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Even The Blind Get Deja Vu

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the again-for-the-first-time dept.

Science 165

zentropa writes "Cosmos magazine is reporting that even the blind experience deja vu — backing the idea that it is caused by misfires in the brain's temporal lobe. They quote a British study where a blind man feels like he has 'already seen' some unfamiliar situations. 'Hearing and touch and smell often seem to intermingle in the déjà vu experiences,' said the study subject, whose name has not been made public. 'It is almost like photographic memory, without sight obviously... as if I was encountering a mini-recording in my head, but trying to think "Where have I come across that before?"'"

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Is it just me... (5, Funny)

Kagura (843695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17156982)

...or have I seen this article before?

Re:Is it just me... (5, Funny)

munrom (853142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157036)

I haven't seen it, but I've heard about it

Re:Is it just me... (5, Funny)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157236)

No, you are having a premonition.
This is slashdot the article is sure to turn up in the near future.

Well DUH !! (1)

zoomshorts (137587) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157380)

Yes you have and no you have not. Deja Vu is that feeling,
but you must understand, ALL people have this!! The Blind,
the Deaf, the Autistic, ALL people get this temporary
sensory feedback loop. It is much like a mental hiccup.

I fart, therefore I am, well noticed.

Re:Well DUH !! (1)

shadowmas (697397) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157946)

It's a glitch! quick pull out the guns.

Re:Well DUH !! (1)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158100)

Lots of guns.

Very Likely (2, Funny)

ToasterofDOOM (878240) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157494)

It is most probable that, as we are on slashdot, the article is a dupe, a 'digital deja vu' if you will.

Re:Very Likely (1)

empaler (130732) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159310)

Wow... I totally feel like I've heard that joke before...

Re:Is it just me... (2, Funny)

telchine (719345) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157714)

or have I seen this article before?


No, it's not just you. I'm pretty sure it's a dupe. Later on somebody will make a post about Soviet Russia, then some East vs West war will break out, a few people will make some tenuous geek jokes and I vaguely remember there being one or two posts that actually discussed the subject matter (although they clearly hadn't RTFA)

Re:Is it just me... (2, Funny)

Chabil Ha' (875116) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157770)

No, it means CmdrTaco is making a modification to the code...

Re:Is it just me... (1)

Mex (191941) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158004)

Just wait until the dupe, and then you can enjoy Vuja De!

It happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157002)

It happens when they change something

Coincidental? (2, Interesting)

mojodamm (1021501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157020)

Who funded the study, Jerry Bruckheimer?

http://dejavu.movies.go.com/ [go.com]

That sounds about right. (2, Interesting)

The Zon (969911) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157052)

It seems to me like blind people would be even more likely than sighted people to experience deja vu. If you think about it, only four senses need to be replicated, and all four are more likely to recur than identical visual patterns.

Re:That sounds about right. (1)

afaik_ianal (918433) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158886)

I'll take it you've never had real deja vu: Not everyone has. The article is kind of silly, because anyone who's actually had it can tell you it has almost nothing to do with senses. It's not a feeling that you've experienced something before, but a feeling that is the same as you get when you've experienced something before.

I get it fairly regularly (maybe once a month on average), and while it will often (but not always) be triggered by something I see or hear, it does not feel like I have seen or heard that same thing before. It's just a spooky feeling in which you feel your brain go through the recollection process, but you have absolutely no idea what it's trying to recollect.

dept (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157054)

from the again-for-the-first-time dept.

Isn't that slashdot's motto?

this is a dupe! (0, Redundant)

WheresMyDingo (659258) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157056)

... er, i least it feels... kinda... like... one...

Re:this is a dupe! (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157410)

You're not having Deja Vu. That's called clairvoyance!

A glitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157092)

in the matrix. I'm waiting for the 3rd version to come out.

Re:A glitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157130)

look around - this is the 3rd version. wake up.

Obligatory... (1, Redundant)

owlnation (858981) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157094)

I, for one, welcome our new... again... er...

Re:Obligatory... (1)

ImaLamer (260199) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158280)

In Soviet Union, Government Remembers YOU!!!

This Makes Sense... (1)

FreeRadicalX (899322) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157096)

...After all, in the future outside of The Matrix, even blind people make good robot-batteries.

Re:This Makes Sense... (1)

LuNa7ic (991615) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157512)

But does a blind person see in VR?

Crazy! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157134)

Next you'll be telling me that blind people can feel emotions and think logically, just like regular people!

My Deja Vu is More Than Just Images (4, Interesting)

Colgate2003 (735182) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157154)

When I get the deja vu feeling, it is usually because I feel as I have heard something (or discussed something with someone) before. If my sighted deja vu is mostly auditory, why is it a surprise that someone who can't see experiences the same feeling?

Re:My Deja Vu is More Than Just Images (5, Funny)

shirai (42309) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157726)

That's a good question actually. For example, when I get the deja vu feeling, it is usually because I feel as I have heard something (or discussed something with someone) before. If my sighted deja vu is mostly auditory, why is it a surprise that someone who can't see experiences the same feeling?

Re:My Deja Vu is More Than Just Images (1)

thermal_7 (929308) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158656)

Agreed, I experience deja vu as feeling like I have been in the same (or a similiar) situation before. For me it has nothing to do with sight.

It's a remarkably stupid piece of research... (3, Insightful)

jd (1658) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158860)

...based on a remarkably stupid theory. I'm going to type this out slowly, so that the cognitive scientists out there can follow what I'm saying. Deja Vu may occur in any number of possible ways, but the human brain needs to be able to recognize ANY stimulus extremely quickly, for survival reasons. Vision, if anything, should be the least of the senses that gets such verification, because if you're looking at a threat directly, you probably don't need to remember that it was a threat the last time. It should be pretty obvious. Sound, smell, taste, touch -- these contain far less information to start with, so increasing the odds of a false positive, but need to be checked far more thoroughly because potential hazards can be much less obvious.


A false positive is bad, especially if there are far too many, but a false negative can be lethal. This would be more true, say, 100,000 years ago than today, and that's when most of these mechanisms became as finely tuned as they are. Back in the days when hominids were trudging through deadly terrain, you had to remember places and situations that were Bad News with enough time to get clear. In those days, there was a shortage of humvees, so having time to get clear meant having extremely early warning. From that, Deja Vu is a very obvious, direct consequence. In fact, no matter how good humans may have been at avoiding such situations, Deja Vu would always be selected for far more often than against.


(The above can be translated by crypto geeks as follows: The brain has a really crappy but very very fast hashing algorithm used to label sensory data. It's so fast that being crappy doesn't hurt survival chances, but it's crappy enough that we are seeing a very large number of hashing collisions.)


Now, here is where it gets fun. The senses are all cross-linked and cross-referenced in the brain. When the barriers in the brain don't work as expected, we get synaesthesia. Now, it is not at all obvious where the comparison is made, or how the barriers work. For this reason, it is entirely possible to imagine a situation where data from sense A is compared with a prior input from sense B. All it would take is for the barrier to fail to work correctly for recalled data, even if it worked just fine otherwise. This is not "classic" Deja Vu, because the brain is not incorrectly matching an experience with a prior experience of the same sense - it is incorrectly matching totally different types of data. Is this possible? Depends. Any connection that is bi-directional in the brain by nature can fail to mask or block data in either direction, so I can see absolutely no reason why - given synaesthetes are proof that the failure can occur one way - it cannot fail on recall.


(There are soooo many brain disorders associated with inexplicable associations, spooky feelings and false associations that you could fund half the field of neurology for the next fifty years just looking at sensory mismatches and nothing else. Given that, I'd call it almost a flat-out certainty that some of these experiences are cross-sensory errors that involve some of the same matching failures as Deja Vu.)

Deja vu (-1, Redundant)

dcapel (913969) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157162)

It's almost like I've seen this article before...

News to me (2, Informative)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157172)

that Deja Vu always involves sight... Every now and then here in Melbourne we get a bit of wet, humid weather and I have to think where have I felt this before? and its usually Malaysia in the wet season I am reminded of, but it takes a bit of back tracking to work it out.

BTW I do have temporal lobe epilepsy and back when I had a lot of problems a feeling of deja vu was often associated with a siezure.

Re:News to me (2, Funny)

Carthag (643047) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158444)

It's not rreally a deja vu if you've experienced it before...

Re:News to me (1)

kzinti (9651) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158598)

My deja vu is always triggered by things I hear, not things I see.

Re:News to me (1)

DeadboltX (751907) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158822)

Something reminding you of something else you have experienced isn't deja vu.
I drink a redbull and the aftertaste makes me think of some sort of candy, like cotton candy; that isn't deja vu.

Dictionary.com defines it as "The illusion of having already experienced something actually being experienced for the first time."

Divide by zero? (5, Funny)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157174)

What happens if you have deja vu of a false deja vu memory from virtual reality?

Re:Divide by zero? (1)

FreeRadicalX (899322) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157210)

Dear lord, what if a blind person has one of those??

Re:Divide by zero? (2, Insightful)

toadlife (301863) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157348)

Then you'll know how a person with severe OCD feels.

Re:Divide by zero? (5, Funny)

avajcovec (717275) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157970)

Nullity!

I think I've done that... (1)

Xenographic (557057) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158450)

More than once, I've had déjà vu about having déjà vu about, well, let's just say it's recursive and I don't feel like there's an end to it. Good way to make your head spin for a while. Although, maybe I should call what I've felt déjà vecu [howstuffworks.com] ... :]

No big surprise. (5, Insightful)

wickedsteve (729684) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157184)

I am sure I am not the only one who is not the slightest bit surprised. In fact I would be surprised if anyone told me that their deja vu exprience was primarily visual.
Every time I have had it it was a feeling of actually re-living the moment in every way and detail even down to the actions and thoughts I had seeming strangely familiar.
For me deja vu has been a completely immersive experience where no single one of my senses was predominant.

Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (4, Interesting)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157192)

First off, with a little practice you can will yourself to have Deja Vu. Just think about how you felt the last time you had Deja Vu. Ask yourself if you remember seeing random things, etc. Eventually you mind just snaps into Deja Vu and if you do this often you can do it at will.

Why would you want to? Well, I've noticed this curious little thing; if you try to remember something when you're in the middle of Deja Vu, you won't be able to, forever. It's like you've erased a part of your memory. Why would you ever wanna forget anything? Well, its actually useful. Say you accidently found what your girlfriend is giving you for xmas. She's gone to all this trouble to hide it so it will be a surprise, and now you're going to have to fake it under the tree on xmas day. No problem, just walk away, wait an hour or two, will up some Deja Vu and try to remember what she got you. Quite apart from the fact that you could remember it 5 minutes ago, you can't remember it now, and you won't be able to remember on xmas day either. Sure, you'll be able to remember that you once could remember, but you won't be able to remember anymore.

It's also good for forgetting the password to your encrypted filesystem when the russians grab you. Not, that, you know, I need to do that.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

celerityfm (181760) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157238)

This is interesting, assuming it's at all real, and reminds me of the idea of what happens when you become aware of your breathing and can't let it go back to involuntary mode.

Sucks when that happens.. but my secret for getting out of that is meditating and taking deep breaths, and concentrating on the breaths themselves and thinking about how each breath is a gift.. how lucky we are to be alive... etc. Now I look forward to the times where I have to take a moment to stop myself from holding back my involuntary breath, because the meditation is very peaceful.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157634)

...what happens when you become aware of your breathing and can't let it go back to involuntary mode.

Thanks a lot for mentioning that and sharing the experience.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

celerityfm (181760) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157652)

use the meditation technique! It works!! :)

I wrestled with sharing it.. only because I knew it would... I dunno, encourage people to try it and then get stuck, doh- BUT I thought about how long it took me to find the meditation technique and that there might be others out there, who like I was, were toiling for years with this problem. Meditation works. You'll find a way out.

Weird how the human condition allows for these things huh? Talk about a fucking software bug.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157978)

I don't really have a problem with letting my breating resume to normal when I become aware of it. And I mean, I don't have to meditate for that to happen. Just focus on something else and your reflex will do the rest.
I bet if you go run around the block a few times, do 50 pushups, etc. several times in sequence that your breathing wil resume itself and it'll be the last thing you're worried about even though you'll be aware of it. ;-)

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17158002)

Heh, I had that too. I just thought about it and constantly made sure I was breathing. I have it no more. Though, I do it unconsciously now(and unrelated to any possible "stress") in what I jokingly refer to as waking sleep apnea. Interestingly, I've also noticed that it's accompanied by a reduced heart rate(and perhaps blood pressure). Then again, maybe I'm just relaxing. Haha.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157658)

"...if you try to remember something when you're in the middle of Deja Vu, you won't be able to, forever. It's like you've erased a part of your memory...

How do you know that you have successfully done this? By definition, you can't remember having done it.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157684)

I can remember that I once remembered it. I can even remember the events that led up to the moment I discovered it, or the thought process I went through to invent it, but I can't remember the actual "chunk" that I erased. Anyways, it works that way for me, I don't know if it would work that way for you. Guess you'll have to try it, if you care.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (2, Insightful)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157718)

Maybe he tattooed all those things he wanted to intentionally forget onto himself so he would know whether or not he actually forgot them after he forgot them.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

Headcase88 (828620) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157780)

Sure you can.
Sure, you'll be able to remember that you once could remember, but you won't be able to remember anymore.
So you remember there was a gift, and you remember you knew what it was, but you can't remember what it is now. Ostensibly, you would also remember that you used the deja vu trick to forget what it was. There's no paradox in that that I can see.

This is one of the craziest while still being somewhat believable things I've ever read. But it just so happens I got deja vu recently (walking through the Fire Temple in Zelda) and I can't get this trick to work. Maybe it would help to revisit the ol' Fire Temple? Maybe I'll try it later.

But I'll probably forget ;)

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (4, Funny)

houghi (78078) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158196)

It must be a trick the editors use all the time.

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (4, Funny)

houghi (78078) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158230)

It must be a trick the editors use all the time .

There's another way to erase memories... (1)

Xenographic (557057) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158520)

I have fairly good recollections of myself during déjà vu, so I'm not sure if your method of forgetting will work for others. That said, I *do* know another technique that works for me and it does use a recursive thought pattern to erase something.

Think of your thoughts as links--each idea reminds you of other "nearby" ideas. I associate, say, a certain smell with soup, and perhaps I associate soup with the red & white cans of Campbell's soup, winter days, and a thermos, etc. So on some level, each idea is like a web page that has links to it from other ideas, and which (probably) links out to a few other things.

The trick is to make a recursive-nothing thought. That is, some dead-end idea that has only one link--a link to itself. So once an idea links to there, it goes nowhere, because the only link out goes right back to that recursive nothing that it was just at. Then, you search through all the things that make you think of the thing you want to forget, and replace those associations with links to this recursive-nothing thought. Remember, though--the link has to be one way. Like the roach motel, thoughts check in, but they don't check out.

Now, unless it's a very new thought that you want to forget, you probably have a lot of links you've missed. This is normal. You need to link them to the recursive-nothing when you find them. Keep doing this and eventually you can suppress the thought or memory entirely. Or at least, I can. Maybe each person needs to come up with their own method, but I find it interesting that we both end up using some form of recursive thought.

Perhaps that's the key in and of itself? I wonder...

Thanks a lot! (1)

wickedsteve (729684) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158580)

I had a recursive-nothing thought for such occasions. It used to go nowhere. But now it is gonna remind me of slashdot.

Re:Thanks a lot! (1)

zobier (585066) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158898)

What are we talking about again?

Re:Cool trick you can do with Deja Vu.. (1)

tuomas_kaikkonen (843958) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158536)

I think you are into something important there. From my experience, most deja vu situations happen during experience chain that leads to something that is un-usual and may contain some highly "sensetive" data that you either do not want to remember, or, that you have loaded with so much intensity (for a lack of a better word).

Sometimes these situations deal with life changing experiences. You are in a cross-roads when you have to make decision which path of action to take, but you hesitate to take some paths. This is probably tied to your survival instinct that tells you to stick to the familiar terrotory.

Other times deja vu may be triggered by distant memory of a dream where you dream about a thing that is now happening. This is another trick of the brain that works in associateve parallel way (I am not an expert in this area, so please forgive me my layman terms or inaccuracies). For example, you dream of walking in a place that is new to you, you see yourself looking out of windows, walking corridors, feeling a bit trapped and uneasy, not really sure which way to go or whom to talk to or what you are supposed to do. Some time after that dream you start a new job, walk in strange corridors, do not really know yet what is expected of you and do not know the people, and may feel a bit fear of uncertainty of new situation -- in this case your brain may trigger deja vu from your dream. Tangent to this is that your brain tends to make dreams of situations that you think before you go to sleep, and if these things are some plans for your future job , then it may explain that situation.

Well, worst kind of deja vus are those that totally disassociate you from this place and disturb your normal life. Well, they may be caused by repressed memories of something bad situations, for example childhood experiences, or mental traumas from adolencense or adulthood. The younger the brain is, the more you have dug up these repressed memories, and the more you try to perhaps block them and that can explain why the younger brain expriences deja vus more often. The older you get, you may learn how to cope with the repressed memories better and accept them and uncover them and "heal" them, so they no longer cause deja vus.

Has anyone experienced Jamais Vu situations, where you feel like "this is NOT happening and NEVER could happen" ? That is some kind of situation that you feel like you are not even present. That could be associated with deja vu expreiences where you deny ever having the experience and that causes the brain to deny your current experience as being real.

TTL

Thought this would be a deep philosophical article (2, Insightful)

UpnAtom (551727) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157234)

... given the title. After all, who could actually think the blind couldn't get deja vu?

Re:Thought this would be a deep philosophical arti (1)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157734)

No kidding. I read this and thought "um... no kidding? In what world did anyone think that the blind *couldn't* get deja vu!?"

Re:Thought this would be a deep philosophical arti (1)

Headcase88 (828620) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157820)

What's next, a /. article that says that blind people can dream? (Giving /.ers deja vu).

Gotta admit it makes for a good excuse to talk about deja vu, and there's plenty of nerdy jokes that can be made on the subject.

Huh? (1)

Das Auge (597142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157254)

I swear I haven't seen this before!

WTF (1)

sethwm2 (1006735) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157294)

Did not not just read this a day ago?

Not that interesting. (2, Interesting)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157340)

I'd be more interested in knowing at what age Deja Vu begins to show up. I've always figured Deja Vu really was you recognizing something similar to something from your past. Nothing fancy, just a little fragment of sensory perception you stored up there and happened to set off the recognition trigger. If it happens in very young children no less often than adults, then you've got a good indication it's not a real memory fragment.

Re:Not that interesting. (1)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157620)

I think I had deja vu at least as often in my early childhood as I do now. I know that deja vu was a common thing for me as early as five or six, and the frequency may have even gone down over the years.

Re:Not that interesting. (1)

paskie (539112) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157828)

I agree, I also feel that I have been getting deja vu more frequently in my childhood. My brain sure got much lazier over the years.

Re:Not that interesting. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157860)

I had a lot of deja vu early on as well, and also plenty of it leading up until I was about 20. After that, I have had it much less often. For me, deja vu is accompanied by the feeling that I know what is going to happen. This leads me to believe that deja vu is a memory thing.

Interestingly enough, the more I think about what I think is going to happen, the more likely it seems to be that it happens. I don't know whether this is just intuition or I am actively participating in making it a reality. I wonder if this is what "genuine" psychics (i.e. ones who actually believe they are psychic) experience. It certainly feels like I can predict the future or know things I can't possibly know during these episodes, even if the evidence shows that it is not really the case.

Re:Not that interesting. (1)

Greatmoose (896405) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158202)

My experience is very similar to yours. Especially recently, I have been to know what was going to happen next, and the really weird part was I KNEW when I had experienced it before (ie, 'Whoa, I did this last Thursday. I REMEMBER this!") The past several "episodes" have all been deja vu of something that happened within the past few weeks or days, and THAT really freaked me out.

I would have agreed once. . . (1)

Fantastic Lad (198284) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157842)

I thought this too, but began wondering why I don't get that "Been here before" feeling every time I enter a situation I really have been in before. Like my kitchen. Or when I'm watching a re-run.

This is not to say that Deja Vu does not also sometimes happen under just those sorts of circumstances, but it seems rather too arbitrary.


-FL

Re:I would have agreed once. . . (1)

Shai-kun (728212) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158804)

...why I don't get that "Been here before" feeling every time I enter a situation I really have been in before. Like my kitchen. Or when I'm watching a re-run.

Except that you do. Deja vu is not so much the 'been here before' feeling itself, but the accompanying eerie feeling caused by feeling familiarity where there should be none. At least, that is how I understand it works; feeling familiar with being in your kitchen doesn't trigger any eerieness since it's completely expected to feel familiar.

Re:I would have agreed once. . . (1)

Fantastic Lad (198284) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158940)

Except that you do. Deja vu is not so much the 'been here before' feeling itself, but the accompanying eerie feeling caused by feeling familiarity where there should be none. At least, that is how I understand it works; feeling familiar with being in your kitchen doesn't trigger any eerieness since it's completely expected to feel familiar.

Fair enough, but the reason I picked my kitchen as the example was that I have three times in the last couple of months, felt exactly that eerie feeling of familiarity upon entering my kitchen. --A room I visit dozens of times each day, (it's between my bedroom and everything else in the house.) So why those arbitrary three times and none of the hundreds of others?

There's no easy answer, of course, but the point I am making is that it is not quite so simple a phenomenon as just stored memories making matches. There's some other mechanic at work.


-FL

Re:Not that interesting. (1)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158034)

Well informally, my 4 & 5 year olds always say "we've seen this before" about half the time when we watch some new movie. Whether they're just remembering an ad or what, I can't be sure, but false memories are absolutely not relegated to adulthood (in fact, they're more prominant in childhood IIRC). If false memories are one of the triggers for deja vu, then I'm guessing very young children experience it as well, although they lack the vocabulary to express it, and probably take it for granted since a large portion of their experiences are "new" anyway.

Re:Not that interesting. (1)

l0cust (992700) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159576)

One major problem with your theory. Young children won't be able to tell if they had anything like deja-vu. Even the grown ups can not differentiate between deja-vu and the ordinary "forgetting-something" all the time. For children it may be more of a non-event, something clicked and was gone in a second. Do you honestly think they will care or remember it after 10 seconds, or remember it well enough to convey to someone that they had an episode of deja-vu (if they even give know what that means)? Attaching probes on their head will be akin to assuming the reason and then considering only the data which supports it. All the accepted type of signals will be considered cases of deja vu even though it will not be possible to prove it one way or the other.

malda assrapes zonk loldongs (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157370)

nt

More than this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157376)

Or maybe it's like this:

Your brain is built by nature's mathematics. You don't freak out all the time because the patterns you encounter around you, are basically the same that built your brain. But every now and then, there will be an anomaly in one of the computed patterns: a detail that doesn't match the anticipated result. Your brain just encountered something known as a 'nullity'. This freaks you out.

Deja Vu? (2, Informative)

ktakki (64573) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157502)

It's just a glitch in the Matrix.

k.

Re:Deja Vu? (1)

stonedcat (80201) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157616)

But was it another Black Hat Hacker or the same Black Hat?

Re:Deja Vu? (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157848)

It's just a glitch in the Matrix.

Yeah, except they don't see the black cat repeat. They just hear the same meow twice.

I always thought... (1)

clragon (923326) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157580)

I always thought that deja vu was an experience, comprised of things our senses tell us. most of my deja vus are triggered not by what I see but rather a combination of senses that makes up the familiar experience of deja vu.

Goes without saying (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157618)

Maybe it's just me, but I'd kinda expect blind people to experience dejavu more often than the rest of us considering how they have to make their way around the house counting how many steps they've made & how many seconds it takes for X to happen.

They're bound to feel like they've done it before sooner or later.

Great timing... (1)

toupsie (88295) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157632)

This report comes out just as a Denzel Washington flick of the same name is hitting theaters. Science and marketing, two great tastes that go great together.

In Soviet Russia... (0)

alchemist68 (550641) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157678)

In Soviet Russia...it's Deja-vYOU!

Get it?

YOU are the Deja-vu for someone else?

the blind? (3, Funny)

Yirimyah (884895) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157930)

And all across America, the hawks are thinking "Is it just me, or is this Vietnam again?"

This is NOT news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17157934)

In other not news, the blind can hear, touch, feel, etc.

(Tin) Foiled Again! (1)

Fantastic Lad (198284) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157964)

I think the experience is based more on a deeper instinctive reaction, (I think instincts are connected to unconscious levels of awareness as well as memories from past lives), and that the experience of Deja Vu is triggered by odd happenings in the time stream which a deeper part of a person notices but cannot rationalize. --That is, time is not linear, and our passage through it can be manipulated by beings which exist beyond our awareness.

--I know. Occam would have a fit. But Occam was also a monk who was satisfied that his theory was useful in finding proof of god, so one should accept that his logical razor leans heavily upon one's experiential biases. Example: If you have never experienced telephones or the supporting technology upon which our telecom systems rely, then is it more rational to assume that people have invented a world-spanning telephone system or that you are simply being lied to by the person making such a claim?

It's all about perspective. The less you know, the more statements must be taken as assumptions, which serve to invalidate them in Occam's equation. Thus, it can be fairly said that Occam rewards ignorance by logically validating inadequate explanations.

Thank-you. --You can buy a copy of my CD at the end of the show.


-FL

Re:(Tin) Foiled Again! (1)

l0cust (992700) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159656)

Good point. Though I do not agree with some part of it. The less you know, the more statements must be taken as assumptions I think it should be "The less you know, the more the number of baby steps you have to take to arrive at the same conclusion". It does not make those steps assumptions because once you start dividing each step into a set of baby steps, they become "knowledge" instead of "assumptions" and no longer stand in the way of Occam's razor because of the very nature of knowledge - seemingly simple and obvious.

Temporal lobe epilepsy (1)

B5_geek (638928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17157994)

I used to have temporal-lobe epilepsy (aka psycho-motor epilepsy) and the "Trigger" emotion/sensation was a very intense feeling of deja-vu. The sensation did not cause the seizure but was rather a warning sign that an episode was starting.

It was caused by a tumor in my Right-temporal lobe. Surgery was preformed and removed my right-temporal lobe plus more from a deep 'root' as the doctor called it. That was April 30/1990. I am feeling much better now. =)

Re:Temporal lobe epilepsy (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158378)

removed my right-temporal lobe plus more from a deep 'root' as the doctor called it

Doctor says here's your problem

userdel root

ahhh feels better already. But I agree with the link to psycho-motor seizures. I had a lot of things like this between the ages of about 14 and 19, then a grand mal, then got put on to tegretol which fortunately got the problem mostly under control.

Incidently, you must have had a few CT scans in your time. Did the dye they put in ever send you totally high? To this day I am still surprised they let me out of the clinic to walk the streets believing I was Albert Einstein for the next three hours.

direcct recording to long-term memory (1)

evilmousse (798341) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158158)


the most believable explanation of dejavu i've heard is that our brain "short circuits" momentarily recording information directly to long term memory instead of it's normal route through short term memory and on through. the sensation we experiencing is not remembering so to speak, so much as the sensation of accessing long term memory.

Spacial Recognition is needed to think (1)

CrazyJim1 (809850) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158182)

Even if you're blind, you need to know your room to navigate and think. I get so much flack about my implementation of Artificial Intelligence [geocities.com] that it needs a modern 3d card and high end CAD to work because people tell me it has no eyes so it can't think for itself. I have half a notion to spend my entire life on AI, but I won't since there are more pressing matters to attend to.

i'm not sure where i read this (1)

sxtxixtxcxh (757736) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158260)

... i read a possible explanation for deja vu the optic nerve signals were rerouted from short term memory and rather ended up going directly into long-term memory, triggering immediately the sense that you've seen this exact scene a long time ago...

in any case, this explanation explains why this particular study was noteworthy.

Of course they do. (1)

TheGrinningFool (1014867) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158284)

It's not specifically what you're seeing that's triggering it. It's not even as simple as "I've seen this before" or "I've done this before."

Instead, it's a completely overwhelming feeling that every aspect of the current situation down to your thoughts has occurred in this exact sequence before. Senses are only a part of the equation. So should it be a surprise to anyone that this affects those missing one or more of them?

Restricted sight based? (1)

blankoboy (719577) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158308)

Since when was deja vu considered to be restricted to sight based events? I have had Deja vu from smells, sounds (music, etc), touch and even just a feeling. Seems quite boring to think that deja vu can only be experienced from sight based experiences.

I seem to recall that Deja vu is actually your brain mis-interpreting what you are currently experiencing as being something you have experienced in the past (ie: processing what you are currently experiencing as if it is coming from your brain's archives. Or in nerd talk - Your brain is mixing up off-site storage with L1 cache.). So, once again, I don't see what this has to do why Deja vu would be isolated to sight based events.

signal lag causes it.. (1)

phreakv6 (760152) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158352)

remember reading somewhere that its because one of the eyes deliver the signal a bit late than the other eye (or one ear than the other), so the brain already knows what has happened

Stupid topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17158402)

What a stooopid article. Are there people out there dumb enough that they thought "deja vue" was strictly VISUAL? It's known as being a "feeling". Why wouldn't blind people experience feelings??!

I dont "see" anything (3, Insightful)

Tweekster (949766) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158438)

I feel the situation, sight has nothing to do with deja vu.

Finally (2, Informative)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158606)

This proves that they have the same capabilities as the rest of us, so the blind can finally stop parking in the good spots up front. ;)

Not all deja vu is like that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17158666)

When I Deja Vu I can sometimes guess what the other person is going to say 2 seconds before they say it. Especitally if it is something distinct, like a pun, a joke, a new spin on a cliche. Its not just "Hmmm... i've had this conversation before..." but more like "Hey we've had this conversation before, I know what he's going to say.."

Well of course (1)

QuantumFTL (197300) | more than 7 years ago | (#17158790)

Deja vu is caused by a glitch in the Matrix - this would affect all senses, not merely visual. Am I the only one that thinks this is really obvious?

Definition (0, Redundant)

Thakandar2 (260848) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159054)

déjà vu - (d'zhä v') - n. A feeling of having seen or experienced something before.

Slashdot definition (1)

Thakandar2 (260848) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159090)

This exact comment has already been posted. Try to be more original...

Audible deja vu (1)

FunkeyMonk (1034108) | more than 7 years ago | (#17159194)

As a professional musician, I have aural deja vu all the time. My life is spent trying to recreate performances in my "inner ear," and it happens regularly that I'll hear a performance or recording that sounds completely familiar. One's most commonly used senses are of course the ones that will experience deja vu.

This reminds me of that bogus psychological study on Auditory "Hallucinations" brought on my frequent iPod use. Some quack spouting off about people hearing sounds that weren't there--more serious than having a song stuck in your head. Again, that's what I spend my life TRYING to do!

You're a reasercher? Gotta research SOMETHIN'!

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