Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Sony BMG Settles Over CD DRM

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the sorry-about-that dept.

Sony 225

aurispector writes "Sony BMG Music Entertainment will pay $1.5 million and kick in thousands more in customer refunds to settle lawsuits brought by California and Texas over music CDs that installed a hidden anti-piracy program on consumers' computers. The settlements, announced Tuesday, cover lawsuits over CDs loaded with one of two types of copy-protection software — known as MediaMax or XCP. Although it's great to see this as a victory for consumers, I can't help but wonder about the next wave of DRM schemes."

cancel ×

225 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

You are still a bunch of no good thieves (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319604)

You are still a bunch of no good thieves

The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (4, Insightful)

dada21 (163177) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319630)

Each State gets $750,000 -- customers will share "thousands more."

Nice. Real way to protect the consumer.

Next Step (4, Insightful)

Mateo_LeFou (859634) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319716)

Is anyone going after the antivirus/antispyware companies whose offerings gave the rootkit a pass?

Re:Next Step (4, Insightful)

Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319968)

Hmmmmn, while we should indeed go after the anti-virus vendors, I think the next step should be to ask why some sony exec isn't recieving jail time for deliberate malware distribution to millions of PCs.

Don't be so critical (2, Funny)

DietCoke (139072) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320388)

I mean, they did agree to pay $1.5 Milllllion dollars!

Now please excuse me, I need to count the 15 pennies that I'm now entitled to.

Fuck Sony.

Re:Next Step (4, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321036)

No kidding -- and you know what the worst part is? If it had been an individual doing this, he would have gotten the jail time! But since it's a big corporation responsible, they get the best "justice" money can buy.

Anybody know the names of the dumbass judges/prosecutors that approved this? I, for one, would like to help them realize just how asinine this settlement is by bitching them out!

Re:Next Step (3, Insightful)

xrobertcmx (802547) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321316)

It could be worse. It could be like the Verizon Wireless coupon settlement that was just approved. $15.00 off your bill or a qualifying Verizon Wireless service. Customers no longer with Verizon Wireless must sign up for a Verizon Wireless plan to use the coupon. Tell me who approved that?

Re:Next Step (1)

Plutonite (999141) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321404)

But if we asked that, they'd say we were new here..

Re:Next Step (4, Insightful)

lightspawn (155347) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320748)

Is anyone going after the antivirus/antispyware companies whose offerings gave the rootkit a pass?

How about the OS vendor that runs untrusted code off a CD without as much as bothering to inform the user?

Mod parent up! (1)

sowth (748135) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321540)

That is not flamebait. It is good security to ask before executing unknown code.

Re:Next Step (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17321450)

Those companies were behaving in compliance with the DMCA. If they had detected it as a rootkit and removed it, they would have been circumventing DRM and guilty of a DMCA violation. The only outcome I would hope for if anybody sued them is the invalidation of the DMCA and those companies not eating any penalties, but I ain't holding my breath at this point.

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (5, Interesting)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319738)

Consumers won't get, "thousands more." From the article, "In addition, Sony BMG agreed to reimburse consumers whose computers were damaged while trying to uninstall the XCP software. Customers in both states can file a claim with Sony BMG to receive refunds of up to $175."

"Customers have 180 days to file claims, which must include a description of how their computer was harmed and documentation of repair expenses."

Granted, $175 is still a decent amount of money. So if you're computer was reasonably fscked, it would probably be a good idea to go through the paperwork. Unfortunately, Sony is probably betting that most people will probably decide it's not worth the hassle. Then, there's the fact that about half of the paperwork customers file will end up going to some overworked, incompetent paper-pusher office slave who will either take way too long to approve the request, or reject it for some bullsh*t reason,...

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (4, Insightful)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319798)

Granted, $175 is still a decent amount of money.

Nope. Sony got off very lightly here.

-jcr

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (3, Interesting)

Sylver Dragon (445237) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319826)

I'm wondering how vigorously the claims are checked. If it's mostly just a matter of filling in the applicable paperwork and waiting for it, I can see people just deciding to get free money and filing a claim, regardless of actual damage. Heck, it might be fun to figure out how/where to get the form, what needs to appear on it and get as many people as possible to send one in. Sort of 'slashdot' the system.

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320090)

umm $175 would be just enough to pay some GeekSquad member to do a nuke and reload (kiss your data BuhBye)

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320468)

A real pc tech can remove the root kit for the same price with losing you data

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (1)

ppanon (16583) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321612)

Only if no-one has already exploited the rootkit and loaded lots more malware on the computer.

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (2, Funny)

Mex (191941) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321302)

Sir, I am in Mexico and even here, 175 dollars is not "A decent amount of money".

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (1)

Gr8Apes (679165) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321452)

Consumers won't get, "thousands more."
Sure they will, that's the grand total that consumers will get. All of them. Together.

Re:The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (1)

garylian (870843) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320696)

That was my thoughts, exactly.

1.5 million, with the rest probably being a buck or two here and there. Hardly a punishment to a huge company like Sony BMG.

A quote from TFA: In a news conference Tuesday in Austin, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbot said the settlement sent a clear message.

"Texans deserve to be protected from harmful hidden software that threatens their privacy or the security of their computers," he said.


This wasn't a slap on the wrist. This was brushing the lint off of their lapels.

sarcasm on I feel SO secure knowing that my Texas Attorney General's office is protecting me so diligently. /sarcasm off

$1.5 Million Dollars? (1)

fallungus (810282) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321580)

A company like Sony can find that much money under their sofa cushions.

And Thousands more (4, Funny)

ePhil_One (634771) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319642)

So not only $1.5 Million in fines, but THOUSANDS more in refunds? So this could cost Sony a total of $1.503 Million dollars? I was going to invest in Sony stock until I noticed that lst little caveat, raising the punishment a potential two or 3 tenths of a percentage point.

Sony is Doomed.

Cheap DRM Research (4, Insightful)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319660)

Doesn't sound like Sony got particularly chastised here. If I were Sony, or any other company interested in inflicting DRM on my customers, I'd happily pay the fees that they're talking about here. Total cost is less than $10M, which is a drop in the bucket for a large, multi-national corporation. If they succeed in inflicting their DRM, they win by taking our rights away. If they lose, then they get some R & D done about how to do better next time. If this judgement were to mean anything to the consumer, there would have to be significant punitive damages as well (I'm thinking in the neighbourhood of $100M or more).

Either way, not much to see here. Big company does nasty things with DRM, gets caught, walks away with dignity and wallet intact.

mandelbr0t

Not the DRM, the rootkit. (4, Informative)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319814)

iTunes, RealPlayer and several other apps prove that it's possible to implement DRM without buggering the host OS. Sony's not in trouble for using DRM, they're int trouble for installing a rootkit.

-jcr

Re:Not the DRM, the rootkit. (4, Insightful)

Lux (49200) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320022)

Right. Only they're not in trouble.

Re:Not the DRM, the rootkit. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320342)

"iTunes, RealPlayer and several other apps prove that it's possible to implement DRM without buggering the host OS." ...man, Sony's got to feel bad now. You basically stated that RealPlayer can write software better than they can... ouch.

Meanwhile in a secret Sony Research Lab... (5, Funny)

vivin (671928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320092)

Sony Suit: Well guys, looks like our DRM scheme tanked. But $1.5 is nothing. Muahaha. That's lunch money for me. What new stuff do you have?
Researcher John: Well, we got this thing where we can put in subliminal messages into the music that our customers buy. Stuff like "P2P and Piracy rapes your mom!" or "Buy more sucky and/or mediocre music!" or "Mike is a fag!"
Researcher Mike: Shut up John!
Sony Suit: Oh that's good stuff! Anything else?
Researcher John: Well, Mike has another idea.
Researched Mike: (holds up cute puppy) We can threaten to kill this cute puppy if they pirate stuff!
Sony Suit: EXCELLENT! (pets cute puppy) Woo's a cute puppy-wuppy! Woo's gonna die to pwotect our intewests!! Oooohh!! Sooo cute! Yesyouare!! Yesyouare!!

Re:Meanwhile in a secret Sony Research Lab... (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320532)

I would hope National Lampoon would sue them if they tried the thing with the dog.

Nice move (1)

Link9064 (991491) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319692)

"Sony BMG also agreed not to distribute any compact discs loaded with any copy-protection software that hinders computer users from easily locating it or removing it from their computers." So that means it'll still be there, just out in the open to let consumers get at it, which will be hidden by some other measure that will continue to piss off the consumer.

Re:Nice move (1)

zentigger (203922) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319916)

No, that means that it will be out there, but it will no be difficult to locate and remove.

That's it? (1)

Trojan35 (910785) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319696)

Sony, with $15.7 billion quarterly revenue? Would $1m even make it into the 10-Q's footnotes?

Re:That's it? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320000)

Sony, with $15.7 billion quarterly revenue?

1) Don't confuse revenue with profits. Its entirely possible to lose money with $15 billion in revenue. Recall the Dot Com mantra "We lose $1 on every item we sell, but make it up with volume!" 2) Don't confues the conglomeration of companies and divisions that is Sony with the Record group. If the Music group is not profitable, the will be sold or dismantled to folks who think they can make money on the product 3) Fines like this come right out of profits and cash, they hurt a lot, especially in an industry that is struggling to turn a profit (because of bad business decisions, piracy, or government mind control rays, whatever),

Re:That's it? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321490)

Would $1m even make it into the 10-Q's footnotes?

      Look at it right here, where it says "$34M - Misc".

Tagged Peanuts (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319702)

I wish I could engage in legally questionable activity in order to get billions of dollars, then only pay a measly 1.5 million for the privilage.

Re:Tagged Peanuts (3, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319736)

Legally questionable, ethically suspect, morally bankrupt.

Re:Tagged Peanuts (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320626)

Is that the going rate for ethics and morals? Count me in! I'll even throw in my soul.

$2 million? (1)

letsgolightning (1004592) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319704)

Looks like about a 2 million dollar loss ($1.5m in direct damages, plus $175 per individual claim to be filed) for Sony for potentially installing this on 2 million (or more!)PCs. Is it just me, or does this almost seem like it can be worth it for Sony to keep going? This is a multinational conglomerate that was just... I want to say a slap on the wrist, but, it's not even that to them!

I Bet It's A Big Deal Internally (4, Insightful)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319914)

they certainly could continue putting rootkits on their CDs, but they're not in the business of giving money away. These companies are big, but the different divisions (and sub-divisions) all keep records of profits and losses. This is going to show up in a big way.

I can see the meeting now:

Muckety Muck: Last quarter your unit had profits of $1.5mil. But this quarter you have a loss of $.5mil. Care to explain?
Sony Music Exec: Well we put this DRM on our CDs and got sued and settled for $2mil.
Muckety Muck: I see. Did the DRM reduce piracy? Or increase sales?
Sony Music Exec: Well... we can't tell if it reduced piracy. And, ahem, sales kinda collapsed after people found out we were getting sued for it.
Muckety Muck: That might just qualify for the dumbest business decision this year! No bonus for you and I'm taking away your parking space.

so while for Sony it's not a big deal, you can bet that the people that made the decision to rootkit their CDs are scrambling to save their careers.

Re:I Bet It's A Big Deal Internally (4, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320296)

Personally, I see the exchange happening a little differently...

Muckety Muck: Last quarter your unit had profits of $1.5mil. But this quarter you have a loss of $.5mil. Care to explain?
Weasely Sony Music Exec: Pirates! Yes, Pirates! With swords and parrots! Our DRM just wasn't strong enough to hold them off. But if you give us another 2 million dollars, we have this surefire thing that is guaranteed to work!
Muckety Muck: You sound full of confidence, so you must be right. Here's another 2 million dollars.
\Weasely Sony Music Exec already working on how to use that money to gild his Gulfstream

I see very little scrambling that will be done by Execs. At most I see some fingerslapping for the poor guy who implemented it.

hidden anti-piracy program? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319718)

It was a damn rootkit!

And by "thousands more" they mean... (2, Funny)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319720)

Thousands of unsold copies of some long-forgotten Mariah Carey album.

SparkArt? (3, Interesting)

hotrodman (472382) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319728)

After having dealt with some of these people, I'd say the next wave is coming from a little company called SparkArt. They also get into 'Viral Marketing'. SA deals with Sony as well, so this little company would be one to keep an eye on in the future......

Re:SparkArt? (1)

sweatyboatman (457800) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320010)

Hah! The third project page (click the forward button) is for a "'viral' promotion" Project called Dr. M... DRM, get it? Oy.

Re:SparkArt? (1)

hotrodman (472382) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320114)

I'd also like to add that this is the company that injects fake files into p2p networks, and they are also responsible for plenty of astroturfing, but their biggest projects as of late, are in DRM.

This is sad. (5, Insightful)

urbanradar (1001140) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319742)

Everyone saw it coming, but it's still sad. If I broke into your house and got caught, I would never get away with simply having to replace the broken lock and saying I'm sorry. But when Sony violate their customers' rights as gravely as they did, they get away with paying what amounts to little more than a token fee.

bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319760)

talk about a slap on the wrist, the fine is pocket change to a global corp. like Sony!

Trusted Computing (3, Insightful)

HAL9000_mirror (1029222) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319804)

"Although it's great to see this as a victory for consumers, I can't help but wonder about the next wave of DRM schemes."
With any disrupting technology, one can use it for "safer" computing or "treacherous" computing (remember P2P?!). It almost looks like entertainment industry is waiting to embrace this (one once it matures) and use it treacherously. BTW, my research area is trusted computing and I believe this technology is the first step towards safer computing. It is so very un-scientific to blindly disregard any technology at inception. All in all, you want it or not, corporations are going to push it into your home PC very soon...

Re:Trusted Computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319948)

How will you defeat TCPA on your own machine? I'm guessing that you've thought about this, since you're a researcher.

I can see TCPA being very useful for business and military applications, but I feel ill at the thought of it being forced on home users.

Seems to me that the goal of the "attacker" is to get at the private key stored within the TCPA chip on his own machine. With that, the "attacker" can fake remote attestation, and with it, gain the ability to override TCPA and force systems to trust him. How would you go about doing this? Or would you use a different approach?

Re:Trusted Computing (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320040)

What about virtualization?

Fair Compensation (5, Insightful)

Alyred (667815) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319880)

So, let's see. When Sony thinks that someone has "pirated" music, they sue them for, what, $1,500 per song, yet illegally invade people's computers and privacy and get off with a hundred dollars or so per person?

Where's the justice in that?

Re:Fair Compensation (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320116)

There was no actual financial damage from this, though.

Re:Fair Compensation (1)

Alyred (667815) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320276)

Really? You don't call my time removing this crap at $120 an hour per machine financial losses?

Re:Fair Compensation (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320396)

Really? I was programming a revolutionary software app and the spyware destroyed all my work. I lost at least 4.3 billion dollars alone because of the Sony Rootkit.

Hey, if they can make bullshit value claims, so can I. They would claim more if they were "hacked" or if the newest Moby album was pirated.... ok maybe not the moby album...

Why? (3, Insightful)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319896)

Why did the states take the settlement? There is no way that Sony could have won this. TX and CA should have rode it out!

Re:Why? (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319954)

No offense dude. But that's a dumb qestion. The lawsuit was being headed by the regular corruptable people - Sony, a company very likely full of corrupted people, just passed the infection along. And so they got a small fine. Just enough to say that "something" was done.

1.5 Mil? Someone got paid (4, Insightful)

BlueCoder (223005) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319902)

60 million would be an insult. They spend more than that on ad campagnes. 1.5 million? That's like a paper cut. On the low side it should have been 200 million to settle. There is some serious corruption going on.

That tickle on the wrist sure hurt (1)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319910)

Sony BMG Music Entertainment will pay $1.5 million and kick in thousands more in customer refunds to settle lawsuits brought by California and Texas over music CDs that installed a hidden anti-piracy program on consumers' computers.

I'm sure the ashtray of the Sony CFO's Mercedes 600SEL will miss that pocket change.

Slashdot editors brainwashed or what? (5, Interesting)

raap (675041) | more than 7 years ago | (#17319936)

This story report is horrible! First it's the Sony rootkit. Name it as such. Not some "DRM" bullshit. Second: "victory for consumers" ? This is wrong on so many levels, I don't believe it. We are customers, not consumers. And no, it's not a victory, not at all. Sony did commit thousands of computer crimes for purely financial interests and got a slap on the wrist. Kevin Mitnick would be in Jail for 3000 years for this. And if my information is correct, the settlement states explicitly, that Sony does not recognize any guilt. Sorry for this rant. But how can such a misleading article be on the front page?

mod up ze parent! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320162)

My sentiments exactly.

Re:Slashdot editors brainwashed or what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320702)

But how can such a misleading article be on the front page?


You're new here, aren't you?

Re:Slashdot editors brainwashed or what? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320844)

Especially within the last 6 months, the editors pick the more inflammatory submission about a topic (facts need not be considered) and slap on a useless and sensational title. The information in the articles is interesting, but only the most emotional and least factually correct are picked. I guess it drives up the page views.

The next wave? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17319990)

Why wonder about the next DRM scheme? It's simple: don't get caught. Malware that's so well hidden that you won't know about it.

Re:The next wave? (1)

sqlrob (173498) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320048)

That's what they thought they had with this. It can still be found. It's hard, but someone will see it and bring it to light. It may not be quickly, but chances are it will happen.

drm not favored (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320012)

think real hard about this one, .. given the choice consumers will choose non-drm over drm. It's really a hard sell to consumer. I'm for the unlimited download 5$/mo.club and the artist get paid directely from that, cut out the middleman, the artist/inventor get paid more money and that can be based on a useage of IP percentage.

Re:drm not favored (1)

egypt_jimbob (889197) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320712)

...I'm for the unlimited download 5$/mo.club and the artist get paid directely from that, cut out the middleman, ...
One third of the population is middlemen and they don't take kindly to being cut out. Seriously, that's what this is all about: Sony is a middleman and by downloading music we're cutting them out. To protect their precarious position, they tried to prevent copying. Their prevention turned out to be a bit heavy-handed and has now prompted more people to believe that cutting them out is a good idea.

What about criminal charges? (5, Insightful)

zentigger (203922) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320024)

If I hacked into thousands of computers and installed a root kit without permission, I'm pretty sure I would be facing enough jail-time to seriously stretch my sphincter. In Texas, I bet that would probably be enough to get the chair! Someone should be going to jail for this kinda crap, and Sony should have their corporate charter dismissed and the assets seized. (corporate death sentence)

Re:What about criminal charges? (4, Insightful)

mpcooke3 (306161) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320476)

Now, now, don't try and make out that the law would somehow treat you "differently" to Sony.

All you would need to do is become part or a cartel that engages in international price fixing, rip off millions of music lovers and thousands of artists, hire hundreds of lawyers and lobbyists and you too will get a decent legal defence.

Mod parent up! (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320516)

Electronic Warfare / Electronic Terrorism - what else do you call something that compromises 1,000s of government computers, business systems, and home computers?
The rootkit trojan fiasco deserved a military response.

If the source of this digital infection was a certain middle east Muslim country,
the Bush administration would have been tripping over itself to start another attack.

Re:What about criminal charges? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320680)

Completely off topic, but I'm from Texas. We haven't had the chair in many, many years. We now shoot people up with pioson and what them twitch to death for several hours. Totally more humane.

Re:What about criminal charges? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321408)

Sony should have their corporate charter dismissed and the assets seized.

      No, just take the board of directors who were in charge at the time, and throw them in jail. Whoops. Let's see if the new board decides to do this kind of thing again.

Re:What about criminal charges? (2, Insightful)

Ender Ryan (79406) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321676)

Someone should be going to jail for this kinda crap, and Sony should have their corporate charter dismissed and the assets seized.

You know, I "hate" a lot of companies. In particular, I "hate" Microsoft -- although I only truly hate companies guilty of more egregious crimes. Not because they are the "most evil" company in the world, but simply because they interfere with my career, harass me at work, and have done a lot of damage in my industry(IMHO).

Still... MS corporate execs perjured themselves in court on a regular basis, to the detriment of the entire American public, throughout their whole anti-trust trial, and I never called for the disbandment of their entire company and the seizing of all their assets(how the parent got modded up... some mods must be demented). Do I think some of the top execs at MS deserve to do some time? Maybe. I believe they deserve a fair shake in court if it came to that.

Anyway, my point is this: many of you participating in this 2 minute hate, like the parent poster, are being absolutely fucking ridiculous.

That said, I do consider the "rootkit" to be criminal, and I do indeed think criminal charges should be considered. One must take into consideration, however, the "rootkit" was not developed by any division of Sony, and we cannot rush to conclusions that any of the Sony execs you folks are calling for immediate pound-me-in-the-ass sentences for had any idea what it was exactly they were doing.

Riiight. I'm sure a few other people care about being reasonable and objective... But let the furor will continue unabated.

Now go ahead. Call me a "fanboi" again.

so what's even lower than a slap on the wrist? (1)

lashi (822466) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320102)

1.3 mil, hmm... I am sure that's even less than a slap on the wrist for Sony. So what's even lower than a slap on the wrist, a tickle on the finger?

so as a consumer, am I still allowed to sue Sony for "hacking my computer and breaking it."? Probably not, eh? How about I got and install rootkit on some Sony's computer?

-------------------

say what's on your mind - online confession and anon email @ my website http://www.sayitt.com/ [sayitt.com]

Re:so what's even lower than a slap on the wrist? (1)

man_ls (248470) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320788)

If you exclude yourself from the Class in writing, yes, you are. Otherwise, no, you are not.

Re:so what's even lower than a slap on the wrist? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321394)

I am sure that's even less than a slap on the wrist for Sony.

      Sure. It's actually a good investment.

      "What, you mean that for just 1.5M dollars we can put a rootkit on 2 million computers? Right on!"

I wonder how much Sony paid their lawers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320110)

I get a feeling they billed Sony for more than $1,500,000. I realize they're already on the pay role, but I assume they still need to bill their time to the case their working on.

Not as bad as Microsoft... (1)

gamer4Life (803857) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320136)

With Microsoft, you've got to PAY THEM to install virus-prone software on your computer...

I dunno (1)

hypermanng (155858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320146)

Though the payout on these lawsuits isn't high, the story represents far more of a disincentive for music vendors to pursue shady DRM-like courses than most posters seem to recognize. The dollar value is low, but it sets a precedent, cost them money in legal fees as well as lost development investment, and most importantly makes would-be corporate coalition partners skittish.

Of course, I expect like-minded corporations to fund a fairly concerted lobbying effort after this to create some stealth legistlation legalizing whatever skullduggery they please. The bill will be called the Media Freedom Act or something like that.

No more trust (1)

Richard Frost (18848) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320164)

You mean the wave after the current wave of DRM we haven't detected yet?

what I hope is next (1)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320202)

Although it's great to see this as a victory for consumers, I can't help but wonder about the next wave of DRM schemes."
whatever it is, I hope it's something where a riot of people with bats and chains can chase it down and attack it like on iRobot. Yeah, it wasn't really a DRM update that made the robots freak out but dammit, I wanna physically harm a DRM technology!

each? (1)

nkkdprgrmmr (630319) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320250)

so, 1.5 million to each customer, right? otherwise, that's bullshit.

Translation: (1)

Chas (5144) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320262)

A couple law firms in each state made some money, Sony expends more effort farting than it takes to make 1.5 million, and the people fucked over directly by their CRAPWARE get a shitty pittance.

weren't 2 million pcs affected? (1)

AlgorithMan (937244) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320370)

iirc 2 million pcs were affected, so everyone gets 75 cents?

Completely unacceptable! (4, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320474)

First they should be criminally liable. What they did is computer-sabotage for commercial gain. Only prison-time is acceptable.

Second, they should have to pay everybody the cost of professional cleanup. I would say that is at least $150 per customer hit, probably more.

I think they got out of thi extremely cheap. Not acceptable for clearly criminal behaviour.

Re:Completely unacceptable! (1)

Nephilium (684559) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320754)

As an aside... they are offering $175 to each person who complains to them about the rootkit... or fills out their form...

Not that I'm happy with the outcome... but they are getting hit for that... assuming people fill out the paperwork...

Nephilium

With some notable exceptions, businessmen favor free enterprise in general but are opposed to it when it comes to themselves. - Milton Friedman

Re:Completely unacceptable! (2, Interesting)

gweihir (88907) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321464)

As an aside... they are offering $175 to each person who complains to them about the rootkit... or fills out their form...

Ok, that is reasonable. But that they can get out of this without any criminal liability is just not ritght. In what way are they different from a common hacker, except that they commited the crime far more often, for commercial gain and in a conspiracy?

nice job (1)

Treates2 (1004837) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320572)

sony pays 1.5 mill. for their stupidicy.. wtf!! i smell some money being handled behind are backs. thats a billionare donating only 1.5 million every 5 years for charity.. it's freaking flip flopping fap fap fap fucking bullshit!!

Re:nice job (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321374)

sony pays 1.5 mill. for their stupidicy..

      This from a state well known for its multi-million dollar medical malpractice suits. I guess you have to feel sorry for poor Sony, your average physician apparently is worth more than them.

Just boycott these companies. (1)

liftphreaker (972707) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320654)

Consumers need to wake up and just boycott these companies. There is no other way to set things right. We need to talk with our money. As long as foolish people keep buying their DRM infested garbage these companies continue to thrive. Doesn't matter how glittery and shiny their next new toy is, people must just say no. The zune is another top contender for this treatment. Together with the DRM infested BluRay players and stuff.

Re:Just boycott these companies. (1, Flamebait)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320760)

I was boycotting Sony until they released the best rear-projection TV on the market. What can I say? Should I watch substandard TV just to make a point?

Re:Just boycott these companies. (5, Insightful)

NeutronCowboy (896098) | more than 7 years ago | (#17320880)

Holy crap, batman - someone completely missed the point of a boycott. Note: you boycott a company if you decide that you are not going to buy their products regardless of their intrinsic merit. So yes, you boycott a company even if they release the best rear-projection TV ever, or if it comes with the kitchen sink and does your laundry, too. Finally - can I point out that you just placed watching TV on a nice TV set above having principles and following through with them?

Wow.

Re:Just boycott these companies. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320926)

No, but you could maybe turn off the TV and pick up a book. Maybe even a dictionary. You could maybe, I don't know.. look up the definition of substandard, because you obviously don't know what it means.


Or you could sit around, eat ding dongs, and be a good little Sony consumerist whore. I think your choice has already been made.

Re:Just boycott these companies. (1)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321476)

I was boycotting Sony until they released the best rear-projection TV on the market. What can I say? Should I watch substandard TV just to make a point?


Substandard Standard
Best != Standard

Therefore not having the best does not mean having to settle for substandard.

Just bitch on slashdot. That'll show 'em. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17321492)

"Consumers need to wake up and just boycott these companies."

Yeah, that piratebay sure is some strong "boycotting". Let's copy some CD's for our friends in protest.

"There is no other way to set things right."

Don't do the crime if you don't want to do the time.

"We need to talk with our money."

"I'm not hurting anyone because I never would have bought it anyway".

They still have these DRM CDs for sale in Mexico (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17320714)

About a month ago, I bought a CD that had version three of the MediaMax software in Mexico, that infected my Windows XP machine. This was a two-year-old CD--they haven't pulled these CDs from the shelves down there.

The infection is actually quite easy to remove. The Wikipedia article [wikipedia.org] details how to remove it. It's really simple:

sc query sbcphid
sc stop sbcphid
sc delete sbcphid
del \windows\system32\drivers\sbcphid.sys


Re:They still have these DRM CDs for sale in Mexic (2, Informative)

xeno314 (661565) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321202)

You realize that this isn't the same DRM/Rootkit that is in controversy (XCP) here, right? (That's specifically noted in the Wikipedia article you cite.)

Shot heard around the world. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17321046)

"Although it's great to see this as a victory for consumers, I can't help but wonder about the next wave of DRM schemes.""

What did you expect when pirates declared war against content providers? Hugs and kisses?

Hang on here... (1)

neonmagic (532879) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321090)

Why isn't Sony being criminally charged for various computer crimes? Why are they NOT being punished?

Are the laws different for big companies and rich people, than for the little bloke? (I know the answer to this, but couldn't help but pose the question anyways!).

Dave

5 OTHER states still have suits. (1)

headkase (533448) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321462)

/. writeup totally confused: Read a better writeup [zdnet.com] . California and Texas have settled - five other states still get to rake Sony across the coals.

Oops 13 other states. (3, Informative)

headkase (533448) | more than 7 years ago | (#17321472)

My bad.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>