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Bugged Canadian Coins?

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the time-for-the-tin-foil-pants dept.

Privacy 354

tundra_man writes "CBC has an article about RFID type devices in Canadian coins found on US Contractors. From the article: 'Canadian coins containing tiny transmitters have mysteriously turned up in the pockets of at least three American contractors who visited Canada, says a branch of the U.S. Department of Defense.' The report did not indicate what kinds of coins were involved."

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354 comments

Motive??? (3, Insightful)

lecithin (745575) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544206)

For the life of me, I can't figure a reason that somebody would do this. Coins change hands quickly and RFID has a pretty limited range.

Aside from:

"Passing the coin to an unwitting contractor, particularly in strife-torn countries, could mark the person for kidnapping or assassination"

But that doesn't seem practical in this case.

Anybody make sense of this?

Re:Motive??? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544246)

I can't think that bugging money will track a person for very long. Either you only want to track that person for a very short amount of time, or you're really interested in tracking the money itself.

Re:Motive??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544726)

Are you sure that RFID has a limited range? I'd think that the gub'mints would have something better.

By the time the US admitted to having the Stealth, wouldn't you think it had been outdated?

Re:Motive??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545252)

Or it's a new way to identify Canadian coins and stop them from messing up our vending machines! Technology saves us again!!!!

Re:Motive??? (5, Funny)

batquux (323697) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544280)

Makes ripping off Canadian vending machines just a little bit tougher?

Re:Motive??? (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544470)

For the life of me, I can't figure a reason that somebody would do this. Coins change hands quickly and RFID has a pretty limited range.

Maybe they suspected the contractors would sneak into a facility that day (spies) and wanted to be able to track them?

They could also be useful for setting off a weapon as somebody walked by, if you knew where the person was going and wanted deniability.

Re:Motive??? (4, Interesting)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544506)

I also read the article and thought WTF.

I seriously doubt anyone managed to mung currency and insert a real RFID unit.
What I do think however is that in a small percentage of coins they resonate at the same frequency as an RFID which would appear as though they were magical.

If you did infact hollow out a bit of a coin and replace some of the metal with an electronic bug the weight and bounce (striking against a piezo sensor) would cause such a difference any coin mech you inserted it into would reject it.

Less quickly than you think. (2, Informative)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544558)

Two reasons they might not change hands quickly:
1) Canadian coins don't get unloaded as quickly in the US since not everyone is happy to accept them, so often those coins are the last you attempt to spend. (a minor factor, I admit).
2) Everyone seems to end up with a pocketful of change at the end of the day that gets dumped in a pile. The pile just grows.

Still doesn't answer the why ... unless some Canadian is trying to find American stashes of loose change.

Extortion? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544656)

The coins may have been given in some immoral/illegal situation by Canada's equivalent of the CIA. Perhaps by one posing as a prostitute? Perhaps perhaps at the scene of a bribe (no, I'm not saying the coin itself is the bribe; but perhaps the bartender gave the bugged coins at the scene)? If the coins showed up on the person in a meeting with the contractor the next day you'd guess which members of the contractors team were present during the immoral activity.

Re:Extortion? (5, Funny)

Slithe (894946) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545166)

Canada's equivalent of the CIA
Would that be the CI-eh?

Re:Motive??? (2, Funny)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544670)

For the life of me, I can't figure a reason that somebody would do this. Coins change hands quickly and RFID has a pretty limited range.

ForEx traders have a motive: they can position themselves to make a LOT of money based on small changes in the exchange rates between currencies.

  1. Spend $100 hacking RFID chips into Canadian coins.
  2. Go long on the currency of Canada's neighbors.
  3. Pass the coins around and wait for the headlines to appear.
  4. Profit !!!

Re:Motive??? (1)

mikeabbott420 (744514) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544766)

Somebody running a sociology experiment

Re:Motive??? (1)

monkeySauce (562927) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544974)

An RFID coin bugging could mean only one thing: invasion!

Re:Motive??? (1)

Malc (1751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545030)

And you know which is the only country to have successfully invaded the US (and burnt down the capital)?

Re:Motive??? (1)

APLowman (968256) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545130)

That would be England, not Canada.

Social Experiment (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545000)

It's probably just some engineering nerd's Social Experiment. Maybe see if he can get the coins back at some point.

A Day In The Life Of A Twoonie (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545002)

  • 0700 In Harry's Pocket
  • 0734 Tim Horton's for Coffee and Apple Fritter
  • 0756 Change for Mary's purchase of Coffee and Scone
  • 0810 Given to sad looking homeless man to buy food with
  • 0812 In Beer Store register
  • 1217 Change for Robert's purchase of something to drink with lunch
  • 1259 In the till at Tim Horton's for coffee and donut
  • 1349 Change for Alice's purchase of coffee
  • 1412 Given to sad looking homeless man to buy food with
  • 1425 Placed on two dollar bet for Murray's Little Girl to show in the 3rd race
  • 1446 Paid out to Harry for bet on Mum's De Woid to win in the 3rd race

i see a trend here, eh.

You don't know? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545044)

I believe it's one of those "If you don't know, you aren't smart enough" situations.

I mean, sure, to use it's useless and pointless but there is some next level stuff going on.

Follow the music. You'll find her.

Re:Motive??? (3, Insightful)

lawpoop (604919) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545112)

The only conclusion that I can come to is that someone is tracking these contractors to figure out who they are.

These can't be general circulation coins. It's too expensive to put RFID in a coin, and there's no use for it. If the government was minting RFID coins, even as a test-run, there would be *some* mention of it *somewhere. If the government were doing it for legit purposes, they would own up to it after these reports. These coins must be being specially made.

Why would you want to make them? I don't think you're really worried about the coin itself; you are worried about the person carrying the coins. You don't need to know where they are at any moment -- there is no infrastructure to track a single coin. You just want to correlate a person carrying these tagged coins on a regular basis with the source of the tagged coins. It's a kind of 'swarming' identification. If the person regularly has a number of tagged coins in their pocket 3 days out of the week, you know they must be one of the people interacting directly with the source. This person is part of the group of people you are trying to identify.

Imagine a customs checkpoint on the border with thousands of people passing by every day. Suppose you know that there are some 50 contractors passing by there every day on their way to work in Canada. For whatever reason, you can't figure out who they are in any other way. But suppose you have access to the Canadian money supply inside the vending machines of the worksite. So you make sure that all of the Canadian money coming into the vending machine is tagged. You have a scanner inside the customs booth. Everyday, there are a number of cars where the driver has anywhere from 0-3 tagged coins. You know these guys must be getting tagged coins from the vending machine you control.

In Canada... (5, Funny)

EXMSFT (935404) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544212)

coins track YOU!

Re:In Canada... (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544334)

Only old people in Canada use coins. The rest of us use Interac.

Re:In Canada... (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544508)

And that's because we have coins all the way up to $2. It sucks having to walk around with a kilogram of change in your pocket. I would use cash more if it wasn't for all that damn change.

Interac foolishness. (1)

sherpajohn (113531) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545054)

I saw someone in Ikea last weekend buy a 2.59 item with Interac. I mean come on, whats the service fee on that? $1 or $1.50? Thats quite a markup for the convenience of paying with plastic.

Re:Interac foolishness. (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545140)

There are no service fees for Interac point of sale purchases.

Re:In Canada... (1)

ElrondHubbard (13672) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544352)

ITYM (pace, Pat Buchanan): "In Soviet Canuckistan... coins track YOU!"

No no no! (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544688)

In Canada.. coins track YOU!

no no no no!

In The Great White North the money trail follows YOU!

Perhaps this is overblown? (4, Informative)

8127972 (73495) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544240)

At least this Globe and Mail report thinks so:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM .20070110.wspycoin0110/BNStory/National/home [theglobeandmail.com]

my guess (-1, Flamebait)

RelliK (4466) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544404)

My guess: some stupid americans had never seen a twoney [www.unb.ca] .

Re:my guess (1)

WhyDoYouWantToKnow (1039964) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544662)

You're right, I've never seen a twoney (I guess I'm one of those stupid Americans). But, then again, the US did stop producing the 2 dollar bill a few years ago.

Re:my guess (1)

terrymr (316118) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545182)

They may not have printed any for a while, but new $2 bills are still being put into circulation. They disappear just as fast because they're such a novelty.

Re:my guess (2, Interesting)

SilverJets (131916) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545260)

They probably got one of those poppy quarters from a few years ago and figured the painted on poppy was a listening device. I say produce the coins so the public and Canadian officials can see them or shut up. This has to be one of the most retarded stories I've read in awhile....transmitters in our coins....sheesh!!

Re:Perhaps this is overblown? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544648)

I just rinsed about a half cup of ass butter out of my crack

Re:Perhaps this is overblown? (1)

u19925 (613350) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544750)

why would they use canadian coins to track americans? actually, these coins were made by US govt to track canadians. now that the story is out, they are denying that such coins exist.

RFID chips (4, Funny)

User 956 (568564) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544252)

Canadian coins containing tiny transmitters have mysteriously turned up in the pockets of at least three American contractors who visited Canada

With RFID chips costing a fraction of a cent apiece, the addition of such a chip must at least triple the value of whatever canadian currency you add it to.

1995 called (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544350)

They want that joke back. With interest.

Re:RFID chips (5, Informative)

MyNymWasTaken (879908) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544642)

No argument, here. However, the Canadian Dollar is close to reaching parity with the US Dollar.

Canadian Dollar to U.S. Dollar Exchange Rate [yahoo.com]

Re: (1, Flamebait)

maroberts (15852) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544846)

the Canadian Dollar is close to reaching parity with the US Dollar.

That statement is exactly the same as saying the Canadian Dollar is valueless. The US Dollar is on its way with reaching parity with zero. :-)

Re:RFID chips (2, Informative)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545210)

the addition of such a chip must at least triple the value of whatever canadian currency you add it to.

      Your joke is out of context, what with a plummeting US dollar and all. I almost feel sorry for you guys, but your sinking dollar made me a lot of money :)

Data mining (1)

subl33t (739983) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544258)

We're just trying to find out what cola American defence contractors' prefer.

Re:Data mining (1)

WidescreenFreak (830043) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544836)

Um ... wouldn't the amount of money in the collection bins of the various vending machines at the contractors' workplace do the same thing? Whichever machine has less product at the end of the day would also be a good clue. ;)

All kidding aside, if this is true it's completely ridiculous. I can't think of one reason where bugging coins would prove to be of any value whatsoever. To track where the money goes? That's what a company's income statements are for. For determining which coins go to which businesses? Again, for what purpose? Or is there such a market in counterfeit, Canadian coins that this is a new way of determining which ones are real and which are fake? I'm being facetious in the last comment, of course, but this strikes be as being either (A) bogus or (B) totally nonsensical. Then again, since we are talking about something that comes from the government, (B) might be understandable.

The crazy dude on the corner (3, Funny)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544284)

screaming about how the birds are spying on him makes a bit more sense now.....

Re:The crazy dude on the corner (1)

Frogular (961545) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544678)

Spies of Saruman?

Re:The crazy dude on the corner (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544722)

screaming about how the birds are spying on him makes a bit more sense now.....

He always did. You just started listening

Re:The crazy dude on the corner (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544754)

Yeah, it makes even more sense considering the Canadian dollar coin is known as the "loonie" [wikipedia.org] . It has a picture of a loon on it.

No, on the *opposite* side from the picture of Liz.

Because its Looney ! (1)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544986)

The crazy dude on the corner...screaming about how the birds are spying on him makes a bit more sense now.....

So, that's why the call it the "Loonie" [wikipedia.org] !.

In other news (1)

JayTech (935793) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544290)

In other news, the U.S. Department of Defense is now requiring all contractor's pocket change to be scanned upon re-enter the country.

Re:In other news (1)

Alchemar (720449) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545128)

Did you mean "All money from contractors returning into the country will be confiscated in the name of fighting terroism" ?

Re:In other news (1)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545158)

In other news, the U.S. Department of Defense is now requiring all contractor's pocket change to be scanned upon re-enter the country

What are the odds that these measures will be applied to airline security?

Or would an x-ray machine zap the crap out of an RFID chip?

Takes WheresGeorge to a new level! (2, Interesting)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544338)

Wow, and I thought I was on the cutting edge by stamping bills and entering them into Where's George? [wheresgeorge.com]

In fact, a April Fool's joke I recall was that WG had developed a way to track US dollar coins, with a machine that would emboss a unique serial number into the coin's smooth edge. The new project would be "Where's Sackie [usmint.gov] ?"

Looks like the Canadian government is way ahead of the curve on that one. Better alert the folks at Where's Willy? [whereswilly.com] , the northern branch of Where's George?.

Name Change (1)

Penguinshit (591885) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544400)

Canada is changing from the "Looney" to the "Buggy" !

whats the point. (1)

VEGETA_GT (255721) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544468)

Ok first off, I believe this is completely overblown, think about it. We give you coins that can be tracked, great, well what do you do with a coin. Spend it, so it ends up in someone else's pocket and da da da. Unless you know who's pocket the coin is in, the information gathered from it is relay useless. You could not even tell that the coin changed hands. Say I I owe Bill 5$, well here is some coins and its in a new pocket. and if people are worried about the coin being used to track you, again the coin can't tell who you are, so sure your location may be tracked but the info is meaningless. The only purpose I can see for this is to track the path of cash as it gets around between visits at the bank. there is already a website in Canada that people write on some bills, which you can go to, enter the specific bill's number, and see where the bill has been. but it dose mean someone had to enter it into the system, so you end up with missing places, but its still interesting.

Coins (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544478)

Bugged coins, eh?

Looks like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544514)

It's time to don tin-foil trousers to go with the tin foil hats we're all wearing.

Re:Looks like... (1)

compro01 (777531) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544926)

well, we'll be coordinated anyway.

Why use coins to track contracters? (1)

loupgarou21 (597877) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544544)

Doesn't it make more sense that canada would use the coins with rfid chips planted in them to simply track circulaton rather than track a few individuals that would probably just end up spending the coins?

Re:Why use coins to track contracters? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544878)

Just do like Johnny Five, toss them into the bed of a passing truck driven by grandpa toker.

In Soviet Great Britain? (1)

Gulik (179693) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544576)

Well, it's like that old British saying: "If the pennies look after you, the lookers will get themselves pounded."

Wait...

Microwave (2, Funny)

KingNaught (718536) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544606)

Just pop your loose change in the microwave for 15sec problem solved ...

you first ;^) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544922)

I don't think I'll be putting any metal change into a microwave, thank you!

Re:Microwave (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545232)

yes because metal in a microwave is oh so safe.

Were these coins found in a nylon mesh bag and (1)

T00lman (1020903) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544614)

made of chocolate? MMMMMMMM chocolate.

Logical course of action? Invade Canada! (4, Funny)

uber_geek9 (879433) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544616)

These RFID coins are clearly the work of Canadian Terrorists trying to harm the American people.

Re:Logical course of action? Invade Canada! (1)

GreenEnvy22 (1046790) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544698)

We're wondering why you haven't invaded us already, we sell you far more oil then any other country :)

Re:Logical course of action? Invade Canada! (2, Funny)

Zeek40 (1017978) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545138)

Little known fact: Ever since Dudley Do-Right [wikipedia.org] made his first appearance on television, Americans have been terrified of Mounties. So long as Canadia keeps its Mounties along the border, you will be safe.

hmm (3, Interesting)

dheera (1003686) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544626)

well, for sure, it would make creating coin vending machines much easier to implement, mechanically. once i was in canada and received a coin that looked like this [members.shaw.ca] which i initially thought was fake, but believed later after reading online.

Re:hmm (4, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545050)

That is a commemorative coin marking the 60th anniversary of D-Day, and the 90th anniversary of WWI. The poppy became the symbol of remembrance of our war dead through the poem In Flander's Fields, written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, a Canadian battlefield doctor in World War One.

Is this even true? (2, Interesting)

Mr 44 (180750) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544636)

From the article:
"The report, which first came to light in a U.S. newspaper, has since been posted on the website of the Federation of American Scientists, an organization that tracks the intelligence world and promotes government openness."

Well, I don't see it on fas.org (search [google.com] ), and if its in a "american newspaper", its one that google news [google.com] doesn't search.

Something just doesn't sound right about this whole story.... It makes no sense, and there's no other cites for it.

LOL (1)

gx5000 (863863) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544680)

Although this sounds like an isolated case, once the coin(s) is(are) back
in the US of A, where the heck would you spend it ?
Anyone in the US accepted any loonies lately ?
So the "they'll be ridd of the coin soon" reasoning is gone.
This was probably just a one time tracking test. ;-)

Re:LOL (1)

lunaticfringe1 (1049418) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544774)

They will probably all end up in Las Vegas where they can be exchanged for gambling money.

Re:LOL (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545262)

The picture in the article is a Loony, but the text says they won't identify what coins are involved. Canadian pennies, nickles, and dimes are routinely passed by US cashiers. That's right--$US==$CAN if the the coinage is small enough and you aren't careful enough to look, which I have to admin I'm usually not. This doesn't piss me off nearly as much as the Dominican coin I got at a yardsale one time. That had to be nearly worthless; but I digress. The point is, small denomination Canadian coins are routinely passed in the US without much fuss. The nickel seems like the most likey target--big enough to hide whatever they want, small enough denominatino not to cause a fuss, common enough in change not to arrouse suspicion. Loonies never pass in the US, because we hate dollar coins down here. I've never seen a Can' quarter either, but I live in DC. Maybe it's more common near the border.

so how do you tell? (1)

phrostie (121428) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544796)

if you did have some of these coins, how would you tell?

Re:so how do you tell? (1)

zuluechopapa (919551) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544918)

The big cargo van with a dish on top and a maple leaf on the side that happens to be following you around is the biggest give away. :)

One Liners (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544804)

Those are no coins, those are tokens from Jacques E. Formage, the popular canadian pizza place and arcade combo!

The same technology was once used by the Fox network to track hockey pucks in-game.

They use it to track bears...bears who buy canadian beer.

It's used to track if Gretzky's wife is gambling at the slot machine again.

It's all a plot to try and locate Bob and Doug McKenzie since nobody has seen them in a while.

If they were wireless devices, they'd operate under 802.11eh

Common Cents (1, Interesting)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544834)

Hey, we fingerprint all Canadians entering the US, soon to demand (RFID) passports from all of them, while our NSA is tapping their phones and email. Who knows what our CIA does up there.

Since Americans are allergic to Canadian pennies now worth almost as much as ours, and dump them whenever we see them on our side of the border, these RFID trackers are relatively pretty benign.

Maybe if we just all wound down the BS simcurity that pretends to protect us, and instead actually just destroyed us some Qaeda recruitment cells, the US dollar would become strong enough again that we wouldn't bother schlepping their Canadian coins back home, like pocket lint.

Re:Common Cents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545162)

Just a nitpick: all Canadians are NOT fingerprinted entering the US. In fact, Canadian citizens are one of the few groups exempt from the VISIT program. I've never submitted to a fingerprinting at the border, and the day I have to will be the day I think twice about ever visiting your country again.

Fingerprint who? (1)

sherpajohn (113531) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545238)

No, Canadian entering the US are not fingerprinted. At least not yet, and from what I have read, its not planned to go in with the mandatory passports when entering the US via plane or boat.

AAAIIIEEEE!!!! (1)

Tool Man (9826) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544842)

The polar bear, it watches me!

Unlike your own president, we're not inspecting your post, just pocket lint. :)

It's actually a value added feature... (4, Funny)

gwn (594936) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544890)

As the world knows it is cold up here in the Great White North eh! There is usually lots of snow too, eh! Well I can tell you from experience that with all our socialist programs we pay lots of taxes and as a result we don't often end up with folding money, eh! So when your coins go missing it really hurts, eh! Like when you lose a handful of coins in the deep snow, eh! So with RFID coins you just get the portable reader out and scan for the coins to find them, eh! Or, you scan your couch to see if you can afford to order in a pizza with back bacon, eh! You walk in to Harvey's (like McDonald's but much better) and they scan you on the way in and let you know what you can afford, eh!

Accidental Perhaps? (2, Interesting)

HighOrbit (631451) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544892)

The article didn't specify if the RFID chips were adhered to the surface of the coin or somehow implanted in the coin itself. An internally implanted chip would be nefarious, but a surface adhesion could be accidental. In the case of an internal implant, since the reading would be local, they would most likely be used to figure out the coming-and-goings of a few locations (i.e. stake out a building and see how many readings you get during certain hours), or perhaps to tell when somebody is NOT in their hotel room, so the place could be searched or laptop with sensitive information pilfered.

Assuming that it was adhered, I could conceive how it could be accidental.
  1. spill coffee on pants on way to conferece
  2. stop at chain store to buy new pants
  3. chain store uses RFID to track inventory, puts small tag in pants pockets of stock
  4. tag seperates from cloths and adhers to pocket contents

Defence? (1, Troll)

RingDev (879105) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544906)

Is this some odd Canadian spelling of Defense? At first I just thought it was a type-o or a missed spell check, but ever place in the article that the word is used, it is spelled with a 'c'.

-Rick

Re:Defence? (1)

etherlad (410990) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545096)

Yes, "defence [wiktionary.org] " is an odd Canadian spelling of "defense," if by that, you mean "is defense [wiktionary.org] an odd American spelling of 'defence'?"

Defence-with-a-c is far more common worldwide and precedes the usage of defense-with-an-s.

Re:Defence? (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545104)

Is this some odd Canadian spelling of Defense?

They use British spelling, like "colour", "humour", and "motour". Apologies to Dave Barry.

Re:Defence? (1)

danpat (119101) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545122)

Canada, being part of the British Commonwealth, tends to use British spelling for stuff. Defence vs Defense, Licence vs License, Colour vs Color, Cheque vs Check, Tyre vs Tire, etc....

Extensive further references available here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_English [wikipedia.org]

Note: I am Australian, we spell much like the Canadians.

Re:Defence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545198)

No, it is the correct spelling of defence.

I put it down to Aliens (2, Funny)

maroberts (15852) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544920)

The metal based aliens simply made a mistake and implanted their tracking devices in what they thought was the dominant life form on the planet. OTOH, maybe money is the dominant life form....

Canadians are super paranoid (0, Flamebait)

andy314159pi (787550) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544930)

I've talked to some Canadians and the majority of them are very paranoid about an invasion by the United States. Given our track record, I cannot totally blame them, although I recognize that it's pretty irrational from a political standpoint. I've also heard that Canada has some sort of contingency plan to get the help of the Chinese or Russians if we were to invade.

It's obvious to you and me that the idea of an American invasion is ridiculous but Canada has their tin-foil intelligence agencies just like we do.

At last ... (1)

cpu_fusion (705735) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544934)

... W has found a basis for invading Canada. ;-)

Just joking... /ducks.

America's policies have infected Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17544936)

Canada has caught America's flu. The Canadian gov't is getting as paranoid as the American gov't. Don't worry Canada you still have some room to catch up. The US gov't rountinely violates our Constitutional rights.
They violate the 1st Amendment by opening mail, caging demonstrators and banning books like "America Deceived" from Amazon.
They violate the 2nd Amendment by confiscating guns during Katrina.
They violate the 4th Amendment by conducting warrant-less wiretaps.
They violate the 5th and 6th Amendment by suspending habeas corpus.
They violate the 8th Amendment by torturing.
They violate the entire Constitution by starting 2 illegal wars based on lies and on behalf of a foriegn gov't.
Besides the point, who uses Canadian money anyway?
Last link (unless Google Books caves to the gov't and drops the title):
America Deceived (book) [iuniverse.com]

Latest development (1)

matt me (850665) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544942)

RMS seen with foil wallet.

Black books: "These books sir, are they real leather? I have to have real leather to go with the sofa. I'll give you 20 pounds for them."
"Are they leather-bound pounds? I want leather-bound pounds to go with my wallet."

Re:Latest development (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17545072)

I love the black books comment, I've only just found out about it. Bill Bailey is a GOD!

It's the Queen (1)

(void*)cheerio (443053) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544950)

Well, I'm sure you all know that us Canadians are terribly conceited, specially when it comes to civil rights and all that, and espcially when comparing ourselves with the Americans.

Ergo, the bugs can't possibly be planted there by our government! Impossible!

I bet it's the Brits!

You see, the way the monarchy and the Commenwealth are all setup, every year our mint imports the small slabs of metal with the Queen's head on them from the UK. They have to be minted their, by order of King Edward II. When our mint makes the coin, we make everything except the Queen's relief, and then solder the important british slab to our coin.

I have a firm belief that the bugs are part of the important relief.

Re:It's the Queen (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545080)

I bet it's the Brits!

      No, the Brits would have had tiny tiny CCTV cameras on the coins which, incidentally, would send their owners speeding tickets in the mail...

Another fine example of military "inteligence" (2, Insightful)

Maury Markowitz (452832) | more than 7 years ago | (#17544990)

Can anyone here imagine a better way to make an RFID useless than putting it in the middle of a coin? And then after making these magical coins, apparently the same super-spies went all over the US and installed readers at every sensitive plant. Without anyone noticing. Wow, with spies like that, who needs bugged money?

The sad part about this is that someone believed it.

Maury

Re:Another fine example of military "inteligence" (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545048)

The sad part about this is that someone believed it.

      Bush certainly did, which is why the US will soon launch a surprise attack on us Canadians. Admit it - he's been wanting to do this for a very long time, at least since his proposal to militarize the US/Canada border. About time the US teaches Canada a lesson, eh?

It's the Canadian Secret Service (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545026)

There after the President's analyst!

Crap (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545134)

I misspelled 'They're'.... I need to slow down.

Useless RFID? (1)

cez (539085) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545038)

I keep reading comments saying how useless the RFIDs would be now...anyone bother to think that perhaps they've already been used? How are we supposed to know the original intent? Its the fact that they were there to begin with, not that they aren't much use now or after they've been spent, and that they wouldn't have been created without a purpose in mind...

There's not a chance that this is real. (1, Interesting)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545078)

I'm just a lowly Electrical Engineer who works in RF.

At my last job, we made transmitters. Some of them were really small - small enough to be surgically implanted into fish or ducks. It was cutting edge stuff; I had to work with the manufacturers to work out bugs in the chips, compilers, and programmers.

There is no way that a working transmitter can be fitted into a mockup coin. You'll have to have some kind of processor. The 10F202 is really small, coming in at about 2mm x 4mm x 2 mm, plus a little extra for the leads. Next we'll add the required RF circuitry, like the tuning and bypass capacitors, amplifiers, etc. We'll neglect voltage regulators and other things, but you're looking at more parts than what will fit in a toonie.

We'll assume that no board is being used, since that alone will negate the chance of a coin being used.

Let's assume an 800MHz signal. Why? Well, why not? That's going to give a 4-inch antenna. Let's assume a 24-gauge wire with a very small insulator, giving it almost negligible displacement. If you wrap this up inside the coin, you're going to have - quite frankly - fuck all for range. I guess you could run the wire on the outside of the coin, but you're not going to have much luck. Internal antennae just don't work very well.

Then you have a battery - oh, whoops, no more room.

So how does this work, again?

Its a joke you fools (1)

waTR (885837) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545206)

As the article states, tracking someone through tracking currency on that person is stupid. The point braught up is what happens when the person puts the coin in a pop machine. Basically, tracking someone through currency of that form could only work in a controlled environment where the person is within range and AS LONG AS THEY DONT SPEND MONEY! The funny thing is is that the coin in Canada is partly there to spur spending as no one likes having coins in their pocket. THerefore, this is officially the stupidest place to put a tracking device. THEREFORE, it is probably some corporate spies rather than government spies (as the article points out there are tons of them at tech trade-shows). This just in...Canada has weapons of mass distraction! We must liberate their water from them! ...dont laugh it is the oil of the future.

Just a trick to get Yanks to donate coins (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 7 years ago | (#17545240)

out of paranoia.

CSIS couldn't fight their way out of a weathered sopping paper bag, even if they had a pair of scissors.

But you never heard it from me. And if I had held a SECRET clearance in Canada, I'd have to pretend I didn't know what I don't know.
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