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Social Network Users Have Ruined Their Privacy

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the putting-it-all-out-there dept.

Privacy 308

Steve Kerrison writes "'There's little point in worrying about ID cards, RFID tags and spyware when more and more people are throwing away their privacy anyway. And the potential consequences are dire.' I've written an article on the dangers of social networks and how many users seem to forget just how public the information they post can be. This follows a warning sent out by the CS department of Bristol University, advising students that they risk lost job opportunities, getting in trouble with their parents and more, if they don't take care. The warning, however, really applies to all social network users, be they college students or over-zealous blog posters."

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Social Networking is a dangerous idea (0)

ZahnRosen (1040004) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365898)

Between sexual predators, kids who tell all and then regret it when it comes time to look for a job, our daughters posts nearly nude photos and our sons enjoying that a bit more than is healthy, these are a bad idea. I just checked the traffic numbers for Myspace, 3rd most popular in the US and 5th on the planet... Where are the safeguards?

Not half as dangerous as a Mulsum controlled web (-1, Troll)

The_Fire_Horse (552422) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365938)

Can you imagine what it would be like if Muslums ran the internet?

ALLAH be FUCKED if I let Muslims run MY country!

Fucking Islams and their medievil tactics using force to spread the holey word of the koran - doesnt it just piss you off?
This is now the 20th century and yet they continue to use 14th century strong arm terror tactics to spread the word of their virul brainwashing.

Hi, I'm The_Fire_Horse [slashdot.org] and you might remember me from such posts as
IsPorn - the 5 pillars of masturbation, and
Muslem Women - YUK - cover up your face, biatch - YOU UGLY!

Today, we will continue our investigation into this so called "Religeon of Peace" that is IsSLUM.

Without rehashing the lists here, it is clear that over 95% of all riots, terror attacks and religous based murders have been conducted by muslims in the last 25 years. Dont get me wrong, Christians were absolute pricks during the crusades and just about ALL religeons have been arseholes at some point during their existance. The thing is, we are not talking about the dark ages, or medievil times - this is 2006, and we as a people should know better.

People who talk against muSLUMs are often killed (taco - please dont post my IP - ktx), for example Salman Rushdie and that poor bastard in the netherlands. You just cannot seem to talk about islam without fear of retribution - all other religeons, for hundreds of years have at least tolerated debate - Hell, just yesterday the fucking vatican stated that 'Intelligent Design' isnt all it cracked up to be (HA - take that Bush!)

So, what can the average Slashdotter do to fix this situation?
ANSWER
1. Keep an on the the patterns of violence mathematically (I may be a troll, but you cannot argue against the sheer volume of news reports) so that you see that it is muSLUMs causing all the trouble

2. Be aware that discussions about the downsides of isSLUM can be hazardous to your health. Try a simple argument with a muslim person on a non serious topic - then say "ALLAH IS A CUNT" and watch your learned friend hit the roof and pull out a knife from the teatowel on his head. Duck and cover.

3. Vote 'HELL NO' to having islam control YOUR country (that is their target, and the core purpose of all the jihads - to have islam based governments and their 'own' laws [shudder]

Stand united fellow slashdot geeks - together we can spread the word that we DO NOT WANT ISLUM IN OUR GOVERNMENT thank you very much


Always remember the slogan: "ALLAH be FUCKED if I let Muslims run MY country!"

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (5, Insightful)

maximthemagnificent (847709) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365978)

>> Where are the safegaurds?

With the parents, of course. Adults control the world children live in, right? Once your kids are adults
(and the transition to adulthood starts around age 8, earlier for the smart ones), if you haven't taught
them basic common sense (not common whatsoever IMO), then it's on you. We're supposed to limit
the ability of people to communicate with one another? Communication is, after all, what you make of it.

Maxim

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (2, Insightful)

silentounce (1004459) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366042)

"Where are the safeguards?"

It's called common sense. There should be no safeguards. If you're stupid enough to blab to the world about drunken panty raids then you deserve the consequences. As for the sexual predator thing, well, you have to educate your children about the danger and make sure they never meet anyone from the internet in real life without some heavy digging and never by themselves. Besides, the person they are meeting will probably have this same issue about privacy so you can find out a lot about them. Anyway, I know others are going to say this. It is not myspace's responsibility. It is the user or the user's guardian that is ultimately responsible.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366108)

our daughters posts nearly nude photos and our sons enjoying that a bit more than is healthy

Yeah, if my sons were enjoying the nearly nude photos of my daughters, I'd be a bit worried too.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (1)

Kerstyun (832278) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366876)

Iah hails from Ar-kansas, y'insensiertive clod!!!

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (5, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366250)

Sounds like more of a problem with your kids, frankly. The danger of sexual predators has been blown way the hell out of proportion...Your kid is still far more likely to be molested by someone you know. It's typical media scaremongering...The number of reported cases of actual assault/molestation are crazy low.

Might as well ask where the safeguards are at your local high school...The opportunities for trouble there are way the hell greater than on MySpace or similar.

The concern for privacy, however is much more real. You don't have to show your tits to be compromising yourself to future employers and current school administrators. I wish like hell I'd never started posting under my own name...I ought to change it, but Satanicpuppy has such a nice ring...

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (1)

The-Ixian (168184) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366644)

Quantify "crazy low" please.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366880)

Search for "MySpace" on the National Center for Victims of Crime [ncvc.org] website, and you get a staggering 12 hits, mostly to articles talking about parents groups freaking out.

There is also a victim report [usdoj.gov] (pdf warning) from the DoJ, but the most recent one is 2000, so not much can be made of that. However, searching the DoJ website itself [usdoj.gov] turns up a big 29 hits for MySpace, which drops to 12 hits if you refine the search to include "sexual".

That's pretty damn low.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (5, Insightful)

GreggBz (777373) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366318)

Good grief we live in a culture of fear... How many young people have been damaged on Myspace? I know a few teens that spend lots of hours on the site, and I must say, they are pretty normal. But you know if one girl gets abducted out of the gazillion like her that are registered on Myspace it will be bloody HEADLINE NEWS!!!! How long have we had these stories of the big bad Internet? I feel like the producers at (major cable news network) are just hoping that there will be some sort of weird sexual predator mania with a million victims across the USA that propagates from the dark corners of Myspace just so they can say, "I told you so!"

The young people on this country that are in trouble are from impoverished households, have abusive parents or suffered some real life trauma that did not involve a website. They have problems not because of myspace.

Yea, spending your life on-line gabbing is probably not healthy, obviously, but relax folks. Tech-savvy, pop culture suburbanite kids are not the troubled delinquents of society.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (3, Insightful)

owlnation (858981) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366390)

Between sexual predators, kids who tell all and then regret it when it comes time to look for a job, our daughters posts nearly nude photos and our sons enjoying that a bit more than is healthy, these are a bad idea. I just checked the traffic numbers for Myspace, 3rd most popular in the US and 5th on the planet... Where are the safeguards?
Where are the safeguards? In your home. In your school, and in your church if you believe in that. The behavior of your children is YOUR responsibility. Not mine, and nor it should be the Government's - there is far too much censorship already. Stop asking the Government to think of the children, and start thinking about your own. Spend time with your children, ask them to explain how MySpace or whatever works and educate them in how to use such things safely. Or ban them from them if you're that kind of parent.

Social networking adds nothing new to the World, it just makes it easier to see it. Which is a good thing. (I'm willing to except, rather than accept, MySpace as a good thing though, just from the tech pov.)

Ok, I'm a pornographer and biased. Freedom of speech is still the most important thing on Earth, social networking is an important aspect of that, so please don't spoil it with some foxnews-fud-fuelled family values jihad. Predators make good cheap easy copy, but they are far more dangerous in a shopping mall than they are online.

The irony of Fox News spouting fud about MySpace while being part of the self same organization that owns it is not lost on me. Nor is the fact that other networks will spout fud about MySpace for reasons of competition.

Social Networking is a global coffee shop (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366400)

The only difference between "social networking" on a forum or one of the Web 2.0 sites and the chit-chat in a local coffee shop is that everyone can hear the gossip and commentary unless the content is deleted. Even then, archive sites still sometimes keep copies of the "embarassing" content.

If you're not willing to take the heat of people looking for someone to blame or hate, don't post. And never, ever forget about issues like libel and slander, because even the best of wisecracking comedians get tagged as producing "hateful" material by people and groups that have a chip on their shoulder.

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (1)

joshetc (955226) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366472)

Author is a dumbass. There is a huge difference between some idiot putting their information on the internet and the government forcing us to broadcast our information via RFID. If he doesn't realize that something wrong with him..

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366612)

... Where are the safeguards?

The only place it has ever been; in our own hands.

Yes, our hands are frail and prone to error, particularly in youth. Such it is, such it has always been, such it always shall be.

Oh, what fools these mortals be. Get used to it.

KFG

can you share some of the photos on 4chan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366756)

pictures or GTFO

Re:Social Networking is a dangerous idea (3, Interesting)

neimon (713907) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366804)

It's hard to create safeguards when we're not even sure of all the negatives.

I remember before there were consumer protection laws, and if you bought a defective car, too bad sucker. That was the way for years. Am I going to argue that all safeguards are an infringement? No. Am I going to argue that we're figuring it out? Yes.

Please don't apply simple "take personal responsibility for the fact the world sucks and hates you" rules. We can make it better, but we have to know what's wrong first.

It's nice once in a while to talk about what's right, but, yeah, that's not nearly as sexy and frightening.

Keep in mind (5, Insightful)

denstark (979527) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365904)

There is a difference between throwing your freedom away, and having it taken away against your own will.

Re:Keep in mind (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366064)

Perhaps, but privacy and freedom are not the same thing.

Freedom concerns the ability to make choices and take action. Privacy concerns other people knowing things about you which you might not want them to.

Re:Keep in mind (2, Informative)

Potor (658520) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366152)

if knowledge is power, then there is only a theoretical difference between freedom and privacy. what people know about you severely affects your ability to act.

Re:Keep in mind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366190)

What is powerful is unique to each individual and relies on what that individual empowers. Nothing is "power" in and of itself. The people who believe in and live by such ideals as "________ is power" are obviously suffering more from their own loss of em-Power-ment than any outside threats.

Re:Keep in mind (1)

Potor (658520) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366274)

Agreed, but I did not limit K to P. Knowledge can be power without exhausting the set of power. And anyway, technology is proof that power is at least knowledge, et vice versa.

Re:Keep in mind (3, Interesting)

Potor (658520) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366136)

That's true - unless social networking is being set up as a sort of honey trap encouraging people to compromise their futures. Hence, I would not stress this difference as a dichotomy - but rather as two moments of the same phenomenon.

People are giving away their freedom within a now-corporate framework that encourages this kind of activity. Just remember that.

As with fidelity/client cards, purchase-rewards, and fast-tracking at airports, the web 2.0 is training us to surrender our personal lives for the most meager of rewards. This kind of surrender almost seems propaedeutic for a greater, involuntary loss of privacy. But then again, Americans have already lost their freedom to credit reports.

Re:Keep in mind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366262)

There is a difference between throwing your freedom away, and having it taken away against your own will.


Just for the record. Is that your personal opinion?

It's true more and more are loosing privacy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17365906)

but at the same time, more and more people losing that privacy are becoming more and more popular than they would have been any other way... Blogging, etc. makes Geeks today turn in to the popular cheerleeders and football players of yesteryear....Just as those cheerleeders could have lost a job opportunity by being the town slut, the bloggers can get in to hot water if they don't watch what they say and do all the time.

Re:It's true more and more are loosing privacy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17365942)

Blogging, etc. makes Geeks today turn in to the popular cheerleeders and football players of yesteryear.
Only among other losers that don't count though.

Anti-social. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17365920)

I advice us all to not be social.

I HATE YOU ALL!!

@Generation (1, Interesting)

TodMinuit (1026042) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365934)

To those born in the 1990s, the @ symbol is more familar than the dial tone. Gone is pen and paper, replaced with keyboards and pixels. Friendships are made via mathematical graphs instead of face-to-face contact. Teenagers no longer crave privacy, instead opting to publish their entire life in a blog. Small circles of friends now strech around the world. Graphical paradise has replaced your own backyard.

Welcome to the @Generation.

Re:@Generation (2, Interesting)

gogodidi (885953) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365992)

puh... close one, I was born in 1989... but seriously, a lot of my friends at school are pretty stuck in this social networking thing. One girl at school even flew to aberdeen to date someone she met over myspace... I am so glad I hate myspace... After reading a book called "crypto" by Steven Levy, and reading about Diffie and Zimmerman made me realize how precious privacy really is. I am not as private as I could be, I gave my website URL to slashdot, and on my website I have my real name somewhere, and on other websites I am not nearly as private as I should be, but I am not telling every schmoe out on the internet what I did last weekend.

Re:@Generation (2, Informative)

silentounce (1004459) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366092)

Kudos to being on slashdot at age 16-17, but please tell me that you're really some creepy old guy or a dog posing as a teenager. I don't think I can take the fact that some born in 1989 is posting on slashdot. And seriously, you should do everything you can to erase all links between your online persona and your real one. Have two, it's fun. You can be careful what you say with your real one, and do what you like with the other.

On the internet, no one should know you're a teenager.

Re:@Generation (1)

It'sYerMam (762418) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366406)

I was the born the year after, but have been posting on slashdot for a a few years (I have been using linux for longer than that, and coding for longer still!)

Re:@Generation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366224)

puh... close one, I was born in 1989... After reading a book called "crypto" by Steven Levy, and reading about Diffie and Zimmerman made me realize how precious privacy really is. ... I gave my website URL to slashdot, and on my website I have my real name somewhere, and on other websites I am not nearly as private as I should be, but I am not telling every schmoe out on the internet what I did last weekend.

Thanks for sharing.

There's no there there (3, Insightful)

catfood (40112) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365954)

News flash: If you say dumb things on the Internet, someone might notice.

How this constitutes a hazard unique to "social networks" is neither explained nor hinted at.

The article presents a non-issue wrapped in snark and hype.

Re:There's no there there (1)

phoenixwade (997892) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366004)

Although I agree the material isn't presented very well, it's not a "Non-issue"

There are already a number of situations where enough personal information is presented on a MySpace or similar social networking site to use for identity theft.

Re:There's no there there (3, Insightful)

catfood (40112) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366122)

But it's not the "social networking" aspect that does it. The same sort of leakage can occur with a blog, on an ordinary personal page, or via a much-forwarded email message. The article doesn't say anything at all that would indicate a special risk inherent to social networking sites.

Re:There's no there there (1)

plover (150551) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366596)

He hinted at it in TFA. Social networking sites "encourage" such behavior via peer pressure. "I gotta get a hundred people on my friends list!" or "I have to have more friends than Jane just to make her jealous." And one proven way to get people to notice you is to be more shocking on your page, via nudity, stunts or whatever.

Re:There's no there there (1)

in10d (555219) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366516)

> News flash: If you say dumb things on the Internet, someone might notice.
>
> How this constitutes a hazard unique to "social networks" is neither explained
> nor hinted at.

Maybe it is not explained in the article, but both you and I, and many slashdot readers know why it is so.

I can tell it in one sentence:

Explosion of social web networking (think: blogs) makes content creators from people, who otherwise would never become authors.

Re:There's no there there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366676)

Old comments on USENET from a decade ago are already coming back to haunt politicians these days. I guarantee both the Republicans and Democrats are archiving all sorts of things off of the internet, just in case these bloggers and myspace users decide to run for office when they're older.

...but most people still don't known this (1)

bagofbeans (567926) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366898)

Yeah, you know how to install an OS, ignore phishers, and you won't execute a virus or rootkit. So you're in a few percent of the internet 'consumers'.

I wish he'd mentioned emails, too. Here's the lecture: Don't ever put something in an email that you wouldn't want everyone to read.

Here's the more subtle lecture: Always send to your personal email account any work email involving you that you might want a copy of later for legal reasons... and if it's for very legal reasons, cc your personal email account when communicating to HR or Legal at work...

Stupid is as stupid does (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17365958)

advising students that they risk lost job opportunities

fear of sexual predators and other unsavoury types
These are the reasons I decide to post anonymously at Slashdot. I think you can guess which one is my biggest concern.

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (2, Interesting)

IkeTo (27776) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366012)

> advising students that they risk lost job opportunities

Strange. When I seek for jobs I worry much more about employers not knowing me enough rather than they know me too much. And no employer will be bored enough to actually read every message in your blog to find your "most silly moment" before he decides whether to hire you.

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (1)

unts (754160) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366068)

Hi, I'm the article's author.

I see your point, but like I said in TFA, if somebody can write a script to seek out predators on myspace, so too can somebody write a script to profile somebody based on their social networking posting, saving them the trouble of reading the boring (i.e. most) bits.

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366138)

> so too can somebody write a script to profile somebody
> based on their social networking posting

Or they could type your name into google, read that article and still conclude the author is a moron?

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366258)

"And no employer will be bored enough to actually read every message in your blog to find your "most silly moment" before he decides whether to hire you."
 
Not true. I work in recruitment (my director prefers "talent acquisition") for a very large organization, and we will "skim" everything we can find easily. Granted, we're not going to waste a ton of time. If you have one ridiculous post, that's fine, but if you're like this guy [simplynotright.com] ... this isn't BS, he actually applied and listed himself as owner of simplyNOTRIGHT.com LLC in the employment history section of his app. And if you think the site isn't that incriminating, do a little digging.

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (1)

silentounce (1004459) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366102)

"fear of sexual predators and other unsavoury types"

Don't worry, CmdrTaco doesn't really have time to read comments anymore.

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366106)

You're a sexual predator?

Re:Stupid is as stupid does (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366112)

That's disguisting.

When was the last time you washed your asshole?

Dire, I tell you, dire (5, Insightful)

MarkusQ (450076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365974)

While the consequences may be as dire as you claim, this is not certain. Even if true, it may still be rational for people to tell all on the web.

In the mid nineties a friend of mine who was putting a game-theory heavy education to work as a top notch security consultant claimed that we had passed a phase boundary and that privacy was essentially dead. At which point he started "living publicly," doing things like making his daily schedule (in detail) available to the world, sending all his receipts (for everything) to the IRS,etc.

When challenged on this rather odd behavior, and asked what he was trying to prove and to whom, he replied that he wasn't trying to prove anything to anyone except perhaps himself. His thinking was that having no privacy isn't nearly as bad as having no privacy and not coming to terms with that fact. He then walked us through a few cases (such as blackmail) and showed whywhen you were better off not getting in the bind of acting as if you had secrets when in fact others knew them.

Perhaps the MySpace people are at least subconsciously reacting in the same way to the growing threats to our privacy--by getting it all out there, so if anyone tries to use it against them they are effectively immunized.

--MarkusQ

I call B.S. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366398)

So, what's his name, date-of-birth, SSN, Driver's License Number, Address and Phone Number?

Oh, wait. Maybe privacy isn't dead, and there ARE limitations and ramifications to living publicly.

Your friend is either a hypocrit or a twit. I find it best to avoid both, let alone follow the advice of a fool.

And I call troll (1)

MarkusQ (450076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366540)

So, what's his name, date-of-birth, SSN, Driver's License Number, Address and Phone Number?

While you may keep such information on people you worked with over ten years ago, I don't. The fact that he was living in such a way that he "had no secrets" doesn't any any way imply that I (or for that matter, anyone else) followed him around collecting the information. His first name was "Dave," he would be about 40 now, and that's about all I recall.

And to forestall another line of troll-attack I can see coming: he would not reveal passwords, etc., though he did point out that working on the assumption that all his personal information was public knowledge forced him to think carefully about his password policy.

--MarkusQ

Some things you can't immunize yourself from (2, Insightful)

hellfire (86129) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366522)

The privacy issue du jour in these past two decades has been homosexuality. You can't tell by looking at someone if they are gay. It shouldn't matter if they are or not, but many people (who I will declare as narrow minded pricks) do think it matters. Not only will these type of people judge homosexuals unfairly, another subset of these people may commit violence upon homosexuals.

Employers can judge you for any number of reasons. Employers are also looking for any reason to filter you out and judge you even before you can prove to them that you'd be a great employee. I don't like the fact that employers judge me because I have a socially and politically charged blog of my own, but I must come to terms with that by hiding it from them so they can't use that against me.

People make bad judgements for stupid reasons, and make stupid decisions based on those bad judgements. Those decisions affect people's lives. The fear of you or your family not being able to survive is a great motivating factor to not post intimate details of your life online for everyone to see. If you must, keep it anonymous.

Society isn't open because there are too many closed minds. There is then no other choice but to hide information that close minds should not see. The last thing I need is my son or my job taken away from me because of some idiot reading something I posted which has nothing to do with either my work ethic or my ability as a parent.

Re:Some things you can't immunize yourself from (1)

MarkusQ (450076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366672)

You can't tell by looking at someone if they are gay. It shouldn't matter if they are or not, but many people (who I will declare as narrow minded pricks) do think it matters. Not only will these type of people judge homosexuals unfairly, another subset of these people may commit violence upon homosexuals.

I might point out that you yourself seem to fall into your "narrow minded" category, since you obviously think it matters as well. You clearly wish it didn't, but that's neither here nor there.

And, you might be correct. But there are also those who will tell you that life in the closet is far worse than life in the open, no matter what fears say otherwise. I don't know which view is correct, but I can tell you that you are wrong when you claim that:

There is then no other choice but to hide information that close minds should not see.

Since this is clearly not the case. You may not like the other choices, but they are there whether you like them or not.

--MarkusQ

You can't tell by looking at someone if they are g (1)

way2trivial (601132) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366678)

speak for yourself please..

Re:Dire, I tell you, dire (1)

PeeAitchPee (712652) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366620)

Perhaps the MySpace people are at least subconsciously reacting in the same way to the growing threats to our privacy--by getting it all out there, so if anyone tries to use it against them they are effectively immunized.

Man, I wish I could agree with you, but I don't. The vast majority of MySpace "tell-all" users are either a) stupid kids who don't know any better and don't realize there are long-term (permanent) rammifications of what they post when they're 13 or b) stupid adults who *should* know better but don't, and get busted after someone finds their near-nekkid weekend party pics etc. MySpace has made having a personal website accessible to the unwashed masses, and the unwashed masses don't even understand the Internet well enough to realize that maybe, well, showing *everything* to *everyone* can be a bad thing sometimes.

I always tell everyone (2, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365976)

When posting something online about yourself consider is it something you'd want your mom, your boss, or a sex offender to know about. Why? Because all three of those will have access to it. If the answer is no in any case, then don't post it. Don't assume that they aren't savvy enough, Google has lowered the barrier so almost anyone can find what they want. Don't rely on technical protections of sites either, especially sites explicitly designed for sharing information.

The web is public, that's just how it goes. Don't put personal information on it that you don't want the public to see, and yes your mom is part of the public.

Re:I always tell everyone (3, Insightful)

Snorklefish (639711) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366208)

I work for the courts (OMG IAAFL). It is understood that judges live under the spotlight. To avoid the risks created by the spotlight, the rule judges live by is to say nothing they wouldn't mind seeing on the front page of the newspaper... too many "private" conservations have created the downfall of too many judges and politicians. The thing about the internet... is that you never know when lighting will strike and make YOU the target of public interest.

Re:I always tell everyone (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366338)

I think that's a pretty good rule for anyone, though I can see why it's doubly so for judges and politicians...You never know when that one, off-the-cuff remark will be picked up out of context and trumpeted as proof that you're biased against

case in point: Tom Stephens (1)

sjwest (948274) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366234)

was an english suspect in the recent english street walkers murders (it was reported in germany), Tom had an myspace account, the media thus determined he alone was guilty becuase he had a myspace account.



Tom was released, but he must be regarded by all persons now as a deviant pervert for having a myspace account and knowing the persons. His employer is Tesco's (a walmart type operation).



Re:I always tell everyone (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366796)

When posting something online about yourself consider is it something you'd want your mom, your boss, or a sex offender to know about.

The thing is, we don't live our lives in SCIFs (Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility) and most of the real compromises happen when artifial barriers you've built up are broken down. Yes, I have a "slashdot id" which is different from my real id, but it's not like friends and such don't know about it, it's not like it's a deep personal secret. And if you compile everything I've ever said about life, education, work etc. on slashdot perhaps even the other way around.

Throw in some bloggers writing about me (I don't blog) and maybe you can hook up me (find some "official" photo somewhere) with this vid you found on YouTube. Or just all the times I've been playing devil's advocate or just tried to argue a position just for kicks (or semi-trolling) without ACing, I doubt an excellent karma will keep anyone from present me like a psycho dirtbag. Same goes for my IRC logs (I know a friend of mine has ~10 years of logs now) or if you get into my email account and hooked up all my purchase confirmations, memberships etc. etc.

The point is, we have all these bits and pieces of our lives, but we won't and can't and shouldn't keep them compartmentalized like that, it just doesn't work. It's fine to say "I don't mix business and pleasure" but it's not a crime to have a beer with a colleague. All of it is really security by obscurity but for the most part, that's good enough. But just because it's not up to military protocol, doesn't mean I'd like someone to compile it all up and show my mom or boss.

A bunch of dumb exhibitionists get exposed. (2, Insightful)

Unknown Poltroon (31628) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365982)

So what? Cry me a river, but how stupid do you have to be to put up embarrassing personal info and pictures damaging to your reputation, and then be surprised when they are used to be embarrassing and damaging?
I had a friend who put up a simple myspace page, and thought it was anonymous, and was shocked when using just the nick and e-mail she had, i was able to trace it through other pages to get her home address and phone number. Took 3 minutes. People don't think. And no amount of legislation or news stories will change that.

Re:A bunch of dumb exhibitionists get exposed. (1)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366090)

Kids and teenagers have done stupid things througout every generation. They are simply incapable of seeing the consequences of their actions, whether it's driving way too fast on narrow roads ("there are never any other cars here") or if it's giving every info on their life to anyone who's willing to "listen" on the internet. This is nothing new is it? It's just a different approach that parents have to understand and inform.

old ... (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365988)

in California you can always find social network, in Soviet Russia socialist find you!!

so? (3, Insightful)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 7 years ago | (#17365990)

One of the benefits of having a more open and honest society will be the acceptance of practices most people do but few admit to doing. In this respect, social networks mean social progress.

Re:so? (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366198)

ahhh, the idealist!

That's a very fine sentiment my friend. But just wait until you get rejected from a plum job because of something you posted after a couple of beers several years before (and had probably forgotten about).

On the upside, I can see a whole new industry (apart from blackmail) emerging from the need for individuals with aspirations to have their murky/ill-considered online postings tidied up or "lost"

Depends on the Employer (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366858)

That's a very fine sentiment my friend. But just wait until you get rejected from a plum job because of something you posted after a couple of beers several years before (and had probably forgotten about).

Personally I'd rather hire someone who's very open about their personal life. If I hire someone who hides everything I can be pretty sure he'll hide things from me at some point.

Would you hire someone who claims to have never seen online porn?

Re:so? (2, Funny)

bohemian72 (898284) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366200)

Mr Kinsey? It's nice to know you're still around and kicking.

It's a simple principle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366030)

People forget that if they put something online for their friends to read, other people can also read it.

A perfect example of this is my wife (soon to be ex-wife). About 7 months ago, she decided that she really didn't want to be married anymore, and that she would be moving back to her parents' house. As she expressed it to me, she just wasn't "attracted" to me anymore.

Well, about a month ago, my sister called me up and said that she found my wife's MySpace page (no, I won't link to it here), and that she listed herself as a lesbian there. Now, my wife had told me years ago (before we got engaged) that she was bisexual, and so it was no surprise. At that time, I had promised not to tell anyone about it (a promise that I kept). In the course of going to file our divorce papers (just waiting for the hearing to make it final), I mentioned to her that my sister saw her MySpace page, and my wife was surprised at it. (As a result, she released my from my promise, but I'm still posting this anonymously.)

It simply hadn't occurred to her that someone outside of her circle of online friends would actually look up her MySpace page. She didn't even try to hide it (her normal email, used her real maiden name, the user ID was one of her usual online nicknames, etc)!

People just don't seem to grasp the full ramifications of all this "neato" technology.

Re:It's a simple principle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366370)

Sounds like you're making this too easy. Now that you're free from your non-disclosure promise, tell the divorce court that you only married her on the promise of threesome action.

Re:It's a simple principle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366742)

Why would I do that? As it is, I've worked very hard to keep the divorce amicable, and I intend to continue doing that.

It does me no good to try and make it any messier than it already is. It won't make me happy, it won't make her happy, and I don't need "revenge" for the breakup of my marriage. I knew what I was getting into when I married her.

Besides, I made a commitment to her when I got married that I would only share my bed with her, and vice versa. I married her because I loved her and wanted to spend the rest of my life with her, not because I wanted a threesome or anything like that.

Which is more dangerous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366036)

Which is more dangerous; the measures by which we "lose" our "privacy", or the people who care about the content of our blogs/lives? The argument that we have to be absolutely status-quo when in view of any camera/search engine/profiler I think is more dangerous than the perceived demons. It's funny how people who are paranoid of losing their "privacy" are really losing it every day, whether they're giving it away or it's being taken, but instead of realising that whatever you would like to do or say or think or feel is more important than the demands made on your experiences by some other person, they go into a panic mode and start putting the muscle behind the "Big Brother", telling people to "behave themselves". That makes them nothing but the jackbooted intellects of the fascist ideals they are anti-promoting. And as for
"privacy", I always hear the same thing about "a little liberty" shed for "a little security", but few people today have even pinpointed on their own whether their "privacy" is liberty or security. Saying "a little bit of both" is a cop-out, when the matter is up for judgement.

This is bullshit. (5, Interesting)

entrigant (233266) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366052)

Erosion of privacy is when personal details about your life are taken from you. It's when police chiefs talk about tapping everyones home or looking up library records without a warrant. If I willfully give away information about myself then I never did consider it very private then, did I? This crap about lost opportunities, while perhaps partially true in today's freakishly religious climate, will not be such an issue as these things become more common. This is absolute proof that the minority voice controls the world. Damn near everyone has to lie about who they are because they're afraid everyone else lives some higher "moral" standard and will look down on them. This is simply not true. Even the noisy types who push this false sense of morality on us hardly practice what they preach. As a global community develops and communication with the entire world becomes simple and cheap the world will shift as knowledge becomes free. You will no longer have to worry about losing your job because there is a picture of you with a joint on someones myspace page or your hair is dyed neon blue. The transition period will not be smooth, but I welcome the day. All this article does is beg us to continue living in fear of some invisible and nonexistent moral majority. I, for one, refuse.

It is already happening. The company I work for was founded by two young entrepreneurs that grew up in the age where knowledge was free and they learned that masturbation won't cause hair to grow on your hands or your dick to fall off. They learned that the D.A.R.E. cop that told them the story of the young man who died from ONE hit from a joint was LYING. They realized that nobody else they grew up with believed this horseshit anymore either. They only care about your skill and your work ethic. As the younger generations start to take back this world it will become a better place to live because of the global community and available, simple worldwide communication.

Do not fear it. Embrace it.

I hope you're right (1)

poptones (653660) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366364)

I really do, because if something like that doesn't happen, the future country of my grandson is royally fucked.

You have become what you dispise... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366418)

no... I'm not kidding

Re:This is bullshit. (1)

aliquis (678370) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366474)

I agree with you that I don't consider much private. I'm very open in forums and in private messages to unknown people (even thought that isn't open to everyone, but it's still pretty much information for being to an anonymous unkown receiver), but I don't give a shit. It's my life, thoughts, ideas, arguments and so on, take it or leave it. If you don't like it? Fine.

21500 hits on google for the combination of my nick name and the forum I visit the most.
1430 for the combination of my irc nickname and the word irc.
1310 hits on my name.

Go figure =P, information wants to be free ;)

Re:This is bullshit. (2, Insightful)

Mahler (171064) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366564)

As the younger generations start to take back this world it will become a better place to live...

This statement has been proven wrong so many times. The people frmo younger generations think they can do it so much better, but in the end the are still human and most of them lose their ideals when they get families and things are getting tough. And it will get tough one day... and the change of heart then seems to help them out in so many other fields that they'd rather not be so idealistic anymore, but rather take care of their families.

I just believe that the evolution of mankind isn't going so fast, that humans become completely different beings in just a few generations. And as long as we are human, we will be freakishly religious... even the ones that think they are not (they just don't see it, because it all seems so normal to think like that)

Lost job opportunities? (2, Insightful)

WWWWolf (2428) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366098)

The only thing that the social networks can change is that previously, you could be an idiot and no one noticed until it was too late. Now, it's easy and fun to make your idiocy known to the world.

I once got a job because someone saw me writing somewhat-smart-type comments on Usenet.

If I had a web design company, I'd hire people who can make their MySpace page have interesting content, look good and pass W3C validation... =)

Change Your Name (5, Insightful)

Detritus (11846) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366154)

I used to have a friend whose name was Robert Smith. I felt sorry for him, having such a common name. In today's world, it has its advantages. Anyone trying to dig up dirt on him with Google is going to have a difficult job.

Re:Change Your Name (1)

CaptainPotato (191411) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366404)

Yeah, yeah... very tough - let's see:

- Lipstick-wearer - "he was even sent home from school once for wearing his sister's make up to school";
- Opium-taker; and
- Described as being the "unkempt poster child of doom and gloom".

Second link from a Google search [wikipedia.org] on your friend. I'd say that he's blown his privacy...

Re:Change Your Name (1)

hackrobat (467625) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366488)

Yes... I am change my names to Borat Sagdiyev. WHY NOT?!!

Re:Change Your Name (1)

rmccann (792082) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366872)

Even better than a common name would be the same name as a very popular person. Trying to narrow down a google search for Bill Clinton would be very difficult.

Re:Change Your Name (1)

ENIGMAwastaken (932558) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366878)

Wasn't he in the Cure?

Downhill after first paragraph (1)

melonman (608440) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366158)

The quote from Bristol uni is sensible and even mildly interesting. After that, it's just another tired rant about blogs (some someone who appears to be using forum software to run his own blog, which doesn't help to convince that he "gets" blogs at all) and various other sites he clearly doesn't like.

Obviously it's a dumb idea to post information you don't want published in public. Sites like MySpace have introduced a lot of newbies to social networking, and they'll take a while to get the hang of it, but it doesn't follow that social networking sites are inherently about loss of privacy.

And chat rooms are dead because of sexual predators?! I still see a lot of chat rooms, and surely a lot of that traffic has moved onto virtual worlds. Do we have a story about why Second Life has been shut down because of sexual predators? Thought not. A lot depends on much the site creators think about security, privacy and so on, preferably before going live rather than after the first six crises are reported in the international press. From the little I've seen of MySpace, it looks like a "bolt on safeguards in response to crisis" sort of outfit.

Re:Downhill after first paragraph (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366462)

>And chat rooms are dead because of sexual predators?!

Yes. Have you tried the chatrooms on irc, aol, or yahoo recently? AOL chatrooms are populated by a few diehard users and annoying teenagers and sexbots. IRC is now solely the domain of geeks. Yahoo chat, which used to have a vibrant community, is completely dead after closing down user created chatrooms, and the remaining chatrooms are solely populated by bots.

>I still see a lot of chat rooms.

Where? Are they any good? Do enlighten us! I currently attempt to chat in CamFrog, Jmeeting, AIM chat (occassionally), and in Yahoo Games. Second Life...doesn't work for me so well.

IMHO, if you want to post a profile on MySpace or whereever, thats fine. Put up your picture, share a few interesting details, but be smart about it! Don't post anything you wouldn't want your mother or boss to see. It is as simple as that. It is also possible to do a MySpace Anonomously.

Privacy (2, Insightful)

Elentari (1037226) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366182)

Perhaps kids are just more open about their lives these days. It doesn't have to be a case of accidentally releasing information; most people are well aware that the things they post will be accessible to many, and they choose to do it.

Things aren't "private" if they're willingly disclosed. Warning people against providing genuine home addresses, or phone numbers, via the internet is, perhaps, valid advice - however, teenagers regularly disclose mobile numbers to people they barely know in "real life" scenarios, and there's as much chance of something happening in that kind of situation as there is in an electronically-based one.

I believe that these concerns are just left over from an ageing population that doesn't really trust modern technology, or thinks that anything besides face-to-face communication is unnatural. I'm sure people once thought this about telephones, too.

Tellyphone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366320)

That's the Devil's Instrument!! ESPECIALLY in Soviet Russia. Unless you're apostate, you should use a satellite uplink headset. That's what ALLAH uses!! Not the same thang as a tellyphone!! Hide in the mountains and talk to the one God ALLAH on a satellite uplink headset, and keep a close eye out for damn Soviet Russian Secret Invaders. If they catcha doin' what you shouldn't be doin' THEY'RE GONE TAKE AWAY YER JOB OPERTUNITIES!! PRAISE ALLAH!! AMEN!!

The New York Times (2, Insightful)

Slashdot Parent (995749) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366276)

I have created a family blog, and the blog entry page contains the following instructions:
Friendly Reminder: "Would it be ok if this were published on the front page of the New York Times, taken completely out of context, along with your name and address?"
Something to think about before every post.

Re:The New York Times (1)

hackrobat (467625) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366662)

For what it's worth, my blog has actually been quoted [livejournal.com] in the local newspaper (India), at least once (and maybe more because I don't read the newspaper). So it can (and does) happen.

I see this somewhat differently (4, Insightful)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366286)

The right to privacy is an important one, because it provides us with refuge from totalitarian authority that would seek to enslave us, to use information about us against us. But even more important than the right to privacy is the right to live freely. One might say that the right to privacy is important insofar as it is one of the pillars that support the right to live freely.

How can one live freely if one must hide behind privacy in order to avoid getting in trouble with various authorities? If one can only be a dissident, contrarian, or black sheep if one hides within the safe confines of one's own skull, is that not what we used to call in oldspeak "oppression"?

I see a bolder way, in living openly, freely, and standing up against those who would punish us for exercise freedoms. To use an easy example, if recreational drug users were a unified voting block, they could take over the country in an election cycle. But because the law makes it dangerous to use drugs recreationally, users are forced to protect themselves with a shield of privacy (which has been steadily eroded by the war on drugs over the years). If everyone would just stand up and openly do what they believed in, they would not be politically isolated and would not be able to be pushed around.

Similarly, the gay rights movement really started picking up steam only after people began coming out of the closet in droves. Privacy protected them, but it also contained and enslaved them. By stepping out into the public realm, they have forced society to deal with them, and through the necessary struggles that are still ongoing, have found increasing acceptance in our culture.

It's true that if you are a fool, and do stupid things, and people find out about it, your life will become more difficult. But there is a difference between foolishness and good people standing up in order to live the lives they wish to choose. Let the fools of the world weed themselves out of the breeding population, but let oppressors and would-be oppressors everywhere quake at the thought of a brave world of proud, public freedom-weilding citizens who are unashamed to let the world see their lives in a warts-and-all nakedness, which really is more beautiful than the idealized, airbrushed nakedness once you realize that the latter is a hollow lie, and that truth is the only substance out of which we build our lives.

Re:I see this somewhat differently (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366582)

I agree with you, but your idea of "slavery" isn't the same as everyone else's. For many people here, the idea of "slavery" is the thought that somebody might not give you the job that you lose sleep over before you're even hired.

So when it comes to exercising their rights versus being enslaved, they're more apt to do nothing at all due to the possibility of losing the amazing chance to be Joe Business Next Door's wage slave because he datamined their online profiles during the interview. I mean, since when is working for somebody else's business, putting more money in their pockets than they're putting in yours, the opposite of slavery? Since when is cringing at the thought of not working "a better jobby" making Joe Business #2 even more money and earning relatively less not extremely slavelike behaviour?

Maybe if people don't have the common sense to figure out how to start their own businesses, market their selves, and incorporate, then thinking and acting like a rat caught in a cheese-maze is just second-nature, and it simply makes some people more comfortable believing that more people around them will be exactly the same.

Some people see the digital revolution as an opportunity, and others see it as a horror. The latter tend to argue more about it and utilize more fear in their responses. The reasons why the former feel the way they do is apparent, but as for the reasons behind the latter, we'll probably never know. But like Hitler, I'm sure we'll remember them all as "Genius, but Mad... hateful of masses of people... used communications as a terrifying device of war and enslavement."

Where is the shift exactly? (1)

dweebzilla (871704) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366302)

Perhaps they are just redefining the boundaries of "reputation" for themselves.

nice, saves money for christmas cards (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17366306)

Happy Christmas to my mom, my boss, sex offenders and the police.

Facebook is far more secure than MySpace any day (1)

master811 (874700) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366386)

Yes even though it is now technically open to "anyone", the privacy controls on there allow you to lock your profile down to the point so that only those you know or trust can access it even to individual sections (i.e. photos/personal details etc). I feel far more secure using that than MySpace, where its either all or nothing (in fact its like that with all the other social sites that I have used as well).

Re:Facebook is far more secure than MySpace any da (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366478)

Yes even though it is now technically open to "anyone", the privacy controls on there allow you to lock your profile down to the point so that only those you know or trust can access it even to individual sections (i.e. photos/personal details etc). I feel far more secure using that than MySpace, where its either all or nothing (in fact its like that with all the other social sites that I have used as well).
Sure, that'll limit it to only the people you trust... or that happen to work at Facebook... or that discover some present or future vulnerability in Facebook's system... or shoulder-surf one of your trusted few while they're logged in.. or obtain one of your trusted friends' passwords through any of the standard innumerable technological or social engineering methods.

If it's on the Internet, it is not reliably private in any way, shape, or form, from the most popular MySpace or Facebook down to the tiny Linux box I hooked up two hours ago behind a pro-grade firewall.

Privacy (1)

Rie Beam (632299) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366402)

It's one thing to discard privacy in the name of a liberating freedom of expression, but with that you have to accept the fact that people now have the ability to make presumptions about you based on how this information is leaked to them and what information is true. If you make certain of revealing all of your dark secrets -- dirty sexual things, for instance -- then the latter is no longer a problem: they have the story. Now comes the disconnect, however, as a lot of people really aren't as open as you and still cling onto values at odds with what you say and do. Ever try running for office? It's the same effect and it has destroyed politicians over some of the simplest falls from grace to underground things that were never intended to get out.

Here's my question: is it safer to bear all secrets and have none, and risk offending a lot of people and putting yourself in harm's way if one of them takes it personally, or should we just use some basic common sense, be open with a lot of things but hold the things that might get us in trouble as secret as possible? We can never assume how every person will act, so taking at some precautions is always a social necessity. I'm not saying you should hide all of your pornography and put Bibles on the table in fear of someone noticing -- if you can get away with something, then you're fine. It's when people start avoiding you that you should either change, make new friends, or try to change them, aka, when it's a bit too late to remove that factor from the equation.

An example (3, Interesting)

Snorklefish (639711) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366440)

Not long ago, Skadhi Myers blogged [skatje.com] about anti-homosexuality attitudes in her high school. In doing so she quoted the bigoted facebook comments of jock and student body president Andrew Jallon:

Okay this is really random but it has to deal with the comment about homosexuality issue that Sibley brought up. Honestly why must our country keep discussing this issue. We all know it's wrong and that it just shouldn't be that way. If you want to go with the same sex move somewhere else. Please before we ship yah off. Honestly just get rid of them and then we won't have this issue. Just ship them to Canada. But yah homosexuality is just wrong so just say no and get over it. It's never gonna be right so yah!!
Then someone from ScienceBlogs linked to her post because it was well written and she's the daughter of P.Z. Myers... a fairly well known blogger. So the meme really picks up speed. The next thing you Andrew finds he's coming under attack for quotes he never expected to be disseminated across the continents.

But reading the quote, one wonders who is this Andrew Jallon guy. Well, a quick google and you can see check out his discus and shotput attempts (not very good). PUBLIC real-estate tax records give a strong implication as to where he lives. And finally, Andrew Jallon's bigoted comments end up on Slashdot. Did he expect this? Should he have expected it. Should we all be paranoid about every post...lest someone take it and run?

I fear not the loss of your approval (1)

ShawnMcCool42 (557138) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366468)

I've always been blatantly honest with my family and friends. If an employer won't give me a job, his/her loss. I'll find a good one elsewhere because I'm good at what I do.

What a load of horse shit this article is. This is the internet age, nobody gives a shit what random joe #3512351 is doing.

You never had privacy (3, Insightful)

MoneyT (548795) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366616)

Never. The only difference between now and The Good Old Days(TM) is the distance that information about you can be obtained from. Where as in TGOD(TM) you actually had to get off your butt and travel to the town a person lived in to have a chat with the local town gossips, now you just need to check google. But it's all the same. Small towns meant everyone knew everyone and all about them. Larger towns and cities gave us anonymity but people don't want that, so large cities breed loud and bold types to stand out so that people see them. The internet and social networking just makes it easier for us to stake our claim in the public square and let people know about us. In the end though, it's all the same, anyone interested can find out anything they want about you, they just have to search for it.

Behave (1)

tinymarc (1036490) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366654)

Hi.

  Internet is much more like a big mall.

Like in the real life a bit of well behave is good to everyone (even to the bad ones hehehe).
You got drunk, well ok. Even in a bar for many reasons this could happen once. Just think on how you will show yourself when you'll be out...
  But that does not make you a real bad person ? Some may think yes.
Somebody can have fun telling that story to someone else at work. And maybe you will regret it. And it will really get you down.
But yet again, the bad person is maybe the one spreading around the story (and of course he do not drink).

Depending on how/what you think the internet is you might act accordingly to your "feeling" (especially if you are drunk and alone and upset for whatever reasons...). You can see discutable things on the net which are due to loneliness and alcohol... And evil behavior too. Good to know. But these things ruin the reality of life and make it trivial...
I meant that is not because you are alone in your rooom that then, you can dirt the world...
My point is that the internet could be a clean place if you keep it clean.Just... Behave.
Watching violence doe not make you a violent person (if you are naturally not one) But diffusing it, yes it is. Especially on your own will.
If someone or your boss think it is his concern to know if you like drinking or he might arrange something . And you too.
Yet again knowing this should bring more knowledge on how informations and message can travel to you.
I am off topic i guess. But if you have to give information on the net. Behave.

pseudo and nick name (1)

tinymarc (1036490) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366714)

Just try your hotmail or msn or every thing else nickname in google and you will know all about the comments somebody did about a topic. Spooky.

Social Networks != Social Networking (1)

sottitron (923868) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366768)

Just to clarify: We are all part of many social networks [wikipedia.org] whether or not we participate in social networking websites.

BIG difference! (2, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#17366912)

On a blog, I can write what I want and give up as much or as little of my personal information and thus my privacy as I want. An RFID tag in my passport is forced onto me, with or without my consent.

The key difference here is whether the person wants to give up his or her privacy. It's their decision. I'm a firm believer in personal freedom, and if someone wants to hold their naked butt into the webcam, together with their phone# and address, it's their decision.

Today, more and more decisions are taken out of our hands to "protect us". I don't want to be protected. I want to be free. Freedom of choice is what makes us human. That's one of the few things I agree with with the bible boys. After all, according to them Adam ate from the tree of knowledge and thus we're forced to choose between good and evil.

I kinda don't want to revert that.

Let them choose. Inform them of the implications, but the choice is theirs.
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