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Thai IT Minister Slams Open Source

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the not-good-enough dept.

520

patiwat writes "Thailand's newly appointed Information and Communications Technology Minister has slammed open source software as useless and full of bugs: 'With open source, there is no intellectual property. Anyone can use it and all your ideas become public domain. If nobody can make money from it, there will be no development and open source software quickly becomes outdated... As a programmer, if I can write good code, why should I give it away? Thailand can do good source code without open source.' This marks a sharp u-turn in policy from that of the previous government."

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Pouring up a tall FROSTY PISS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865618)

Now that it's getting cold out, be on the lookout for your local vendor selling a tall mug of steaming Frosty Piss. Plenty of head to go around!
 

THAILAND'S BIGGEST EXPORT IS AIDS (0, Troll)

CmdrTaco (troll) (578383) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865678)

n/t

misquote (5, Funny)

The Clockwork Troll (655321) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865914)

I was in Bangkok when the announcement was made. What he actually said was:

I'M IN UR MINISTRY
MALIGNING UR SOFTWARE

Re:Pouring up a tall FROSTY PISS (1)

NosTROLLdamus (979044) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866148)

Hot Damn!

Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (4, Insightful)

El Cubano (631386) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865620)

If nobody can make money from it ...

Maybe he would be so kind as to provide links where Netcraft confirms that IBM, Sun and Google are dead or dying?

Spoken like someone without a clue. Sheesh.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (3, Insightful)

nacturation (646836) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865642)

Maybe he would be so kind as to provide links where Netcraft confirms that IBM, Sun and Google are dead or dying?

Netcraft confirms: IBM, Sun, and Google make boatloads of money off of the countless unnamed and unpaid developers who write the code that they use. Does the amount they contribute back exceed the amount they gain by benefiting from the work of others?
 

OK. Let's pack up and go home (4, Funny)

El Cubano (631386) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865682)

Netcraft confirms: IBM, Sun, and Google make boatloads of money off of the countless unnamed and unpaid developers who write the code that they use. Does the amount they contribute back exceed the amount they gain by benefiting from the work of others?

You know what? You and the Thai IT Minister are right. I don't know how I missed it for all these years.

OK. Everyone, let's pack it up and go home. Some one be sure and shutdown the web servers on the way out. I hear that Best Buy is hiring, maybe I'll try there.

Re:OK. Let's pack up and go home (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Crowhead (577505) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865784)

Almost all of the money made by open source has been made by exploiting open source. Yes most of the internet runs on OSS. But how many of the billions if not trillions of dollars has made it back to the pockets of the developers of the big parts like Apache? I would guess not much since even Apache has a 'donations' link on their site.

Reward for Open Source? (4, Insightful)

JacksBrokenCode (921041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865980)

I've often wondered this myself. What is the reward for developing open source software? If companies can come in and use open source components in their own creation in a way that they make money without violating licenses, but at the same time aren't obligated to give anything back to the community, where's the motivation for new developers to go open source? Not everybody operates with an altruistic "I'm giving back to the community" motivation.

Personally, I don't develop software just so that I can be an anonymous contributor to future technology. I do it to pay the rent, buy cars, etc.

What am I missing here? (And I'm not being sarcastic with that, I genuinely don't understand why anyone would want to share the fundamentals of their creation in a way that would compromise any potential future earnings.)

Re:Reward for Open Source? (2, Insightful)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866070)

Ask a scientist who works a lifetime for little pay and publishes their discoveries in journals anyone can read.

Re:Reward for Open Source? (5, Interesting)

macklin01 (760841) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866228)

I've often wondered this myself. What is the reward for developing open source software? If companies can come in and use open source components in their own creation in a way that they make money without violating licenses, but at the same time aren't obligated to give anything back to the community, where's the motivation for new developers to go open source? Not everybody operates with an altruistic "I'm giving back to the community" motivation.

True, open source contributions may work against your future earning potential. On the other hand, it can also help build it in a number of ways. In my case, I'm not a formally-trained programmer. I learned C++ on my own out of books and trial/error for my scientific research. As such, I didn't have a lot of confidence as a programmer.

Starting an open source project helped me to gain valuable feedback that improved my programming skills in a way I could never have done on my own. I also got a helpful confidence boost--I'm no longer ashamed of my coding, or scared of letting others see it. This has been liberating, and has helped me to improve as a collaborator. In my case, the improved skillset gained through open source contributions will most certainly add to my future earnings potential.

For those who already have all their skills and couldn't possibly gain from feedback (whoever that may be), open source could be viewed as the equivalent of pro bono work done by lawyers. Lawyers often do pro bono work to help the poor, etc., and possibly to keep certain skills sharp on things they may not do on a day-to-day basis. For a programmer, open source gives the opportunity to practice something new or out of the daily grind and get valuable feedback on it. Or to work on a larger project that they wouldn't have time for otherwise.

And then as mentioned above, there's the resume aspect. When I was applying for an NSF postdoc fellowship (still underway), I was asked for "synergistic activity": ways you contribute to the maths/science/engineering community or education beyond your normal duties. Being able to say "lead author of a project used in undergraduate education and industrial and academic research in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia" was certainly a boost, considering many graduate students can only claim making better handouts for their classes or the occasional presentation.

So, there's another perspective. ;-) -- Paul

Re:Reward for Open Source? (1, Insightful)

amRadioHed (463061) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866262)

... What am I missing here?

My guess would be passion for what you are doing. For people who really love what they are doing, compensation for it is just the icing on the cake.

Re:OK. Let's pack up and go home (1)

Sr. Zezinho (16813) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866054)

Write once, exploit everywhere.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (1)

strider44 (650833) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865702)

I thought that was the point. For everyone the amount they gain is more than the amount they contribute, that's the beauty of open source.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (5, Informative)

jlarocco (851450) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865984)

Does the amount they contribute back exceed the amount they gain by benefiting from the work of others?

I understand why you listed Google and IBM. But why is Sun in your list?

If you hadn't heard, Sun just open sourced the entire Java compiler, virtual machine, and JIT compiler. That makes Java one of the most popular open source projects in the world. And then there's the tens of millions of lines of code for OpenSolaris. So far, Sun is the largest contributor to both of those.

I'd almost be willing to say Sun has released more open source code than any other company.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (4, Informative)

nathanh (1214) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866118)

If you hadn't heard, Sun just open sourced the entire Java compiler, virtual machine, and JIT compiler. That makes Java one of the most popular open source projects in the world. And then there's the tens of millions of lines of code for OpenSolaris. So far, Sun is the largest contributor to both of those.

And OpenOffice.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (1)

adtifyj (868717) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866230)

And NFS, NIS, OpenSPARC, etc

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (4, Insightful)

cp.tar (871488) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865744)

Spoken like someone without a clue. Sheesh.

What a strange quality for a politician, don't you think?

And in other news (2, Funny)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866056)

"Thai software slammed as useless and full of bugs. OSS community says 'keep your code, we don't want to see the source'."

Money? (5, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865864)

Maybe, just maybe, people are not in it for the money. Maybe they love to code for "the pure fun of it". After all, millions of people do crosswords, solve sudoku, climb mountains, ride bicycles, and blast apart aliens, for the sheer joy of it. They don't get paid a red cent (or <color><smallest Thai coin>) for doing it. Maybe they like the recognition of being the one that wrote $widgit$. Maybe they want to put "Accomplishments: Developed $wigit$ software" on their resume. Maybe they're already so filthy stinking rich that a few measly $100K a year isn't worth the hassle of cowtowing to a pointy haired boss with no more imagination than week old oatmeal, who couldn't code his way out of a paper bag if all he had to do is double click on the "Escape from paper bag" icon.

Re:Money? (2, Interesting)

dalutong (260603) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866120)

I don't think it's just for the love of it. I know that I contribute to OSS because I could never write a full (pick your app/framework/daemon) myself. So something can be, in part, "mine," without me having to be either a genius or part of a great software team.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865952)

Disclaimer: I am both a Thai and a Microsoftie and probably biased

If I understand correctly, Google makes money using its closed-source page rank algorithm and closed-source adword. They may use opensource software but it's in fact the closed-source stuff that is actually making money. Sun/IBM also make money from closed-source software and/or closed-source hardware.

I also understand that a good number of Microsofties make millions or billions with their closed-source software. I rarely hear about opensource champions becoming rich. Linus and most of the people who contributed to opensource don't really see much monetary returns for their work. Certainly not on the scale of BillG or the Google guys.

Say what you like about how wonderful opensourcing is as a principle. The minister is correct about opensource contributors not making much money from their contribution.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (3, Insightful)

waxapple (1011943) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866034)

But he actually said: "If nobody can make money from it, there will be no development"

Which is complete nonsense.

How far we've come! (2, Insightful)

Gregory Cox (997625) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866106)

OK, so he's an idiot politician.

The good thing is, he's an idiot politician who knows the terms "open source" and "source code" and can use them more or less coherently in a sentence. This shows that these concepts are becoming more mainstream.

Better, if a politician makes a comment like this, it starts a debate. People who didn't know what "open source" means might start to want to find out.

Even better, his arguments are ridiculously confused and easy to dismiss. "Public domain"? He may have power in Thailand, but governments in other countries looking seriously at open source software are not likely to be swayed by anything he's said. If Microsoft really were bribing him, you'd think they could have fed him some more convincing lines.

The only thing left is to look forward to the results of his policy. If for any reason things don't go as well as planned... perhaps it will be time for a different approach.

Re:Are the some Netcraft links I missed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866144)

maybe you can provide a link that shows where google is open source

you fucking idiot

Typical idiot. (5, Funny)

Teddy Beartuzzi (727169) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865626)

He sounds eminently qualified for politics.

Re:Typical idiot. (1)

RuBLed (995686) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865782)

So then, he must be reserved for that first civilian flight to the Moon along with the Congress.

Worst case scenario is that he's not getting anything from Santa next month.

Re:Typical idiot. (1)

rexbinary (902403) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866164)

He sounds eminently qualified for Microsoft.

in other news (3, Insightful)

blackcoot (124938) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865630)

in a public ceremony today, the thai government thanked microsoft for their generous assistance in lining government coffers, i mean, developing thailand's it infrastructure.

Re:in other news (1)

Comatose51 (687974) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865750)

My guess is that Microsoft probably backed the recent military coup. j/k

Re:in other news (1)

Warshadow (132109) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866190)

Sounds like the plot to Market Forces by Richard K. Morgan. :)

Re:in other news (5, Funny)

strider44 (650833) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865762)

I hate it when people always dismiss things like this as paid for by Microsoft. That guy could very well just be a genuine idiot, and yet you're trying to insult him by saying he's corrupt as well.

Re:in other news (1)

Kangburra (911213) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865824)

I hate it when people always dismiss things like this as paid for by Microsoft. That guy could very well just be a genuine idiot, and yet you're trying to insult him by saying he's corrupt as well.


To be fair if it wasn't so plausible people wouldn't be so quick to think it. You can only base your assumptions on history and Microsoft's is chequered to say the least.

Re:in other news (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866064)

... Microsoft's is chequered to say the least.

Do you play chequers on a chequerboard? Or chequemate in chess?
 

Re:in other news (4, Informative)

badfish99 (826052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865798)

It's not the government coffers he is thinking of.

A Thai friend once explained to me why Bangkok has both a monorail system and an underground railway. I think the same principle is at work here: a new government always abandons the projects started by the previous government, and starts new ones.

You see, bribes are always paid at the start of a project, during the vendor selection phase. This person is looking to get a large sum of money from Microsoft in exchange for abandoning some open-source projects and switching to Windows.

monorail.. monorail.. monorail.. (1)

professorhojo (686761) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866240)

a town with money's a little like a mule with a spinning wheel. no-one knows how he got it and danged if he knows how to use it

All comments following this one will be... (1, Redundant)

Atlantis-Rising (857278) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865634)

"OMGZ! Microsoft has set us up the BRIBEZ!"

Re:All comments following this one will be... (1)

undeaf (974710) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865832)

You must not be paying much attention to world events, or you'd be know that there would be a significant amount of comments along the lines of "Open source users slam military coups" as well.

It's too bad (1)

Eztli (1027962) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865636)

Thailand is such a *massive* creator of open-source software, it shall surely die without their support.

How much was paid? (1, Insightful)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865644)

How much did Microsoft pay the Thai IT minister? Or is this the case of a government official knowing nothing about what he/she/it is regulating?

His statement, "As a programmer, if I can write good code, why should I give it away? Thailand can do good source code without open source," shows that he does not know the true hacker ethic. A true hacker writes code to be proud of, not because he/she is being paid but because of pride in code.

Re:How much was paid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865720)

A true hacker writes code to be proud of, not because he/she is being paid but because of pride in code.

This is so true, especially for me. When I move out of the dorms, I'll code myself an awesome apartment and sit in it and code all day, or at least until I'm hungry, then it's open source hamburgers for everyone!

Re:How much was paid? (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865908)

I get paid, but I write good code. When at a company, I rewrote a message compiler (similar to the Windows rc.exe), on my own time, to speed it from 45:00 to 3:15.

Re:How much was paid? (1)

Trevin (570491) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865940)

You jest, but I kept writing code throughout my times on summer break, unemployment, flipping burgers, and (ick!) doing technical support.

Getting paid for doing what you love is a nice bonus, but a true hacker does what he loves even if he has to do something else to make a living.

Re:How much was paid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866020)

But a true hacker only does it for the fun.

For software to be usable to the general people, there needs to be *design* and (gasp) technical support, just as for production quality (not from/for the hackers, but developed for the potential masses) it takes many other thankless tasks.

That's why you need professionals.

Re:How much was paid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866090)

No offense (actually, maybe some offense is inevitable) but unemployment, fast food, and tech support do not imply you even have the capability of getting paid for doing what you love... there are a lot of people who love to sing, but they don't get very far on American Idol. You may want to stick to coding in the shower.

Re:How much was paid? (1)

rerng007 (1027966) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865774)

As a Thai people, I really ashame to have such a stupid and suck ICT Minister. Maybe he is paid from Microsoft or being too politician speaking with no knowledge about things

Political situation in Thailand (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865800)

As far as I can see he is a professor at an engineering university. His publication list suggests that he does inded know how to code. http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=+Sitthichai+Po okaiyaudom [google.com] I think he is going to make a bot of money before Thailand returns to democracy.

Re:Political situation in Thailand (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866098)

Aparently he is senior advisor a center for circuit design http://www.ee.mut.ac.th/micdrc/ [mut.ac.th]

Thailand's newly appointed Minister... (1, Redundant)

Centurix (249778) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865650)

Steve Ballmer must go to Thailand for a regular rub'n'tug by the sounds of it.

Re:Thailand's newly appointed Minister... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866180)

You mean Zune'n'Squirt don't you?

Insert Obligatory Fun Game Here [awakenedlands.com]

no wonder (1)

nawcom (941663) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865664)

that thai woman at the thai restaurant would never give me one of the recipes. at first I thought only the hispanic cooks in the back new, but now I know the real truth. *rolls up in sock drawer and cries to sleep*

I love the sweeping generalizations! (1)

Gemini_25_RB (997440) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865686)

"...he claimed that most open source software is often abandoned and not developed, and leads to a lot of low-quality software with lots of bugs." It might be true that most projects are abandoned, but I like the fact that all of the decent (or better) OSS is ignored. Except Linux. The professor couldn't handle a geek coup.

Re:I love the sweeping generalizations! (1)

mrjb (547783) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866140)

Most closed source software is abandoned, buried and full of bugs as well. Conveniently, he ignores that fact.

*Yawn* (1)

Krakhan (784021) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865688)

Politician blabs on about a subject he knows nothing about. News story at 11.

budget whore (3, Insightful)

SethJohnson (112166) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865694)

At first I was going to bid the minister a hearty, "Good luck starting from scratch!" Then I realized that he's choosing a path guaranteed to furnish him with a huge government budget and staff to control. I figured this out when I noticed he never used the word 'cheaper' when comparing open to closed source options.

Seth

Fud or just dumb? (4, Insightful)

bky1701 (979071) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865696)

"With open source, there is no intellectual property. Anyone can use it and all your ideas become public domain."

I am hoping something was lost in translation, because if it wasn't this guy is not only not getting the idea but totally missing the point. Then one must ask, what kind of country has an "IT Minister"? I bet he gets razzed for that... in fact that my explain this. If the guy can't install anything open source without causing errors, I really don't think he belongs in that job.

Neither. You don't get it. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865926)

this guy is not only not getting the idea but totally missing the point.

He is a smart politician.

That means: what he says has little or nothing to do with what he thinks. A politician says something for one of two reasons:

  1. He/she thinks it will persuade more people to vote for him
  2. He/she thinks it will attract money (in whatever form: campaign donations, bribes, bigger budget)

Once you understand this, the world will start making more sense to you.

Re:Fud or just dumb? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865950)

what kind of country has an "IT Minister"?

One that recognises the reality of todays IT economy and doesn't want to be left behind in the dark ages? Say, most of Europe and SE Asia?

In fact the United States could be on of the few industrialised nations without someone who is directly responsible for IT policy.

Re:Fud or just dumb? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866078)

What the hell is IT *policy*?

You can develop technical solutions, or you can deploy/install them to actual people or companies, so they will be useful. But why in the world would you need policy to regulate - or whatever - IT? Do you have Car Manuf. Ministers? Chemical Ministers? This is just ridiculous!

(by the way, I'm German and haven't heard of any IT ministers in Europe)

Re:Fud or just dumb? (1)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866224)

No I think this guy meant what he said. From the article he also said:

"The new ICT Minister expressed his belief in censorship and said that even the most avid freedom of speech advocate would change his mind if he sees doctored pictures of his daughter's head on a naked body posted on the Internet."

This guy does not seem to understand freedom speech nor want to. But considering they have a military dictatorship it's no wonder.

Frankly my opinion about this guy is, "Moving along nothing to see here..."

How was it delivered to our eyes? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865698)

Hmmmm... By what means was his message delivered? What kind of server?

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Thu, 16 Nov 2006 07:15:11 GMT
Server: Apache/1.3.27 (Unix) PHP/4.2.2
X-Powered-By: PHP/4.2.2
Connection: close
Content-Type: text/html

Bangkok post : Linux Thailand IT ministry: ASP.net (4, Informative)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865866)

The headers you posted are for the Bangkok post website [bangkokpost.net] . However, the Thailand Ministry of Information and Communication Technology website [mict.go.th] is running ASP.net (Microsoft) [nwtools.com] :
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Length: 8641
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Location: http://www.mict.go.th/index.html
ETag: "4a7c5a4cef2c71:331"
X-Powered-By: ASP.NET
Last-Modified: Wed, 08 Nov 2006 04:35:20 GMT

However, it is interesting to note that it was running Linux about a month ago [netcraft.com] .

Re:How was it delivered to our eyes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866000)

The company I work for recently delivered an air traffic control system to Thailand. It runs on linux.

Interesting point of view (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865718)

This only shows how bad the minister really is. It is beyound his mind that someone does something for free to make the world better. Besides that there also is a viable business model behind giving code away for free and that is support for people willing to pay for on time support.

Appointed by a military junta, BTW. (5, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865734)

Let's not forget that Thailand's legitimate government was toppled by the army a short while ago. I'm sure this clown is the least of Thailand's troubles right now.
-jcr

Re:Appointed by a military junta, BTW. (5, Interesting)

bjprice (863197) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865768)

The coup was obviously undemocratic, but Thailand is now actually in a far better situation than under the previous regime. I live here.

But yeah, this chap clearly has no idea what he's talking about.

Re:Appointed by a military junta, BTW. (3, Interesting)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865996)

The coup was obviously undemocratic, but Thailand is now actually in a far better situation than under the previous regime.

I don't live there, but I have friends who are in the royal family (it is a big family) and that's the impression I get too. The guy who was ousted appeared to have gone a little too far in indulging in american-style government/corporate bogus-free-market kleptocracy (the "socialize the costs, privatize the profits" kind where he and his family were majority shareholders).

Thai, but otherwise unrelated, I just saw Citizen Dog [imdb.com] and loved it. Along with Bangkok Loco [imdb.com] and Shutter [imdb.com] the Thai film market has been showing some real potential. I hope this "regime change" will continue with the economic circumstances that have encouraged recent local film production.

Re:Appointed by a military junta, BTW. (1)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866252)

Is it? For example do you agree with the following comment?

"The new ICT Minister expressed his belief in censorship and said that even the most avid freedom of speech advocate would change his mind if he sees doctored pictures of his daughter's head on a naked body posted on the Internet."

Yeah I suppose censorship is better...

Re:Appointed by a military junta, BTW. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865998)

Unfortunately, Thaksin Shinawatra was even more of a joke than the junta that toppled him.

mixed up example (0, Flamebait)

kaan (88626) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865742)

If nobody can make money from it, there will be no development and open source software quickly becomes outdated...

He's so right! Open source stuff is teh suck!

Check out Windows XP - it's not open source, it has no bugs, and it has totally progressed for the past five years!
Erm... or not.

Wait a second... no progress, tons of bugs, outdated products... this all sounds very familiar. Are we sure this guy isn't bashing Microsoft products instead of open source?

Re:mixed up example (1)

Krizdo4 (938901) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865796)

Perhaps something got lost in the translation.

Thailand? Gee, didn't I hear about them recently? (2, Insightful)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865758)

I can't say I'm in a position to properly evaluate this, but I wouldn't exactly consider the Thai government very trustworthy right now.

No suprise. (2, Interesting)

Don_dumb (927108) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865764)

A country that doesn't like open government, doesn't like open sourced software.

They did have democracy, but the military 'closed' that.

Re:No suprise. (1)

bjprice (863197) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866174)

That's something of an oversimplification.

We didn't have a "democracy" - we had a Prime Minister, Thaksin, who'd already resigned in April - why was he still in power? The People's Alliance for Democracy (PAD) had been protesting against this for months, and were due to demonstrate again on Sep 20th.

Thaksin had allegedly arranged for troops to fire on them, then declare martial law - giving him as long as he wanted to remain in power.

The coup was held on the evening of Sep 19th, largely to prevent this bloodshed, and further loss of democracy. The tanks were just for show , incidentally - no shots were fired.

Re:No suprise. (1)

pudro (983817) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866196)

What is all this anti-Thai military crap? They took charge (without violence) to ensure that democracy would prevail. There was reason to believe that the previous election was stolen, and they demanded another. They never planned on keeping control, and did nothing to signify that they did. They even stated that they would end the coup if the monarch (who they didn't support giving power to) willed it.

They essentially said, "The election was a fraud. Give us one that isn't, and we'll step down."

And the most of the people agreed. (Obviously not those who supported the alleged election-thief)

Probably got FF 2 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865766)

We are all sorry for Firefox 2.
The one OSS that actually became popular among Win users, and it actually made people get back to IE .

How about citizenship? (2, Insightful)

tyrr (306852) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865792)

I can write good code, why should I give it away?

And you, mister politician, why should you serve your community? How about telling your people that you are looking for money, fame, and power? Fortunately, there are still people in this world who are not in it for the money.

Re:How about citizenship? (1)

rossz (67331) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865994)

Speak for yourself! I work with Linux, Apache, and a host of other open source packages. I'm in it for the money. You can't expect me to show up for work every day for the fun of it, do you? I have bills to play.

Re:How about citizenship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866010)

Disclaimer: I am both a Thai and a Microsoftie and probably biased

Some people might want to give away their code as a service to the world. Kudos for them. For the rest of us, we have families to raise and bills to pay. I see nothing wrong with individuals or businesses making money from honest work. Nor do I think there is anything wrong with ministers who think his developers should make money with closed-source software.

Just because you want to give your work away for free doesn't mean I have any obligation- moral or legal- to do the same. This minister doesn't want to. It's his choice.

Likes censorship too... (4, Informative)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865802)

The ICT Ministry will soon put forward draft Acts to the National Legislative Assembly on cybercrime and on web sites that are pornographic or considered lese majeste, allowing officials to arrest, fine and imprison offenders.

lese majesty also lèse majesté (lz mj-st)
n. pl. lese majesties or lèse majestés

      1. An offense or crime committed against the ruler or supreme power of a state.
      2. An affront to another's dignity.

Re:Likes censorship too... (1)

bjprice (863197) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866194)

Lèse majesté is already a criminal offense in Thailand - but in this case we're dealing with the first definition. Specifically we're dealing with people offending the King or the royal family.

Not at all surprised that they would want to enforce this on the internet too.

Censorship == good ? (1)

martijnd (148684) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865808)

>> The new ICT Minister expressed his belief in censorship and said that even the most avid freedom of speech advocate
>> would change his mind if he sees doctored pictures of his daughter's head on a naked body posted on the Internet.

The man had bad experiences before -- who can blame him.

I think we should listen (1)

nemoyspruce (1007869) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865954)

to what the man has to say. After all, they have found a very efficient solution to all their election problems, maybe he knows something we dont.

Turncoats? (1)

palad1 (571416) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865836)

This marks a sharp u-turn in policy from that of the previous government."

Well, considering how the government turnover was handled, is that actually a surprise?

He had a point! (2, Insightful)

ancient_kings (1000970) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865842)

When the mortgage and car payments bills grow into a huge pile next to your computer and you have a wife with six kids, writing software for free is just plain stupid. I guess most open source authors think somebody might be interested in hiring, but little do they realize its much easier to copy the whole software tree and hire some vietnam programmers for 13 cents an hour to takeover.... "Silly Programmer, Tricks are for kids."

Re:He had a point! (2, Interesting)

Kangburra (911213) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865906)

I think the Mozilla team have proven you can code for free. internetnews [internetnews.com]

Re:He had a point! (1)

ancient_kings (1000970) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866026)

I can probably name all the successful open source codes on my fingers. If one were to calculate the probablity of being surrounded by 20 models, a pile of money, a giant house, gold robots in the bahamas by purchasing _______ ______'s book/TV show/DVD/CD "HOW TO MAKE A GAZILLION DOLLARS", I'm quite sure it is higher than writing open source code. Wait 'til you "programmer" leave mommy's cellar, get a wife and you'll grow up real fast...

Re:He had a point! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866122)

I quote :

"writing software for free is just plain stupid."

So although there are successful OSS projects (by your own admission) these are all run and staffed by stupid people?

If stupid people can make a living while creating free code then why don't you try. You seem qualified...

Re:He had a point! (1)

smoker2 (750216) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866260)

When the mortgage and car payments bills grow into a huge pile next to your computer and you have a wife with six kids ...
Aaah, the old "chicken and egg" scenario !

clueless gibber (3, Insightful)

l3v1 (787564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865876)

Well, everyone should stick to what they know and not shame themselves by useless proud ignorance. I think the proper reaction to this speech should be total dismissal and disregard. Otherwise he might think his opinion counts.
 

People cannot make perfect code (1)

eealex (835401) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865882)

As a programmer, if I can write good code, why should I give it away?
Because people cannot write better code by themselves when comparing with having many people looking at the code in an open domain.

politician does not understand technical issue.... (1)

smash (1351) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865896)

... is this news?

mod parent down (1)

xIcemanx (741672) | more than 7 years ago | (#16865936)

-1 Flamebait

Great country, shame about the politicians (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16865976)

Politicians in Thailand are, frankly, bought and sold. Qualifications for office are a large amount of personal wealth and the right contacts. The educated Thais know this - and I'm sure they couldn't care less what he says. The military and the Royals hold all the power.

What is interesting is his motivation - could this be paid for by Microsoft bribe money? A few dollars buys a lot of FUD in Thailand, and they do seem to have redoubled efforts to screw up opensource lately.

hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866038)

the man has a point.
just look at 99% of projects on freshmeat.
opensource usually means a very short lifecycle.
that's offcourse excluding popular projects that manage to find founding or their coders don't have money problems.
and there a too few of them.
and yes...he's right about the bugs as well.sure they get fixed eventually(in the projects that don't die).
but the simple reality is opensource coders usually lack skills.If you have a problem with this comment download ANY RANDOM project and look at the source.
The only good thing about this sort of coding is that it's free.Because most of them would be in court if they actually sold such a project to a client.

Let the inflammatory comments flow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866084)

Call me flamebait but,
Thailand can do good source code without open source.

What was the last piece of software I ever saw coming out from Thailand?

Is there any?

-jl

clog (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16866146)

He forget the worst part of open source - how badly it clogs up the series of tubes that is teh interweb. With closed source, all the code is in nice packages, with labels and monetary value and everything. That's why Windows, IE, SQL Server all zip through the tubes like a greased up lemming through out car exhaust. Try stuffing some of the Linux in there, and whooboy, you're gonna clog them tubes.

Same old, same old (1)

Omega Blue (220968) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866172)

Gee, Slashdot is at it again.

Post an idiotic flamebait article to draw in comments. Haven't I seen it here before?

Open Source != Public Domain (1)

ComplYueStill (1026848) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866232)

Obviously he missed the point that Open Source softwares are still copyrighted, with even restritive terms to guard itself in free forms.

a thai's take (3, Interesting)

ghort (2896) | more than 7 years ago | (#16866244)

An authentic thai told me:

"open source" has almost no meaning in thailand because 99% of software you can buy is pirated

it's true though you can buy "Microsoft" Windows for like $5

at what seems like a real computer store
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