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ABC/Disney Shuts Down Blog Exercising Fair Use

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the mouse-trap dept.

Censorship 525

An anonymous reader writes "A blogger named Spocko had his blog shut down by ABC/Disney lawyers because he had posted clips from an ABC Radio-affiliated program and commented on their content, as well as informed show advertisers of what exactly they were paying for. Spocko merely pointed out the content that station KSFO was broadcasting, and as a result Visa pulled their advertising from the station. More companies were reportedly considering pulling their ads. A YouTube video summary is available. From the Daily Kos article: 'How'd he do it? He did it the way it's always done - by working within the law, identifying points of weakness, exploiting them and being absolutely tenacious ... It appears to me as if Disney is attempting to bully a little guy in an unethical manner. Any media lawyer worth the air she breathes knows that Spocko's use was well protected.'"

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525 comments

Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

metlin (258108) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499668)

You know, a lot of folks have commented on attacking the other side by torture, murder etc. These folks are forgetting a fundamental fact - the moment you start doing these things, you become like them. There is no difference between us and them if we resorted to the same methods that they do. And that is why it is wrong.

It is sad that there are media outlets out there that not only supporot but also advocate these things.

I mean, racism, advocating torture, describing how they want to get rid of folks they do not like etc. Coudln't all that be construed as inciting hatred and violence?

Disgusting would be another way to put it, especially when you are totally ignorant of the other side and blindly seek to murder, mutilate, insult and say nasty things.

Don't these people have a conscience? And doesn't Christianity say something about loving one another? I wonder where all that was lost.

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

JoshJ (1009085) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499724)

It was lost in about 100 AD when the Church started killing those who didn't agree with the viewpoints of those in power. They've been doing that for the past 1900 years, give or take a few (Crusades, Inquisition, Reconquista, killing/threatening scientists in the renaissance period, etc). Why expect that to change now?
Religion is a barrier to progress and an excuse for evil.

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

metlin (258108) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499744)

Oh I'm not a Christian and nor do I support religion in any form (am an agnost) -- I was just talking about the right-wing show hosts.

If you are right-wing Christian, doesn't that involve _following_ your religion? The one that supposedly had a man called Jesus who talked about doing good, being good to everyone etc?

That is the part that I do not understand.

Re:Problem with things like torture (5, Funny)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499940)

If you are right-wing Christian, doesn't that involve _following_ your religion? The one that supposedly had a man called Jesus who talked about doing good, being good to everyone etc?

That is the part that I do not understand.
The events of the Old Testament took place before God sat down and took some anger management classes.

Some Christians are a bit more Old Testament in their faith than others.

Re:Problem with things like torture (-1, Troll)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500004)

I enjoyed the part about making callers say, ""Say Allah is a Whore!". Same god, just a different name.

The whore trifecta: Jesus is a whore. God is a whore. The Holy Ghost is a whore.

Re:Problem with things like torture (-1, Troll)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500168)

Allah and God are completely different deities.

Re:Problem with things like torture (-1, Troll)

pedestrian crossing (802349) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500250)

Allah and God are completely different deities.

But that doesn't change the fundamental (pun intended) fact that they are both whores...

Re:Problem with things like torture (1, Interesting)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500320)

You're mistaken. 2 years of Lutheran school, 4 years of Jesuit school, and a degree in Anthropology, with an interest in religion, has taught me that Allah = God. Christian God = Jewish God = Islamic God.

Just different takes on how it would like to be worshipped.

Besides, my other post was a straight line. How could you pass up on the whore trifecta?

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

ergean (582285) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500324)

Say what?

The notion of Allah in Arabic theology is substantially the same as that of God among the Jews, and also among the Christians, with the exception of the Trinity.

Re:Problem with things like torture (3, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500118)

Religion, like patriotism, is easily turned from it's true meaning into a tool for the gain and exercise of power. That doesn't mean that faith or pride in your country are wrong. It means that you need to know enough about those things, to be able to tell when they are being misused. To put it in comfortable /. terms : Computers are wonderful things, but if you don't carefully inspect and maintain them, they pick up a bot and become a bad thing. The church is no different.

Re:Problem with things like torture (2, Interesting)

Cally (10873) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500220)

All religion is inherently a bad thing, even when "good" things are done in it's name, because it is based on a falsehood, i.e., a superstitious belief in the supernatural[1]. It's wrong, and that makes it bad.

[1]Except possibly some advanced flavours of Buddhism; all the varieties I've come across tie up some interesting ideas with a bundle of irrelevant cultural baggage I find irritate me too much to allow me to learn enough to make a better-based decision. Dumb? *shrug* could be... but it's pretty unlikely, and anyway there are plenty of more accessible lifestyle things I could do to improve me "sense of inner calm" or "harmony with the cosmos", or whatever. When I've managed to quit smoking, come back and ask me about the ineffable ;)

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

The MAZZTer (911996) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500364)

Oh I'm not a Christian and nor do I support religion in any form (am an agnost) -- I was just talking about the right-wing show hosts.

If you are right-wing Christian, doesn't that involve _following_ your religion? The one that supposedly had a man called Jesus who talked about doing good, being good to everyone etc?

That is the part that I do not understand.

In the church, we call those types of people who are confusing you "hypocrites".

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500496)

If you are right-wing Christian, doesn't that involve _following_ your religion? The one that supposedly had a man called Jesus who talked about doing good, being good to everyone etc?

In the church, we call those types of people who are confusing you "hypocrites".

Which ones? The ones actively following the principles of their religion, or the right wing neocon nutjobs masquarading as Christians?

Re:Problem with things like torture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499754)


So "good" christianity was around for only ~60 years. :) The stories only started long after Jesus supposedly existed, there's no real historical texts which mention him. Only the bile-ball.

Re:Problem with things like torture (5, Informative)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499776)

It was lost in about 100 AD when the Church started killing those who didn't agree with the viewpoints of those in power.

Christianity had no state support until AD 313. Right up until that point, it was heavily persecuted by the Roman Empire and was in no position to go out killing. Might want to get your facts straight.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

grub (11606) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499812)


Christianity had no state support until AD 313.

The Bush family can trace its genealogy back 700 years?!

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499840)

Good work on the math, buddy.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499890)

Silly slashdot delays caused this to be posted after your correction. My apologies. All the same, the Bush administration is not a state religion. You'd have to go back to the 1800s to find real establishment of religion anywhere in the US, and slightly further back to find real intolerance of religions other than those established by the state. (This is mostly interesting when contrasted with the intolerance in England that caused much of the US to be settled, those settlers of course being intolerant.)

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

grub (11606) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500084)

I had to wait two minutes to post my correction as well :) Clicked Submit and realized my error.

Re:Problem with things like torture (3, Informative)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500182)

And only in 325 they _voted_ on what to believe with only about 300 of 1800 bishops attending, so what the right wing now thinks as the absolute 'Truth' was a meager minority vote by a bunch of iron age guys. Not to mention the 500 variations that came afterwards.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Council_of_Nica ea [wikipedia.org]

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500256)

Since when is a single theological matter, namely the nature of the Son and his relationship to the Father, the whole of Christian belief? And the orthodox belief was not developed ex nihilo in AD 325. The Arian side lost because they could not show that their view of things was in harmony with Christian tradition up to that point. Instead, it was clearly a wacky and uncalled for innovation to most of the Church.

A minor correction in date (2, Informative)

rumith (983060) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500322)

Christianity was declared as the state religion of the Armenian Kingdom in AD 301.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500554)

I think he's referring to the recent Tom Hanks flick, The Da Vinci Code or whatever it was.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

ari_j (90255) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499790)

You have mistakenly conflated "Christianity" with "the Catholic Church." Don't worry, you're not the first person to make that mistake. You also have conflated "church" with "religion." While those are more closely related, they are still not the same thing.

Re:Problem with things like torture (5, Funny)

Howserx (955320) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500040)

Like the bumper sticker says "if going to church makes me a Christian, does going to the garage make me a car?"

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

semifamous (231316) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499826)

Don't blame religion. Blame people. People do this stuff. They may do it in the name of religion or in the name of their own greed, but it's still the people who are doing it.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499982)

Exactly. Too many are trying to blame the motivation for what they do. "The devil made me do it." Clearly the culpability lies in the decision to act regardless of the provocation. This is why the arguement for things like restriction of speech don't hold water. Oh well, as long as we continue to support these companies, buy their products, and re-elect their puppets into office, I wouldn't expect anything to change soon.

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

hunterx11 (778171) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500152)

I agree that religion is given too much credit for encouraging evil, but it is likewise given too much credit for encouraging good.

Re:Problem with things like torture (2, Informative)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499916)

It was lost in about 100 AD when the Church started killing those who didn't agree with the viewpoints of those in power.

The factual errors in your post just cry out for more correction. You write of "the Church" doing various things, and identify this Church with Christianity. However, by the beginning of the second millennium, Christianity was not a single organization. The split of the Oriental Orthodox after the Council of Chalcedon, the existence of Nestorian groups in East Asia out of contact with the West, and the Great Schism between the Orthodox Church and Rome in the eleventh century all served to make it difficult to claim any sort of generalization about Christianity. The examples in your post must be specified as relating mainly to the Roman Catholic Church.

Please, for pete's sake take a look at a common reference like the Oxford History of Christianity [amazon.com] that any decent library is sure to have.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500054)

If you want historical accurance please check out the atheism section at about.com. [about.com] Follow the links at the bottom. Thanks.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500128)

A few hyperlinks on a notoriously amateur website trump the world's most respected academic press (and n.b., most of academia is not devout Christian)?

And since when is "accurance" a word?

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500184)



A few hyperlinks on a notoriously amateur website trump the world's most respected academic press (and n.b., most of academia is not devout Christian)?

And since when is "accurance" a word?


Appeal to authority fallacy. No specific criticism of the material presented. Ad hominem (spelling). Thanks for playing.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500202)

Peer review before publication is permitted is an essential element of academic discourse. OUP has it, about.com and the vast majority of what they link to don't. Therefore, the hyperlinks proposed are not appropriate material for a debate. Rules against ad hominem attacks only come in to play when only peer-reviewed material is on the table.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

Planesdragon (210349) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499958)

Religion is a barrier to progress and an excuse for evil.

You're right. No anti-religious government has ever become an evil empire that hampers progress and rules by fear and terror... I mean, except for the Soviet Union. And the American Eugenics program.

(Oh, and the Christian Church, which you seem to be slurring, didn't have the power to so much as pull people into pews until the reign of Constantine the Great's Edict of Milan in 313. And few significant branches of Christianity never had even that much power.)

Evil men do evil things using whatever excuse they can find. Naked power, religion, science, and even the "good of the people" have all been used as excuses to do terribly evil things.

Re:Problem with things like torture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500022)

Oh, and the Christian Church, which you seem to be slurring, didn't have the power to so much as pull people into pews until the reign of Constantine the Great's Edict of Milan in 313

The Church didn't have much power to pull people into pews even for a few centuries after Constantine, since pews are a fairly recent invention limited to the West. In the ancient Church worshipers stood through the service, and the architecture of the oldest churches and many liturgies reflect this. Today, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches generally maintain this tradition.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500218)

He said religion makes it easier to do evil, not that religion is a necessity to do evil.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500150)

The past 1900 years, and since 100 AD? I think you either got the years wrong or you're just delusional.

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499832)

And doesn't Christianity say something about loving one another? I wonder where all that was lost.

Yes, it does. You now have good reason to believe these people aren't actual Christians.

Re:Problem with things like torture (0, Flamebait)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500030)

>You now have good reason to believe these people aren't actual Christians.

Umm, who are you to judge who is "real christian" or not (where's that part in the bible about judging others). Not to mention this fits in with the history of xtianity (or any religion really) although I believe xtianity may be the bloodiest because of historical reasons. Early histories, crusades, inquisition, witch burning, reformation, recent child molestations, etc etc. Lets not be purposely naive.

Re:Problem with things like torture (0)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500112)

I believe xtianity may be the bloodiest because of historical reasons. Early histories, crusades, inquisition, witch burning, reformation, recent child molestations, etc etc. Lets not be purposely naive.

Clearly you have never looked into the history and teachings of Islam. They caused the Crusades, and their prophet was a pedophile (unfortunately, the prophet was the Perfect Man, so pedophilia is still a-okay). And let's not even talk about contemporary Islam, which kills hundreds or even thousands of people a year...

Ah, fuck it. Why do I even bother? People will hate the West and everything it stands for regardless of what anyone says or does (yet they refuse to move to obviously better and more advanced countries like Pakistan or Iran).

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500166)

Ah, fuck it. Why do I even bother? People will hate the West and everything it stands for

Who hates the west? Criticising Xtianity =! embracing Islam. Where do I even mention Islam or 'the west?'

Re:Problem with things like torture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500232)

Actually it's very simple. I Corinthians 5 says Christians are supposed to judge those inside of the church, and are forbidden to judge those outside of it.



BTW, your next to last sentence would carry more weight if it were condemning practices the Bible condoned rather than things the Bible condemns, things which any literate person can figure out are not Christian.



Um, except: what was wrong with reformation? Unless you're Catholic, which I presume you're not.

Re:Problem with things like torture (4, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500482)

"Umm, who are you to judge who is "real christian" or not (where's that part in the bible about judging others). "

Ah, a perfect example of warping a religious ideal into a tool for your own purpose. Thank you. There a great deal of difference between exercising your personal feeling of justice (Judging) and verbally holding your fellow man accountable (you claim to be Christian, yet are clearly acting otherwise). Judge not lest ye be judged, is not a call to apathy but to mercy.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

Mad Quacker (3327) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500298)

And doesn't Christianity say something about loving one another? I wonder where all that was lost.
Yes, it does. You now have good reason to believe these people aren't actual Christians.
Not according to the Old Testament, in fact if there were electric chairs around those days I'm sure they would have been used for executions as well. So you're a christian and disregard the Old Testament? Fine, perfectly well in the new testament Jesus calls for all those who will not fall to him to be killed. Yes, it's all in there. A real christian believes these things.

If you go by "the book" these people are being good christians.

The koran just takes a much more succinct approach to all the same ideas, it's just a more virulent and easier to understand version of christianity.

As for the moderates who don't believe such things your labels of "christian" and "muslim" just leads to in-group out-group fighting, like apes in the trees.

Re:Problem with things like torture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499994)

I remember back in grade school reading about slavery and wondered how slave owners could do what they do and still go to church on Sundays. Just stay home and kill some bunnies. I don't know how people can support hatred/violence/murder and still consider themselves Christian. The second they step out of church doors, they go back to yelling at others, swearing, lying, treating others with disrespect, and selling used cars to "suckers." Capitalism trumps religion--that can be ABC's defense until more sponsors pull their ads.

Re:Problem with things like torture (3, Interesting)

MysticOne (142751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500042)

What I've always found interesting is that these people seem to be able to make threats against elected officials (calling for their death, torture, etc.) yet nobody ever says anything about it. Yet the moment a kid in a high school somewhere says something to the same effect, they're arrested, interrogated by the FBI, etc. Yet if you're a talk show host, or a popular right-wing media whore, you're allowed to call for the death or torture of anybody with whom you disagree.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500212)

Nobody actually takes pundits seriously.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

masdog (794316) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500362)

Apparently some advertisers do, otherwise they wouldn't have pulled advertising from this particular station.

Re:Problem with things like torture (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500144)

I mean, racism, advocating torture, describing how they want to get rid of folks they do not like etc.

And doesn't Christianity say something about loving one another?


I dont know you assume torture and murder cant exist within Christianity, be advocated by the church and scriptures, and cant be done by Christians. Its historically false to even assume such a thing. Christianity is no pacifist religion . I really wish people would just accept the scripture and history of their own religions instead of making these little perfectionist strawmen. This has been going on since Jesus walked the earth, except now you can thank secular thinkers for giving you the right to free speech to even question your chosen religion.

Christian torture. [jesusneverexisted.com] Christian racism. [secularhumanism.org] Christian Slavery. [evilbible.com] Christian Warfare. [about.com] Inquisitions (more torture). [rotten.com] etc

Daily Kos? No thanks. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499688)

I'm not RTFA because it's DailyKos.

Anyone have another source?

(I'm not conservative by any stretch of the imagination, I just can't stand that site.)

(my captcha is "fanatic". How apropos)

same topic, from Salon.com (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500200)

While this isn't perfectly recent, here is an article from Salon.com that talks about the kind of things Melanie Morgan and Lee Rodgers from radio station 560 KSFO in San Francisco are spewing: http://www.salon.com/opinion/conason/2006/07/14/me lanie_morgan/ [salon.com] (ad movie-required warning)

Below is the text of the article:

Electrocute Bill Keller! No, hang him!

The moronic hosts of GOP-connected radio station KSFO get big yuks calling for "traitors" in the press to be killed -- all brought to you by Disney.

By Joe Conason

Jul. 14, 2006 | While Melanie Morgan debates with Ann Coulter about whether the executive editor of the New York Times should be killed by gas chamber or firing squad, the institutional forces behind the San Francisco radio host deserve to share in the national spotlight now focused on her. Morgan's brand of authoritarian extremism is brought to her radio listeners every day courtesy of the Disney Corp., which owns KSFO-AM -- a station that functions as a mouthpiece and fundraising mechanism for the Republican Party.

Through KSFO and Move America Forward, a right-wing nonprofit (and "nonpartisan") organization that she co-chairs, Morgan enjoys an extensive network of connections in the Californian Republican Party. The founder and "chief strategist" of Move America Forward is noted Republican consultant Sal Russo, whose firm has represented a broad spectrum of GOP candidates around the country over the past three decades.

Started as a vehicle for the recall of California Gov. Gray Davis, the group has pursued such disparate causes as discouraging theaters from screening Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 9/11," promoting the confirmation of United Nations Ambassador John Bolton, promoting happy news from Baghdad -- and, last December, launching an ad campaign to persuade Americans that Saddam Hussein really did possess a hidden arsenal of weapons of mass destruction.

For a commercial radio station, KSFO maintains an unusually close relationship with the local Republican Party. The station's Web site links to Political Vanguard, which is operated by Contra Costa County GOP chairman Thomas Del Beccaro. Both his site and KSFO feature a series of party fundraising events, notably a gala hosted by Morgan herself and an upcoming speech by Wall Street Journal columnist John Fund. (Perhaps Morgan will take the opportunity to harangue Fund about his traitorous Journal colleagues, who also published the story about the financial tracking of terrorists by the SWIFT bank consortium.)

Anyone wishing to purchase tickets to these KSFO-sponsored events is advised to make out a check to "Contra Costa Republican Party" and mail it to the party headquarters in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Morgan and her co-hosts at KSFO (formerly the home of hatemonger Michael Savage) are predictably thrilled by the attention she has received ever since she called for Times executive editor Bill Keller to be sent to the gas chamber (after a "trial," of course). To listen to them is to wonder whether they may have gotten a little overexcited about their newfound notoriety -- Morgan's daily program specializes in primitive politics, with aging frat-boy high jinks provided by male sidekick Lee Rodgers and another character known as "Officer Vic."

On June 27, following a news item about President Bush's denunciation of the Times story on financial tracking of suspected terrorists via the SWIFT (Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ) bank consortium, Morgan sputtered, "Get 'em! Yes, hang 'em! Yeah!"

Two days later, her sidekick Rodgers became exasperated with the Associated Press for reporting that antiwar activist Cindy Sheehan and others had begun a hunger strike. "Why don't you dopes at the Associated Press do the world a favor? Commit mass suicide!"

"Oh, Lee!" tittered Morgan.

The hilarity continued on June 30 when Morgan clarified her position. For the sake of listeners who wondered why she kept calling for prosecution of the New York Times but not of the other newspapers that had published stories on the SWIFT tracking, she explained that they're all traitors in her mind.

"I'm going to say this one more time," she barked peevishly. "Yes, we're picking on the New York Times, the poor defenseless New York Times. But I don't care if it was the New York Times or the L.A. Times or the Washington Post or the Wall Street Journal. All of you people are equally guilty of treasonous behavior!"

By then Rodgers had gotten plenty fed up with all the criticism of his co-host, and he issued an ominous warning. "God Almighty," he muttered. "The day will come ... The day will come when unpleasant things are going to happen to a bunch of stupid liberals. It's going to be amusing to watch, it's going to be very amusing to watch." Morgan cackled as if on cue, "Heh heh heh."

Like many right-wingers, the KSFO crew can dish it out, but they can't take it. Their feelings get hurt when anyone slaps back. On July 10, New York Times columnist Frank Rich published a Sunday column identifying Morgan as part of a "get the press lynch mob." Although Rich didn't urge any summary punishment for her, Morgan reacted the next day by calling him "one of the meanest liberals that's on staff there in the columns department" and wrongly accused him and other Times staffers of having "lied about what I've actually said." (In the same breath she made a similar bogus complaint about a column I wrote for Salon.)

Then she and her crew came up with a new position regarding what should happen to those journalists whom she deems traitors. Not what should happen, actually, but how it should happen.

"I really do believe that anybody who publishes classified information that results in a charge of treason should be fried! Fry 'em! Trial, conviction, death penalty!"

At that point one of her co-hosts cheerfully interjects, "You originally called for the gas chamber ... but we kind of like Ole Sparky," meaning the electric chair. To shrieks of laughter from Morgan, he launched into a gruesome description of execution by electrocution: "Their hair would go up and everything, smoke, electrical jets shooting out of their eyeballs ... We'd take Bill Keller, put him in the electric chair -- after a trial -- and then fire it up." He then launched into a series of oral sound effects -- buzzing, screeching, hissing and blubbering sounds meant to simulate the high-voltage end of the Times editor.

While Morgan modestly bills herself as a fount of "intellect and wit," her brand of fascist vaudeville isn't universally admired. That could be why, according to a blogger and media activist who calls himself Spocko, several KSFO sponsors have canceled their commercials. Yet Morgan and her cronies, straining to keep up with Coulter, seem confident that Disney, ABC Radio and their advertisers love broadcasting the mock electrocution of a New York Times editor. Who cares about journalism or freedom of the press, or even standards of taste? There must be a lot of money to be made in jackboot radio.

-- By Joe Conason

Re:same topic, from Salon.com (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500406)

I'm not a fan of the mainstream media(controlled by Rupert Murdoch and the military-industrial complex) but those people make the MSM look like fucking angels.

TWOFO SUCKS COCK (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499730)

DC++ dchub://hub.twofo.co.uk:4144 ... fuck those filesharing fucktards at ... Zeus rides cock [twofo.co.uk]

Liberals are the only ones left listening... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499758)

...to all this right wing old skool conservative radio. The ratings would be even lower if you stopped listening. Your blood pressure would also be lower. In some ways this reminds me of those PTC wackos just listening to be offended so they can complain.

I seem to recall (3, Insightful)

also-rr (980579) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499768)

A broadcast on the BBC about Florida and a rather barmy woman on her way to Disney (World|Land|Empire) who gave the quote:

"Wouldn't America be a better place if Disney were running it."

I contend that the correct response to this statement would have been involuntary entry to an organ donation programme.

Re:I seem to recall (5, Insightful)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499822)

I contend that the correct response to this statement would have been involuntary entry to an organ donation programme.

Isn't that the kind of talk that Spoko was complaining about?

Re:I seem to recall (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500346)

Isn't that the kind of talk that Spoko was complaining about?

Are 'ignorant' and 'stupid' considered protected classes of individuals?
I know that Muslims and democrats are.
(As are most religious & political groups)

Disgusting radio commentary... (4, Interesting)

ip_fired (730445) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499772)

I listened to the radio commentary and had to stop before it finished. It's absolutely disgusting! I'm glad this guy did something about it.

Talking about chopping off fingers and genitals, talking about what it would sound like to have someone electrocuted. It's things like this that cause me to feel shame for being an American. We should be above this type of thought, and *certainly* above this type of action.

Re:Disgusting radio commentary... (1)

goldspider (445116) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500006)

"It's things like this that cause me to feel shame for being an American."

Yes, because the words of a few asshats represent all Americans, and therefore represent you.

I understand, though. It's fashionable these days to say you're ashamed to be an American.

Re:Disgusting radio commentary... (2, Insightful)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500096)

I'm ashamed that my nation picks leaders such as George W. Bush, who thinks selling lives for oil is a less heinous crime than two men loving each other.

SLAPP Reborn (5, Informative)

NorbrookC (674063) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499808)

One of the tactics that large companies have used in the past, when dealing with critics - particularly grass-roots activists - was the SLAPP : Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation. Someone against your project, or annoying you? File a lawsuit against them. Since you have the money to push it, and they generally don't (if you pick your target well), the only way out of it for them was to shut up. This had the "benefit" of shutting up your other critics, too.

It appears that Disney has dusted off the tactic here. Yeah, Spocko did nothing illegal. All he did was advocate a position, comment legally on what he saw wrong, and point it out to those who finance it. Rather than actually change anything, Disney decided the best move was to shut the critic up. This seems be backfiring though - and it'll be interesting to watch how Disney will twist and turn to try to spin this in a better light.

Re:SLAPP Reborn (3, Interesting)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499872)

It appears that Disney has dusted off the tactic here.

Actually, it hasn't been dusty since about 1967. After Walt Disney's death, the corporation decided that a vast litigation department would help keep the billions flowing in.

In the 1970's they went around the country shutting down child care centers that had Disney characters on their walls.

Re:SLAPP Reborn (1)

hrieke (126185) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500048)

Which was completely with in their rights to do so- protecting their copyrights is their job.

This blog is completely different case, please learn to identify the differences.

Re:SLAPP Reborn (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500392)

This blog is completely different case, please learn to identify the difference.

While it is offtopic, I think it does show the behemoth nature of the Disney legal department. And while specific cartoon characters may be protected by copyright, I think certain instances of characters painted on the wall may have been fair use. The paintings could have been interpretive in nature. In any case, I think that it does show the over-reaching nature that copyright has attained atop the ivory tower.

Re:SLAPP Reborn (5, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500534)

Let alone the fact, that were it not for Disney's legal army, copyright terms would not currently stand at 99 years. That company has done far more damage than it is worth. Far more, and as for that little bastard Mickey ... I hope somebody traps his ass. And not with one of those mamby-pamby "humane" traps, either. I want the life quickly squeezed out of him, so we can toss his moldering carcass on the scrap-heap of history.

Again... blaming the lawyers (3, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499908)

Spocko had his blog shut down by ABC/Disney lawyers

Sigh... Why do slashdotters hate lawyers so much? It's always "the lawyers" and never the management of ABC or the gutless wonders at Spocko's ISP.

It is a disgusting tactic they are using, but it is par for the course. Anyone can threaten a baseless lawsuit. The way to handle it is to call their bluff. I do not believe for one minute that ABC would follow through with their ridiculous (alleged) threat.

By the way... has anyone actually seen this letter we're talking about?

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (2, Interesting)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499966)

Sigh... Why do slashdotters hate lawyers so much? It's always "the lawyers" and never the management of ABC or the gutless wonders at Spocko's ISP.
Lawyers are to corporations as big guys with strong arms are to the mob.

"Disney" had their lawyers shut him down, Disney is dead, therefore Disney, the inanimate corporation doesn't take actions by itself, Disney's Management took the decision, the lawyers did the deed.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (0, Troll)

feepness (543479) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500028)

Any media lawyer worth the air she breathes knows that Spocko's use was well protected.

Note that a lawyer on the side of Spocko, the good guy, is female and therefore exempt from negative connotations.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500002)

Spocko has one goal--silence that radio host. Period. He may have put lipstick on his rhetorical pig, but it's the same thing. What's disgusting is how soon you people forget your principles when someone says something you don't like.

Bullshit (4, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500034)

What's despicable is how soon some people forget that Free Speech includes the right to comment on someone else's speech.

Free Speech doesn't include the right to have sponsors.

Dixie Chicks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500272)

Y'all lefties sure hollered their free speech was being violated.
All this guy did was the same thing.Good riddance to no talent talkers.The pros can get sponsors despite who they offend.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500090)

Spocko has one goal--silence that radio host. Period. He may have put lipstick on his rhetorical pig, but it's the same thing.

Threatening to file a frivolous lawsuit versus showing someone's sponsors what they are supporting...

You think that's the same thing?

You're a fucking moron.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (2, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500074)

Why do slashdotters hate lawyers so much? It's always "the lawyers" and never the management of ABC or the gutless wonders at Spocko's ISP.

Because there's ALWAYS some slimy, shitbag lawyer that would do whatever you'd like, just so long as you had the money. If I read more about lawyers refusing to accept cases like this, then maybe I'd have more respect for them. They're kind of like whores... they'll do whatever you want, just so long as you have the money to pay for it.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (3, Insightful)

spiritraveller (641174) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500170)

Because there's ALWAYS some slimy, shitbag lawyer that would do whatever you'd like, just so long as you had the money. If I read more about lawyers refusing to accept cases like this, then maybe I'd have more respect for them. They're kind of like whores... they'll do whatever you want, just so long as you have the money to pay for it.

First, Disney didn't have to hold out a bag of money on a street corner looking for a "slimy lawyer". They have a legal department, which they keep staffed. They are employees of Disney, and at the same time, Disney is their client.

Secondly, lawyers are like whores because that is the ethical responsibility of every lawyer. When you represent someone, you stand in their shoes, whether it is a corporation, a little old lady, or somebody charged with a capital offense.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (3, Insightful)

NineNine (235196) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500302)

As a lawyer, you have no responsibility to take every case. If somebody asks you, as an attorney, to have somebody killed, you have a legal responsiblity to say, "No". If somebody asks to you batter some individual until they shut up (even though that individual has done nothing wrong), then you have the moral responsibility to say "No". I have a buddy who is an attorney who regularly turns down people that he doesn't want to represent for a whole variety of reasons. The Disney lawyers pursuing this are whores. It's as simple as that.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (1)

slaida1 (412260) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500240)

Sigh... Why do slashdotters hate lawyers so much? It's always "the lawyers"

Because they are the ones in the end who decide whether to press the charges, send the threatening letter or not. Just like police or any little gasket of a big machine, just because the machine is so big and your part is so small it doesn't mean that there isn't one who will take all the blame.

The lawyer has a choice: either he says "No, I'm not going to do it. It's not right." or he accepts the money and keeps his unethical job. In any case he should not have false belief that he's only doing his job and nobody can't blame him for that. It is not so. We all have to bear responsibility for things we do, it doesn't matter if we do them for behalf of someone else or under pressure or threat of losing our jobs.

"What would you do, I bet you'd take the money and keep the job just like I do!"... Yes, maybe. But life isn't fair, it is lawyer who is in the tight spot and it doesn't matter what somebody else would do in his position. He does wrong, he gets the blame. Or something worse.

Re:Again... blaming the lawyers (1)

SiChemist (575005) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500552)

Hear, Hear! Personal responsibility-- If you take a job that does evil then you are doing evil. "Just following orders" is never an excuse.

Look what lawyers did to McDonalds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500472)

Raped them in court over some woman spilling coffee on herself.
And now they can only sell lukewarm coffee.
Lawyers suck they sue over anything and often win despite the merits of the case because juries think the "victim" deserves something.

Stupidity in high places (1)

HangingChad (677530) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500514)

do not believe for one minute that ABC would follow through with their ridiculous (alleged) threat.

I think you're right, they're just trying to stop the bleeding.

The lawyers are just doing what they're paid for doing, it's ABC/Disney management that fumbled the response. This is not how you respond to this type of criticism if you're guilty...and they're guilty. This is knee jerk. All it's done is to hang a lantern on the protest so it might be seen by a wider audience. They made him a hero. Hopefully they sober up before actually filing a court case. Then those radio clips would be evidence in a court case and open the door for discovery. Public suicide.

More proof that, in my opinion, top executives are not worth the millions they're getting. Lose money, bungle incidents like this, still collect a golden parachute.

It's also possible the ABC/Disney execs don't know what exactly is going on. This could have been bungled entirely within the confines of ABC's radio division. This smells a lot like mid-manager knee jerk trying to save their job after losing a major sponsor. You know how information gets filtered on the way up the chain. Who knows what bs story they fed up the pipeline?

Also doesn't stop him from sending transcripts to sponsors and potential sponsors. Maybe the rest of us to could dash off a quick note to FedEx letting them know their support of right wing hate speech doesn't make them look good.

From what I heard... (1)

FunWithKnives (775464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499948)

On the YouTube video summary (thanks to the guys that put that up, btw), this just lends more credence to what the "liberals" or "democrats" or whatever you want to call them have been saying. By acting childish, and being vulgar and stupid, these idiots are showing that they have no legitimate argument or opposing viewpoint to give. Because of that, they just spew complete trash, and hope to ridicule the people that think that there is something -very- wrong in this country right now.

Sounds like the cavalry coming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17499954)

"...if you want legal help. You can google me -- Camille Abate -- or you can check out my law website, www.abateandpreuss.com, or my new insitute's fledgling (i.e., unfinished) website, www.caja-institute.com.

In any event, I'm very familiar with Rule 11 motions and with federal practice, and it would be fun!

Politics is like football; if you see daylight, go through the hole. -- JFK "

Maybe someone can clue me in on how Rule 11 applies here. I googled it and it is a rule about motions submitted to a court. Among other things, it forbids motions that are for the purpose of harassing the other party. Maybe I missed it, but I wasn't aware that there was a court case; just the threat of one. Did Disney file any motions?

Anyway, the lawyer in the quote above seems to think Rule 11 applies here.

Full circle (2, Insightful)

Gordon Bennett (752106) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499956)

What a strange turn - the radio show's presenters are entitled to their free speech, however objectionable to most, yet the reviewer was slapped down - Disney's logic behind this escapes me.

Re:Full circle (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500178)

"Disney's logic behind this escapes me."

Their logic had nothing to do with free speech and censorship. They reasoned that certain publicity could be bad for their profits, and they had the power to silence that publicity (or so they falsely believed in this case), so they tried to exercise that power.

It fortunately backfired on them.

Nonetheless, the DMCA as a method of trial-free law-backed coercion still exists in full force, and is being successfully abused in many other situations. As long as one person can instantly (albeit temporarily) silence another merely by sending a letter to an ISP (with no trial, no judge's approval, no oversight whatsoever), it will continue to happen.

What about FCC? (3, Interesting)

eieken (635333) | more than 7 years ago | (#17499988)

I know blogging about something like this is bound to gain a lot of traction pretty quickly, but isn't it also possible to send in a complaint to the FCC about this? I know the FCC isn't typically what any of us think of when we think justice, but it is within their domain to dish out some hefty justice.

No doubt the comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500024)

were taken out of context. That's the way the LLL's work.

Good for ABC/Disney, fighting back against the insipid inanity of the left.

Re:No doubt the comments (4, Insightful)

a_karbon_devel_005 (733886) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500088)

How do you "take out of context" a 40 second clip about someone talking about frying someone on the electric chair because they don't like their political views (complete with moronic sound effects)?

I'm not at all surprised by the idiocy that goes on in the realm of talk radio, but all this guy did was put up clips to show ADVERTISERS that were paying for ads on this show what was going on.

If the quotes were defensible, ABC should have defended them. They didn't. And as people have pointed out, commenting on segments of shows like this with portions of the original broadcast is COMPLETELY legal under the Fair Use laws.

...I just realized I was responding to "Anonymous Coward." Doh.

What happened to what we used to say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500080)

...to the perpetually aggrieved conservatives:

"Don't like what you are hearing or seeing? Use that 'off' button."

Lets not become new class of perpetually aggrieved.

KSFO is in big trouble here. (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500180)

First, already this is the top story on MediaPost [mediapost.com], a web site for ad buyers. This is very bad for a radio station.

Then their big mistake: On Nov. 14th Melanie Morgan said this about Nancy Pelosi: "We've got a bulls-eye painted on her big laughing eyes." (from the Daily Kos) [dailykos.com]

That might be a felony. 18 USC Sec. 871 [cornell.edu]

  • ...Whoever knowingly and willfully deposits for conveyance in the mail or for a delivery from any post office or by any letter carrier any letter, paper, writing, print, missive, or document containing any threat to take the life of, to kidnap, or to inflict bodily harm upon the President of the United States, the President-elect, the Vice President or other officer next in the order of succession to the office of President of the United States, or the Vice President-elect, or knowingly and willfully otherwise makes any such threat against the President, President-elect, Vice President or other officer next in the order of succession to the office of President, or Vice President-elect, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than five years, or both."

They said that after the November election, when Ms. Pelosi was Speaker-elect of the House. (The Speaker of the House is second in line for the Presidency, after the Vice President.) Somebody is probably going to be asking some hard questions of the people at that radio station.

There's a legitimate First Amendment issue here, but it's in that grey area between political speech and death threats. Morgan, KSFO and Disney may have some unpleasant months ahead. This could create liabilities that would interfere with the planned sale of the station to Citadel Broadcasting. That sale was supposed to happen during 2006, but on November 22, the deal was postponed and repriced [marketwatch.com], and not to Disney's advantage. ("the potential amount of cash retained by Disney has been reduced by $300 million in the aggregate, $100 million of which is an outright reduction in the cash...")

In terms of financial losses by a media company, this could be bigger than the Janet Jackson "wardrobe malfunction."

Winter? Or Ice Age? (1)

heretic108 (454817) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500300)

Vivaldi's 'Winter' concerto - perfect choice of backing on the YouTube video presentation - highlighting the fact that free speech is presently suffering one very cold winter.

Hopefully the new Congress (pushed by enough pissed-off individuals and lobby groups) might bring back the sweet chirping of birds and fresh green buds on the trees of creativity.

Or is this the start of another Ice Age [wikipedia.org]?

sex 3ith aL trollkore (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17500336)

in eternity...Romeo thei8 parting has sig7nificantly

5-minute audio clips are not "fair use" (3, Interesting)

sobiloff (29859) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500370)

It appears that Spocko had clips that ran as long as five minutes. That's beyond fair use in most circumstances. Those are probably what gives Disney a leg to stand on. His short clips (5-15 seconds) were within the bounds of fair use, though.

DailyKos is a deeply partisan site (3, Insightful)

ConfusedSelfHating (1000521) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500466)

DailyKos and their allies want the radio station shut down because it's a conservative talk radio station. This is just an excuse. There is a complete lack of context to their comments. They mention that the radio talk show hosts suggest that a black man from Nebraska should be tortured to death. My guess is that a particular criminal performed a horrible act and they want him to pay for the act more severely than the law provides (an emotional response). I don't know because it's not mentioned in the article. Just the race baiting key points of "black man" and "torture/execution".

I'm not saying that the radio station shouldn't be shut down. However, I suggest we should base our discussions on more reasonable sources such as the New York Times, the Washington Post and various British papers (not the Guardian). If Rush Limbaugh said that Nancy Pelosi should be removed from office because she was disloyal to the United States, would you take him at his word?

That said, I believe that websites should be allowed to post copyrighted material when it's in the public interest. If they feel that the copyrighted material is violating the law and constitutes a threat, they should be able to bring their case to the public.

counter-notification (3, Informative)

belmolis (702863) | more than 7 years ago | (#17500520)

I'm surprised that the blogger has given in so easily. I understand that he can't afford a lot of legal expenses, but my understanding is that at this point all he needs to do is file a counter-notification with his ISP certifying that to the best of his knowledge his use of copyrighted material falls under Fair Use, which it almost certainly does. Here's a how-to [cmu.edu]. This puts the ball back in ABC/Disney's court and doesn't require a lawyer at all.

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