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Unplugging Your Backups

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the long-range-storage dept.

71

Lucas123 writes "Computerworld has an article about how consumers, home offices and company branch offices can use microwave, free space optics, WiMax, and a new Wireless USB protocol to backup and access data over short and long distances. The story says that wireless USB can be used to transmit data from one to 10 feet from a PC or laptop at up to 480Mbps, while microwave and WiMax can be used to transmit data securely over miles. Steinbach Credit Union Inc., in Canada, has been using microwave and an IP network for years to backup data to a disaster recovery site 32 miles away, the story states."

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71 comments

slashdot broken? (0, Troll)

mlrtime (520968) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790439)

slashdot broken?

first fucking post (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790447)

orca stacks

osaka is love

nigger first post, fuck all yall faggots

k-fed for LYFE! KFED FUCKING RUELS! FUCK YOU FAGS AND FICK BRITNIY FAGGOTS fuck geeks faggots

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Microwave those backups! (3, Insightful)

davidwr (791652) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790451)

How many of you saw "microwave" and "backups" and thought "data destruction?" :)

BTW, A minute ago: "Nothing for you to see here. Please move along." Damn those newfangled invisible wireless radio waves!

Regarding WiMax (2, Insightful)

parvenu74 (310712) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790457)

In theory, WiMax could be used to send backups to a remote storage facility "miles away" -- providing that there is a WiMax network that is actually in operation. But outside of select areas in select cities (like in Canada), where is this WiMax network of which the author speaks?

i have a question. (4, Insightful)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790467)

Why do we need wireless USB when we already have bluetooth? and vice versa? and beyond that, why do we need wireless HDMI?

Figure out a protocol and stick with it. That's why regular plug-in USB works so well.

Re:i have a question. (1)

killerdark (922011) | more than 7 years ago | (#16792700)

I assume you don't have much hands on experience with Bluetooth? I think that in this day and age it is about time we get a short range wireless protocol that doesn't require resetting your computer at least once a day.

Re:i have a question. (1)

rthille (8526) | more than 7 years ago | (#16796074)

You must use Windows. I've never had trouble with bluetooth in OS-X.

Re:i have a question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16793146)

Because a single bluetooth channel lacks the bandwidth to transfer enough data for two-channel stereo headphones? A single channel is below 128kbps, versus wireless USB at 480mbps.

Re:i have a question. (1)

crashelite (882844) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793228)

480 burst... i have NEVER seen usb actually get any where close to a rate of 480mb/s or anywhere close to that (100 mb/s but thats about the max)... on the otherhand i have seen firewire work at 350mb/s on a chain to the last device on the chain...

Re:i have a question. (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793608)

480 burst... i have NEVER seen usb actually get any where close to a rate of 480mb/s or anywhere close to that (100 mb/s but thats about the max)... on the otherhand i have seen firewire work at 350mb/s on a chain to the last device on the chain...


Hence the reason Firewire is universally applauded by people do digital audio editing/mixing/composing while USB 2.0 hasn't made any significant inroads. Also one of the main reasons why audio guys use Macs: all Macs have Firewire standard. Most other PCs don't. And Mac OS X support for Firewire is rock solid.

Re:i have a question. (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793502)

Don't forget Bluetooth has no real meaningful encryption. Whatever protocol they are using for over-the-air backups certainly should have encryption available.

Re:i have a question. (1)

Thaelon (250687) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793688)

Bluetooth is only 1Mbit or so.

Wireless USB is reputed to be as fast as regular USB.

I for one welcome wireless devices. I'm tired of the spaghetti.

Re:i have a question. (2, Funny)

OriginalSpaceMan (695146) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793888)

Why do we need wireless USB when we already have bluetooth? and vice versa? and beyond that, why do we need wireless HDMI? Try to put your questions into perspective here. Why do we need USB when we have perfectly good parrallel cables? Why do we need DVDs when we have perfectly good CDs? Why do we need laptops when we already have desktops? Why do we need refridgerators when we have already have iceboxes? Why do we need washing machines when we have perfectly good wash-boards? Why do we need cars when we have perfectly good horses? Why do we need horses when we already have feet? I can do this for years...

Re:i have a question. (1)

r3m0t (626466) | more than 7 years ago | (#16794038)

"Why do we need USB when we have perfectly good parrallel cables?"
The data transfer is faster and it's easier for a computer to know when something was hotplugged and it's smaller.

"Why do we need DVDs when we have perfectly good CDs?"
Um... DVDs do movies. But if you're talking about data, DVDs store larger amounts in the same size.

What you should have done is point out some actual advantages of wireless USB, etc.

Re:i have a question. (1)

OriginalSpaceMan (695146) | more than 7 years ago | (#16796642)

You completely missed the point...

Re:i have a question. (1)

charlesnw (843045) | more than 7 years ago | (#16798668)

He sure did. Way to hard core nerd. Its called a joke people!!!!!

Re:i have a question. (1)

kinnell (607819) | more than 7 years ago | (#16795116)

Figure out a protocol and stick with it. That's why regular plug-in USB works so well.

So presumably we should all still be using RS232 for everything?

Apart from the obvious advances in technology which make protocols obsolete, different protocols are better for different tasks. In general there is a trade-off between high bandwidth and low latency. There is also cost versus performance to consider, and performance versus flexibility. USB, for example, is great for what it was designed for - a low cost general purpose interface for computer peripherals - but it's very inefficient at large burst transfers, e.g. disk drive access. A lot of new protocols get developed because the existing ones are far from perfect - some of these don't work as well as expected, or just don't get adopted because of market forces. Hence the large variety of protocols.

... and to answer your first question, wireless USB has almost 500x the peak bandwidth of bluetooth.

Huh (5, Funny)

Tarlus (1000874) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790469)

"to backup and access data over short and long distances"

But what about medium distances?

We provide this today (0, Offtopic)

DevilM (191311) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790509)

We provide this today in Atlanta, DC, and Boston. Its not WiMAX, but it is microwave and/or millimeter wave capable of 1Gbps.

www.oneringnetworks.com

Ahh Yes! (2, Funny)

Mysteerie (972719) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790531)

Though can it cook popcorn correctly?

Yes it cooks popcorn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790551)

at your house and all of your neighbors. All at the same time! /. still going through upgrade, btw.

Ex-Lax. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790557)

Sorry, that's the first thing I thought of when I saw the title...

Wires? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790563)

I fail to see what's wrong with an ethernet cable. 1000mbps. Enlighten me.

Re:Wires? (1)

hkroger (666340) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793392)

Well, the question is that what's wrong with 32 miles of ethernet cable. Yes, what's wrong with that?

Only microwave frequencies? (3, Funny)

the_humeister (922869) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790567)

Screw that! I want high energy gamma ray frequencies so I can backup my data anywhere around the world! Although this might suck for those poor bastards who don't have lead suits.

Diversity? (3, Insightful)

leenks (906881) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790579)

I want wireless USB because then I can have a USB hub attached to it, and get rid of lots of unsightly wires. E.g. it would be nice to run the USB digital TV adapter over the other side of the room where the TV socket is. Or to put the printer in a more convenient location. Or even better, have the midi interface next to my disklavier in the living room, but receive the data upstairs in my studio. And no, there are no suitable bluetooth devices for most of these things.

Could be very cool (3, Interesting)

mschuyler (197441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790613)

Actually, this might be very cool. I'm sitting here downstairs on my laptop. I just backed up today's work on an SD card in the machine (Umm, that would be Drive F: because the elves at HP put in a @#$! partition they didn't tell me about.), and then on a USB drive connected to the machine (That would be Drive G:). It would be dandy if I could set up a simple wireless USB drive upstairs and zap this stuff up there to H:\HOME as well. No fuss remote backup, not quite off-site, but Hey! I'm retired; I don't get out much. I know I could "go thru the network" on a mapped network drive" but what if the other machines aren't on? Green power and all that. And I know it might be cool to send it to Mongolia or Google, but the fact is I don't quite trust my stuff in those places. So if it were cheap and simple, I'd buy it. At least the way I'm envisioning this (which may be entirely wrong), I could see its use.

Re:Could be very cool OT (1)

ChoGGi (522069) | more than 7 years ago | (#16794100)

it isnt hard to change the drive letters
start>run>diskmgmt.msc

Microwave Chips (1)

rHBa (976986) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790621)

I can see HR rubbing their hands in glee. Now sysadmins can take their lunch break and do backups at the same time.

Re:Only microwave frequencies? (1)

sellthesedownfalls (748902) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790633)

Photons have too high of an interaction cross section. You need to figure out how to interact with and store data on neutrinos so you can shoot them all over the globe (and through it, as well!).

sending data miles away with wimax (1)

aachrisg (899192) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790650)

All my computers, like the computers of everyone I know, already have devices attached to them that let them send data THOUSANDS of miles, to any other computers set up the same way.

Already a reality (1)

polaris852 (686050) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790660)

My place of 'ork provides such services, and we have many customers that use us as a backup link and for backing up their data. www.oneringnetworks.com

Re:Already a reality (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16793130)

"'ork" ?

that already required 4 keystrokes. why not type it properly?

2 Gbps over 2 km (3, Funny)

ckedge (192996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790704)

.
Bah! Once a week we burst 200GB to a site 2km away.

And I mean this literally - we use "sneakernet".
.

Re:2 Gbps over 2 km (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16794290)

I can't believe I checked your work on the speed rating of 2gbps you gave...but I really am that bored right now:
((200 * 8) / 2) / 60 = 13.3333333 minutes to travel 2km with that 200GB disk


Seems about right I suppose...if not maybe a tiny bit slow.

Nothing to see here, move along (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790742)

Seriously, all they're saying is that you can transmit data using data transfer protocols. All I have to say is: WELL DUH!

Can you say 'new attack vector' children? (1)

amavida (898618) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790786)

Why do we need all this dulipcation? Wireless USB v's Bluetooth etc etc...
Mythical WiMax or whatever they call it...

It's madness I tell you! Madness!
Bah Humbug!

Steinbach Credit Union (4, Interesting)

Hemogoblin (982564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790806)

Wow, I can't believe Steinbach Credit Union was mentioned on Slashdot. I live in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada...about an hour from Steinbach, Manitoba. The Steinbach Credit Union is so small, I think it only has like 3 branches in total. Steinbach itself only has a population of approximately 10,000. Further, Steinbach is located in rural Manitoba, known for its Hutterite colonies. Given all that... somehow they're on the bleeding edge of technology? Take that California!

Cpu over head (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790816)

how much more cpu over head does wireless USB have over USB. Fire Wire and Ethernet are better at moveing big files.

Not new! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790828)

In my hometown, coincidentally in rural Manitoba, one company gets DSL-speed internet access out to farms who would normally be out of DSL/Cable range using microwave transmissions. Before that, schools in outlying communities in the area got the same treatment from the region's school division in a time when high speed wasn't available there. Hell, go back to the days of old-tyme CBC Radio. Transmissions were broadcast across the country using microwave transmissions.

It's not new tech! It's just not often used because of that whole pesky line-of-sight problem. It works in flat-flat Manitoba but in, say, San Francisco fat chance.

Slow, slow, slow (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 7 years ago | (#16790900)

They must be talking about very small backups here. These days it's more common that people have a problem with Gigabit Ethernet with jumbo frames not being fast enough to do backups as quickly as desired. Using megabit speeds for terabytes of data must be a nightmare.

Good timing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790910)

Just installing a Dragonwave microwave link to our DR site right now and took a break to read slashdot while the radio reloads. We'll be running backups over the link as well. Doing the same to other sites already using Free Space Optics as well as 802.11a Cisco 1410 bridge links - funny how many network engineers don't think outside the box and hence this becomes news, been using this setup for a couple of years and its actually more reliable than the local carrier (Telstra, I'm in Oz) and _much_ cheaper. We have Gigabit FSO link and several 100 Mb/s links as well as the 54Mb wireless, the wireless tops out at 20Mb/s though.

A lot depends on location we have a nice grain Silo that serves as a central site for the wirless links and have great LOS to most of Melbourne.

         

Verbs and Nouns (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790930)

Guys, "backup" is a noun. You do not "backup" a computer. You
"back up" a computer.

You don't "login" either, or "logoff", or "setup". Next thing
you know "turnon" and "turnoff" will be verbs, too.

I know it's hopeless, but come on! Get a clue!

     

Re:Verbs and Nouns (1)

The_Wilschon (782534) | more than 7 years ago | (#16794508)

It is hopeless, as well as being pointless. No meaning is lost here, so why even waste your effort trying to resist this kind of change?

Don't get me wrong, in cases where is meaning is confused or lost, I'm quite the nazi. But here it is just pointless.

Re:Verbs and Nouns (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16794958)

It is hopeless, so just stop, no one is going to change because of your posts.

Re:i have a question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16790966)

Wireless USB beats the hell out of Bluetooth in bandwidth. We get to keep the 480 Mbps speed, and lose the connectors.

On another note, this is scary as hell in the security department. How many people stand near your computer during the day? Now imagine any of them could be stealing data from it while they do. Worse yet, what if they were putting something on instead? Let's keep this under wraps until we're ready to deal with those issues.

Re:Regarding WiMax (1)

kylehase (982334) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791012)

I thought companies do not need WiMax providers. Can't they can setup their own WiMax stations?

Re:Wires? (2, Funny)

Twisted64 (837490) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791058)

by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 10, @11:04AM (#16790563)
I fail to see what's wrong with an ethernet cable. 1000mbps. Enlighten me.
Backing up to a site 32 miles away? Come now, people would be tripping over the cable constantly, you're going to lose the plastic tab on at least one end :)

But seriously, for anything offsite, no.

Re:Regarding WiMax (1)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791084)

The additional threat of this system is that it suffers from all the sorts of security concerns present with traditional wireless v. wired transfer. Sure, data backup is important, but for a good many (if not most) companies, preserving the integrity of the data is even more critical.

Sure, encryption is possible, but heavy encryption may well defeat the point of the speed and ease of the data transfer and backup.

It's also not very convincing to say that, hey, we'll be safe because no one owns the hardware yet. Well, if WiMax is as great as TFA claims, then everyone will have it soon enough.

I'm not saying it's an unworkable idea, but it does have many flaws that have to be overcome before the technology can be completely viable in the mainstream.

Of course ! (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791098)

while microwave and WiMax can be used to transmit data securely over miles

Got that right, nobody will ever see the data I transmited in the microwave, not even me.

Good luck with that. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16791112)

My WinXP setup can't even remember it has USB 2.0 speeds with a damn cable!!

XP: Please plug this device into one of the following hubs identified in bold face.
(1 hub listed, in bold face.)
Me: I'll bold face ya, alright. And your little Ballmer too.

Hey... I use that bank (3, Informative)

thetamind_pyros (656004) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791132)

Steinbach Credit Union is my home bank, so it was interesting to hear how they set this up back in 2003.

SCU has a second branch located in Winnipeg. Data is constantly synchronized between the two sites providing a physical disaster recovery solution and a convenience for customers, as loan information, etc is always up-to-date so it doesn't matter which branch you visit. (People from Steinbach often visit Winnipeg for shopping and movies). As opposed to paying $70,000 per month for 3rd party leased lines, or $1 million to lay their own fibre, SCU found the cost-effective solution to create their own private wireless network. SCU also uses the direct link for email, VoIP, and streaming security cameras which provides additional bandwidth and long-distance savings.

The towers are full-duplex and shoot a narrow microwave beam which is almost impossible to intercept 100 feet above ground and data is encrypted "2^48 power" and apparently not affected by the weather. <<insert Canadian weather joke>>

SCU won the silver medal in the SearchStorage.com Spring 2003 Storage Innovator awards competition for their innovative wireless SAN setup.

Here [computerworld.com] are more article [byteandswitch.com] links with details [varbusiness.com] and diagrams of the setup and equipment used.

But is the link encrypted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16791198)

I hope that the Steinbach Credit Union has a level of strong encryption over and above that of their microwave provider.

If they are using the provider I'm thinking of I would hope so. I know a shop that considered a similar provider in the area for our data link several years ago but rejected them. They had an insider who explained that most of their encryption was done by frequency rotation (alla WWII) rather than anything strong.

Weird... (1)

evilviper (135110) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791348)

and a new Wireless USB protocol

But not the old Wireless USB protocol... Oh no, not that one...

to backup and access data over short and long distances.

As opposed to what??? Why specify "short and long"? Why not "ANY" distance?

wireless USB can be used to transmit data from one to 10 feet

But don't even TRY to use it at less than one foot...

from a PC or laptop

No handhelds? No mainframes?

Re:i have a question. (1)

DanJ_UK (980165) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791384)

I would imagine it has something to do with the transfer speed of Bluetooth vs USB 2.0, transferring large files over a Bluetooth connection is about as interesting as watching paint dry.

wireless (1)

esiminch (899049) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791442)

I'm wonder how wired <URL:http://www.wired.com/> is going to address this general trend to wireless tech...

wired, unwired, wireless

Re:i have a question. (1)

ECELonghorn (921091) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791524)

Why do we need wireless USB when we already have bluetooth? and vice versa? and beyond that, why do we need wireless HDMI?

Bluetooth is great, but it has it's limitations. It was designed to be a low power usage protocol for wireless devices such as mobile phones. It is great for small amounts of data transmission, such as with bluetooth headsets, GPS, mice, or keyboards. However, as soon as you try to send a few MB of data it starts to become unbearably slow. Most devices use bluetooth 1.2 which has a maximum transfer speed of 723.1 kbit/s, and the newest protocol can get up to 2.1 Mbit/s. So if wireless USB can transmit data at 480Mbps, and still have the same range as bluetooth, it would be roughly a 240x improvement for data transmission rate. Also, because it is "wireless USB" I'm guessing it would be compatible, or with little modification, existing USB drivers and be an easier transition (for product producers and consumers) to using more wireless devices. So specifically to comparing those two technologies, that's why.

Generally speaking though, IIRC various protocols arise as a result of patents and also marketing/business decisions. USB and Firewire are very similar, the biggest difference to my knowledge is that firewire was developed by apple and less widely adopted. You may also seen one of several articles on slashdot about HD DVD vs. Blu-Ray. Is there really all that much difference except who gets the patent licensing fees, and who is the one who lost billions in product development? Nope. It all comes down to business, not logic.

Oh! That explains it! (1)

Schraegstrichpunkt (931443) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791570)

I was wondering where all that personal finance information I sniffed from the air and sold to some Arab dudes came from.

where'd the reply to comment links go? (0)

abandonment (739466) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791590)

anyone else not seeing the 'reply' buttons for any of the comments now? who's testing in production again...

And how is this news (1)

wintermute000 (928348) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791630)

And how is running links over microwave news??????????

In my old job we've had microwave E1 links (standard 2 meg) linking CBD sites for years!!!

OK its not fantastic in terms of bandwidth etc. and specifically speaking, its used for voice channels, but you can send anything over the layer 2???? How is this news????

Re:And how is this news (1)

arabagast (462679) | more than 7 years ago | (#16793280)

it seems as if your "?" key is stuck. please contact your nearest computer shop and ask for a replacement keyboard.

Wait a sec (1)

Dersaidin (954402) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791642)

Is a wireless USB device still a USB device? The transmitter might be, yes, but I dont think the storage device is a USB for this setup.

Is a wireless USB device still a USB device? (1)

StorageIO (1025602) | more than 7 years ago | (#16796390)

Is a wireless USB device still a USB device the answer is yes, except that instead of using a cable, it is a wireless conenction. The computer still utilizes the USB drivers/software stack except that at the lowest levels instead of cabling, its wireless. Existing USB devices and PCs can be retrofitted with a small USB wireless transcivever that plugs into a USB port, likewise, an existing USB device (Printer, camera, external disk, etc.) can also be adapted for use with USB Wireless. Moving forward, look for wireless USB to be built into PCs as well as other devices. In terms of performance, since wireless USB is based on USB 2.0 it has similar if not same performance and distance constraints/capabilties as cable based versions. Check out http://www.usb.org/developers/wusb [usb.org] for more info. Why wireless USB vs. say Bluetooth, as others have posted, bluetooth is very slow compared to USB and range limited. Why Wireless USB vs. say WiFi? The comparison should be along the lines of USB vs. Ethernet, and then, wireless USB vs. WiFi for IP. Hope that helps to fill in some of the blanks. Cheers GS

Microwaves (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16791890)

I use my microwave to backup my data. It only takes 30 seconds, and there's a handy 'ping!' sound at the end to tell me when it's done. Never tried restoring anything though, mind.

Re:I have a question (2, Insightful)

mlush (620447) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791912)

User 956 Why do we need wireless USB when we already have bluetooth? and vice versa? and beyond that, why do we need wireless HDMI?

Starting out with HDMI, why does a DVD player have to be close to the TV? Why is is stacked on top of a TiVo a Satellite reciever next to a playstation and an XBox, wouldn't it be nice to have all that clutter sitting in one corner of the room and have the TV hanging on a wall somewhere else.

How many bluetooth printers and scanners are there?

I'm working on putting a scanner in the kitchen with idea that if I find a nice recipie in a magazine, I can just lob it in the scanner push the one touch scanning [gentoo-wiki.com] button and it automagically dumps the image on my archive server runs a quick OCR on the image and dumps it in a database. If I want the recipie back (OCR willing) I should be able to find it via a simple text search

Wireless USB would be great I could put the scanner almost anywhere I wanted without having to worry about running 40 ft of USB cable through the house. Equally having a wireless USB backup drive tucked away in a draw somewhere makes a great backup if my laptop gets stolen... I'd certainally worry about the security of data stored on a wireless USB drive but its no worse than having a WiFi dirve.

Figure out a protocol and stick with it. That's why regular plug-in USB works so well.

True up to a point, when did you last use a floppy disk? a protocol that does not move with the times risks extinction..

Backup and Tan (1)

twoblink (201439) | more than 7 years ago | (#16791952)

You can back up your data and get a tan and cook your steak all at the same time. I love microwave backups..

Already Doing Wireless Backups (1)

koolB (149856) | more than 7 years ago | (#16792326)

I have been doing this using KeySpan USB server plugged into my wireless access point (using PSK TKIP). I can scan documents over the wireless network using my very old HP 3200 Multifunction Scanner, backup to my 300GB usb drive and many other tasks.

For access to legacy usb devices this Keyspan server really is nice.

I also have a silex 2.0 usb server (and corresponding 2.0 hub) but it just doesnt have the backwards capability with older devices as the keyspan does.

The negatives to the Keyspan USB server are:

- My main linux server (Knoppix 5.02 with a 4MB img file) cannot access this drive (Linux driver anyone?)
- Extremely slow for large files (USB 1.x speeds)
- Driver development seemed to have completely stopped and it's buggy (occasional BSODs).
- Max 4 USB devices (HP930C Printer, HP3200 Multifunction, SanDisk CF reader, ext USB HD)

I have recently moved my external USB drive to my linux box and share via samba for performance reasons, but I regret having to keep a desktop machine up and running 24/7 (power consumption).

Ideally, using a low power LAMP (linux) box would be optimal.

Moo (1)

Chacham (981) | more than 7 years ago | (#16794282)

Microwaves? Those nuke boxen? I think i can still hear my cordless phone ringing.

phone rings

Honey, don't bother, that just me doing a backup.

We're on dialup?

No, we're on expensive behind-European broadband, but i'm backing up via microwave.

You're using the microwave as a backup?

No, i'm using the other computer as a backup, i'm using the microwave to make some popcorn.

Oh, i see, so when can i use the phone?

You can use the phone now.

Then why is it ringing?

That's just me doing a backup.

I thought you said we're not on dialup.

grumbles Would you like some popcorn dear?

This stuff is great (1)

dustball23 (309393) | more than 7 years ago | (#16795148)

I looked into using license-free microwave and radio for doing backup. It was amazingly inexpensive. You can get BOTH ends of a 48mbps link for a couple grand. There are a lot of possibilities with this technology too. You can share the cost of bringing fiber into a building with the buildings nearby. I evaluated this product a few months back, looks like the price went up just a bit so I'd shop around: FibeAir 4800 [meridianmicrowave.com] .

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It's the video that never ends: neverending.tv [neverending.tv]

Distributed redundant online p2p backup? (1)

amchugh (116330) | more than 7 years ago | (#16796792)

I always wondered if it would someday be possible to set up a free online p2p backup solution (with encryption obviously). The scheme I envision is one where you are graded by the system on your availability for restores, and the more available you are the more often you can backup to the system. Also, the more of your HDD you set aside for other people to backup to, the more volume of data you can backup to the system.

ob. kottke ref. (1)

sxtxixtxcxh (757736) | more than 7 years ago | (#16796972)

but it already takes so long to copy that 17 meg file over ethernet!

/kottke
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