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Quake in Taiwan Cripples Internet

CmdrTaco posted more than 7 years ago | from the scott-you-really-should-move dept.

The Internet 171

judebx writes "Powerful quakes measuring 7 on the Richter scale have struck southern Taiwan and caused damage to undersea communication cables, disrupting telephone and internet services in several parts of Asia. The quake comes on the second anniversary of the Indian Ocean Tsunami, and triggered tsunami warnings. Human casualties, however, have been low so far."

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Let's wait and see (3, Interesting)

Xenna (37238) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376156)

what the effect on the incoming spam will be...

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

A.Chwunbee (838021) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376210)

Oh woe am I being, how will my outsourced compainy be delivering grate softwares to US at low low low prices now?

Re:Let's wait and see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376484)

Oh woe am I being, how will my outsourced compainy be delivering grate softwares to US at low low low prices now?

Does this mean the software for our new manufacturing plant will be delayed?

Bob

Bob's Sewer Lids and Grates
"We've got your shit covered"

Re:Let's wait and see (0, Troll)

TrisexualPuppy (976893) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376344)

what the effect on the incoming spam will be...
Interesting that you might say that. I work in Washington for an Internet Security firm. Most spam does not in fact come from Taiwan. There is a lot of enforcement against spam out there that never makes the news. The Taiwanese actually regard the US very highly and want to keep up their image, so they are actively pursuing ways of crippling the spammers. There's a good bit of reading here [wikipedia.org] and a bit more about politics here [wikipedia.org] . Be careful what you say about the Taiwanese. They are undeserving of merely being called spammers.

Re:Let's wait and see (4, Funny)

Dr Caleb (121505) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376822)

"so they are actively pursuing ways of crippling the spammers."

I vote for axe handles. Or, tie them to a bed, and smash thier ankles with a sledge hammer. That worked for Cathy Bates.

Re:Let's wait and see (2, Insightful)

petabyte (238821) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377268)

"so they are actively pursuing ways of crippling the spammers."

I vote for axe handles. Or, tie them to a bed, and smash thier ankles with a sledge hammer. That worked for Cathy Bates.


Now what sort of logic does that make? James Caan spent the rest of the movie [wikipedia.org] in a wheelchair with a typewritter!. The spammers would still be able to spam, but not much else.

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

kypper (446750) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378562)

I agree. Smash their wrists with the hammer too...

Oh, and gouge out their eyes for good measure; God knows we don't need a blink-typing system available.

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

Xugumad (39311) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377272)

Agree. I SpamCop a lot of my spam, and these days I get equal quantities random European countries, and US, as origins. Mail logs for the server I maintain doesn't show any serious change in the volume of spam detected, either.

I think there used to be a lot of Taiwanese spam, but you're right, it's been cleared up...

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377594)

It's not just to Taiwan. The article does link to stories that say that service to other parts of SE Asia is diminished or cut off.

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

Xenna (37238) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377674)

I didn't mean that Taiwanese are spammers. The article mentions whole parts of Asia being cut off because of this quake. It's no secret that a lot of spam originates in Asia, if that's still true today with the botnets and all.

X.

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379186)

The Taiwanese actually regard the US very highly and want to keep up their image, so they are actively pursuing ways of crippling the spammers.

Yeah, but don't you think that a 7-Richter earthquake is overdoing it a bit?

- RG>

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

WheelDweller (108946) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378114)

Ya know...I don't remember seeing all those intrusion attempts in the logs last night...

Does anyone know? Are these people inept at installing firewalls, or is hacking their #3 export?

Re:Let's wait and see (1)

solitas (916005) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379190)

Does anyone know of an online 'map' that summarises the extent of the 'blackout'? (i.e. how much traffic passes through Taiwan?)

Spam (-1, Troll)

Dan East (318230) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376158)

Now let's see how much spam levels drop.

Dan East

Re:Spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17377094)

Strange, the spam level in my inbox is as high as usual. All coming from the US and Russia.

Re:Spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17377368)

Ah, you must be in Asia and think no spam comes from there. It's strange, my web logs and my email show that almost all website attacks and spam are generated from APNIC and RIPE. Some come from Africa and less than 1% come from North or South America.

quake cripples internet (5, Funny)

CreatorOfSmallTruths (579560) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376168)

I hope all is well with them over there..

am I the only one who read this and thought "wow, these id games are really hitting it off in taiwan" ?

Re:quake cripples internet (1)

einsteinx2 (886442) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376414)

HAHAHA I thought the exact same thing. I was like "wow I didn't know Quake online was such a hit overthere!"

Re:quake cripples internet (1)

Cctoide (923843) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377204)

No, no you weren't.

Re:quake cripples internet (1)

Vlijmen Fileer (120268) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377512)

No, not the only one. It took me several seconds ;-p
There must be something seriously wrong with me; I never even play computer games...
-- Off to see psychiatrist --

Re:quake cripples internet (1)

madprogrammer (214633) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378722)

Not at all, I didn't even bother reading the story right away, because I thought it was just an exaggeration, or someone finding something else to blame games on.

It wasn't until I read an e-mail from work that the Hong Kong office was experience connectivity problems due to the earthquake in Taiwan that I was like, "Why the hell wasn't that on Slashdot?"

Then I went back to my RSS feed to check, and saw that the story was there. I read the story, started reading the comments, and then saw your comment and realised why I hadn't noticed it earlier. So thanks for completing the puzzle for me!

What is the sound of one spam clapping? (2, Funny)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376200)

Oh, right! I've got almost everything that might come down that pipe null-routed anyway. I feel for the cable repair guys, but...

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (5, Interesting)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376412)

Oh, right! I've got almost everything that might come down that pipe null-routed anyway.

I speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and say, fuck off and die.

95% of the world's spam is paid for by American spammers. (See the ROKSO list.) I get flooded by American spam and then get blocked by racist assholes like you.

I've been offline all day and while my email (hosted by Yahoo) is still dead somehow I can access Slashdot.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (0, Flamebait)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376520)

I speak for everyone in Hong Kong

Please do me a favor, since you speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and see about the other little problem (aside from the ocean of spam that does come from your neighborhood). The vast majority of the more sophisticated crack attempts that I see pounding on all sorts of systems that I touch come from Asia, and most of that from China and Korea. There are plenty from Romania, Russia, and elsewhere, too, but because of the types of systems that I work with (and the businesses that they support), the signal to noise ratio (for all packets, not just e-mail) from where you're sitting makes handling those packets more or less pointless. I'm sorry that you get a lot of spam from elsewhere, but I see very deliberate, beyond-script-kiddie crap coming from your side of the Pacific in a steady, relentless attack. Not your fault, of course. But save some of your hissing and spitting for the people around you that have forced my hand so many times.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (2, Interesting)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376728)

Please do me a favor, since you speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and see about the other little problem (aside from the ocean of spam that does come from your neighborhood). The vast majority of the more sophisticated crack attempts that I see pounding on all sorts of systems that I touch come from Asia, and most of that from China and Korea.

Look at a map. I'm as responsible for what happens in Korea as you are for Brazil. And China is still in most ways a separate country. Telecom companies in particular are not cross border.

crap coming from your side of the Pacific..

Right. I'm responsible for the whole fucking hemisphere. 3 billion people, dozens of countries, All lumped together in your tiny mind. It's hard not to stereotype people like you in return.

And even worse, having white skin, I get blamed for what you idiots do.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (3, Insightful)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376922)

And even worse, having white skin, I get blamed for what you idiots do.

Look, I don't care what color you, or anyone else is. I care what they do. The systems I deal with have nothing whatsoever to do with your daily life (especially since you use a Yahoo account). I'm just telling you facts: there are large IP blocks serving Hong Kong, much of China, Taiwan, Korea, etc., that are, for me and my users, a source of essentially nothing but spam and endless cracking attempts. So until that ratio changes to something more like what I see out of, say, Brazil or Germany, it pretty much all just gets stopped. I'm injecting network geography, not race into this. You're the one that's got race stuck in your head. Packets have no color to me, they just carry the intent of the person sending them, or the carelessness of the person using an unpatched, pirated O/S that's being a slave to the person sending them.

You are the one that said you speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and I replied in a way to point out how ridiculous that sounds. You can't have it both ways.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (0, Troll)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377432)

You are the one that said you speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and I replied in a way to point out how ridiculous that sounds.

Yet still missing how prejudinced you are in your blaming the whole of Asia for the actions of some spammers msotly IN THE PAY OF AMERICANS.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

Tesen (858022) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377784)

You are the one that said you speak for everyone in Hong Kong, and I replied in a way to point out how ridiculous that sounds.

Yet still missing how prejudinced you are in your blaming the whole of Asia for the actions of some spammers msotly IN THE PAY OF AMERICANS.


WOW! Easy there, I think what he is saying is that he has seen lots of crack attempts, lots of spam (from his observations) coming from those IP groups for those countries. He decided to use a brute force method of simply just nullifying anything from those IP ranges. Why is that prejudice? He has seen a problem from an address range and decided to block it. Might not be the brightest thing in the world to do, but it is within his right to make that choice as the admin for his network.

So one admin decides to black list entire address blocks in order to protect their network, BIG DEAL! Their right and THEIR loss.

Tes

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378172)

So one admin decides to black list entire address blocks in order to protect their network, BIG DEAL! Their right and THEIR loss.

Hey, I've got users that DO need their little part of the world exposed to those other trans-Pacific chunks of the 'net, and we deal with different problems (and audiences) in different ways. Things like web-services machines that are only there to serve domestic business partners, etc., don't mind the null route one little bit. Quick and simple. E-mail is touchier, but if you're in Asia you already know that expecting the rest of the world to unblinkingly accept SMTP mail from your own ISP's relays is just silly, under the circumstances and given the history. If I were trying to conduct international business from Asia, I'd be using a domestic US or European mail host, no question.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377820)

Yet still missing how prejudinced you are in your blaming the whole of Asia for the actions of some spammers msotly IN THE PAY OF AMERICANS.

You are completely missing the point. There are spammers in Germany, too. Same story. Just like in South America, India, Australia, and Canada. But from those other places, more of the traffic is legitimate. If virtually none of the traffic from a particular class C (or B) address block is legitimate, then I'm often inclined to block it. I get spam and crack attempts from Spain, but I also see a lot of real mail and web traffic from those same addresses... so, I have to make a decision. But when almost EVERYTHING that comes from, say, 81.0.0.0 is complete noise and nonsense, away it goes. I don't CARE what color people are when their use of my network is overhwhelmingly poisonous.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378872)

mers in Germany, too. Same story. Just like in South America, India, Australia, and Canada. But from those other places, more of the traffic is legitimate. If virtually none of the traffic from a particular class C (or B) address block is legitimate, then I'm often inclined to block it.

If it's your own personal mail, fine. If you're doing it for an ISP or a large company without gettng the users to sign off on you preventing them communicating with half the world's population, not fine. I know for instance I can hardly ever send messages to anyone on AOL because of broad-brushed blocking.

You are completely missing the point.

The point is YOU are blocking ME for something someone "on the same side of the Pacific" did. Then you gloat about it. So I take it personally.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378290)

And even worse, having white skin, I get blamed for what you idiots do.

Like maintaining a significant military presence in the region to deter mainland China from invading Taiwan? Like keeping the lunatic Kim Jong Il from attacking South Korea, Japan, and others? Yeah, that is idiotic, protecting ingrates at great expense, which is why we probably aren't going to do it much longer.

I know that you are pissed off because you can't have all of your Internet today, but you really need to calm down. ScentCone is right; there is an inordinate amount of malicious activity originating in China. No, you don't control everything in the Far East, so it isn't your fault, but you shouldn't presume to speak for all of Hong Kong.

By the way, everyone who knowingly takes part in a criminal enterprise is a criminal, not just the "kingpin", so don't assign all of the blame to "evil American spam lords".

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

FyRE666 (263011) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378056)

I can see why you might be a little irritated, but I routinely block all asian address ranges - or as many as possible - on servers I admin for customers (all services, not just email). As the parent pointed out, I've also noticed the only traffic coming from there is spam or automated cracking attempts. It's nothing personal, just an obvious and effective way to prevent intrusion and at least some of the spam - it's like capping an open sewer outlet.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

Kerstyun (832278) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378938)

I speak for everyone in Hong Kong
I reckon's you looks like 'em all, too.

Re:What is the sound of one spam clapping? (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379312)

It sounds like you are the racist. Only a racist would make the implication that nationality necessarily implies genetic ancestry. The guy you are replying to did not do that. You did.

A Communication disruption can only mean one thing (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376206)

Invasion

Connection flaky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376228)

My brother is living over there right now. He IM'd me a short while ago to ask if I'd heard about the quake... but a lot of our messages were being dropped, and the one's that did come through were sent in spurts.

Yes, the Internet does work around breakages. It doesn't necessarily work that well.

Re:Connection flaky (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376656)

Yes, the Internet does work around breakages. It doesn't necessarily work that well.


Call me crazy, but wasn't that what {*cough*algore*cough*) DARPA designed it for? The fact that it still WORKS - just slower - means it's working JUST as it should.

What'll be the effect on currency trading? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376230)

Since Reuters' service used for trading is disrupted in Japan Korea and HK?

How do undersea cables get damaged? (2, Interesting)

THESuperShawn (764971) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376234)

Seriously- I am just curious. Is it possible that they were damaged by magma flow? I just find it hard to "fathom" (ba dum dum) that undersea cables could get damaged by an earthquake.

I would think that any kind of rock-slide or similar would be slowed by the friction of the water, making cable damage difficult. And I would not think that plate movement would be enough to bend or stretch the cable to the point of breaking. So how does the cable get damaged?

Surely someone here knows more about the hazards to these cables...

Re:How do undersea cables get damaged? (4, Informative)

dpaton.net (199423) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376296)

Unfortunately, all it takes is a large rock weighing a few tons with a sharp edge to fall and cleave a cable that's laying against a flat rock on the bottom. I don't know precisely how the transcontinental cables are built, but the smaller ones I've dealt with for river and lake crossings are quite vulnerable. They're stiff as hell (don't react well to bending), somewhat brittle (don't react well to bending or crushing), and designed to be laid and buried, and never move again (don't react well to general movement). A sharp vertical motion could crack them, or a rolling motion could set them up to be crushed by flying debris (quakes can be very fast, even underwater, hence tsunami generation). There's lots of ways for a cable to die.

Re:How do undersea cables get damaged? (4, Funny)

value_added (719364) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376746)

stiff as hell (don't react well to bending), somewhat brittle (don't react well to bending or crushing), and designed to be laid and buried, and never move again (don't react well to general movement).

I suddenly had this deja vu feeling where I'm hearing my ex-wife talk on the phone with her girlfriends.

Re:How do undersea cables get damaged? (4, Funny)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376354)

Well, the tubes are often made of glass, and vigorous shaking will crack them. Then, water rushes into the tubes and the poker chips float up while the racing horses drown, clogging up the internets. It's pandemonium, I tell ya. If only the internet was a big truck...

Re:How do undersea cables get damaged? (4, Funny)

owlnation (858981) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376776)

Well, the tubes are often made of glass, and vigorous shaking will crack them. Then, water rushes into the tubes and the poker chips float up while the racing horses drown, clogging up the internets. It's pandemonium, I tell ya. If only the internet was a big truck...
Should we also perhaps be worried about the affect on marine and seabird life from the resulting v1@gr4 slick? Maybe good for the whale populations to help them recover from Japanese "scientific" whaling? I, for one, welcome our new potent and satisfied cetacean overlords.

Re:How do undersea cables get damaged? (4, Interesting)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376452)

I would think that any kind of rock-slide or similar would be slowed by the friction of the water

Yeah, but there's still a lot of energy there, and a several hundred pound rock is still plenty able to crush the coaxial cladding of a cable draped over the sea bed. There's also all sorts of other metalic debris that can get shifted around.

I talked once to a guy that was in the business of knowing how to sabotage these things (well, not Taiwanese cables, but of course Soviet ones, spanning their Naval port areas... for a really interesting look at risky underwater espionage adventures, pick up the non-fiction "Blind Man's Bluff" for a quick read - fascinating). Whether older-style telco copper or newer fiber, the cables can be easily crimped, pinched, etc. Apparently it was fashionable to make it look like a damaged, rusty old trauler derrick (used for pulling in huge fishing nets) had been dropped over the side of a ship and just happened to land on a comms cable... all so that they could gauge how quickly and in what way strategic opponents would shift to other communication methods and go about repairs.

Maps of currently in-use undersea cables (5, Interesting)

THESuperShawn (764971) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376508)

So I went about researching this myself (thanks for the input so far) and found a few good links...

Although the layout of this page is awful (and they beg for click-fraud abuse), it does show a few really good maps of the current undersea cable infrastructure. Pretty neat stuff.

http://eyeball-series.org/cable-eyeball.htm [eyeball-series.org]

Re:Maps of currently in-use undersea cables (1)

AlHunt (982887) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376604)

>Although the layout of this page is awful (and they beg for click-fraud abuse), it does show a few really good maps of
> the current undersea cable infrastructure. Pretty neat stuff.

I'm surprised this much information is available in the information restriction age.

Re:Maps of currently in-use undersea cables (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376670)

Don't worry, the maps are probably not anywhere close to accurate. After all, oil/gas companies whine if they're forced to report their pipeline position to within more than a few hundred feet, and these are things that blow up entire neighborhoods if someone decides to put a swimming pool in their backyard since the map says the pipe runs through their neighbor's yard.

Re:Maps of currently in-use undersea cables (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17377554)

The page is from Cryptome's eyeballing series. The guy who runs Cryptome has regular visits from the FBI. He has hi-res aerial images of nuclear installations, government buildings, military complexes etc.

Version? (4, Funny)

mrgrey (319015) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376236)

Quake 1, 2 ,3 or 4?

Re:Version? (1)

Inverted Intellect (950622) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376532)

This pretty much reveals our cultural bias, but I also initially understood the headline as describing rampant multiplayer matches crippling internet access. Now *that's* what I would call a heated deathmatch. Electrifying, even.

Given /.er's general tendencies towards being gamers, "earthquake" would have been a better word to describe the occurance.

Re:Version? (1)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376894)

Yeah, this was my first thought, too. I'm suprised that they're still so actively playing a game that was released over ten years ago (hurrr!).

Re:Version? (1)

varghan (834564) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377080)

I thought the internet is crippled by torrents, not by quake, nowadays.

Re:Version? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17377742)

Quake 1, 2 ,3 or 4?

Quake 7 according to one Mr Richter.

Re:Version? (1)

tedgyz (515156) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377914)

Damn! You beat me to the punch line.

Gah! (0, Troll)

Karganeth (1017580) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376238)

They only have themselves to blame... they should have built REINFORCED tubes. Earthquakes are so common in Asia, I don't know why they didn't do this!

Re:Gah! (1)

Bazman (4849) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376318)

No! To make an earthquake-resistant internet you need to make it out of _stretchy_ tubes!

Re:Gah! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376340)

Unless you know the details of the fault, you shouldn't make any comments like that. No designs/implementations are 100% even if they did guard against earthquakes.

Re:Gah! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376504)

it was a (tubes) joke doofus. unless your response was a joke too, in which case it wasn't funny.

Re:Gah! (1)

ztransform (929641) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376608)

Earthquakes are so common in Asia, I don't know why they didn't do this!

Tornados are common in mid-USA, earthquakes are common in California, blackouts are common in the tri-state area.

What is not common is knowing exactly when, or where, they will strike. Not everyone has travelled back to 5 November 1955 [wikipedia.org] and knows the exact such details about a lightning strike!

The cost of laying an undersea cable is HUGE. It is impractical to maintain a thick sheath the entire undersea length. It is only on the ends where the cable comes ashore that much thicker and sturdier sheathing is used because friction and anchors are a lot more common in that area.

I think you'll find for all intents and purposes undersea cables are manufactured to withstand expected engineering problems. But planning for an earthquake is best mitigated by a self-healing ring such as the topology used for the Southern Cross cable [southerncrosscables.com] between the USA and the South Pacific.

Multiplayer Quake (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376240)

did always have inefficient network code, it was only a matter of time...

Sure... (1)

Geekfather (1012353) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376270)

"Human casualties, however, have been low so far." Wait until all those gold farmers can't get into World of Warcraft... we'll see some human casualties then.

Cripples internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376310)

Well, my internet is working fine.


Perhaps the article should say "Cripples Taiwanese ISPs".

Re:Cripples internet? (1)

ketsugi (930099) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377054)

It's not just Taiwan. Most of us in the Asia-Pacific region have experienced network outages today. I'm speaking from Singapore, which is almost as far as you can get from Taiwan and still be in the APAC region (except for our Southern neighbour Indonesia, of course).

Priorities (2, Funny)

mattwarden (699984) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376400)

So, wait.

People were injured and died in this quake, and the headline is Quake in Taiwan Cripples Internet ? You insensitive clods.

Re:Priorities (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376564)

Uh, this is "news for nerds, stuff that matters." People die every day, it doesn't matter.

Re:Priorities (1)

Inverted Intellect (950622) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377050)

Yes, it does actually matter. While /. certainly is not a media outlet, dedicated to bringing news to the average (typically non-technically minded) masses, not making as much as a brief mention of the deaths incurred while reporting a disaster affecting technology is, at the very least, insensitive, and at worst callous.

Re:Priorities (1)

wordsthatendinq (971620) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379108)

Actually, it isn't quite the poster's fault; this was exactly how some of the news sources wrote their headlines. The BBC version [bbc.co.uk] said "Asia communications hit by quake," and the CNN version [cnn.com] (as of the time I post this) makes no mention of casualties.

Furthermore, severe earthquakes in Taiwan that damaged semiconductor manufacturing plants have costed billions (I guess in USD that would be tens of millions) in losses per day. It isn't that casualties are not significant losses as well, but in terms of impact, many more people - there are thousands whose daily living depends on these plants - are affected by damages to technological equipment.

Re:Priorities (2, Insightful)

khallow (566160) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379286)

I disagree. I think it's prudent and time-saving to avoid phony displays of sensitivity and feeling. When I die, I hope my death will not inconvenience people and force them to such acts.

Re:Priorities (3, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376614)

People were injured and died in this quake

      Get off your moral high-horse and stop trying to tell us that you actually give a shit. No one believes you.

Re:Priorities (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17378314)

Wow, suddenly I understand conservatives. You really are sociopaths.

Re:Priorities (1)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377030)

Right. Because broken infrastructure doesn't matter in an emergency situation. Tell that to the people trying to phone their family.

Spam (1)

AnyThingButWindows (939158) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376432)

My Spam levels just dropped in half! SpamAssassin is not working near as hard as it was before Christmas. I feel for the guys out there fixing all the broken fiber.

So what? (1)

Elektroschock (659467) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376466)

I don't think why I should care. Power systems break down all the time. Telephone systems less often. A decentral net is the best of all worlds. So the solution is to identify national strategic dependencies and seek alternatives.

Hmmm... (0, Redundant)

Enoxice (993945) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376550)

Title and summary contradict one another: "Quake in Taiwan Cripples Internet" and "Human casualties, however, have been low so far."?

You'd think with so many people running around with Rail Guns and Rocket Launchers in DM3, there'd be plenty of dead space marines...

tragic, but (1)

brainspank (515274) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376558)

where will I get my cia1i5 now?

You know you're on a nerd website when.... (1)

LordPhantom (763327) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376578)

"Powerful quakes measuring 7 on the Richter scale have struck southern Taiwan and caused damage to undersea communication cables, disrupting telephone and internet services in several parts of Asia.... Human casualties, however, have been low so far."

when.... the disruption of the internet trumps the part about human casualties!

Re:You know you're on a nerd website when.... (1)

bhrgunatha (1044094) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377592)

Considering over 200 000 died a couple of years ago and 7 years ago here in Taiwan 2000 died - it's not that big a deal so I guess the author had to spice it up. In central Taiwan I haven't noticed any drop in service, so maybe it's local to connections from the South.

Re:You know you're on a nerd website when.... (2, Funny)

rumplet (1034332) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378258)

RAM prices, Won't somebody think of the RAM prices!

Re:You know you're on a nerd website when.... (1)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379188)

when.... the disruption of the internet trumps the part about human casualties!
It pretty much happens every christmas. Anyone else noticed that? It's just god smiting the heretics.

 

Internet Traffic Report: Asia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17376620)

Hey guys (0)

Kim Jong Ill (1033418) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376876)

What's shakin'?

Only Quake? (1)

corywingerter (917335) | more than 7 years ago | (#17376966)

Their Internet was crippled by Quake? What the hell is gonna happen when they start playing Q3A?

Follow the traffic... (3, Interesting)

martyb (196687) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377098)

On the Internet Traffic Report website [internettr...report.com] you can click on Asia [internettr...report.com] and see where the current congestion and outages are. Scroll down to the bottom and you can see these graphs, too:

These plots give a 24-hour window on the situation. It it's easy to see when things started getting shaken up (bad pun intended).

In Soviet America... (1)

guruevi (827432) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377430)

In Soviet America Quake 4 cripples Internet 2

The game (1)

UnderDark (869922) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377498)

Was I the only one who that it the title was referring to the id game "Quake", not an earthquake?

China achieves goal of becoming LAN (4, Informative)

rumplet (1034332) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377700)

I got up today and the net was borked. My first and immediate assumption was that some students had gone out protesting again and got massacred, and the Chinese gov. tried to shut down the internet completely to try and suppress the news.

Internet access was practically dead, but I spotted "7.1 Taiwan earthquake" in an RSS feed from Google. Google was the only thing that I use, that worked since the server was inside China.
Chinese sites were not affected and load at full speed, but anything outside mostly times out.

I doubt the strategy to route everything though a few key points for censorship purposes helps much with making the net robust against just this sorts of disaster.

Also for the poster near the top talking about spam, Taiwan isn't a major source of spam, but China is, and China was just as badly affected by the damage to the undersea cables.

Re:China achieves goal of becoming LAN (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17377902)

I am getting through to /. from Hong Kong by using a proxy in Kuwait, forced routing over Europe. Everything except Google is fuxd except of course the stuff on the China "LAN". No phones either. The ISPs here just route everything through America, apparently the operators of the cables across Eurasia charge a lot more. So much for decentralization. Also interesting to note how people here can't talk to each other because MSN Msngr etc. is unreachable.

Each wave created more landslides (3, Interesting)

Turmoyl (958221) | more than 7 years ago | (#17377726)

This outage has been labeled the largest ever in the Pacific Rim region (as relayed to us by a Sprint rep).

The company I am currently employed by has a lot of affected circuits in the APAC region (a colo in Honk Kong and many offices in China, India, Singapore and Australia). The circuits belong to Sprint and OnReach, and they have both been able to determine that the earthquake itself and at least 2 of the aftershocks each created undersea landslides, and it is the detritus from the landslides that actually damaged the cables.

There's been a lot of ups and downs on the affected circuits as latent capacity is brought on-line, various peering agreements are created and/or reworked, etc. It's not going to get much better anytime soon, either, due to there being at least 7 affected undersea cables and only 2 repair ships available to perform the repairs (which, of course, requires digging the cables out from underneath all of the detritus before the repairs and redeployments can even begin).

In the immortal words of the writers of Full Metal Jacket, "It's a giant shit sandwich and we've all got to take a bite."

Slow Internet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17378016)

Speaking as someone from South East Asia, my internet has been a littke slow since yesterday. It's still ok for viewing web pages and stuff, but whenever I try and play WoW I get disconnected within minutes. They say the cables won't be fully repaired for a few weeks, which means no WoW for quite some time for me. And I had just renewed my subscription the very day the quake hit...

heh (0, Flamebait)

SuperStretchy (1018064) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378220)

Better get Al Gore off his ranch to go fix his love child.

fuc4? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17378298)

In other, completely unrelated news... (1)

Shaltenn (1031884) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378386)

Prices of WoW gold skyrocket 300 fold.

Re:In other, completely unrelated news... (1)

El Torico (732160) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379294)

I know that you are being funny, but you have an interesting point. This probably makes other gold farms more profitable since the ones affected by this can't do business. If I played, I'd be a farming ho right now.

My poor helpdesk (1)

jjthegreat (837151) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378926)

As 1/3 of our frontline staff is based in the Philippines, it has all been rerouted to our canadian contact center. With an expected outage of 3 weeks im sure most of our guys are gonna burn out from the call driven overload.

I wonder how many overseas outsourced operations will be affected by this. Probably not a good time to be calling your major branded PC manufacterer for support.

I always thought (1, Flamebait)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#17378970)

that the internet had a very robust Department of Redundancy Department. Shouldn't this be a wake up call to all of us that if you want reliable internet, you have to break it free from the corporate mono culture that it and all of our present day communication infrastructure suffers from? Start with good wireless, perhaps? If we don't, you will soon see intentional shutdowns. And on another note, the people who make all of the equipment that makes the internet work and all of your computers and such belong to a pretty exclusive club. They can shut you down PDQ also. As far as expanding our freedoms, the whole internet thing is turning out to be one big disappointment. It is almost as tightly controlled as all the other mass communication technologies we have. Unless your machine gets smashed by falling debris, you should be able to network to other computers no matter where they are. Maybe the internet works just fine for DoD, but for the rest of us, it's no better than Ma Bell's phone service.

A communications disruption... (1)

Guysmiley777 (880063) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379016)

A communications disruption can mean only one thing: Invasion!

FPS (1)

maximthemagnificent (847709) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379042)

>> Quake in Taiwan Cripples Internet

They must really love first person shooters in Taiwan!

Dont expect this to be fixed soon (4, Informative)

rivetgeek (977479) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379052)

I work for a MAJOR telecom provider and this wont be fixed anytime soon. I have inside information that cable ships have been dispatched to fix the fiber cut but there is no ETA. Last time this sort of thing happened was when the sea-me-we cable was cut a couple years ago during an earthquake and effectively isolated greece for 3 1/2 weeks. Due to a lack of non sea cable bandwidth, there is no re-route possible. Affected routes are: Tokyo/Hong Kong Seoul/Hong Kong Taipei/Hong Kong Singapore/Osaka Kuala Lumpur/Tokyo Los Angeles/Hong Kong

Internet Crippled at Home (1)

flyneye (84093) | more than 7 years ago | (#17379260)

I feel for them and hope for a quick recovery.
Around this house,It's Quake III crippling the internet connection.

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