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Student Makes a Million Online, Gets Deported

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the probably-should-have-thought-this-through dept.

Role Playing (Games) 309

Via Kotaku, a story at the Mainichi daily news about an enterprising exchange student that got himself deported. Wang Yue Si, a Chinese student who went to Japan on a student visa, found himself in need of some spending money. Since he was a gamer, he decided to make some cash by selling virtual items online. He was so successful, the cops noticed. From the article: "He started selling items such as weapons and currency for online games through an Internet auction site in April this year, without obtaining the appropriate residency status. Wang, living in Kumamoto, has admitted that he sold the virtual goods for about 6 million yen ($US 1.3 Million), in violation of the Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Law. A bank worker became suspicious when Wang regularly sent money back home to China and alerted police in August, prompting Kumamoto police officers to investigate the student."

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309 comments

1 Million Dollars? (5, Informative)

MoriaOrc (822758) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995474)

Summary says "6 million yen or $1.3m" .. but 6m yen is only about 50k dollars (1 yen is slightly less then 1 cent in value) .. so .. which is it?

Re:1 Million Dollars? (5, Informative)

tilandal (1004811) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995496)

He has admitted to selling 6m Yen but is suspected for selling over 150m Yen. Poor job on the write up.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (5, Informative)

ack154 (591432) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995520)

Per the article, he has sold a TOTAL of about 150 million yen... which works out to roughly $1.3 million, USD.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (2, Interesting)

Numberboy (952448) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995916)

I wouldn't exactly call him an idiot. With that cash he could go study anywhere he wants, forget Japan.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995538)

He earned 6 million yen ($50k) in between April 14 and May 23 this year. He has so earned 150 million yen since 2004- this is what a Japanese news site says.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (4, Informative)

MoriaOrc (822758) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995570)

(sorry to reply to myself, but now that I've actually RTFA rather then just the summary...)

The (U.S. $1.3 million) is not in the article. The yen that is about 1 million US dollars in worth that they are talking about is the 150 million yen that he is suspected of having made, rather then the 6 million he has admitted to making.

Also, the article didn't make that conversion in the summary (the 6 million yen = 1 million U.S.).

Re:1 Million Dollars? (3, Insightful)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995572)

Thanks for the clarification, I remember when 300 yen equalled a dollar. I suddenly thought that somehow the Chinese Economy was booming more than I imagined. $50,000 is doable in a year of online gaming if you really know what you're doing and have no need for sleep. I can't see anyone making a million unless they're employing a mass amount of workers. For example, you can make $2.50-$5 an hour selling gold on WOW with a level 60 character. If you employ Chinese for .50 an hour, you're making a 2 or 3$ an hour profit if you don't have to invest in their computer too.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (2, Insightful)

AgentFade2Black (968245) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995594)

The summary is not entirely clear.

If you RTA, it said he sold 150 million yen worth of goods. I believe the 6 million was in reference to an individual item.

Re:1 Million Dollars? (4, Informative)

lordmetroid (708723) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996270)

In Japan a Student Visa legally allows you to earn 0 yen in profit made from any work or service you provide. So yeah, no wonder he was deported!

Idiot. (4, Insightful)

jo7hs2 (884069) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995476)

I'm fairly certain they have immigration lawyers in Japan. Something tells me he was more than aware he couldn't make money while there. Not exactly like Japan is a dictatorship with harsh penalties for bizarre crimes, either. Poor baby.

Re:Idiot. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995620)

Japan is a fairly xenophobic society, especially towards other east Asians. No sane lawyer will want to fight this. When it comes to immigrants, Japan is a dictatorship(unless you're white.)

Re:Idiot. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995718)

Yes because everyone goes around consulting lawyers.

Anyway, you have strange rules for who's an idiot. He did make a shit-load of money after all, most of which Japan can't touch because he already sent it away.

Re:Idiot. (4, Insightful)

bunions (970377) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995730)

Idiot? He made $1.3M selling stuff on the internet while still in college. How many millions did -you- make in college?

Re:Idiot. (0, Redundant)

kingkade (584184) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995910)

Damn straight. This guy is a damn genius or just really lucky. Either way, he made that money fair and square in my opinion (after taxes withheld by the sticky-fingered state of course). And he made it off of dumbasses who have too much of it. Exactly the way it should be. There's one born every minute indeed.

Re:Idiot. (4, Informative)

magarity (164372) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996068)

Either way, he made that money fair and square in my opinion (after taxes withheld by the sticky-fingered state of course)
 
He made it failry in terms of his customers got what they paid for but the authorities are mad because he DIDN'T pay income taxes on it; he was a foriegn exchange student and wasn't supposed to be making any income in the first place.

Correction, please. (0, Troll)

WED Fan (911325) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995976)

He made $1.3M selling stuff...

He made $1.3M selling NON-stuff.

Maybe I'm of a certain age (I started on one of these. [wikipedia.org] ), but, I don't see how people can get themselves into paying for fake goods that exist in a game.

Re:Correction, please. (5, Insightful)

God'sDuck (837829) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996158)

I don't see how people can get themselves into paying for fake goods that exist in a game.
Pretty much all entertainment is virtual. If paying someone for a software patch to a game that extends play or makes it more fun is reasonable, then so is paying someone for a software permission to use something that extends play and makes it more fun.

Now, reasonable does not mean it's *worth* your or my money. Certainly not mine. But for someone already throwing out dozens of dollars each month, who has the money to spend, and is willing to throw out an extra few to do something that they think is fun without the effort of programming/finding/whatevering it themselves.....I'm not sure that's so much weirder than paying $14 for a two-hour movie and a little bag of buttered grain, that I could obtain for myself with a walk to the library and a small garden.

Re:Correction, please. (2, Interesting)

modecx (130548) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996160)

He made $1.3M selling NON-stuff.

How good of a salesman does it take to convince people to fork a million dollars over a period of a couple months, in exchange for a couple bits on a computer? Do you even have an idea of what that kind of talent is worth?

You're jealous.
You're bitter.
You wish you thought of it first.
You wish you had the balls and the skills required to pull it off.

Re:Idiot. (3, Insightful)

Goldsmith (561202) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996062)

There's a difference between "making money" and "making money illegally and perhaps getting it all taken away." So yes, he is an idiot.

Re:Idiot. (2, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996264)

There's a difference between "making money" and "making money illegally and perhaps getting it all taken away."
If you're in college, what would you care?

Here's a fact: In the business world, there is always a high paying job (or venture capital) for someone who has shown they can make money, even if that person has no ethical barriers to speak of.

Sometimes it is because the employer thinks they can temper the lack of ethics, other times it is because that is exactly the type of person they wanted to hire. Why else do people with nasty, back-stabbing personalities get hired?

Re:Idiot. (3, Insightful)

Cadallin (863437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996452)

being deported for violating the terms of a student visa by making money hardly demonstrates a morally bankrupt person with no ethical barriers.

Re:Idiot. (1)

syousef (465911) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996314)

He got lucky. I know of people who make millions on lotto. That doesn't make them smart. Based on the chances they take they're still idiots. Just very lucky idiots. Proof that intelligence is no substitute for good luck.

Re:Idiot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996384)

Difference is he had access to cheap Chinese sweatshop labor

Re:Idiot. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996410)

Does this make the local drug-dealer a genius? Fact is, he made the money illegally.

Re:Idiot. (0, Redundant)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995802)

Anyone capable of making a million whilst still a student is quite smart in my mind. He wasn't slinging hash at norms or anything. I say well done.

Re:Idiot. (2, Interesting)

badriram (699489) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996102)

Well you can call him what you want, but the law is not exactly easy to understand (well when is it). When I was a student (on visa), I always wondered if it was legal to sell something on ebay, because technically if I made a profit on it, then it could be considered as work. Or what if you buy stock in the stock market and made money on it? There are lot of scenarios esp online where it is not very clear. Of course it is always better to err on the side of caution.

Re:Idiot. (2, Insightful)

pla (258480) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996130)

Something tells me he was more than aware he couldn't make money while there.

Not having a work visa does not equal "can't make money".

If he owned a business back home that made him money every week, I don't think that would have caused any problems.

If he negotiated the purchase of his home and car in China, while in Japan, I doubt that would have caused him any trouble either.

In this situation, since the income came purely from online sources, did he "work" in Japan? Or did he oversee the operation of a home business from abroad? I suspect a good lawyer could successfully argue the latter if this involved criminal charges, but when it comes to matters of control over imaginary lines on a map, most countries paranoidly shoot first and don't even bother to ask questions later.

Re:Idiot. (1)

monteneg (901462) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996340)

Assuming he had a student visa, then he can work 20 hours a week but needs to file with the Justice Department before starting the job. Don't know what this online work would count as. Actually, most foreign students in Japan work more than 20 hours a week, but I guess they aren't making a million dollars and so they are unlikely to get noticed like this guy did.

Japan is strict (4, Insightful)

gullevek (174152) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996390)

you have a working visa, you are allowed to work, for the part your visa is allowed. You have a student visa, you study, you don't make $1million. If they catch you, you are out. Plus he might get a 1 or 10 year ban on returning to Japan.

Seriously, if you care about living in Japan, don't fuck with the officials, they are more Xenophobic than any other country I could imagine.

[thought I love living in Japan, its always about the people you meet]

These stories get more common... (2, Interesting)

Myself (57572) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995518)

Okay, deportation is a new angle, but there always seem to be problems when people sell in-game items. The stories keep coming...

I'd love to see a broad treatment of law-meets-games-meets-money from someone who actually understands the issues involved. I'm tangentially interested in all those things but I don't really have enough background to put these sorts of things into perspective.

Anyone?

Re:These stories get more common... (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995566)

It's really simple, if the TOS say you can sell content out-of-game, then there is no problems. If the TOS say you can't sell content out-of-game then you are a cheating lowlife and should be banned from the game, if not dragged out into the street, forced onto your knees and shot in the mouth.

The TOS == The rulebook. If you don't wanna play by the rules, don't play.

Re:These stories get more common... (5, Funny)

Ralph Yarro (704772) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995808)

If the TOS say you can't sell content out-of-game then you are a cheating lowlife and should be banned from the game, if not dragged out into the street, forced onto your knees and shot in the mouth.

See, because you suggested letting them off lightly like that you got modded troll. Try to suppress your misplaced sense of mercy. Some people aren't worth it.

Re:These stories get more common... (0, Flamebait)

b0s0z0ku (752509) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995870)

If the TOS say you can't sell content out-of-game then you are a cheating lowlife and should be banned from the game, if not dragged out into the street, forced onto your knees and shot in the mouth.

Sod the TOS! If there are gullable idiots willing to buy virtual merchandise, nothing wrong with making a few bucks. Only crime is getting caught!

-b.

Re:These stories get more common... (3, Insightful)

iidoru (1027828) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995612)

I think there is not much of an issue - in the end it is all about taxes. If he had payed all the right taxes (which is hard because he is not a resident) - he would not be in any trouble (maybe someone still would point out to him that he is not supposed to do this without proper residence or equivalent), but it probably would not be such a huge issue.

Re:These stories get more common... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995708)

(maybe someone still would point out to him that he is not supposed to do this without proper residence or equivalent), but it probably would not be such a huge issue.

Correct. As a general rule if you have a million dollars and ask nicely then you can be resident wherever you like. Especially is you made the million dollars in less than a year because there's probably plenty more where that came from.

He'd have got the same treatment in USA, EU, etc (2, Informative)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995936)

Many/most countries with restrictive visas (eg. student/tourist visas) would charge/deport someone for working without suitable work permits. I know people who have been blacklisted from USA (never allowed to even land in transit in USA) for overstaying a visa by one day.

Lucky he wasn't hung.. (2, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995522)

do not fuck with gamers in Japan. They make the Koreans look like pussycats.

Four friends are playing a game of Monopoly. One guest turns to the other guest and offers to sell Park Place for $10 real dollars. You're the host, what would you do? That's right, tell the cheating bastard to go home.

Re:Lucky he wasn't hung.. (4, Funny)

ack154 (591432) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995556)

You're the host, what would you do?

Say "make it $5 and you've got a deal."

Re:Lucky he wasn't hung.. (1, Offtopic)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995616)

Then everyone stops playing and someone suggests you put on an "adult" DVD and 99% of the time you never see those friends again and the other 1% of the time they start stalking your wife and keep calling you at work. Is that what you want? Well, is it?

Re:Lucky he wasn't hung.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996348)

Then everyone stops playing and someone suggests you put on an "adult" DVD and 99% of the time you never see those friends again and the other 1% of the time they start stalking your wife and keep calling you at work. Is that what you want? Well, is it?
This sounds a little too detailed to be hypothetical, to me....

Re:Lucky he wasn't hung.. (1)

Bob Cat - NYMPHS (313647) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996302)

I'd hold out for the $10.

In any case, this is perfectly legal in Monopoly, whatever is not forbidden in the rules is allowed (tournaments may differ).

I have heard of one case where a player about to be bankrupted asked the landlord if he could just pay him with money from his wallet instead of getting eliminated. All the players at the table thought he was a complete idiot, so they laughingly okayed it. He opened his wallet, and pulled out a big wad of... MONOPOLY MONEY.

Then he'd be Hung Wang. (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995668)

Oh you mean physically hung. Then its an offcolor joke if you look at it that way. I'm talking his name.

House Rules (4, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995786)

You're the host, what would you do?

House Rules: The house takes a 50% cut of all real money transactions that affect game play.

If Chon Wang wants to sell Park Place to Princess Pei Pei for $10, someone's going to have to fork $5 over to me.

Re:Lucky he wasn't hung.. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995816)

Four friends are playing a game of Monopoly. One guest turns to the other guest and offers to sell Park Place for $10 real dollars. You're the host, what would you do? That's right, tell the cheating bastard to go home.
No, you laugh at him for wasting his money to win a stupid board game.

True Gamers would answer: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996354)

Kill em and take their stuff. You must not play enough rpgs... :D

I think you misunderstand (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995984)

Apparently they are claiming he illegally made money in Japan. Since the game was online, he could have made the same money in his home country.

Think of it this way, if you own a business in one country and that business continues to make money while you are on a tourist or student training visa (a visa that does not authorize you to engage in employment in the country you are visiting) in another .. is that illegal? Of course not. What if you business calls you for some advice while on vacation? Are you allowed to give it? Obviously you are or should be (if not, it's a retarded law).

I don't see how he's in violation of his visa terms, considering that he could have been in China and done the same thing since it was all done online and not as part of work for some company. That is, it's not like he "stole" a local's job.

Unless selling virtual items for money is illegal, Japan is dumb and wrong for deporting him.

Well well (4, Interesting)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995622)

Seeing how cutthroat the whole gold and itemfarming buisness is, to be able earn $1m+ from sales, he must have been the frontman of aa rather large gang of sweatshop farmers. Which would be perfectly fine as a violation of his status.

not unexpected (5, Insightful)

coaxial (28297) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995624)

Nothing to see here folks. He violated the terms of his visa, and thus got deported. The only thing unusual was his buisness.

Move along. Move along.

The same thing could happen in the US (5, Informative)

tadd (51292) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995636)

If you are on a student visa, you're not supposed to be making money by working, you're supposed to be studying. no I know there are ways around this, but with most of them, if you get caught, you go home.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (3, Insightful)

chanrobi (944359) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995742)

Hell i'll take that deal. Get deported and take home $1.3M? Who cares about school. You won't have to work the rest of your life!

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (2, Insightful)

archen (447353) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996198)

I agree with you there. I mean why was this guy in school? Probably to get a good job so he can make decent money. He's made enough now that he could stuff it in the bank and make more on interest than I do working. If I could have managed the same thing when I was in school I'd do exactly the same thing.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (1)

trenien (974611) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996316)

As was said in previous post, if you think a lone person can farm enough items/gold by himself to earn mor than $1M, you're living in fantasyland.

There's no way in hell this guy wasn't a front for a farming organisation/company of some sort.

So, violation of his visa + caught = get out. Such laws are the same in pretty much all modern countries - which you're completely entitled to discuss, but that's an altogether different subject.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995754)

Is working at school ok?

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (2, Informative)

fossa (212602) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995812)

Generally yes. Even off-campus work may performed if approved by the school (the example I have in mind is an internship; I believe that off-campus work must be related to one's studies).

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (2, Informative)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995914)

In the US, you are allwed to work upto 20 hrs on campus and you get to work off campus for internships with authorization. You have a total of 12 months off campus for your entire stay and are allowed to decide on how you want to use that. Many people take 3 months for each summer others take 12 months at once after college.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (1)

Xaer0cool (700219) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996296)

No, the 3 month summer internships count as curricular practical training (CPT). In most cases, that does not take away from the 12 month optional practical training (OPT) that you receive after you graduate.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (1)

b0s0z0ku (752509) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995850)

If you are on a student visa, you're not supposed to be making money by working, you're supposed to be studying. no I know there are ways around this, but with most of them, if you get caught, you go home

Under US law, are you allowed to make money in your home country while studying? Let's say you're German studying in the US. Can you do programming for German clients via the Internet and receive payment in Germany?

As far as Japanese law, he should have recieved payment for the items outside Japan. His only moral crime was getting caught. Nothing wrong with making a killing off of stupid people who want to overpay for virtual crap. And what did Japan lose from it? He was studying over there, paying money to the university, and spending money to prop up the economy. Probably he should have paid taxes, but it was still a net gain for Japan.

-b.

Re:The same thing could happen in the US (2, Interesting)

clifyt (11768) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996046)

"Under US law, are you allowed to make money in your home country while studying?"

Depends...I run a little research area for my university and I hire students all the time.

Depending on their visa, they may only be able to do work that is solely in support of their education...as the research we do is academic in nature and its for the same university they are attending, they can do this. At the same time, some of the stuff I do for the university that is off-campus -- we do a lot of High School outreach and assessment -- I can't even ask that these folks come with me because they could be deported if someone wanted to get technical about it (i.e., same office, same sort of job, just benefiting another academic institution other than my own -- even if it is in a partnership where we both benefit).

So yeah, the US has the same sorts of laws. I think this is why most of the folks want to get more than an academic visa before coming over (though the academic one has a few privs that the working one doesn't...and vice a versa).

People with misplaced priorties (3, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995732)

They never cease to amaze me. I don't blame the opportunist quite as much as I blame the addicts.

Gambling, porn, online gaming... let's add drugs to the list too. It's all a waste of money. Porn is free as far as I'm concerned, gambling is often too risky the way some addicts play, and drugs waste in an obvious way. But paying for "virtual stuff" in a virtual world?! That's a waste of money and time.

It's not like I don't understand it -- I recall calling in sick to work more than once so I could finish a level of X-Wing versus Tie Fighter... the pay check started to reflect my obsession and I made corrections. I wish other people could learn that lesson.

Re:People with misplaced priorties (1)

nuggz (69912) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995794)

So they waste their money on crap, and leave the more efficient to run the economy.
Welcome to the free market, free and self correction to squeeze out inefficiency.

Re:People with misplaced priorties (1)

Aaarrrggghhh (987643) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995926)

No kidding!

Can you imagine the game addict who gets caught stealing from Ma's purse..., "No mom, I'm not on drugs! I just needed 40 bucks more to get a Level 60 Tier 2 Epic Hunter..."

-The kid's going to rehab

Re:People with misplaced priorties (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996090)

Not only are you an idiot, you're a self-righteous one. Worry about your own vices, and shut the fuck up about other peoples'.

Re:People with misplaced priorties (1)

mochan_s (536939) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996128)

I agree. I mean people pay for cable and internet access which is what just some electrons flowing around. Waste of money.

People also pay for services that they can do themselves. Waste of money.

And don't let me even get started on slashdot subscriptions.

Re:People with misplaced priorties (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996146)

Porn is free as far as I'm concerned

Not while the US government thinks it can lean on ISPs to out you.

Re:People with misplaced priorties (1)

pnewhook (788591) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996366)

Good points...

Hoewever, don't you get paid sick time? Why would calling in sick affect your pay?

Article says *arrested*, not deported (4, Informative)

njdj (458173) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995770)

The article says: "A university student from China has been arrested for illegally engaging in business activities outside the restrictions of his student visa, police said." Arrested, not deported.

Of course it's an English summary of a Japanese original. Does anyone here read Japanese well enough to check the original source?

About the discrepancy in the money amounts mentioned in another reply: 6 million yen is what the student has admitted. That's nowhere near $1 million. Police suspect his total profit is 100 million yen, which is near enough $1 million.

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (3, Funny)

bunions (970377) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995838)

You can't deport someone without arresting them first. Deportation is the next logical step, since it sounds like this guy has no defense. There's really not much else they can do to him.

Well, at least that would be true if Japan has the same laws as the US. As an American, I'm not really capable of imagining places that aren't America, so I just pretend that everywhere that isn't America is just more America except people talk funny.

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (1)

Christopher Rogers (873720) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995906)

The Japanese article only states that the student was *arrested* under suspicion that he was selling this stuff on the Internet illegally, mentioning nothing of deportation.

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995956)

"Suck it, Monkey" - is that you Chris? No freakin' way! How's the baby?

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (1)

TorKlingberg (599697) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996408)

The article says he was arrested for ), which means "immigration control law violation (activities outside the permitted)"

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (1)

AgentFade2Black (968245) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995922)

Quoting TFA:
Police suspect that Wang has sold a total of 150 million yen in virtual items and sent more than 100 million yen to China.
150 million yen, for those bad in conversion math, is 1.29 million USD. Again, the amount *suspected* to be sold was 150 million. The 100 million was how much he sent back, *supposedly.*

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (1)

uhmmmm (512629) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995980)

The original Japanese article also only says he was arrested. It doesn't mention deportation.

Re:Article says *arrested*, not deported (1)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996054)

It's the English edition of a Japanese paper. As long as you trust the original source it's reasonable to assume that they can translate their own articles properly.


Another poster suggested that deporting might be the only option - I doubt that. They can probably fine him or just ask him to pay taxes on his income. If I'd made $1.3 million I'd be less concerned about being deported and more about being made to pay about $500k taxes....

typically japanese (-1, Flamebait)

aminorex (141494) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995844)

that bank worker was certainly alert to the opportunity to screw a foreigner.

Re:typically japanese (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995904)

sure, he was just working illegally to fund his studies. Lets ignore the fact that he is a gold farmer, it seems like someone really didnt need 1.2 million dollars to fund his studies though.

MOD PARENT DOWN racist crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995942)

where the heck did that come from? Mod parent down as a racist loser. Or have you got some references/ stats to back up your claim that it is typical for Japanese bank workers to pick on foreigners?
 

Re:typically japanese (2, Insightful)

Asic Eng (193332) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996104)

Is it? I suspect that Japan isn't the only country where money laundering is something the police takes an interest in. If someone on a student visa (who normally wouldn't have an income) transfers over $1 million, it's reasonable to be suspicious. In all likelyhood he committed tax fraud, btw.

Inmates watching inmates (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16995862)

Personally, I find it repugnant that banks report "suspicious" activities on their customers in many countries. For example, in the past, if you played with more than $10K at a time, US bank drones filed a report on you. Some years ago, that threshold changed to $3K -- loan to family member, car downpayment, any reasonable major purchase (PS3 plus games?!) - now requires reporting YOU to federal authorities as being suspicious. Interestingly, many banks file a report for any amount $1K in cash.

Dealing with a little cash is not exclusive only to the terrorists who sell drugs to babies. Nor is having a few thousand dollars in bank transfers solely the realm of pedophile rapists who conduct school shootings.

This guy got busted by a pro-active bank teller who was trained to believe everything you do is suspicious. All the while, in the US, they look you in the eye and smile like nothing is wrong, because they are generally held to strict secrecy by law. US bank tellers watch your every move and transaction, report your private monetary activities to federal law enforcement without you knowing it, then trot out the dog-n-pony show about some gold-farmer-type guy and we are supposed to believe that justifies our lack of privacy.

Re:Inmates watching inmates (1)

georgewilliamherbert (211790) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995912)

Most college students who take in $1.3 million over 2 years are doing so via drug dealing. It doesn't take a post-9/11 conspiracy seeking banker to see something suspicious there.

Apparently this was the nearly unheard of exception, but that doesn't indicate that the suspicion was unreasonable.

Re:Inmates watching inmates (1)

grommit (97148) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996114)

You're perfectly welcome to keep your cash (lumps of gold would probably be better since US currency probably has RFID tags in them, right?) underneath your tinfoil hat.

At any rate, I'd be interested to see *any* credible documentation of banking and or federal regulations that mention this mandatory secretive reporting that you're blathering about.

Re:Inmates watching inmates (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996250)


At any rate, I'd be interested to see *any* credible documentation of banking and or federal regulations that mention this mandatory secretive reporting that you're blathering about.

Documentation, my ass -- they won't document behavior they don't want you to know about. It's well known, but for obvious reasons not documented, that the bastard zealots in the banking industry will watch for, and report to their federal overlords, any series of transactions below the mandated reporting limits as being made to stay under the radar.

It's the same principle as cops who are attentive to cars driving through the Arizona desert under the speed limit. Obviously the driver is a drug-runner trying to escaape the notice of the cops. So the nazis pull out a specious bullshit infraction like "weaving". Since there's no defense against this charge, they get to sniff around (and plant) anything they want.

Similarly, fast food wappers on the floor are considered "evidence" of drug-running as the miscreants obviously are in a rush to deluver their payloads.

Re:Inmates watching inmates (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#16996200)

I used to work as a bank teller (as a college student).

We are required by the Bank Secrecy Act to report to the Department of The Treasury when a customer (or non-customer) conducts transactions resulting in the movement of $10,000.01 or more in cash in a single business day (note the difference between business day and calendar day).

We are given discretion to file Suspicious Activity Reports if a customer (or non-customer) attempts to structure transactions to avoid going over the $10,000.00 threshold or purchases large value negotiables (e.g., a teller, official, or cashier's check) with *cash*...or for transactions that are suspicious (and potentially indicative of money laundering or potentially illegal activity).

What this means is that if you find a briefcase with a million dollars (and it's real), do not deposit all of it at once.

Most bank tellers are more concerned about getting their paychecks on time, figuring out what's for lunch, and trying to keep their cash trays (and the vault, if you're a head teller or branch manager) in balance. We really don't care what our customers do with our money, as long as they don't do stupid things (like finding a million dollars in cash in a briefcase on the street and trying to deposit it all in one day).

heard something similer (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995900)

Well sort of

I knew someone at uni who graduated in my year who became a millionaire in the last six months by hosting a web based service on the uni servers that had tens of thousands of users and got bought for over a million.

He broke so many uni network rules that the uni could of kicked him out. However they made it quite clear that they liked to have a few rich allumni about the place, and brushed it under the carpet.

Had he just broken the rules and not got rich I'm sure the story would have been different.

Making money in the wrong country... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995954)

If he was doing that in the U.S., Donald Trump would be driving him around in limo saying that we needed more entrepreneurs like him.

Entrepreneur (1)

Graabein (96715) | more than 7 years ago | (#16995986)

This guy sounds like a true entrepreneur. Instead of deporting him, how about hiring him?

Just a thought.

Forget why he was deported (1)

AbRASiON (589899) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996038)

Who cares that the bank teller alerted authorities, how the hell can WE make 1.3million selling things online - good lord.

I know SOME small amounts of money can be made but 1.3million? Where do I sign please?

6.3 million yen is NOT 1.3 million US dollars (0)

windowpain (211052) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996060)

Go to Google and enter "convert 6,300,000 yen to dollars".

The answer:

6,300,000 Japanese yen = 54,286.9453 U.S. dollars

Who's smoking what?

Would He Mind? (1)

HammerHead2000 (898900) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996216)

I would imagine that $1.3m will go a long way in China, he probably doesn't need that student status anymore anyway.

What I want to know is... (2, Interesting)

Sinbios (852437) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996258)

...How the HELL is he making all that money, and where can I get in on this?

What a Crock (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 7 years ago | (#16996484)

What a crock the Japanese are. Here is someone not on social welfare, hardly taking a job away from someone else in violation of his visa terms, and they deport him for being successful instead of broke.

While I'm sure the bank may have felt he was a criminal getting money in some nefarious way, once they found out what he was really doing they should have just left him alone.

The good news is that he should be able to continue to pursue his profession just as well from China. Well, that is minus the 20Mbs typical broadband in Japan -- USA DSL and Cable modem users eat your heart out.

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