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Laser Turns All Metals Black

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the bzoooom-whaaaawwwww dept.

333

Roland Piquepaille writes "Researchers at the University of Rochester have found a way to change the properties of almost any metal by using a femtosecond laser pulse. This ultra-intense laser blast creates true 'black metal' from copper, gold or zinc by forming nanostructures at the surface of the metal. As these nanostructures capture radiation, the metals turn black. And as the process needs surprisingly low power, it could soon be used for a variety of applications, such as stealth planes, black jewels or car paintings. But read more for additional references and a picture of this femtosecond laser system."

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anything special? (4, Insightful)

Loconut1389 (455297) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969478)

Does this black metal have any special properties aside from being black? The article mainly talks about other ways of making it black not being as good- is that all this really does?

Re:anything special? (3, Informative)

biocute (936687) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969544)

Low power (so low cost) makes it an ideal alternative to traditional coating/painting.

Re:anything special? (5, Funny)

diersing (679767) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969766)

Awesome! What colors are available?

Re:anything special? (5, Funny)

notthe9 (800486) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969958)

Any color you want, so long as it's black.

Re:anything special? (-1, Redundant)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970038)

You can have it in any color, so long as it's black.

Re:anything special? (5, Funny)

Headcase88 (828620) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969990)

Good for stuntships that only go on one un-manned mission to explode into a sun. As long as you don't mind everything being completely black.

Re:anything special? (1)

Amiga Lover (708890) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969586)

I'm not sure I understand the article.

Guo's research team has tested the absorption capabilities for the black metal and confirmed that it can absorb virtually all the light that fall on it, making it pitch black.

Surely if it absorbed all the light, it would be completely invisible, not black?

Re:anything special? (4, Informative)

Tim C (15259) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969614)

Surely if it absorbed all the light, it would be completely invisible, not black?

No, because if it was invisible you'd be able to see what was behind it; if it merely absorbs the light that falls on it, you'd see a black shape instead...

Insightful? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969776)

Moderators who lack a basic science education might consider refraining from moderating stuff to do with science.

Re:anything special? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969630)

Surely if it absorbed all the light, it would be completely invisible, not black?

No...black is the absence of all light (actually, the absorption of all light), so it would be black.

Re:anything special? (3, Insightful)

sumdumass (711423) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969938)

I never thought of it on the same plane before but radio wave (electromagnetic light waves) like what would be used in radar and such are a form of light waves. I guess the term "Black" meaning it absorbs light means it is invisible to radar, infrared and everything else that uses something from the light spectrum to operate. Thermal?.

Now I see why the military might be interest in this. It isn't just an alternative to paint.

Re:anything special? (1)

muuh-gnu (894733) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969636)

If it lets all the light pass through it, then its invisible. If it absorbs all the light, and reflects nothing or little, then its black.

Re:anything special? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969642)

Uh, you realize that black is the absense of light, right?

It would be invisible if it magically transmitted photons through the entire metal.

Someone failed physics class.

Re:anything special? (5, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969618)

The treated metal absorbs all incoming radiation, such as microwaves and lasers.

Hint: Think "perfect stealth", not only for planes, but for your car as well. Make that cop toting the radar gun go insane.

Re:anything special? (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969852)

The treated metal absorbs all incoming radiation, such as microwaves and lasers. Hint: Think "perfect stealth", not only for planes, but for your car as well.

I don't know about that; though Roland mentions it in his typically breathless puff, TFA doesn't. I can understand these nanostructures absorbing light, with wavelengths similar to their scale, but not microwaves, radar, etc. with wavelenghths of centimetres. But absorbing all light is going to make things heat up. It will be emitting more infrared than a "shiny" surfaced vehicle.

Re:anything special? (2, Informative)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969880)

I sort of skimmed TFA and the abstract (GASP!), and they made it seem as if they could create nanostructures with different properties based on the frequency, intensity, and duration of a given pulse. While I find it unlikely that they've created something that effectively absorbs basically any sort of radiation, it's likely that with a little tweaking they can get it to absorb specific wavelengths.

Re:anything special? (1)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969660)

Well because it is jet black I'd assume it probably absorbs heat from the sun pretty well.

Re:anything special? (-1, Flamebait)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969714)

Well, to be honest, I don't really like black metal. I heard it's less reliable, and doesn't act appropriately, despite all we've done to help it perform. Once black metal is in your neighborhood, property values go down and people try to leave ASAP. I've never seen a black metal do a job right without having to be replaced. If my daughter were interested in a black metal, I'd steer her another way as best I could. I don't serve black metal either.

Re:anything special? (1)

pcnetworx1 (873075) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969964)

Michael Richards? Are you there?

Special Properties (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970058)

Does this black metal have any special properties aside from being black?

Well, that one property alone makes it excellent for building Ford Model-Ts.

Re:anything special? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16970078)

It's also pretty good at burning churches [wikipedia.org] , murdering people [wikipedia.org] and killing itself [wikipedia.org] .

Also good for pissing off the neighbors or when you're really pissed off.

Blackness (1)

moatra (1019690) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969506)

Isn't applying a coat of black paint easier?

Paint lacks an important property (1)

patio11 (857072) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969572)

See, paint isn't really bloody expensive. Anything that goes on a government procurement request has to be really bloody expensive (done by the lowest bidder, because you need to *economize* on that $10 billion make-work project, darn it). Expect the Space Shuttle and our new fighter planes to get a quick laser blasting in the near future.

Re:Paint lacks an important property (2, Interesting)

Petronius.Scribe (1020097) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969992)

Paint is also heavy - a couple of hundred kilograms for an airliner, and almost a tonne for a B52.

Re:Blackness (4, Interesting)

ross.w (87751) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969644)

It is, but it also insulates a bit. If you paint something black, it emits and absorbs radiant heat with the properties of the paint, not the metal. This is about making the metal itself black so it absorbs/emits more efficiently.

Solar (3, Insightful)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970100)

So this could make for more efficient thermal solar panels.

Re:Blackness (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969722)

Guo's research team has tested the absorption capabilities for the black metal and confirmed that it can absorb virtually all the light that fall on it, making it pitch black.

Having an aircraft made out of treated metal would make it one heck of a (visually) stealth plane. As it is, the U.S. stealth planes require a going-over with a fine tooth comb after each mission to ensure no scratches, dents, or chips are in the paint. Presumably a metal approach would reduce turn around time.

Oh yea, and black kicks ass.

Re:Blackness (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969848)

No, 'Paint it Black' was a Rolling Stones album. It won't do.

Re:Blackness (2, Insightful)

HazE_nMe (793041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969896)

I think this would be nice for car exhaust pipes. If you use normal paint on anything that gets very hot, the paint burns up. This would be a nice alternative to paint for extremely hot applications.

Re:Blackness (2, Interesting)

bladesjester (774793) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969922)

Since other people have pointed out the fact that this wouldn't burn off or rub off easily, one of the other things that this would have as an advantage over paints and powder coats is that they add thickness to the material in question and this (theoretically, at any rate) would not. That would be a big plus for precision insturments. Especially if it has any oxidation inhibiting properties.

Re:Blackness (1)

enosys (705759) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969960)

I suppose that this process does add some thickness. It seems like it creates a very thin irregular and maybe even sponge-like layer on the surface. That layer probably takes up more space than the same material in its former compact form.

Mr. H. Desoto (2, Funny)

TJ_Phazerhacki (520002) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969512)

Your spaceship is ready....

Re:Mr. H. Desoto (1)

SinGunner (911891) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969522)

I was just about to ask if it also rendered the metal frictionless.

Re:Mr. H. Desoto (1)

jmagar.com (67146) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969616)

Destination: Sun of Kakrafoon

Re:Mr. H. Desoto (1)

mikael (484) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969874)

Zaphod is understandably worried. He tries to explain to Arthur why they are having difficulty with the controls.... "Every time I try to operate one of these weird controls, which is labelled black on a black background, a small black light lights up black to let you know you've done it!"

Episode 6: Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy [sadgeezer.com]

Re:Mr. H. DesIAto (1)

Ryan Monster (767204) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970030)

Wow, I can't believe how much of a geek I am that I knew without looking anything up that it was Hotblack Desiato, not Desoto.

"true 'black metal'"?! (4, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969520)


This ultra-intense laser blast creates true 'black metal'

Rubbish, true [youtube.com] 'black [youtube.com] metal' [youtube.com]
(sniff... brings back memories of seeing them in '83.)

How black is it? (4, Interesting)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969524)

Are we talking like optical black, suitable for coating the insides of instruments like telescopes and microscopes?
-jcr

Re:How black is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969550)

Yeah. Like, how much more black could it be?

Re:How black is it? (3, Funny)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969626)

The black has to be as close as possible to absolute. Otherwise you'll be picked up on scanners from a long way away. You have to make your speedster totally non-ferrous, too, right down to the windings in the Bergenholm.

Re:How black is it? (1)

JBird (31996) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969834)

The black has to be as close as possible to absolute. Otherwise you'll be picked up on scanners from a long way away. You have to make your speedster totally non-ferrous, too, right down to the windings in the Bergenholm.
Yes, excellent Lensman reference. Now we start the countdown to super stealth.

Re:How black is it? (1)

rancher dan 3 (960065) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970116)

Sweet dude, the moderators took it seriously. Hahahahahahahahahahaha.

Re:How black is it? (1)

Kreigaffe (765218) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969602)

Blacker than the blackest black.. times infinity!

Re:How black is it? (2, Funny)

ross.w (87751) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969606)

It's so black, even the white bits are black!

I know - boring

Re:How black is it? (1)

Associate (317603) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969720)

More of a pastel black really.

Re:How black is it? (4, Funny)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969730)

Blacker! I'm talking black knobs with black legends on a black control panel black. It's so black it's frictionless.

Re:How black is it? (4, Informative)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969748)

An older New Scientist article [newscientist.com] on a related technique reports 7 to 25 times less light reflected, compared to optical black paint. NS also reports [newscientisttech.com] on the current laser-based technology.

Re:How black is it? (2, Informative)

P3NIS_CLEAVER (860022) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970024)

Optically black paint is also problematic, as it chips off and gets into the optics. This would allow a black coating with zero contamination.

Applications (2, Informative)

Jarjarthejedi (996957) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969526)

Interesting applications listed, detectors, chemistry, etc. What I'm wondering is the question implied by the editor, can this blast be used to make the metal absorb radar waves? If they can made a laser pulse make the substance absorb all visible EM radiation, can they do the same for invisible? This could have significant applications for the military if it can, not just for better stealth aircraft, but think of it. An invisible to radar destroyer, aircraft carrier, tank even. This is defiantly worth keeping an eye on, for the many scientific applications as well as the military ones. If it's really as easy as creating a femptosecond pulse to make something stealth many other nations would be able to do it soon as well.

Re:Applications (1)

SinGunner (911891) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969566)

This was obviously created by "The Scientists" as a means to make "Cool Stuff". Let's not drag "The Military" into this, eh? We saw what they did with "Nucular Technology".

Re:Applications (1)

metroplex (883298) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969788)

Apparently, the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment [www.mil.no] is using Ultrafast Laser Technology for some research, so I suppose someone already thought about using it in the military field.
The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich is collaborating with them, altough I find it really difficult to understand to what extent. From their webpage:

Dr. Arisholm is an expert in parametric three-wave interaction modelling. We collaborate on the design and implementation of chirped pulse optical parametric amplification (CPOPA) an alternative route to phase-controlled intense few-cycle laser pulses.

Re:Applications (2, Informative)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969574)

What I'm wondering is the question implied by the editor, can this blast be used to make the metal absorb radar waves?
Maybe. The thing about reflecting photons is that the same material can be opaque, transparent, or reflective depending on the wavelength of the photons in question. It sounds like this technique makes a very good black for optical frequencies. Whether it's also black to radio waves needs to be investigated.

-jcr

Re:Applications (2, Informative)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970112)

> Whether it's also black to radio waves needs to be investigated.

No it doesn't. It is obvious that it is not. The process makes the metal black by creating an intricate surface structure on the scale of the wavelengths of visible light. It would look like a shiny metal surface at the centimeter or so wavelengths used by radar. The effect probably peters out somewhere in the infrared.

Re:Applications (1)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969680)

Well just because it absorbs radar doesn't mean it will be invisible. If it absorbs it too well then it is simply going to look like a big blank spot in a sea of otherwise random noise. Put simply, the lack of any reflection will be just as obvious as the vehicle would be without the coating.

Re:Applications (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969888)

As I mentioned in another post, a black object (If I remember year 10 physics :) also radiates energy away more easily, which may work against it hiding successfully.

Re:Applications: Vandalism (1)

Gertlex (722812) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969790)

The article mentions needing no more power than is available from an electrical socket.... Assuming you could then also battery power it, you'd have the potential to vandalize any bare metal in public with black marks that are "impossible" to rub off...

Sounds like a nightmare to me.

Re:Applications: Vandalism (2, Interesting)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969906)

The article mentions needing no more power than is available from an electrical socket.... Assuming you could then also battery power it, you'd have the potential to vandalize any bare metal in public with black marks that are "impossible" to rub off...

Who says it's impossible to rub off? It's a very thin surface treatment. A quick rub with sandpaper should remove it to ordinary metal. And no reason you coudn't paint over it. Actually paint might adhere better to a fuzzy surface like this, when repainting over over an enamel paint job you take the shine off it with some fine sandpaper first.

Re:Applications (1)

jamesh (87723) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969844)

On the other side of the coin, back when there was an article about using lasers to take out missiles while they were in the air, someone suggested that they make them as shiny (in all spectrums) as possible to reflect rather than absorb the military laser. That would be incompatible with the idea of using the black metal for stealth.

So I guess you have to choose... you can be really hard to find but easy to laser a hole into, or really easy to find but really hard to laser a hole into.

One of the things I (barely :) remember from school is black body radiation. A dark object appears dark because it absorbs more light, but it also more freely radiates the energy away again. I wonder what effect that would have on the stealth ability

Re:Applications (1)

BJH (11355) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969892)

That doesn't mean it more freely radiates it away at the same wavelength.
The whole thing about true black-body radiation is that the spectrum of the radiation is continuous, and depends only upon the temperature of the black body.

Laser etching craze (2, Interesting)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969530)

How long until you can get your logos engraved onto your laptop/ipod in black (instead of the current efforts).

Dethklok (1)

Kenshin (43036) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969548)

Wow, to turn it into pure black metal, they must have to measure the femtosecond using a Dethklok [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Dethklok (1)

bmajik (96670) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969970)

BLACKER than the BLACKEST BLACK... Times Infinity!!

Picture (5, Funny)

duguk (589689) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969552)

Picture can be found here [googlepages.com]

I really should just go to bed...

DugUK

Hey look the Roland Template Script is back (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969554)


and his additional references [google.com]

ethz (1)

metroplex (883298) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969560)

A friend of mine is studying chemistry at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zürich and one of the devices he most likes to talk about is their femtosecond laser [ulp.ethz.ch] , mainly because everytime he mentions it to non-scientists he obtains lots of funny blank stares. A literature student myself, now I finally discover that device has an immediate, practical utility! It can turn metals black, w00t!

Re:ethz (1)

bladesjester (774793) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969856)

The thing that I wonder is whether it will have the protective properties of bluing or powder coating - helping to prevent oxidation of the metal.

If it did, I'd love to have some of my blades treated with it because keeping the good carbon steel ones well oiled can be a pain at times. Also, since it apparently uses small amounts of power to acheive, I can see this used in a lot of industrial applications.

Obligatory Spinal Tap ref (2, Funny)

germansausage (682057) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969562)

"None more black"

Black Metal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969568)

Lay Down Your Souls To The Gods' Rock and Roll!!! UGH, UGH, UGH!!! BLACK METAL!!!!! \m/

tag as "pigpile" (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969570)

As usual, tag as "pigpile" to warn others not to click on Roland Piquepaille's adwhore blog...

Resist rust, other corrosion? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969584)

I wonder if this helps reduce rust and/or other corrosion and/or resistance to reaction with liquids?

      Cool trend prediction - black hockey skate blades in the NHL.

"wall outlet" ease of the use (3, Funny)

Kanasta (70274) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969604)

"wall outlet" ease of the use + "it would drill a hole through your skin" = ultimate home security system

Defence applications? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969608)

No mention of zapping people with it, but the first item in the applications list is "stealth planes"
Can't you Americans stop thinking about killing people for even a moment? Sad nation
of insecure violent cunts.

black (5, Funny)

Feyr (449684) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969612)

a black engagement ring? perfect for your goth bride! Buy One Now!

Re:black (1)

chmod a+x mojo (965286) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969898)

Ooooh, where can I buy a goth bride?


*ducks*

Re:black (1)

Jedi Alec (258881) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970026)

In Soviet Russia...oh screw it, you get the idea.

Obligatory Pigpile Rant (4, Informative)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969634)

Since it's the holiday, the usual rants against the article submitter, Roland Piquepaille, have been rather muted. To sum up:

* He gets a lot of articles posted to the front page, which makes the rest of us jealous.

* His articles tend toward pseudoscience, or at least towards the sort of flashy, headline-inspiring science that does little to advance human knowledge.

* He used to link to his personal blog, which really irritated people who'd love to have their own blogs get Slashdotted on a regular basis.

* He now links to his zdnet blog, which really irritates people who'd love to have their own blogs get picked up by a big corporate website.

* To top it all off, he's French, so all the right-wing nutters hate him automatically.

My irritation comes mostly from the second point -- and, I'll confess, the first as well. But as his defenders (and even the Slashdot editors) have noted, it's not like he's got some inside line to CmdrTaco's desk. He just finds himself at the right place at the right time.

Nonetheless, I recommend continuing to tag his articles with "pigpile", just so's we can keep up.

Re:Obligatory Pigpile Rant (1)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969770)

Actually he doesn't have that many articles posted, maybe 1 or 2 a month tops. It's just people remember his outrageous name. Sure it's a lot compared to you, but you probably don't submit nearly as many as he does.

Re:Obligatory Pigpile Rant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969782)

I'm still missing the part where it explains why I should give a rat fuck. Is there an FAQ somewhere?

Re:Obligatory Pigpile Rant (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969982)

What horse shit is this? The number of times I've submitted an article and had it rejected only to see it on the front page a few days later is mind boggling. My wording is often similar or superior. While I don't take it personally suggesting that the editors don't favour particular bloggers when chosing to accept or reject a story is naive.

Re:Obligatory Pigpile Rant (1)

P3NIS_CLEAVER (860022) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970064)

Yeah, but this is an interesting article. Maybe he's trying to not be such a dick?

Meh (5, Funny)

LoRdTAW (99712) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969668)

We all know that true black metal is Mayhem.

Space-age technology! (5, Funny)

shadow demon (917672) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969676)

"It's the wild colour scheme that freaks me," said Zaphod whose love affair with this ship had lasted almost three minutes into the flight, "every time you try to operate one of these weird black controls that are labelled in black on a black background, a little black light lights up black to let you know you've done it. What is this? Some kind of galactic hyperhearse?"

The walls of the swaying cabin were also black, the ceiling was black, the seats-which were rudimentary since the only important trip this ship was designed for was supposed to be unmanned-were black, the control panel was black, the instruments were black, the little screws that held them in place were black, the thin tufted nylon floor covering was black, and when they had lifted up a corner of it they had discovered that the foam underlay also was black."

*bows to Mr Adams*

black... (5, Funny)

yakumo.unr (833476) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969698)

black is the new gold.

(and silver, and bronze..)

Solar collectors (3, Interesting)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969750)

Seems like the perfect coating for solar panels for hot water. The search has always been for the best heat absorbing surface. This type of coating should be the most efficent coating for heat absorbsion.

The Slashdot Report (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969778)

Another submission by Rolling Pigpail... Why not just make him an editor?

But... (1)

twistah (194990) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969780)

Does it also make the metal grym and frosbitten?

Hmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969816)

New heatsinks!

I wanna see it painted, painted black....

Obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969800)

I, for one, welcome our new black metal overlords

Where do I send my guns for this treatment? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16969828)

Cool! Now I can have my pocket pistol, and my revolver, and my assault rifle, and my sniper rifle all coated with this sexy stealth laserbeam coating! Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition!

Black Mountains of Darkness (1)

Disharmony2012 (998431) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969876)

Black fucking metal from Norway loves Satan!

So... (1)

BorgCopyeditor (590345) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969900)

...basically, twisted metal -> black?

Hey, Roland the Plogger has to work Thanksgiving (1)

Animats (122034) | more than 7 years ago | (#16969932)

He's BAACK! Roland the Plogger, at it again, flogging his blog.

All metals? (0)

Ltar (1010889) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970000)

But can in turn Diamonds black? Diamond is one of the hardest, if not THE hardest metal known to mankind.

Re:All metals? (1)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970040)

Oh yes, because carbon is totally on the left side of the periodic table. Of course.

Make everything metal (2, Funny)

netwiz (33291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970008)

blacker than the blackest black times infinity...

uh....wtf? (0)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970020)

From TFA:

During its brief burst, Guo's laser unleashes as much power as the entire grid of North America onto a spot the size of a needle point.
Really. And what are they using to power this laser, then? Europe's power gird? Otherwise I think I might have noticed the entire grid failing all at once, especially since one would assume they've performed the experiment multiple times....

Plus I'd hate to see that poor bastards electrical bill....

That's not all (5, Funny)

Centurix (249778) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970046)

They found on the way that by using a nanosecond laser they produced Emo metal, which can cut itself.

All metals huh? (2, Insightful)

syousef (465911) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970054)

"This ultra-intense laser blast creates true 'black metal' from copper, gold or zinc by forming nanostructures at the surface of the metal."

Since when were there only 3 metals known to mankind? The summary blows.

Then you look at the articles.

"The key to creating black metal is an ultra-brief, ultra-intense beam of light called a femtosecond laser pulse. The laser burst lasts only a few quadrillionths of a second. To get a grasp of that kind of speed--a femtosecond is to a second what a second is to about 32 million years."

And:

"Currently, the process is slow. To alter a strip of metal the size of your little finger easily takes 30 minutes or more, but Guo is looking at how different burst lengths, different wavelengths, and different intensities affect metal's properties. Fortunately, despite the incredible intensity involved, the femtosecond laser can be powered by a simple wall outlet, meaning that when the process is refined, implementing it should be relatively simple."

I'm guessing this has to do with etching an intricate structure. Perhaps also that the laser can only be fired at a given rate. None of this is explained at all well.

So maybe.... (2, Interesting)

boojumbadger (949542) | more than 7 years ago | (#16970076)

All the unaccounted for dark matter is covered in nanotubes.

This is why today in the USA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16970096)

This is why today is known as "Black Friday" in the USA ^_^
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