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Map of the Internet

Hemos posted more than 7 years ago | from the truly-impressive dept.

The Internet 186

Wellington Grey writes "Author of the popular webcomic xkcd has put up a hand made map of the internet as today's comic. He also has an interesting blog entry detailing some of the work that went into it, such a pinging servers and creating a method of fractal mapping to display related regions as contiguous sections on the grid." The drawing is pretty damn impressive; somebody get on making that thing a giant wall poster so I can paper over Taco's office door.

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186 comments

Rasterizer. (4, Insightful)

celardore (844933) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193744)

The drawing is pretty damn impressive; somebody got on making that thing a giant wall poster so I can paper over Taco's office door.
Have you tried something like Rasterizer? [rasterizer.de]

Re:Rasterizer. (5, Informative)

Council (514577) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194048)

To everyone who's asked for a large poster of this -- I'm going to be offering large prints of it in the xkcd store before too long, but for a handful of reasons I can't easily do it immediately (I'm in the middle of the holiday rush with shipping out t-shirts). It's cool to hear so many people are interested, though! Thank you!

I would actually like to see someone else create a computer-generated poster with a higher level of detail (there will be algorithms for the mapping on the blag [xkcd.com] soon). I think you can do some interesting things with this fractal; it'd be neat to see all the websites you visit marked with red dots, more detailed survey info for the registry patchwork, server density/space usage (the 63-74 blocks are more densely populated than anything else), etc.

Use Domains+Web Sites, instead of IPs? (5, Interesting)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194256)

Although a map of the IP address space is probably more interesting and informative, something that was based on the distribution of domain names might be more appealing to a non-technical audience; perhaps something showing the relative size of various sites beneath each TLD, with some factor based on popularity and grouped by semantic distance and interlinking.

E.g., so you'd end up with something that had big regions for the major TLDs, and then within them you'd have semantically related regions (sites that are related based on keywords or link to each other heavily). The base unit could be sites, and their size would be proportional to their number of publicly-accessible pages times a 'popularity factor.' Maybe you could extract some of the popularity information from Google (not that they'd probably like you hitting them with a lot of scripted searches).

I think it would be neat, particularly if you ended up with something that showed such locales as the Spamblog Ghetto, Fortress Corporate America, and, of course, the Porn District.

Re:Use Domains+Web Sites, instead of IPs? (1)

jZnat (793348) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195214)

Porn District? We'd lose a large level of detail since that'd take up a majority of the poster. ;p

Q: IP addresses and domains (1)

harmonica (29841) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195854)

Not exactly a direct reply to parent, but is there a simple way to get mappings from domains to IP address space--in bulk? There is the RIPE DB for the IP space and Whois lets you do single queries on domains, but is there some sort of publicly available list of valid domains with or without IP addresses belonging to them?

Re:Rasterizer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17195614)

To everyone who's asked for a large poster of this -- I'm going to be offering large prints of it in the xkcd store before too long,
Sounds great!

Do me a favor though-- redraw it with a straight edge...

Just looking at the web comic gives me an epileptic seizure and I fear magnified parkinsons squiggles will push me past the "grand mal" point.

Re:Rasterizer. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17196128)

To everyone who's asked for a large poster of this -- save your money, it's not really that good.
Fixed.

Also please learn to draw something other than stick figures.

xkcd (4, Funny)

Tet (2721) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193798)

xkcd is a work of genius. See, for example, this classic [xkcd.com].

Re:xkcd (2, Funny)

Fordiman (689627) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193922)

That was special. Almost makes me want to install Linux on my girlfriend, just so I can try that.

Meanwhile, I agree with the killing Ann Coulter thing. She just makes humans look bad.

oblig. (5, Funny)

Bugs42 (788576) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195562)

Almost makes me want to install Linux on my girlfriend, just so I can try that.
You know, of course, what this means.

Slashdotter1: Dude, I met the most awesome girl last night! She's hot, funny, smart, AND a gamer!

Slashdotter2: Yeah, but can she run Linux?

Re:xkcd (4, Funny)

Thornae (53316) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194054)

Note that there is no request for a password.

The implications of this are left as an exercise for the reader...

Be warned: If you're viewing xkcd for the first time, you might end up reading through all of them. It's simple but brilliant.

Re:xkcd (5, Funny)

erpbridge (64037) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194166)

Methinks the Girlfriend is insecure? Seems she is easy to root.

Since the girlfriend takes commands over the air, that makes her an open access point?

One Factor (5, Funny)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194330)

In reality, the security of the girlfriend system is hardware-based; it requires the presence of a specialized dongle.

Add another link (1)

anticypher (48312) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194378)

Damn, just when I had almost made it through 2006 without adding a new webcomic link to my bookmarks. This afternoon is going to be shot to pieces checking the archives.

the AC

He needs to show the reserved Class E block as such (the whole upper right corner), as well as many other reserved blocks. With corrections/suggestions coming in from /. and other sources, he could have a nice map soon enough. Pretty enough to buy a copy or two

Beeb (0, Troll)

smallguy78 (775828) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193806)

Amazing that the BBC owns to class As and the british MoD too. I suppose we did invent the damn thing though, so we deserve it.

Re:Beeb (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17194086)

I'm pretty sure you can claim hypertext or http or something like that, but not the network itself. The network was a DARPA project.

Clever (5, Insightful)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193810)

Wow, I wish I was clever enough to come up with stuff like this.

The author gets additional Cleverness Points for thinking to post the geonetric locations of the major geek sites (slashdot, digg, boingboing, etc.) in order to encourage those sites to repost links to the author's website.

Re:Clever (4, Insightful)

strider44 (650833) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194056)

It's not like he gets ad revenue. XKCD is the best computer comic I read and I don't really think he craves the attention so much.

Impressive, yes... but does it contain (0, Offtopic)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193840)

any truthiness?

Someone send this to Colbertnation.com and ask them for a review?

Real Map of Internet (4, Interesting)

Delta-9 (19355) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193856)

Thats neat, however opte.org [opte.org] is working on realtime maps of the internet.

Re:Real Map of Internet (2, Insightful)

grommit (97148) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194028)

That's nice, however those opte maps don't show the same information as the xkcd map does. While a whole bunch of lines randomly spread around has a certain spartan appeal, it doesn't convey any information. I can't look at the opte maps and say, "Oh, there's so and so" or "here I am." So, I'd hardly call them maps. Maps usually have information tags describing/naming places. Maybe those LGL files contain that information? It'd be nice if they made screenshots of the output of those LGL files though.

Re:Real Map of Internet (1)

HairyCanary (688865) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194100)

The last updates to that site seem to have occured nearly two years ago. Are you sure they are still working on anything?

Interesting... (4, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193880)

But where's the "Here there be dragons" [wikipedia.org] part?

Re:Interesting... (0, Offtopic)

griffjon (14945) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193974)

Dude, he pointed out slashdot. What, do you want mapquest directions to the dragons?

Re:Interesting... (1)

turly (992736) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194132)

But where's the Here there be dragons part?
I think you'll find that Halliburton (owner of 34.x.x.x) qualifies as a dragon.

Or at least an ogre.

Re:Interesting... (2, Funny)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194136)

But where's the "Here there be dragons" part?

In view of the way humanity's moral compass has been recalibrated since the middle ages I think the need for the creation of a "Here be porn!" annotation is more urgent.

Re:Interesting... (1)

Stavr0 (35032) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194160)

Right there, Just left of the Multicast space. There's a picture of Trogdor, burninating lost packets and thatch-roofed cottages ...

Re:Interesting... (1)

British (51765) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194790)

Right next to the Asia-pacific part, which could be captioned "here be the spam".

Re:Interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17195804)

The 192/8 space used to be referred to as "the swamp"

Re:Interesting... (1)

trianglman (1024223) | more than 7 years ago | (#17196142)

Lets see:
Dragons - loud, obnoxious, and best avoided.
I would say its that North America section near the top of the center. AKA Myspace.

Amazing web commics (2, Interesting)

TheRagingTowel (724266) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193884)

What amazes me most is his ability to make you see the character's face expression although it's a faceless stick figure (eg this [xkcd.com]). That and that he seems to be an absolute geek :)

MIT (4, Interesting)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193886)

I always laugh at how MIT half as much as all of latin america and as much as all of Africa.

I remember being in MIT and getting a real fixed IP for every single device. We actually had a coke vending machine that was hacked and online with its own IP. Considering they has so much that they are no where near running out, I'm sure there are a ton of toasters online at MIT as well.

Re:MIT (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17194040)

I always laugh at how MIT half as much as all of latin america and as much as all of Africa.

Buh?

We actually had a coke vending machine that was hacked and online with its own IP. Considering they has so much that they are no where near running out, I'm sure there are a ton of toasters online at MIT as well.

Wuh?

Re:MIT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17194718)

My uni has 3 class B ranges (erm... 129.31, 146.169 and 155.198) plus a truckload of class Cs, but I've yet to see a toaster online... still, no NATs in sight.

I'll work on the toaster.

Re:MIT (1)

cyclomedia (882859) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195282)

my last job before this one was at a web/intranet firm with 5 employees. The guy had started it up in the mid 90s and managed to cheaply get an entire ...255 subnet range just before someone did the math and realised exactly how rare they were. So whilst the physical size of the operation was much smaller than MIT the scale was probably comparable. Once you subtracted the handful of servers i had almost 50 IP addresses all to myself ... handy for running VNC/SSH from home at the weekends but never did get around to installing a web cam in the cafe downstairs*, mind

*where a bunch of young polish student waitresses worked

Re:MIT (5, Interesting)

Pasquina (980638) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195894)

Each dorm is assigned all of a second-level IP: 18.XXX.*.*, that's 65536 IP addresses per dorm. At about 300 students per dorm, that's more than 200 static IPs per student...just in case. My fraternity is assigned 512 IPs for 45 guys.
If nothing else, it has skewed my opinion on how quickly we're running out of IPv4 addresses.

I've also heard that MIT rents some of their IPs to Portugal. (This was also the subject of a supposed hack that some MIT student took out an entire country's internet service for a little while.) Does anyone know if either half of this is true?

What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17193888)

What language is this? "somebody got on making that thing a giant wall poster so I can paper over Taco's office door."

Running out? (1)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193916)

There appear to be quite a few "wild" areas on the map. People keep complaining how IPv4 address space is running out, but there is actually grass growing in some of those areas!

Re:Running out? (3, Funny)

revlayle (964221) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193980)

THAT what must be clogging the tubes. Not porn... GRASS!

Re:Running out? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17194282)

Keep it down or Congress will give the DEA jurisdiction over the internet...

Where's the money? (1)

kooky45 (785515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193938)

1. Work out fractal map.
2. Place domains on map.
3. Ping servers and put them on map.
4. ?
5. Profit!!!

Or is there pure geek value in this?

Re:Where's the money? (2, Insightful)

masklinn (823351) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194238)

Or is there pure geek value in this?

I take it you've never read xkcd have you?

Good job, but... (3, Interesting)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193964)

They did a good job in labeling things like local, multicast, loopback, and VPN addresses, but they forgot to note 169 as such.

Why was 192 picked as private? (1)

us7892 (655683) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194312)

Was the choice of 192 as private based on something? Or was it just picked pretty much out of a hat based on what was remaining...

Just wondering...

Re:Why was 192 picked as private? (2, Informative)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194960)

192 = 128*1.5 or 128 + 64

i.e. while not strictly a power of two, it is closely related to one.

More specifically, the bit pattern for 192 is a nice clean 11000000

Re:Why was 192 picked as private? (1)

ezzzD55J (697465) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195896)

it's not. it's (from rfc1918)

          10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix)
          172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix)
          192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix)

Hmm... (0, Offtopic)

FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193968)

Slashdot warrants a special mention as does suicide girls.

I think we have a pretty good insight into the sick and twisted human mind with this map.

IPv4 space (4, Insightful)

JohnnyBigodes (609498) | more than 7 years ago | (#17193994)

I thought we were (supposedly) running out of IPv4 space... but the map shows quite a few unallocated blocks. What gives?

Re:IPv4 space (4, Insightful)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194414)


I thought we were (supposedly) running out of IPv4 space... but the map shows quite a few unallocated blocks. What gives?


Look at how much spqace MIT has. Now, look at how much space the whole of Africa has. Even if we assigned every last block, we would probably never see an African university with a whole /8 to itself. Think about how many people are in India and China, and compare the asian assignment vs. the US assignment. It will be impossible to ever make IPv4 fair. IPv6 allows us to just bypass the whole issue and let everybody have as much address space as they could possibly use.

Re:IPv4 space (0)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194558)

"Think about how many people are in India and China, and compare the asian assignment vs. the US assignment. It will be impossible to ever make IPv4 fair."

I think it tells you more about where the network originated and who controls and owns the infrastructure. if the third world invested the money in the research and infrastructure, the would have more. Since they didn't they should be happy with what they have been given for free.

Re:IPv4 space (1)

Khuffie (818093) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195142)

So just because they didn't have the money to invest we should leave them further behind in the dust instead of giving them the opportunity to better themselves?

Re:IPv4 space (1)

Aerion (705544) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194788)

Look at how much spqace MIT has. Now, look at how much space the whole of Africa has. Even if we assigned every last block, we would probably never see an African university with a whole /8 to itself. Think about how many people are in India and China, and compare the asian assignment vs. the US assignment. It will be impossible to ever make IPv4 fair. IPv6 allows us to just bypass the whole issue and let everybody have as much address space as they could possibly use.

"Fair" is an odd word to be using. Does "fair" mean that every region has the same number of IP addresses per capita?

MIT has the infrastructure and resources to actually use a lot of IP space, whereas Africa doesn't. North American and Europe have a huge headstart on Internet infrastructure, and so they ought to get more IP space, regardless of population.

Now, admittedly, MIT doesn't need a whole class A. But my dorm has two class B's to itself, and regardless of whether that's necessary or not (hint: it's not), it's still fun to brag about. Take that, Harvard!

Re:IPv4 space (1)

vadim_t (324782) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194454)

Space isn't supposed to be allocated efficiently. If 1.2.3.4 goes to the US, 1.2.3.5 goes to Spain, and 1.2.3.6 is in Japan that makes routing a huge pain.

This is the problem IPv6 is supposed to solve. With so much address space you can just assign a range to a country which is much, much larger than all of IPv4 and forget about having huge routing tables.

Re:IPv4 space (1)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194804)

They've been saying it for years. I'm thinking it's got to be kinda one of those "the earth is warming, no cooling, no warming!" type things where nobody really knows.

Re:IPv4 space (1)

Midnight Thunder (17205) | more than 7 years ago | (#17196036)

The problem never has been the number of addresses left, but the number of addresses available. Before you scream that it is the same, it isn't really: One is a indication of the number of addresses in use, while the other is an indication of political or business motivation, or ability, for making the address available to those who want them. Address allocation is never going to be an efficient task, so by having more addresses available you support the fact that %10 of the addresses will never be allocated.

There are probably other good reasons for IPv6, but I am not an expert here.

So why (3, Funny)

dattaway (3088) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194070)

does a company like Halliburton get a whole square? Are they planning to invade others?

Netcraft map of the .. (1)

rs232 (849320) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194080)

I recall Netcraft produced a map of the Internet. Anyone know where it can still be found.

Man (22) lost in 'Related searches' detour (1)

Sigg3.net (886486) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194188)

This is nice for when you get lost. It can be hard finding your way back to the work you were doing, when UserFriendly pops up in related searches.

Someone you've never heard of (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194262)

I was curious about the "BB&N" who had the 4 and 8 nets (how binary!!). Turns out they're described here [wikipedia.org]
One of their guys wrote "[IEN-74] Sequence Number Arithmetic - William W. Plummer, BB&N Inc, September 1978", which is referenced by [RFC 1982] [ietf.org] Serial Number Arithmetic.

Re:Someone you've never heard of (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17195546)

They invented the '@' for emails for crying out loud. They can have any block they want :)

Re:Someone you've never heard of (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17195840)

You're both dense. The grandparent for not knowing who Bolt, Barenak and Newman are and you for not having the faintest clue what roll they had in creating the internet. Go away and read some history. Get a copy of Where Wizards Stay Up Late.

DEC?? I think not (2, Informative)

Necron69 (35644) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194346)

I have news for this guy. DEC (net 15) hasn't existed in nearly a decade, and HP and Compaq merged like four years ago. So Nets 15 & 16 should be labeled "HP".

All your IP space belong to us!!! Bwahahahaaaaaa!!!

- Necron69

A good reason to move to IPv6 (4, Interesting)

Rocketship Underpant (804162) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194356)

Isn't it kind of sad that the entire continent of Africa gets the same number of IP addresses that Prudential, an insurance company gets?

IPv6 is there too... (4, Informative)

scsirob (246572) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194372)

Just float your mouse over the picture and he will tell you what the IPv6 version looks like.

Even more clever, and sooooo right ;-)

47.x.x.x belongs to Nortel (1)

hgavin (259102) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194622)

It's labelled as Bell North on the diagram, probably because their R&D used to be called Bell Northern Research, but they're Nortel now.

Where Y'At? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 7 years ago | (#17194640)

Giant wall poster? Somone make a simple CGI that plots IP# arguments clearly on that map. So when I want to know "where someone is" when I have their IP#, I can see on the map. And keep a log of IP#s, and plot them all, maybe in increasing colors by timestamp or sequence.

Found an error... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17195062)

16 isn't DEC, its HP (along with 15). That whole "compaq buying DEC and Tandem and hp buying Compaq" thing ended DEC a long time ago.

Useful (2, Interesting)

Hegh (788050) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195612)

That's actually quite useful to me. Twice I've watched somebody attempt to brute-force their way into an FTP server that I run for myself (which I have since taken off of the public internet, since I realized I only use it on my LAN), and now I know that the attacks which came from 61/8 and 62/8 are in Asia and Europe, respectively (therefore I don't have to worry about blocking those entire IP ranges, since if my FTP server were public again, I would never be in one of those ranges trying to get in). Anybody else have a practical use for this?

No Microsoft? (1)

anss123 (985305) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195652)

Seems most tech companies have a large chuck of that map, except the most greedy one of all :P

Re:No Microsoft? (1)

pimpimpim (811140) | more than 7 years ago | (#17196062)

I have the impression that the companies that were in early on the internet managed to get a lot of IP space for themselves (before everybody else realized the problems and unnecessity of that later on). Probably Microsoft was late for supper as usual.

That is not to say that several of these companies managed to screw up big time on the way and are now minor players. That makes this map actually a historical map of the situation at the end of the 80's.

Equality (1)

Elixon (832904) | more than 7 years ago | (#17195776)

That small red point in the upper-left corner of the map... is there a label "China" attached to it?
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