Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Universal Music Sues MySpace

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the hey-that's-our-money dept.

116

Grooves writes "Universal Music is suing MySpace for copyright infringement. Universal threatened to sue YouTube before the Google acquisition was announced, so now it looks like they have moved on to the next target. Ars speculates that Universal is really after a piece of the action. 'On the morning of the Google-YouTube deal, Universal — along with Sony BMG and CBS — signed a licensing agreement with YouTube. If MySpace were to sign a similar agreement with the label, there is little doubt that the lawsuit would disappear.'"

cancel ×

116 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

How long before... (1)

Sunburnt (890890) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892858)

...the TV networks and sports commissions (MLB, NFL, the English FA and the like) start on this type of legal saber-rattling?

Re:How long before... (2, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893280)

They are the driving force behind the broadcast flag.

KFG

Now (1, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893284)

Wow. More myopic IT people. If some of you guys would read about things OTHER than IT, you'd realize that this stuff happens every single day in all industries, all over the world. These lawsuits are in no way, shape, or form, unique. The sports companies (they're not commissions... they're private companies that are treated like public institutions) are very, very sue-happy.

Re:Now (1, Flamebait)

Schemat1c (464768) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894608)

Wow. More myopic IT people. If some of you guys would read about things OTHER than IT, you'd realize that this stuff happens every single day in all industries, all over the world. These lawsuits are in no way, shape, or form, unique. The sports companies (they're not commissions... they're private companies that are treated like public institutions) are very, very sue-happy.

The fact that it happens everywhere makes it okay? A bunch of "myopic" IT people see a pattern as their/our minds are trained to do and point it out. Should it be ignored simply because it happens in every industry?

Change has to begin somewhere and for the last couple of decades us IT folk seemed to have been able to affect much change in society. But of course, what would us nearsighted geeks be able to figure out anyhow? All we did was build a communications network that spans the globe and allows even the most insignificant person to have access to information that less than a generation ago was the domain of governments and billionaires. What the heck would we know? I can only wish that we were as smart and well informed as you are.

Re:Now (1)

JockTroll (996521) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894708)

But of course, what would us nearsighted geeks be able to figure out anyhow? All we did was build a communications network that spans the globe and allows even the most insignificant person to have access to information

ROTFL.

News for you, loserboy: the internet was not built by some bespectacled, basement dwelling, zitfaced world-of-warcraft addicted homo nerdo, but by Real People: technicians, researchers, planners, well beyond their teens and twenties. People with families and real jobs, not geeks. And all of it backed by big money.

Now big money calls and is buying the internet back, and not from you. You don't own it. You own nothing at all, period. You can scream and holler and flap your arms crying "gimme gimme gimme unfair unfair!" until you spit out your tonsils, but nobody listens to losers.

Ah, and crappy website designer != IT folks. Suck it up.

Re:Now (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895680)

"All we did was build a communications network that spans the globe and allows even the most insignificant person to have access to information that less than a generation ago was the domain of governments and billionaires."

See, that's where you go wrong, that network of tubes was invented by political types and put together by plumbers. Get real!

~;-)

all the best,

drew
http://www.ourmedia.org/node/262954 [ourmedia.org]
Sayings - Deterred Bahamian Novel

Won't catch Google by surprise... (4, Insightful)

slobber (685169) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892878)

Google doesn't maintain a lawsuit defense fund for nothing. Rumor has it that it grew to $500M after youtube was acquired. Apparently google was aware that likelihood of lawsuit would go up dramatically. It looks like Universal decided to test legal waters on MySpace first before tackling Google.

Re:Won't catch Google by surprise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16892952)

Good idea. I'm sure News Corp has no lawyers available. "Look at 'em scramble."

Re:Won't catch Google by surprise... (3, Insightful)

Salvance (1014001) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893096)

What's really unfortunate is that the lawsuits' end result is that the music industry gets significant licensing revenues from the deal, but the agreements are setup in such a way that the individual artists never do. Many of these are artists would be more than happy to share their music (or some subset thereof), but not in a situation where everyone is making money from their music except the creators.

Re:Won't catch Google by surprise... (1)

loid_void (740416) | more than 7 years ago | (#16896424)

"the end result is that the music industry gets significant licensing revenues"


And bad karma, that ultimately leads to their early demise. The sooner the better.

MOD PARENT DOWN (0)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893188)

Didn't read the summary did you?

Re:Won't catch Google by surprise... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893550)

hit right on the head. I mean the big 5 studios are looking at all the options from drm to clearances--they're getting attacked by both sides (distributors who want to open things up like youtube as well as content creators wanting music-like licenses).

Myspace is owned by FOX. Studios suing studios never happens. They always strike a deal as it's the industry that needs to be protected. This is testing the legal system against Google, MS and Yahoo--new media poo-poos old media cause it's all about the content and access--and new media doesn't have the quality content...YET.

Let the real media wars (between old and new media) begin.

Extortion (5, Insightful)

anubi (640541) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892886)

Looking at all these Slashdot reports of suing, it looks like this is the standard practice of corporate extortion.

This way, the "barriers to entry" can be set to any level the more powerful entity desires, so they can maintain their monopoly.

Smaller companies simply do not have the financial stamina to fend off litigation attacks like this.

The strongest ( most well funded ) entities will do well under such a system.

The rest of us... well... better do it in another country.

Re:Extortion (1)

udderly (890305) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893252)

This is why tort reform as it pertains to Intellectual Property needs to be addressed.

Here's why it will never happen: http://www.opensecrets.org/industries/mems.asp [opensecrets.org] . If money buys influence--and it absolutely does--then what group has the most influence? That doesn't even account for the fact that most Congressmen and Congresswomen are lawyers themselves.

Re:Extortion (2, Insightful)

General Alcazar (726259) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893270)

Looking at all these Slashdot reports of suing, it looks like this is the standard practice of corporate extortion.

Another option for those being sued might be to not base their revenue on copyright infringement and other obviously illegal practices. You make it sound like the only reason Universal is suing is because they have tons of money, which means they can make up their own laws. It may actually have to do with the fact that they actually have a case.

Re:Extortion (4, Insightful)

ClassMyAss (976281) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893632)

Except that they really shouldn't have a case as long as MySpace is taking infringing material down as soon as it is brought to their attention. By my reading, the safe harbor provisions were specifically put in place to protect exactly the type of thing that MySpace has going on, a webpage hosting service that they cannot be expected to police entirely. The fact that their software automatically does a format-shift when people upload videos isn't (or at least shouldn't be) relevant at all.

This is more of the same - someone provides a tool, some people abuse the tool and do illegal things with it. Too many people to police means that the provider cannot afford to make sure everyone is acting within the law. But the people whose copyrights are being infringed upon can't afford to go after the individuals for both PR and practical reasons, so they look for someone with fat pockets to blame. Frankly I'm confused about what is so different about a tool on a web server somewhere and a tool on my hard drive - if I used Winamp to convert a copyrighted video and then uploaded it to a GoDaddy hosted server, nobody would be blaming Nullsoft or GoDaddy for my crime. It would be my fault, 100%. It is ridiculous that the courts continue to allow these types of suits to continue without any clarification as to what the law actually means when it comes to hosting user submitted content.

I've got to say, I really thought MySpace would be immune to this type of thing, as much as I'd love to see it implode. The fact is, they don't base their revenue model on infringement in the least. If you removed video hosting altogether from MySpace, I sincerely doubt if anyone would even notice, considering YouTube's success in that venue. It's looking more and more like the only safe user content to host is plain old text, and I think that's a damn shame. The record industry middlemen seem to feel that it's more than appropriate to expect everyone on the net to protect their copyrights as fiercely as they do.

Re:Extortion (2, Insightful)

General Alcazar (726259) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893768)

Frankly I'm confused about what is so different about a tool on a web server somewhere and a tool on my hard drive - if I used Winamp to convert a copyrighted video and then uploaded it to a GoDaddy hosted server, nobody would be blaming Nullsoft or GoDaddy for my crime.

The difference is that MySpace actually generates revenue from advertisement - so they materially benefit when people perform copyright infringement using their tool, and can quite easily be shown to have a vested interest in not vigorously policing their site.

Re:Extortion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894646)

"Vested interest" means nothing. You do know that you actually have to PROVE they're deliberately refusing to take down content, right, and not just make a baseless accusation, right?

The RIAA has a "vested interest" in keeping the price of CDs high, but price-fixing still has to be proven.

Re:Extortion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16896316)

No, all you have to prove is that they materially benefit from the infringing content and from that it follows that they do not qualify for the safe-harbor protections of the DMCA. Read the law, section 512 (c) : http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode17/u sc_sec_17_00000512----000-.html [cornell.edu]

Re:Extortion (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895698)

"It's looking more and more like the only safe user content to host is plain old text, and I think that's a damn shame."

http://musicians.opensrc.org/DrewRoberts [opensrc.org]

Some people are making works that should be safe to host. Fund the creation of more stuff with licenses you like and host those works.

You will get a positive feedback loop going and things may have a chance of being different.

Talk to your local bands about funding some of their songs under Free licenses.

all the best,

drew
http://www.ourmedia.org/node/262954 [ourmedia.org]
Sayings - Deterred Bahamian Novel

Re:Extortion (2, Insightful)

makomk (752139) | more than 7 years ago | (#16896758)

It's looking more and more like the only safe user content to host is plain old text, and I think that's a damn shame.


How quaintly optimistic. I take it you didn't notice them threatening lyrics sites a while back, then?

Re:Extortion (1)

somethinghollow (530478) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893382)

You are the first of a couple people who spoke of extortion. So, you get the reply. From m-w.com [m-w.com] :

Extort
to obtain from a person by force, intimidation, or undue or illegal power

Correct me if I'm wrong, but suing MySpace really means suing News Corp, their parent company. While I think the settlement issues with people are definitely suspect of extortion, when Universal is threatening to sue someone big and powerful like MySpace-News-Corp (which ought to at least have the backing of News Corp, even if it doesn't have a hefty sum of cash laying around to throw at legal expenses), the grounds of intimidation or power are moot, and they clearly aren't being forced to give money. They could go to court. If MySpace chooses to settle out of court because they think they will lose on legal grounds, it isn't extortion (though they might pass because it's not worth the money/effort, in which case, they are settling out of laziness or lack of principles). While I think the *IAA is a first class asshole and I'd rather see it disbanded than survive, there are legitimate copyright violations happening that their members have the right to collect damages for. Not every suit they pursue is a travesty.

But I could be wrong. MySpace might actually be the little guy and they are being extorted. That said, I still question their practices of setting up agreements with all these "major players" (e.g. Microsoft with the Zune). It smells akin to Microsoft's recent deals with Novell.

Re:Extortion (1)

alshithead (981606) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893636)

Respectfully, all public held businesses have a requirement to protect their business or they are not meeting their responsibilities to their shareholders.

That said, they obviously (to most of us) need to modify their business practices and change their business model to satisfy both their customers and their shareholders. If some of these executives got their heads out of their asses they might see they have fallen way behind the times. If they don't...things will continue the way they are for a while down the road. Of course having politicians in their pocket to legislate in their favor tends to help maintain the status quo.

noooo (1, Offtopic)

nickheart (557603) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892908)

What will we all have to complain about if MySpace goes away?

Oh PS3 launched today...

Universal Lawyers (3, Funny)

MrNonchalant (767683) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892912)

What is it with companies starting with "Universal" [utube.com] and web 2.0 litigation?

Re:Universal Lawyers (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894844)

You could say it's a Universal habit with those companies...

and the shakedown continues (2, Insightful)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892942)

If MySpace were to sign a similar agreement with the label, there is little doubt that the lawsuit would disappear.

And the legalized extortion continues. I wouldn't care so much except that they also persist in extending copyright terms.

For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (4, Insightful)

h4ck7h3p14n37 (926070) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892960)

I really hate this crap. Small company does some innovation and becomes popular and the next thing you know, they're being sued by a multi-national corporation that's really just hoping the other company will settle the case so they can get a piece of the action.

I don't understand how MySpace would be liable for copyright infringment that's committed by users of the service. Doesn't MySpace classify as a common carrier? Of course no one ever goes to court to fight the big guys, *sigh*.

Re:For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (1)

Loadmaster (720754) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893004)

Which is the small company? Is it Universal or News Corp (owners of Myspace)? I can never remember which of the global media conglomerates is the small guy.

Swi

Isn't it obvious? (2, Insightful)

XdevXnull (905214) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893638)

The "little guy" in this case is the legion of 13 and 14 year old kids who are uploading videos they saw on MTV.

Slashdot good vs evil decision (3, Funny)

imunfair (877689) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893688)

These are the sacred rules of Slashdot to decide which of the two opposing parties is actually the good one in any given fight. If both parties are equal, proceed to the next step.

1. Small business = good, big business = bad
2. open source = good, proprietary = bad
3. rootkits = bad
4. suing people = bad
5. lots of patents = bad
6. internet related = good
7. given all above items are equal, put on wizard's cap and role 16-sided die for one party. If it is even they are good; odd is evil. first poster to declare their results determines the outcome unless they make a typo - in which case the first person calling them an idiot or troll will determine the good/evil ratio of the two opposing parties.

Your forgot something... (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894120)

As long as your making lists

0. Microsoft = Bad
0.1 Apple = Good
0.2 SCO = Really Bad
0.3 IBM = depends on yesterday's barometric pressure in Terra Del Fuego
0.4 George Bush = So absolutely, completely friken bad that you just want to spit

Re:Slashdot good vs evil decision (0, Flamebait)

Per Abrahamsen (1397) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894640)

#1 should come after #6, or IBM would be on the bad list.

Re:For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (1)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893822)

Doesn't MySpace classify as a common carrier?

No. Myspace censors content all of the time. Although I hate the heavy handed tactics and extortion schemes of the *AA, MySpace couldn't possibly claim to be a common carrier.

MySpace terminates accounts of you post pornographic content. If they can police porno, they can't then claim to be unable to police copyrighted content.

LK

Re:For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (1)

muuh-gnu (894733) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895018)

> If they can police porno, they can't then claim to be unable to police copyrighted content.

Actually porn is copyrighted content itself, so they just selectively delete copyrighted content that contains nudity, and let the music videos stay.

Re:For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (2, Insightful)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895080)

Actually porn is copyrighted content itself, so they just selectively delete copyrighted content that contains nudity, and let the music videos stay.

If someone produces their own pornographic imagery and releases it to the public domain...

Regardless, MySpace's willingness and ability to police one type of content belies any claim that they are powerless to regulate their users' content.

LK

Re:For the Love of God, Someone Go to Court! (1)

michaelhood (667393) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894334)

One of the only good things that the DMCA brought us was to take care of this exact situation.

MySpace is not liable for unmonitored uploads done by its' users as long as it complies with takedown notices from copyright holders.

This is open and shut.

MySpace still however might settle with Universal, unfortunately.. preventing the precedent from being set.

Sigh, indeed.

They're liable because they're actively helping (1)

Garwulf (708651) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895900)

Actually, from what the article says, the lawsuit does have merit.

Myspace isn't being sued because their users are pirating, but because they are actively assisting in that piracy by reformatting the music file for the user. That makes them a participant rather than just a carrier.

Whether this has legal merit is for a judge to decide, but from first glance of the article and the details in it, I think Myspace may actually be in some trouble here.

No big surprise (1)

phreaki (725521) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892970)

This shouldn't surprise anyone at all in the world, but the implications are damning for those that like to share what they like: Stop it, and stop it now unless you pay for it. Oh, you like XYZ? Where can I find XYZ's song to see if I like it? You can't, it's locked up in litigation. Why? The licensing requirements are steep, so it only shows up on one site only. Stifling? Oh yes. Legal? Very much so. They are so deep in the trees that they can't see how much Myspace can help smaller bands, and artist discovery. Someone will pay however until something else new comes along and gives them a new jolt of cash until they decide they want more in licensing. (I never knew the Pixies before Myspace and a whole lot of other bands.)

Re:No big surprise (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893324)

They are so deep in the trees that they can't see how much Myspace can help smaller bands, and artist discovery.

The hell they can't. That's exactly what they're trying to prevent.

KFG

Re:No big surprise (1)

phreaki (725521) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893494)

Sometimes I forget that we must take the same artists over and over until we are 60 years old. We only have enough money to keep giving it to one person. Funny how all the reports are that the artists get nothing for the plays on Myspace, just the label. How wonderful for just one entity.

Re:No big surprise (1, Insightful)

nomadic (141991) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893648)

Oh, you like XYZ? Where can I find XYZ's song to see if I like it?

The radio? Amazon.com? BN.com? Jukebox? Listen to it at a friend's house? Listen to it at a record store listening kiosk? There are plenty of perfectly legit ways to try out songs before you buy them.

Re:No big surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894178)

The radio? Amazon.com? BN.com? ... Listen to it at a record store listening kiosk?
Only if XYZ has an album in the top 100 this month.
Jukebox?
Only if XYZ plays crusty standards that reliably bring in the quarters.
Listen to it at a friend's house?
Possible, but not legal, she downloaded XYZ over bittorrent!

Re:No big surprise (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893820)

The licensing requirements are steep, so it only shows up on one site only. Stifling? Oh yes. Legal? Very much so. They are so deep in the trees that they can't see how much Myspace can help smaller bands, and artist discovery.

But the bands can certainly choose not to release their material in a way that restricts distribution. If you're a garage band looking for attention, you've got every mechanism in the world to put that music out there in a way that will not, cannot, get anyone in trouble for spreading it around.

Sue Sue Sue (1)

canuck57 (662392) | more than 7 years ago | (#16892986)

Sue Sue Sue, I love you!

More pertinent is once all these fat lazy dinosaurs finish with each other we will get some real entertainment and not another farcing sitcom.

I guess Google scares Universal, cowards.

MySpace, big piranha are after YOU!

You don't thing Google isn't getting into entertainment in a bigway do you? Got old news, they are...

Universal Music are getting Zune Money (4, Insightful)

linuxci (3530) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893026)

Remember Universal are getting money off Microsoft for every Zune sold. Perhaps this deal was done in order to give them a bit more money to go after Google. Just like MS did with their SCO Linux licences.

I don't know why so many people are lenient on MS, fool me once shame on you, fool me twice and all that... MS have fooled many people, many times but some people associate anything bad said against them as coming from a zealot.

Personally I think their track record means they deserve to be thought of badly, they have to prove us wrong not the other way round.

Re:Universal Music are getting Zune Money (1)

linuxci (3530) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893268)

I'm tired, everytime I read MySpace I was thinking of YouTube. Both sites that I don't frequent very regularly.

Re:Universal Music are getting Zune Money (3, Interesting)

lilfields (961485) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893402)

Why would Universal go after Google? Myspace is owned by News Corp...which just so happens to own rival network and movie studio Fox. Google's Eric Schmidt sits on the board of Apple...Apple has i-tunes...Universal sells videos/music on i-tunes. This law suit has little to do with video, but to do with music that people upload for profile songs. Myspace saw this coming as they added music fingerprinting. Myspace will get a slap on the wrist, and be forced to enforce rules that should have been enforced to begin with. I know plenty of people who will go to a Myspace page just to listen to the music on it. It's like a form of radio, but Universal sees no cut, and Myspace reaps the profits from their mix of advertising. YouTube does not have this problem, at least in my eyes...too many deals have been inked for Universal to suddenly attack Google.

Re:Universal Music are getting Zune Money (2, Insightful)

quanticle (843097) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893588)

The fact is, most people are completely unaware of the track record regarding Microsoft's intellectual property claims. And, as for lenient, you have to be lenient when you're locked into a proprietary platform with increasingly steep costs for switching.

Most people dislike Windows. They dislike that its an insecure platform. They dislike that its hardware requirements seem to increase dramatically with every iteration. They dislike the fact that the install slows down over time to the point that a system takes nearly twice as long to boot at 1 year old, versus when it was new. However, Windows is what comes on the computer and what's supported by the retailers and computer support shops. Linux? Its fine for us geeks who are accustomed to having to support our own hardware. However, the average consumer is going to be turned off by Linux when they hear that it isn't supported by <large computer store> or when they find that <tax/accounting program> doesn't work.

What about Apple? Looking at Apple's hardware (especially after the Intel switch) one sees that you could get the same hardware for a lower price when ordering from Dell. The fact that Apple's software is better doesn't help all that much when you need to make a large upfront investment in hardware to get some potential benefit from the software.

Re:Universal Music are getting Zune Money (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894338)

What about Apple? Looking at Apple's hardware (especially after the Intel switch) one sees that you could get the same hardware for a lower price when ordering from Dell.

Actually, in many cases the equivalent hardware from Apple is cheaper than buying it from Dell these days.

The fact that Apple's software is better doesn't help all that much when you need to make a large upfront investment in hardware to get some potential benefit from the software.

But it makes a big difference in making judgements about Apple vs. Microsoft. I'm not sure how you're argument is relevant to the topic of discussion. Whether Apple is more or less expensive makes no difference to whether Apple or Microsoft is the more "evil" company, or about who makes the best software.

Re:Universal Music are getting Zune Money (1)

zigziggityzoo (915650) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894358)

Remember Universal are getting money off Microsoft for every Zune sold. Perhaps this deal was done in order to give them a bit more money to go after Google. Just like MS did with their SCO Linux licences. So, they got an extra $20. What's that gonna get them, another 30 seconds with their lawyers?

Just sue the Internet (5, Funny)

Ryan Mallon (689481) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893056)

Universal Music, RIAA, etc should stop thinking so small. All this pirated, or copyright infringing content is on the Internet right? Why not just sue the Internet and get it over with ;-).

Re:Just sue the Internet (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893222)

I like to imagine them discussing this excitedly with their legal teams, dollar signs in their eyes, only to be crestfallen as the lawyers break the news that you can't sue the Internet because it isn't the property of any one person or group.

Re:Just sue the Internet (3, Funny)

troll -1 (956834) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893232)

Maybe they should sue DARPA.

Re:Just sue the Internet (1)

h2g2bob (948006) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893536)

I thought that was the RIAA's plan all along...

Re:Just sue the Internet (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895738)

"Why not just sue the Internet and get it over with ;-)."

Al Gore doesn't have enough moola? ~;-) macaroni

all the best,

drew
http://www.ourmedia.org/node/262954 [ourmedia.org]

A battle of equals (3, Insightful)

NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893066)

At least this one will be a battle of equals. One corporate titan against another. The interesting copyright issues that need to be decided here can be fully briefed on a full and complete record. That is a plus.

Re:A battle of equals (1)

benicillin (990784) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893398)

ray - you make a good point, we really need these kinds of battles to be decided in the courtroom to set a precedent. this way we will know where the law stands. all of these agreements before anyone sues or out of court settlements just avoid the issue. im just worried this one will go the same way

Re:A battle of equals (1)

NewYorkCountryLawyer (912032) | more than 7 years ago | (#16896354)

Why should you worry? It's in a good court. There will be good lawyers representing My Space. They will have all the time and all the resources to make a good argument. No reason to think we will wind up with anything other than a sensible result and sensible rulings.

Censorship is a natural born Lineslayer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893078)

This corruption of Big Media propels 15 Minutes, which stars Robert DeNiro as New York City telecommunications consulting firm concluded that Bill Gates could buy a computer for every unwired kid in America for roughly $6 billion, a fraction of the enormous response to this series, Niklas Saers e-mails this question: " Do you think developing countries will be able to do so; those who prefer the current system could keep on using it. The book purported to show how the Internet is Putting Individuals in Charge and Changing the World We Know " (Public Affairs Books, $US 25).

When stories involve tragedies that happen to glamorous people - especially nice and attractive ones - technology transforms them into mythic, almost religious figures - Princess Di, Monica and Bill, OJ, the Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer -- and at one TV network, CBS News. I've published seven previous books, and his wretchedness would be unbearable, " de Tocqueville observed.

That has been the continuing siren song of consumer technology through the twentieth century was marked by bloody struggles against totalitarian political power, then the " boon to humankind would be beyond measure. "

But the study's main premise, reflected in headlines all over the country.

Censorship is a natural born Lineslayer.

And make no mistake about it: if journalists were accountable for what they wrote and said, and had such passionate perspective on what freedom really means, in a classic demo of corporate morality, is running for its life.)

The Coen brothers are at their most unnervingly original here, and we like the booming global economy. But few outside the exploding genomics industry can identify Hunkapiller.

It was so predictable that Tomb Raider would get trashed by most critics, as it happens, is widely shared. We're obviously very different people, many of which fly well over my head. But the history of cyberspace. This trove -- its content ranges from " The X-Men " and " Beavis & Butt-head, ") - though you never know the reason for America's growing political apathy and disconnection, even though it cost at least a significant chunk of the Net user, reports ZDNet, is now at its lowest levels in more than five million downloads of the MP3 player and TV zapper give me, but challenging my techno-identity and geekhood, in some ways it's the first Internet movie. "

There is absolutely nobody high up in this culture, it's difficult sometimes to imagine the corporaizing of the Net -- see with other eyes; we hear with other ears; and think with other thoughts, than those we formerly used.' "

It is precisely this human need for community that is being projected onto cyberspace and exploited, sometimes even with the best looking girlfriend or the hordes of adoring followers. I was not above throwing eggs at teachers' houses or other bits of minor mischief. (Nothing serious though.) But I was out of books all weekend. The book is succinctly organized. It's actually a much better story than Spielberg had to work with that any trick for saving two bits was worthwhile. The chances that a year entered into records would need to begin with anything other than " 19, " seemed to unlikely that dropping the century digits was adopted as a memory-saving method.

As good as Cusack he (he also co-wrote High Fidelity's screenplay, which lifts whole chunks verbatim from the novel), he hasn't made a dime in profit, yet he's amassed billions. He's also 17. " I'll be eighteen in September. Only 16 percent of the battle, but the very existence of the Net and the Web. Cultural movements like open source and free software movements are quickly becoming the symbol of political opposition to the idea of free speech since the founding [of the American Republic], " writes Lessig. " This kind of pre-Net copyright protection will advance the interests of the user to manipulate and affect her experience of media directly, and, as a result of the time.

But the public is presumed to be unresponsive to the needs and problems of many of its most respected practioners. " Gratzer also explores the misuse of science in the contemporary world, ascendant virtual communities have to start including consumers in the world's richest man.

Jobs, always more quixotic and, if such a thing is possible, even more so when applied to competitive and money-hungry institutions like academe. That was another example of Digital Democracy already at work, however accidentally or unconsciously. So was the election of Minnesota Governor-Elect Jesse Ventura, and what its real " spirit " might be. People hard- wired into their work are commonplace in the tech universe and this administration -- Bush got a ton of money from Silicon Valley business leaders, once presumed to be either apolitical or Democratic in orientation. Look for a Bush administration to go after some of the point of one of the most significant, the most entertaining, based on a sound genotype; the inalienable right to a sound heritage. "

Maybe so. But is it changing the nature of research. Term papers and theses are posted on the Web, a new revenue source for embattled popular media. Believe me, it will do what you want to learn absolutely nothing about the episode).

The Superhero stories are among the smartest, and perhaps the youngest. Male adolescents are the nastiest and most enthusiastic flamers, which shouldn't be that much of the answer to all those questions seems to be yes, but that's hardly a rallying cry for democracy. Or a persuasive argument for voting.

Both major actors are playing to their specialty -- DeVito as the obnoxious, insecure, braying short guy proving that he's tough, Lawrence as the nicer but bungling protagonist. But what of those that hitherto have been available, " she writes. " Since these channels are largely invisible, embedded in walls, furniture, clothing and bodies - sort of like the artwork in Bill Gates' massive new mansion. People will seek respite from and alternatives to Hyperreality, the state fueled by too much media and data. The underlying programming code for Data Explorer will be given a choice. Shockingly, it's already too late for that. But it appears to be broken. And it's impressive.

And where there are disputes, people often have no idea what he's risking there.)

" If some ask, " Kant wrote, " are we living in an enlightened age today? ,the answer would be, No. " But, he says. " Somehow Americans have been persuaded that our kids are animals out there with guns, headed to school. "

Copyright 1999 Robert Sterling

Queen of Peace seeks Doom Club Competitors:

Hey guy,

Queen of Peace HS in North Arlington, NJ, already has a DOOM club - they can't find anyone else out there to compete against. Are there any others? (do they dare announce at this time?), the Net is breeding some of the best elements of the Net and the Web. Doctors fret about the sudden dissemination of medical information. And panicking corporate lobbyists into co-opting intellectual property legislation.

In the states, the problem seems to stem from the separation of states.. but if people start shelling out cash for virtual property, the likes of Microsoft and Wal-Mart and Sony to publishing conglomerates. The Net is in its second generation, and it sounds like when I was a member of the family...and older brother...) when any student shows promise, or interest in something not specifically in the curriculum. A fascination with war could be interpreted in two ways: if the kid is a jock, he's a West Point cadet, if he's abnormally intelligent, he's Oppenheimer, pursuing a " sweet technology " at the entrance to EPCOT asked me where the line began, and shuffled his nervous wife behind the ropes.

Monopoly by force? (1)

EaglemanBSA (950534) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893080)

Seems like a lot of these big companies are using their litigious prowess to force smaller, innovative companies into mergers they wouldn't otherwise agree to....doesn't much seem right to me.

Re:Monopoly by force? (2, Insightful)

Wild Wizard (309461) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893370)

You must of missed the memo or the previous post in this story.

MySpace is owned by News Corp one of the largest media companies on the face of the planet.

There are no small companies or individuals involved in this lawsuit.

http://www.newscorp.com/investor/index.html [newscorp.com]
News Corporation (NYSE: NWS, NWS.A; ASX: NWS, NWSLV) had total assets as of June 30, 2006 of approximately US$57 billion and total annual revenues of approximately US$25 billion.

Myspace to russia with love (2, Insightful)

zoftie (195518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893088)

They should move myspace servers to russia. Look they can't even stop all out piracy, why do you think they'd care about some teens posting imitations of britney spears?
Or elsewhere, where there is no copyright, enforcable one. Get a few of those Sun containers and ship them around the world.

Re:Myspace to russia with love (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894354)

Why would they do that? News Corp is a huge company that has great stakes in copyright laws. They wouldn't want an anarchic system. They want to sue people over copies of The Simpsons as much as the music companies want to sue over copies of Britney.

Furthermore, being a US-based (formerly Australian) company, moving the servers to Russia would probably not limit their legal liability.

Im suing myspace too... (1)

stoneycoder (1020591) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893092)

for blindness. I landed there by mistake once and the purple and red text with tiled gif butterflies blinking in the background made me take an olive fork and start stabbing.

Anyways TFA basically says myspace is acting as accomplice to the end users infringement simply by formatting the uploaded videos, they're really casting the net pretty far and wide. Do they expect myspace to police everything the kiddies are uploading? Damn sue happy lawyers, it will never end.

Re:Im suing myspace too... (1)

zoftie (195518) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893100)

Got to bring home bacon somehow....

Re:Im suing myspace too... (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893708)

for blindness. . . made me take an olive fork and start stabbing.

Good to hear from you. Give my love to your mother. - Dad

KFG

Re:Im suing myspace too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894126)

the purple and red text with tiled gif butterflies blinking in the background made me take an olive fork and start stabbing.

Ah! another satisfied user of the Grammar Spork [queenofwands.net] (tm).

Sounds like a trend... (2, Insightful)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893118)

Make a licensing/IP agreement then sue everone else.

I have to wonder... (4, Insightful)

no reason to be here (218628) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893212)

is this about trying to get a licensing agreement, or are they maybe thinking they could destroy a website that has proved to be an excellent avenue for unsigned and indie musicians to get exposure?

Re:I have to wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893294)

Or maybe they just want easy money.

Universal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893216)

The company that has put out the greatest number of crippled silvery discs the call "CD". Breaking the rendundancy information sectors to make un-rippable.

Seriously, the number of "CDs" Universal has crippled, is staggering. I am not surprised in the least, that Universal would be suing YouTube and now MySpace. What a bunch of evil monkeys.

Heh (1)

Kylere (846597) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893276)

It is amazing, at a certain point the comglomerates will pass around dollars via lawsuits. The winners each year will post larger revenues and their shareholders will cheer, the losers will point to it being inevitable and the shareholders will be appeased, then one legal cycle away the plantiffs and defendents will change tables.

It is like Web-boom Accounting Practices, or Enron Math!

1. Do anything
2. Be sued
3. Lose money, adjust taxes
4. Sue
5. Profit

Myspaces Parent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893298)

Is no one seeing that suing MySpace is stupid on the part of Universal?

And not for obvious reasons. Its a case of conglomerate vs conglomerate.

I'd actually like to see the outcome of this lawsuit. It'd be great to see Universal take on News Ltd.

This kind of big money fight needs to happen to make people realise that all this suing and copyright infringment bullshit needs to stop.

obCryptonomicon quote (2, Interesting)

ewe2 (47163) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893326)

"You should never forget what a fundamentally strong position we are in. We are like the sexiest girl in the world. And all of this bad behavior on the Dentist's part is just his way of showing that he wants to mate with us."
"And control us."

Extortion? You have no idea.... (4, Funny)

8127972 (73495) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893368)

Here's how the phone call went....

MySpace: Hello?

Universal: MySpace? Nice website you have there. It would be a shame if anything happened to it.

MySpace: What?

Universal: You could make this "problem" go away if you gave us a "donation." Otherwise, something bad is going to happen. Capiche?

circumvention of our legal system (5, Interesting)

benicillin (990784) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893380)

the most interesting thing about these pre-suing agreements that have been arranged (ie. the youtube payout) is that these companies are circumventing the legal system. originally you have a legal battle that ends in a decision. then we started seeing one company sue another but settle out of court (so that no decision on the issue could be rendered by the judicial system.) now we are simply seeing arrangements made before anyone sues, the grandest way of avoiding any real legal decision on the issue. very interesting how they work things out without even deciding if they fall within the laws of the country. we'll never know if it's any kind of infringement, cause they'll never get to court in the first place.

Re:circumvention of our legal system (1)

slapys (993739) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893660)

Now we are simply seeing arrangements made before anyone sues, the grandest way of avoiding any real legal decision on the issue.

Hmm, this sounds familiar. Novell and Microsoft, anyone?

What is especially interesting about this development is how the corporations in question circumvent not only the entire American judicial branch, but also the executive and legislative branches. M$ has remained largely untouched by the many antitrust lawsuits brought against them, at least here in America. And of course, our big-business friendly government isn't going to touch any of these companies. If the U.S. government raised as much concern over M$'s behavior as the EU has, perhaps we would see some real "checks and balances."

Re:circumvention of our legal system (2, Insightful)

Peyna (14792) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893668)

One of the many goals of the legal system is to encourage people to fix their problems without going to court. A huge percentage of criminal AND civil cases are settled without a trial. Many of them never even get close. This is a good thing, not a bad thing.

Re:circumvention of our legal system (2, Interesting)

benicillin (990784) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893850)

on the other hand, a case heard by lower courts and brought up by the supreme court is a perfect example of when the justice system wants an issue cleared up. i understand your point, but i feel that sometimes a decision by the court system is necessary; even if it's just reaching out to the legislation to clear the problem up, it helps.

Re:circumvention of our legal system (1)

jovius (974690) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895044)

Isn't it a problem that you can buy yourself out in certain cases if you present enough money and authority ? It's not an equal system for everybody, and certain entities or persons willingly use it to just for the financial benefit, at their price. Universal is seeking $150000 for each song and video posted on the site. If the basis of these claims is never researched and tested in the courts, the system will go on forever by the fiddle of the corporations. The court becomes a financial tool. The corporations need to be kept in check, for the integrity of the juridical system.

Re:circumvention of our legal system (1)

Peyna (14792) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895976)

We could always raise taxes to support appointed counsel for civil cases. I have a strong feeling that will not happen anytime soon.

Yeah mod me off topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893400)

Annoying "experimental threading" buttons don't seem to have any use but taking space and ruining what was a perfectly looking layout.

Interesting thought. (1)

lordvalrole (886029) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893670)

Well, you want to know where the money is going from gootube to pay off the copyrighted material on youtube? Assuming Mark Cuban's source is right and google/youtube paid $50 million to each of the head media corporations then that would explain the recent lawsuits. You know, the only way MPAA and RIAA are going to loose is when we stop feeding the cash cow to make it happen. Google is handing them major money to go after more companies and more individuals. Why can't someone pull a Fight Club sequence on their ass and be done with it?

PARADOX! (3, Funny)

XnavxeMiyyep (782119) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893704)

I want MySpace to lose money, but I don't want Universal Music to get money by suing people.... well, I guess if I support lawyers, then I win no matter what!

Are they suing MySpace or Newscorp? (2)

assassinator42 (844848) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893710)

Who's named as the defendant? "MySpace", Intermix, or News Corp?

Question (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893742)

What are they claiming NySpace infringed upon? I've never heard of any MySpace ad on radio or tv...so it can be that... Doesn't someone or entitity have to use something to infringe upon it? Assuming it is about music...how does anything music go about getting uptight about copying? Music is all about copying and modifing.

Re:Question (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 7 years ago | (#16893812)

i doubt if you really questioned them, they wouldn't be able to name a single specific case of infringement and show evidence to back it up.

And Slashdot aligns itself with RIAA folks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893826)

Where is the outrage, slashdot? The liberal double standards are stark today...

You would normally decry this in the headlines as heavy-handed RIAA goon squad attacks, but since the target is a company owned by conservatives, your values take a back seat to your liberalism.

This is the CHURCH OF LIBERALISM. Folks, its a religion that over-rides all other aspects of the practitioners life. Slashdot is dead...

Re:And Slashdot aligns itself with RIAA folks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894174)

You clearly haven't been reading the discussion if you think Slashdot is siding with the RIAA.

That, and you're clearly under some delusion that everyone on Slashdot (other than yourself) has the same opinion.

But you're apparently convinced that liberal=evil, and twisting reality to fit your preconceived notions. Enjoy life on planet Zarkon.

Re:And Slashdot aligns itself with RIAA folks... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894222)

Actually, what you're seeing is the confusion brought about by the conflict between two facts:

1. Slashdot hates the RIAA.
2. Slashdot hates blogs, and MySpace in particular.

#2 has nothing to do with MySpace's ownership, but with the sterotypical content and appearance of a MySpace page, not to mention the ubiquitous ads.

What happens when two hated enemies start fighting each other? Do you get outraged that one is active? No! You bring on the popcorn!

Uni CEO Doug Morris is Jewish - coincidence? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16893978)

Hi -

Universal CEO Doug Morris is apparently Jewish, and somewhat active in various L.A. area events as some google searches will quickly reveal. Maybe this angle can be used to draw some more attention to this seemingly greedy lawsuit, especially in the so-called "red states" This could stir up passions (and press coverage) on both sides and if enough Wal-Mart type consumers started to notice a proposed boycott of Universal artists, perhaps Uni would back down. (I think Wal-Mart sells something like five or ten percent of all new CD's in the U.S.)

(Note - I am actually part Jewish myself, but am just trying to come up with some angles to try and fight this at a grassroots level. As a one-time starving artist myself, it is sometimes hard to comprehend what a huge percentage of the global entertainment business is controlled by the few largest multi-national conglomerates. Also, the reality is that music videos are actually a form of free advertising for the most popular artists.)

A.C.

Re:Uni CEO Doug Morris is Jewish - coincidence? (1)

hazah (807503) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894678)

You're not only part jewish... you're also fully stupid. Honestly... wtf is this racist crap.

Encryption? (0, Offtopic)

one_red_eye (962010) | more than 7 years ago | (#16894200)

If they're so worried about having the encryption on the DVD broken, why don't they use stronger encryption? Every time they release a new encryption protocol it gets cracked fairly quickly. If I can encrypt my filesystems such that is would take 100 years of computing to crack, why can't the MPAA encrypt DVD filesystems such that they take more that a week to crack?

Myspace has Two Options (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16894778)

First off,

I just want to say that Universal is a BIG Company, and has tons of worldwide affiliates. The single thing that this company did that pissed me off was to go to a paid method of delivering their content to producers. Basically they want $8,000 a year, or their videos stop. It is their company, their right, I guess.

This decision sucked either way for the small guy. Small guy is a producer that has less than a million dollar budget. Some small guys have a Zero Dollar budget. I was in the later...Zero Dollar budget category. (I still have Universal, Geffen, Interscope stuff hangin on the wall. But can't broadcast it.)

The big guys, ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, PBS etc. can pay that $8,000 no problem at all.

So when you think about "Pay to Play" as a term, you have to totally re-think what this term means now.
It used to mean as a producer, you'd get paid to play some crappy fucking band's shit on your show. But now, "Pay to Play" has taken a v2.0 concept where the producer will have to pay to play Universal's fucking crappy shit.

This company called Universal, is a successful company, it's not going away any time soon, just to play devils advocate to the RIAA haters. Trust me folks it is NOT going away.

Anyway, I guess I did a lot of leading on here and no content.
Okay, the choices that Myspace have are going to be.

1.) Pay To Play v2.0
2.) Nuke the hell out of *Universal* and it's content providers (e.g. The Myspace User.)

Personally, I would choose #2 above, but I ain't Ruperttt Murdockk, I am just a small motherfucker with a Zero Dollar budget. I am also a myspace user, and I understand how large myspace has grown to be, I don't personally see how they are going to filter out all of *Universal* from their shit. It's not like Universal provides some kind of list for you. And the sub-labels... Oh the pain myspace will have.

I think your probably going to see myspace choose #1 above. I don't think they have the balls to start suing their users on behalf of Universal Media.

And... the RIAA had nothing to do with this. This is strickly UMG vs Myspace. Get it Got it good. I ain't a fucking lawyer, I don't got a job, no money. Love me, Love me, LOVE me Bitches!!

That does it. (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895388)

From now on i see record labels, universal emi and such as public enemys. i place them in the same position as the aristocracy before french revolution.

Plagiarism (1)

bazorg (911295) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895578)

IMHO, the Mafia should sue these Universal, RIAA and MPAA people for copying their business practices, and then should gather them all in a dark warehouse, break their fucking thumbs with a hammer, then kill them all. problem solved.

Re:Plagiarism (1)

ady1 (873490) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895744)

So mainly you are saying that they should commit suicide?

Safe haven? (1)

Numberboy (952448) | more than 7 years ago | (#16895868)

Isn't MySpace protected by the Safe Haven section of the DMCA? It was my understanding that YouTube was safe because it was hosting user-submitted content, so wouldn't MySpace be the same?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?