000 hours into a real world 4000 hours, and those who are ridiculously capable behind the keyboard but can't handle personnel issues worth a damn.
      (Speaking as that very rare third type who IS that flexible and has to deal with the other two types on a daily basis. Sometimes I think I should change my title from "Consultant" to "Bi-directional Tech/Management Translator". :)

Re:Black Art? (3, Insightful)

asuffield (111848) | more than 7 years ago | (#16779181)

It's just that each generation seems to insist on learning everything the hard way.


"Experience is a dear teacher, but fools will learn at no other"

Each generation has far more fools than the previous one. Population expansion and all that. You can spot these people because they never learn from anything other than their own mistakes. Ironically, many of them think that this is a virtue.

Believe it or not, the mainframe folks in the 1970s really did know a lot about IT Operations.


In the 1970s, mainframes were hard to work with. You had to be good to get anywhere at all. Nowadays, it is far easier for an idiot to use a computer.

Oh, and in recorded history, there are no significant instances of people learning from history. That's why it always repeats.

Re:Black Art? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16783557)

I would say many managers insist on the right to pick a product/Technology/solution from brochureware, then get cross that the outsourced guns brought in to make it all work - fails miserably. Never ceases to amaze me the homework put into buying a car or investment, yet the same people fall for brochures - like SOX in a box.

A heartfelt thank you.... (5, Insightful)

jaypifer (64463) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777233)

Lucky we have commentary Academe to put us people that actually work in IT onto the proper path. Possibly he would be equally open to our suggestions on how universities should operate.

yuo Fail It (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777243)

by BSDI 3ho sell And she ran The mobo blew suffering *BSD

Black art... oh, that... (1, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777297)

Just stop using the black light and use normal lights. Where IT workers work, it doesn't need to be a dark hole in the wall. That's for cables and switches.

I've already learned... (5, Funny)

gamer4Life (803857) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777405)

...everything I need to know about management from Dilbert.

IT Management and Fred Brooks (5, Insightful)

callistra.moonshadow (956717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777431)

A friend recommended it (The Mythical Man Month) to me 10 years ago when I was a Sr. C++ developer at a small start-up. I read it, then later re-read it. Years later, after going over to the "dark side" and becoming a manager I often still quote from that same book after going through things like RUP, Agile, MSF, etc. Everyone puts a new spin on the reality that if you have a project with a manager that is not technical they have to have a VERY strong development lead or they are in deep doo doo.

In the past some at some companies people could not fathom a good project manager being a good architect. Where I currently work that is not the case. My strong management skills are important, but my technical knowledge is also valued. I have seen change in the industry in this direction. I hope it continues. At the end of the day what was valid over 40 years ago is still valid today.

Not who I want to get tips from (3, Funny)

L4m3rthanyou (1015323) | more than 7 years ago | (#16777567)

McAfee breaks down IT into three categories functional, network, and enterprise
Well, clearly, the quality of McAfee's products demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach.

Re:Not who I want to get tips from (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16777823)

hey ding-dong. The guy's last name is "McAfee". Nothing to do with the company.

Please! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16778203)

Don't say "McAfee" and "Framework" in the same sentence ever again.

name of ill omen (1)

esoterus (66707) | more than 7 years ago | (#16778225)

Unfortunately, though I'm sure he's smart and all, it's a little hard for me to take IT Management advice from a guy named McAfee... Ah well, at least it wasn't from Harvard's Peter Norton...

Re:A heartfelt thank you.... (1)

Fulcrum of Evil (560260) | more than 7 years ago | (#16778433)

Lucky we have commentary Academe to put us people that actually work in IT onto the proper path.

Hey, someone's got to, and I can count on a very few fingers the number of IT managers I've met who know who Fred Brooks is.

Our IT Department (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16778873)

is broken into a few areas:

Firefighting - finding those lovely bad caps
Suspect Web Development - adding spaghetti PHP code
Trolley pushing - bring out ya dead PCs

Re:IT Management and Fred Brooks (1)

SirKron (112214) | more than 7 years ago | (#16778893)

Check out the 20th Anniversary edition [amazon.com] , it has four new chapters.

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

bsd4me (759597) | more than 7 years ago | (#16779657)

I think you are talking about two different things. Personally, I would prefer to be managed by someone who admits that they don't understand all of the details, but instead trusts the team and does a good job of helping them work together to reach the project's goals. It's one thing to understand the long term goals and have an overview of the technology involved, and another thing to stick your nose in because you have some cursory knowledge.

I think it boils down to the difference between a project manager and a technical lead. A project manager should really focus on the logistics, but keep the technical specs in mind. A tech lead is responsible for the details, and works within the guidelines that the project manager sets up.

It's unfortunately just like any other management (0, Troll)

briancnorton (586947) | more than 7 years ago | (#16779755)

A lot of IT/IS people have a very distorted view of the world in thinking that their profession is the mission of their organization. IT is about facilitating the people that do the real work. IT is easy; the business uncertainty is low, 90% of the work can be done by trained chickens, and there is no production requirement. LITERALLY all you have to do is keep stuff working and upgrade from time to time.

But that's not how it works in all too many companies. For an enterprise with 10,000 people producing, you have 1,000 IT people to sit around and think of new ways to justify their continued employment through bureaucratic process and unnecessary BS. IT managers, just like all good managers enter the resource war with their colleagues for more money, more staff, more power, etc. What is forgotten is that meeting requirements has essentially a fixed price.

I have worked in industry a long time with a bunch of carbon-blobs that do anything they can to impede the real work. IT is not a mission, it's a f@#$king support role worthy of no higher esteem than janitors, accountants or lawyers. Now get off your pedestal and fix my god-damned computer you FU%$&ing OBSTRUCTIONIST!!!

Re:Black Art? (1)

AchilleTalon (540925) | more than 7 years ago | (#16779901)

In the 1970s, mainframes were hard to work with. You had to be good to get anywhere at all. Nowadays, it is far easier for an idiot to use a computer.
It's not only mainframes were hard to work with, you also have to squeeze out every bit from it and every clock cycle. Today, you can easily add more memory, cpu and disk for almost nothing to any computer. So, a badly written application, sub-optimal system can be made working about right just throwing hardware at it. Something like trashputing instead of computing. Management methods have also suffered from this way of thinking. Why should I monitor a system if I can just add more disks, memory, cpu and make everything redundant? Believe it or not, I have see this kind of shops. In crash post-mortem they never ever asked themselves if they should have monitored something in first place in order to prevent the problem. They analyze the problem and buy more hardware to solve it.

Don't ask me to fix your computer. (1)

binarysins (926875) | more than 7 years ago | (#16780747)

A lot of non-IT people have a distorted view that all IT staff fix computers. I know how, but I don't. It's not my job. I *can* get you the data you need to make a sales decision. I can tell you why the query development wrote is broken, and how to fix it so that not only will it make the website work but *faster*. So please don't confuse a DBA with a desktop administrator ;)

P.S. All of the desktop administrators I have known have been extremely helpful, skilled in multiple areas and far from lazy. Maybe I'm just lucky.

Re:It's unfortunately just like any other manageme (1)

CB-in-Tokyo (692617) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781159)

Wow! You have some bitterness going on there! I am an IT/IS manager and in many ways I agree with you (minus the venom). IT does exist to support the business and many times IT/IS does get a distorted view. That is a function of Bad IT management. The main thing that separates IT from Electricians and Janitors is that IT can be, and needs to be, used strategically. This is the biggest failing with the article. It needs to be stressed that businesses run on information, and the more efficiently you can handle that information, the more you can create real competitive advantages that either save the business money on the back end, or help drive revune on the front end. Two quick examples that jump to mind are Just in time delivery, and targetted sales based on data mining.

Yes, there are carbon blobs (they also exist in Finance, HR, marketing, sales and any other functional part of the business). What a CEO, COO needs to understand is how IT can be used for strategic advantages. This is the responsibility of the IT manager/CIO. They need to understand the business well enough to put forward ideas that the other executives can understand, in other words, how can this project give us a strategic advantage. The article does a nice job of breaking IT down into different categories, but completely fails to bring IT into a strategic light. For a non IT example, the CEO doesn't need to understand six sigma in order to understand the importance of quality control. The CEO DOES need to know how, if and where, six sigma can give an advantage.

I am sorry to hear that you have had that kind of experience with IT, but I am also glad as it means my job prospects are great!

Cheers,

CB

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

shmlco (594907) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781247)

Reread the quote. The guy said he may not be the greatest technical mind, not that he had no experience or knowledge whatsoever.

And regarding iterative design, part of that process lies in prototyping and getting feedback as soon as possible from the users. The "waterfall" has its share of issues too. Plenty of projects have been designed and designed and designed and then built, only to find out afterwards that none of the users read or understood the hundreds of pages of "specs" and what was built doesn't serve their needs at all.

And frankly, the ONLY time you can get a set of design documents that completely describes the project, with no changes or iterations or refactoring whatsoever... is when you do them after the fact.

Re:It's unfortunately just like any other manageme (1)

Xeleema (453073) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781493)

Dear Sweet $DIETY, I sincerely hope your head doesn't pop-up over a cubicle wall in my building. I recently met a gentleman in a Starbucks, who started a conversation with me regarding IT after seeing my purchases from the adjoining bookstore.
          His philosophy was quite similar; "IT is by no means important, it's just a necessary evil. A means to an end." He then went on about how no one is even truly dependent on IT, computers, or information.
          I mentioned my point of views differ, as I have made a career of IT, and I don't see myself as a "glorified secretary". Then I steered the conversation towards his laptop, a rather beat-up looking Dell, with an 802.11 PCMCIA card sitting next to it. Turns out my new friend is a writer, been in my hometown for almost two weeks, and hasn't been able to upload his work off of the laptop the whole time (PCMCIA card not working, Dial-in line for his company was always busy, etc).
          Long story short; there was an "incident" involving my recently topped-off 20oz coffee thermos, and his laptop, which was aptly on his lap at the time. Not only did the poor Dell unleash the magic smoke the instant my thermos slipped, but it's display didn't survive the fall off of his lap as he started hopping up and down like, well, someone who's "valuables" were drenched with hot coffee.
          Something tells me that he spent the better part of the evening begging a physician to be gentle with him, and begging a "glorified secretary" to recover two weeks of his work off of his Almond-Morning-Expresso soaked hard drive.

P.S: Yes, I am aware of the fact that I am a bastard. Thank you.

Re:I've already learned... (1)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781695)

everything I need to know about management from Dilbert.

As have many managers... which is why Dilbert exists in the first place... wait, Dilbert is creating some kind of tear in the space-time continuum, isn't it?

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

Bwian_of_Nazareth (827437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781701)

No, you are not correct. Project manager needs to facilitate the design, they do not have to get involved on the technical level - if they have good people whom they can trust. Project management is not about delivering, it's about managing the delivery. Sometimes it is even a disadvantage to mix these two. You have to draw a line between your responsibilities as a project manager and the team who delivers. Otherwise you can be sidetracked easily - your job is not to deliver 100 % quality at 1000 % the price. Your job is to deliver adequate quality at reasonable price. Nothing is black-and-white once you factor the cost in - something technical people quite often fail to see.

And I am saying this as someone who has done project management for IT project but who has a master's degree in CS and who did the delivery as well.

Sure - you are correct that the design phase is crucial - but I do not agree that this means that the project manager must be involved on the technical level as you imply.

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

Bwian_of_Nazareth (827437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781765)

---Posting again, as the previous post seems to have gone to a black hole---

No, you are not correct. Project manager needs to facilitate the design, they do not have to get involved on the technical level - if they have good people whom they can trust. Project management is not about delivering, it's about managing the delivery. Sometimes it is even a disadvantage to mix these two. You have to draw a line between your responsibilities as a project manager and the team who delivers. Otherwise you can be sidetracked easily - your job is not to deliver 100 % quality at 1000 % the price. Your job is to deliver adequate quality at reasonable price. Nothing is black-and-white once you factor the cost in - something technical people quite often fail to see.

And I am saying this as someone who has done project management for IT project but who has a master's degree in CS and who did the delivery as well.

Sure - you are correct that the design phase is crucial - but I do not agree that this means that the project manager must be involved on the technical level as you imply.

Re:Tunnel Vision (1)

Bwian_of_Nazareth (827437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16781781)

You need to change your job, really. You live in a sad world and I would not want to be in your place. Or maybe not you but the moderators who moderated this "Insightful" rather than "Funny". Oh, wait, this is Slashdot.

Re:Tunnel Vision (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16781901)

you can NOT delegate decisions to the people who have the knowledge to make them as you would be left to do nothing at all.

This is also one of the reasons why it's stupid to complain that your boss "does not nothing". If your boss indeed "does nothing" it means she is very good at trusting you and that is a good thing.

Re:IT Management and Fred Brooks (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 7 years ago | (#16782107)

my technical knowledge is also valued.

Ever hear of the PMP certification? It is handled by the Project Management Institute. They state that it is a necesity that a project manager have technical knowledge. You certainly don't need to be an expert, but if you aren't capable of understanding a detailed progress report, you will be incapable of managing the project.

Howbout Engeneering? (2, Insightful)

krico (678909) | more than 7 years ago | (#16782419)

How long did it take until engineering mgmt was not a black art?

WTF (1)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16782667)

WTF happened to ITIL?

Re:IT Management and Fred Brooks (1)

callistra.moonshadow (956717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16782811)

I had the 20th anniversary edition. It will probably be interesting reading.

Re:IT Management and Fred Brooks (1)

callistra.moonshadow (956717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16782859)

Yeah, I know about it because I've studied for the cert, but haven't taken the exam. Much of what they give you is great for general project management, but even with PMI the methodology is suggested, not something you use 100%. In as far as non-technical managers plenty of places still go that route and end up paying for it in various ways. On the other hand, you can run into situations where the managers may be technical but spend no time doing business analysis. Without understanding the user story and the pain points a *solution* may be provided that is robust but falls far short of what the user needed or wanted. I've seen far too many technical people botch applications because they don't *get* what users/audience they are building for.

Re:Tunnel Vision (2, Funny)

Tim Browse (9263) | more than 7 years ago | (#16783607)

"Hello, Meme Police? I'd like to report a spillage."

Re:Please! (1)

Speedcraver (868818) | more than 7 years ago | (#16784285)

Apparently the moderator has never managed an EPO server or this would be at least a 2. I know what you are saying brother!

Generational conflict (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16785231)

Folks have commented about the mainframes in the 70s being well-run (and I agree) and how people don't learn from history.

I think it's still a symptom of the Boomer-Knows-Best mentality. The Silents ran the mainframes--and we can still learn from them--but Boomers prefer to toss that knowledge out.

Enter the issue of Boomers managing Gen Xers. This process is working so well that the Boomers have turned their attentions to the Millennials.

Obligatory... (1)

Zuvis (743584) | more than 7 years ago | (#16785461)

In Soviet Russia, IT breaks you down.

In a perfect world... (1)

phiwholigan (898048) | more than 7 years ago | (#16787691)

the IT staff would make the decisions and then tell management/sales/paper pushers what they are to do. Judging by the comments on Slashdot over the years, I am not the only ubergeek that thinks the IT people should be the high paid personnel and the management asshats should be the underpaid paper pushers that we all know they are. If I had a company all the managers would have to have undergrad degrees in CS or something before they were allowed to get their MBAs.

Re:In a perfect world... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16793786)

"If I had a company all the managers would have to have undergrad degrees in CS or something before they were allowed to get their MBAs."

Hey, moreoff - you typically HAVE to have an undergrad before you can pursue an advanced degree.

Re:In a perfect world... (1)

phiwholigan (898048) | more than 7 years ago | (#16917926)

no duh, my point was that they would have to have an undergrad in computer science, not business or management. way to miss the point n00bie troll!

wrong categories (1)

NateTech (50881) | more than 7 years ago | (#16787853)

For most IT projects you could better categorize them as: "decreases costs and adds efficiency to the business", "increases costs and makes things more difficult", and "is huge Enterprise overhead purchased by someone at the CxO level who's clueless."

Oh wait, that third one falls into the second category, but the magic of "I'm in charge, do what I say" comes into play and suddenly the need to determine whether or not the project is worth the money being spent flys out the window.

If you work on projects that fall into that third category, you know who you are. The larger the organization, the more money you're being paid over your peers to shut-up and keep working on it, no matter how many years behind it is, no matter how few goals it actually will reach when you're done, and no matter ANY form of logic.

As Rick Moranis stated so succinctly in the movie SpaceBalls, "Keep firing, Assholes!"

reply (1)

Cyboiorg2k (1025398) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791554)

Spent ages scrolling back to copy McAfee The biggest pain in the a$$ software. The IT field is filled with two types of people, those that know what there doing and those that have been there since 1992 and think they know what they are doing. "He has been here since 1992, John is 67, but will not take retirement, he keeps us all in check and we cannot do anything, he just upgraded us to windows 2000" I have heard that, thats a real sentenance at an interview. The people that hire you are idiots 90% of the time. They interview you becuase the person that runs the show is too busy. lol Whats with the firefighting, every interview or visit to an IT department is like visiting Iraq, people running around, terminal 2 is down, what do we do, i got a call from sales on 3rd floor, there email is down, who do tell, Janet Chadderdon wants how to do an out of office reply right now, she needs you now. Thats all i see. Dam people, you all run nothing, my job is 90% foresight, 9% hands on and 1% firefighting. If you cannot just sit in front of your computer for a whole day (8 hours) and not get one phone call, you are either dumb or in the wrong job. btw, in case you wanna bitch about networks, i run a 1000 node network. So, the point is, kick all these old DOS, Win 95 people out and we may have a chance at getting people that are living in today, into companies. Thats you i am talking about. Dvid
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  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>