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Canada May Lose Copyright Fair-Use Rights

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the rights-eh? dept.

Your Rights Online 303

DotNM writes with an article from the CBC reporting that the Canadian government is considering removing fair-use rights from Canada's copyright law. From the article: "Exacerbating the situation is intense pressure from the United States, where Canada is considered a rogue when it comes to copyright and intellectual property. It still hasn't ratified a 1997 World Intellectual Property Organization copyright treaty... Two of the most controversial issues are [DRM] and the closely related technological protection measures."

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303 comments

Fight.. (5, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605006)

now is the time for Canadians to get out there and tell their elected representatives that they don't want US copyright. Do it now, before your politicians trade your dental plan for a keg of beer for their meetings.

Re:Fight.. (2, Funny)

arth1 (260657) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605038)

US beer? They'd never accept!

Re:Fight.. (1, Offtopic)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605086)

Samuel Adams is a pretty good US beer.

Just because Budweiser sucks, doesn't mean you should hate on all US beer. Hell, people in the US don't even drink that stuff.

I can only imagine what Fosters is doing to Australia's reputation for beer. People in Australia don't even drink that stuff.

Re:Fight.. (5, Funny)

Rufty (37223) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605266)

[Q] Why is American beer like sex in a canoe?
[A] They're both fucking close to water...

Re:Fight.. (1)

rikkards (98006) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605670)

Might have to turn in my Social Insurance and OHIP card but if given the choice between Molson Canadian, Labatt's Blue and Samuel Adams, I'd have to go with the Merkin. Keith's and Adams, would be Keith's but DogFish Head IPA would take the cake.

Canada PIRACY rate is Mexico at 65 percent (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17606100)

Canada's piracy rate exceeds that of Mexico's, claimed to be at 65 percent. Russia's stands is 99% and China's is 110%. USA is 35%. Bringing up the bottom, as it does so well, is the UK's, at 22%.

Re:Fight.. (0, Offtopic)

7Prime (871679) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605510)

Unfortunately, people in the US DO drink that stuff. But don't worry, most country's have similarly bad, mass-produced crap. Just thank god you're not Mexico, and don't drink Tacote (Mexican equivelent of Budwiser... really terrible stuff). Remember, Canadians have Molson Ice (sorry, there is SOME good Molson, but some of it is just as bad as Bud).

I do agree that not ALL US beer is bad, but most of it is. Sam Adams is tollerable, I don't know if I'd exactly call it "great beer". Although, many smaller, more regional brews are quite good. Here in Alaska we have the "Alaskan" brewing company (I know, really creative name), but aside from the really uncreative name, some of their stuff is DAMN good. Alaskan Amber has become a stapple, and is now exported all along the pacific coast. They also make a really good "Guinness-like" Oatmeal stout that's worth a try. The fact is, few country's are big enough to warrant such incredibly hugely mass-produced beers as Bud and Miller, even things like Heineken are a drop-in-the-hat comparitively... which is why they're so much better. After a brewing company gets too big, it just gets bad. The same happens with really small micro-brews too... as many individuals have no idea how to make good beer (myself included... but I don't brew).

Re:Fight.. (0)

cyber-vandal (148830) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605512)

I can only imagine what Fosters is doing to Australia's reputation for beer. People in Australia don't even drink that stuff.

Aussies are lying to you. I've drunk Fosters in Australia and it was shit there too.

Re:Fight.. (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605548)

Huh? I am an Aussie, and I'm tell you that Fosters is the most unpopular beer in Australia, much as Bud is the most unpopular beer in the US. The marketing might say otherwise, but there's a limit to how much they can bend reality.

Re:Fight.. (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605646)

The marketing might say otherwise, but there's a limit to how much they can bend reality.

Maybe some consultations with the RIAA might help them in that department. They didn't just bend it, they broke it in two.

Re:Fight.. (0, Offtopic)

Guido von Guido (548827) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605546)

US beer? They'd never accept!

I hate to have to break the news to you, but Canadian beer has fallen behind. I've been going to Canada (primarily Toronto and Stratford) for vacation since I was a kid. In the old days, I preferred Labatts and Molson to any mass-produced American beers. The thing is, that's not saying much. The American craft brewing/microbrew industry, however, now produces better beer than the mass-produced beer in either country. It's also made larger strides than the Canadian craft brewing industry. Bud, Miller et al still suck, and there are a number of excellent Canadian craft brewers (particularly Unibroue, although it remains to be seen if Sleeman will screw up Unibroue like it did Upper Canada). But the pickings are sparse. I'm not sure what the situation is like in Vancouver or Edmonton, but in Toronto the selection available at the Beer Store or the LCBO is fairly pathetic compared to the selection at several liquor stores and a couple of grocery store chains where I live (near Madison, WI). I'm not all that impressed with the craft brewing/small breweries I've seen in Ontario. I like Creemore, but I'm not so fond of Amsterdam or Steam Whistle. To be fair, I've never been to British Columbia. Considering the strength of the beer culture in Oregon and Washington, I wouldn't be surprised if craft brewing in British Columbia were in better shape than it is in Toronto. I would love to hear some counter-examples to look for next time I'm in Toronto.

Re:Fight.. (1)

rikkards (98006) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605748)

Considering the strength of the beer culture in Oregon and Washington, I wouldn't be surprised if craft brewing in British Columbia were in better shape than it is in Toronto. I would love to hear some counter-examples to look for next time I'm in Toronto.


My dad's family is from BC and their opinion is that Kokanee and Rickards (yes I used to drink it religiously which is where my online name came from (although mispelt)) have gone downhill since Labatt's and Molson respectively bought the companies.

Re:Fight.. (1, Offtopic)

tbo (35008) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606134)

I'm not all that impressed with the craft brewing/small breweries I've seen in Ontario.... To be fair, I've never been to British Columbia.

I'm originally from Canada, now living in the States. I'd put the microbrew/craft brewing industries of the two countries about equal. The fact that you've never been to BC means you've missed some good microbreweries (Granville Island, in particular). Alberta's Big Rock Brewery also makes some good stuff. As for Ontario, I haven't been there in a long while, but Sleeman does seem to be about the only decent thing they export out west (I'd have to go there to find the smaller breweries). As for mass-produced Canadian beer, try Rickard's Red. It used to be great, and is now merely "surprisingly drinkable", as the bottle says (what a horrible slogan, but it is OK for mass-produced beer).

In the US, I'd pick Fat Tire as my favorite. I also really enjoyed a pint of Yosemite Falls Double IPA I had in Yosemite Valley, but I haven't been able to find it anywhere else (it's brewed in Pasedena, CA, I think).

Re:Fight.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605048)

Who exactly do I yell at ?

I just wrote this letter to my MP (4, Interesting)

acidrain (35064) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606028)

And I would like to ask all Canadian citizens reading this to do the same. ------------- It is easy to overlook the erosion of our rights when faced with more pressing social issues, but I would like to ask you for a minute of your time to consider the implications of a change that the Conservative government is planning to make to Canadian copyright law. I'm writing you as a professional software engineer who is concerned about the planned extension of Canadian copyright into what is called "Digital Rights Management." As a person who makes a living producing work which is protected under copyright, you may find it ironic that I am opposed to this legislation. One reason for this is that in reality DRM effectively creates a monopoly environment which locks out creative individuals who are not in the employ of large corporations, and empowers those corporations to engage in anti-competitive activities. It does this by forever binding the use of things rightfully purchased to the day to day wishes of these corporations. Including limiting their use to devices and software who's producers have a financial obligation to the controlling corporation. I see no reason why our government should pass laws to protect the interests of these large foreign interests, at the expense of the rights and freedoms of Canadian citizens. The very citizens whom you were elected to represent.

Seriously. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605072)

Do what you can to save your country. We already lost ours.

Re:Fight.. (1)

F-3582 (996772) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605104)

Why not declare war against the U.S.?

A majority of their troops is in foreign countries, anyway, so why not give it a try? They should at least try to drop a big one on the RIAA headquarters.

Re:Fight.. (1)

radarsat1 (786772) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605168)

A majority of their troops is in foreign countries, anyway, so why not give it a try?


And where do you think OUR troops are?? (canadian troops, that is)

Re:Fight.. (3, Funny)

peragrin (659227) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605288)

wait since when did Canada have troops? I always figured you just sent a group of mounties out for those policing duties.

(I live an hour from the border, I know what you do and don't really have)

Re:Fight.. (1)

Score Whore (32328) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605380)

they don't have enough mexicans. we can threaten to ship them a few million and they'll cave to any u.s. demands.

Re:Fight.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605498)

A majority of their troops is in foreign countries, anyway, so why not give it a try?

It might have something to do with about 10,000 nuclear warheads and the fact that neither the US Navy nor the US Air Force is remotely "tied down" at the moment. Considering that Canada has about 100 fighter and bombing aircraft (slightly more than a single US supercarrier), it wouldn't be an understatement to say that Canada would be raped like an 8 year old boy at a NAMBLA meeting.

Re:Fight.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605900)

Getting in, that's easy. Getting out again, that's hard.

Re:Fight.. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605156)

Wish Canada had a dental plan (we never had a public dental plan... only those supplied by employers if you have a good enough job). We only have a medical system that doesn't provide enough primary care physicians and won't let you near a specialist unless you see a primary care physician first (and even if you do, it takes many months of waiting for an appointment). Have a bad shoulder? Forget the orthopaedic specialist... live in pain.

Re:Fight.. (-1, Troll)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605294)

Canadian's can't even fight local government or get a collective voice together long enough to do anything. And the last time they actually stood together was when it was actually important and mattered(80's during wage/price controls). Remember in Canada, the government knows best. And to stand against that is at the core 'Anti-Canadian'. That of course means not American, better and all that too.

The Liberals whipped people well during their years in office. People breaking out of that mold will be exceptionally difficult.

Re:Fight.. (0, Flamebait)

flight_master (867426) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605412)

This is why Harper is called a Moron by Canadians...
We need the Liberals back, now

Re:Fight.. (1)

zoftie (195518) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605528)

If they would ever go through with this, means CRIAA won't levelrage tax on blank media anymore. They can't have their pie and eat it as the same time, legally.
What you would rather have, moron stealing from you or someone clever, who can hide it , or make it appear a something else. Paul Martin is an embarrasment to the country of canada. Glad he is gone. He is one who ousted Jean Chrétien out. And he has balls to go out there after being forced from the office by the people, still Harps on about how liberal party is ONLY choice for canadians and they will going to get back in leaders. No SORRY. No we are going to BETTER next time around.

Re:Fight.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605678)

I work in the federal government and trust me, as much as the Liberals are good for my personal employment well being, they have done a crap load of bad, wasteful stuff over the years.

Any government that's in place for too long gets corrupt, one of the reasons I like the US law about no more then 2 terms for El Presidente.

Glad they finally got the boot last election, even if it's for one term they can hopefully realize to stop pissin on us joe public. Sponsership, the BC RCMP / Jean Cretien thing, etc etc etc.

Re:Fight.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605732)

>We need the Liberals back, now

Nearly half a billion dollars each term buys a HELL of a lot of protection from the MPAA/RIAA and their Canadian counterparts, though. You can tell them to stuff their money up their asses with that.

At least with the liberals out of office, we might have the money to do that. Maybe.

We need anyone but the liberals in office, if you want Canada's GDP to be in the pockets of Canadians, rather than in the pockets of liberal friendly AD media.

Re:Fight.. (1)

flight_master (867426) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606102)

...And Harper is different how? Cozzying up to the Americans? Getting rid of the CWB? Income Trusts? Childcare? Healthcare? Making a fool of Canada world-wide? I'm socially conservative, but Harper is NOT a Conservative.

Re:Fight.. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605494)

It wont happen. Canadians will roll over and do what the USA tells them to do. They are the 51st state anyways.

Inflammitory words bordering on Troll???? If it motivates only ONE of you to go out and flame the hell out of your government officials demanding they support actions that are for the people and not their corperate interests or just doing what thir USA masters tell them to do, then it will be worth it.

Get off your arse, start yelling at the scumbags you have in power and force them to do YOUR bidding and not that of a forign and hostile government. (Yes, the USA should be considered hostile to othernations. we force our will on you at gunpoint.)

This is from an American, who knows that change here in the states is futile. The Ultra rich and Corperations own our government lock-stock-and barrel. there is no chance in hell we will ever regain our government that was respected for over 100 years....

We are doomed, dont let us sieze control of your country by dictating policies.

Posting Anon to avoid being arrested for unpatriotic sentiment.

Re:Fight.. (1)

VEGETA_GT (255721) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605740)

I agree, give me a number I can call and I am on it. I seriouslay beliveve this is a MASSIVE mistake. If fair use is removed, that even affects things like photocopying parts of books for school. Um ok so I can get fined for trying to study. Fair use coveres this and the US has a similer thing. So removing fair use actualy will not help things but will just screw over people compleatelay.

Re:Fight.. (5, Informative)

JebusIsLord (566856) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606090)

First, go here to find your representative:

http://webinfo.parl.gc.ca/MembersOfParliament/Main MPsCompleteList.aspx?TimePeriod=Current&Language=E [parl.gc.ca]

then, email them the following (just a suggestion):

Hi [representative],

This is my first time writing to you, as a new constituent. I am writing concerning an article I read today on CBC.ca. http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/01/11/copy right-canada.html [www.cbc.ca]

I am fairly concerned about possible changes to Canadian fair-use laws. I consider myself a patron of the arts, and one of the music industry's best customers. As a modern, technology-savy citizen, I primarily listen to the music CDs I purchase on my portable iPod, or on my PC. Changes to fair use laws would make the act of "ripping" these songs to my computer, illegal. I consider myself an ethical consumer, and I don't see how in any way this activity harms the music industry. I suppose one could argue that, should this law come into effect, I could purchase my music online and therefore no "illegal" copying from CD would take place. However, these downloadable files (by way of the iTunes music store, for example) already defeat fair-use by restricting your ability to move them to new devices, new PCs etc.

In short, this law will punish good consumers, like me. Unethical consumers of music are already breaking the law by downloading pirated music, so this law will not affect them. If such legal changes are made, in order to continue listening to music in the manner I have been for years, I will probably opt to simply break the law - as I expect will the majority of iPod-owning Canadians. I will also seriously question whether or not such an industry should be supported financially by my hard-earned paycheques.

Thank you for listening,
[insert name here]

first two episodes tonight (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605062)

i've already downloaded and watched the first four episodes (available on your local torrent site) but in episode 4 a nuclear bomb explodes in Los Angeles. Jack Bauer is across town when it happens. He has just shot Curtis dead (the ctu agent.) There are 4 more nuclear devices in the u.s., ready to detonate on Fayeed's orders.

BTW, this comment contains spoilers so you may not want to read it.

Re:first two episodes tonight (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605152)

Did they find out who killed Kate on Lost yet? I was hoping that would be resolved in the initial batch of leaked epsiodes from Crustaceo Mutoid's bunch, but the last two seem to be missing.

Fuck those file sharing fucktards (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605076)

At twofo [twofo.co.uk]

fuck them
fuck them all
they all suck dick

dc++ hub.twofo.co.uk:4144

kittens!

what? (4, Insightful)

macadamia_harold (947445) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605084)

Exacerbating the situation is intense pressure from the United States, where Canada is considered a rogue when it comes to copyright and intellectual property.

You mean, "levy-paid-to-RIAA-on-all-blank-media-regardless-o f-use" Canada? Are we talking about the same country?

Re:what? (4, Informative)

temojen (678985) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605272)

No, it's Levy paid to CRIA for blank CD's and audio tapes (not HDDs or DVDs), but you can't be sued for downloading music or videos.

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605404)

So if you rip a CD into MP3s you're breaking the law, but if you download the same MP3s its legal? cool

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605428)

No, neither of those two things are illegal in Canada.

Re:what? (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605614)

No, it's Levy paid to CRIA for blank CD's and audio tapes (not HDDs or DVDs), but you can't be sued for downloading music or videos.

OK, so what this is REALLY all about is bringing Canada the 'joys' of civilisation - clogged courts, frivolous lawsuits and legalised extortion as RIAA's Canadian clone swings into action. Gotcha. They must not have had enough cash laying around for 3 hookers for every guest at last year's Christmas party and figured this would be a good way to skim some 'coke & hookers' cash...

Re:what? (2, Interesting)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605508)

You mean, "levy-paid-to-RIAA-on-all-blank-media-regardless-o f-use" Canada? Are we talking about the same country?

s/RIAA/CPCC [www.cpcc.ca], but yes.

Actually, I recall a Canadian [Supreme?] court case that said that this blank media levy effectively makes music-downloading legal. They can't claim that the "artists" (nudge nudge) aren't getting paid, because they are, through the levy.

The really evil thing is how the exception [cpcc.ca] to the levy works. Some types of groups (follow link for full list) are excempted from the levy paid to the CPCC.

However in order to be exempt from paying a levy to the CPCC, you have to fill out an application and pay an "administrative fee" to the CPCC ($60 for commercial users, $15 for non-commercial).

Methinks that musicians don't see a whole lot of this, however, following that court case and before this law is passed (hopefully it won't be, or it will be similarly struck down), this levy is the CCCP's (did I just say that?) achilles heel.

- RG>

Re:what? (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605616)

You mean, "levy-paid-to-RIAA-on-all-blank-media-regardless-o f-use" Canada? Are we talking about the same country?

I love paying some musicians wages so that I may backup my own copyrighted photos on cd's. By the way keep your receipts for recordable media purchases. You never know when the levy could be reversed.

Re:what? (2)

gravesb (967413) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605668)

How is the US pressuring Canada to get rid of fair use, when the US still has it? Granted, the RIAA is trying to chip away at it, but its still there. The US pays the blank media tax as well, I wish we had a court that would say the tax exempts consumers from piracy charges like Canada's did. Maybe the US is trying to get something like the DMCA passed to protect DRM, but not fair use. The article goes on to talk about pirated music, which has nothing to do with fair use. Fair use is based on music you buy. It seems like the title is trolling a little bit, although the issue needs to be addressed.

Re:what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605718)

I'll say it again:
American educators & students are allowed to rent/buy a movie and show it in class.
Canadians are not.

And Wal-mart's TV commercials (circa 2003) didn't know this.

Taxes (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605098)

Will it get rid of the damn taxes on CD's?

Intense pressure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605100)

Canadians don't like to do anything the U.S. asks at the best of times, why would they start now?

If anything, a request from the U.S. would have them do the opposite as an expression of patriotism.

Re:Intense pressure? (3, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605352)

Canadians don't like to do anything the U.S. asks at the best of times, why would they start now? If anything, a request from the U.S. would have them do the opposite as an expression of patriotism.

Don't undere$timate the power of lobbyi$t incentive$ on politicians.
     

Re:Intense pressure? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605532)

Or the ability of a Canadian Conservative Government to get down on all fours and lick american boot.

Re:Intense pressure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605576)

Precisely. Given enough millions, even otherwise disinterested parties will begin to take notice. I have been happy to see Canada resist some of this, and am disappointed to see them remove their own rights so some corporations can get richer on their backs.

Re:Intense pressure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605956)

Because the conservatives LOVE anything US. Next up. Get the fucked up health care system they have down in the states...

We'll march day and night.. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605128)

...at the big cooling tower, they have the plant but we have the power.

CBC == Liberal Propaganda (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605134)

Don't believe a word they say.

Like anything (5, Insightful)

RichPowers (998637) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605162)

It's harder to get fair use rights back once you lose them. Better to fight now than fight later...

Re:Like anything (2)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605654)

I agree wholeheartedly. Yes CA folks pay special tax on blanks, and unless there is some pretty creative bookkeeping going on up north of the border, I'd be willing to bet a beer or 6 that the annual check to the **AA mafia rather handily exceeds the royalties actually lost from any so-called piracy.

I look at you all as a beacon of common sense in the wilderness, a thorn in their side if you will. As I'm equally sure the **AA legals are telling their bosses that daily in an attempt to justify their bloated retainer.

So please CA folks, do stand up and be counted, else this will be just another gun grab story and we have all seen the expense vs public good that by now close to a billion dollar program has done for you. Other than making criminals out of deer hunters, I've seen NO benefits whatsoever from that program, social or economically. Even the PM admits it was a lost cause from the git-go, but guess what, its still on the books and anybody who runs afoul of it will spend their life savings on legals and still lose some sunshine time in the government hotel, and it ain't Club Med from what I hear.

--
Cheers, Gene
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty:
  soap, ballot, jury, and ammo. Please use in that order."
-Ed Howdershelt (Author)

Re:Like anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605714)

There's no risk of losing our fair use provisions. We don't have any. Seriously.
We have fair dealing which is much more limited than fair use. No time/place shifting for example (other than for audio), which, I believe, makes DVRs illegal.

Of course we all hope for inclusion of fair use provisions, but I'm not holding my breath.

Re:Like anything (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605792)

Are you sure? Isn't that the law that enables you to use excerpts for purposes of critique? I.e. criticisms of texts would not be able to quote the parts they refer to?

so what (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605172)

In most town you can't even spit in the street. That is stupid and as such is never enforced, will be the same for DRM. Canada is not the lawyer hive that is the US.

Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (5, Insightful)

dsanfte (443781) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605180)

The Conservative Party in Canada is always on about cutting government intervention in the economy, and then goes and supports legislative corporate welfare like Bill C60. They're clearly just out to make their media friends some more bucks.

Sadly, the biggest lie circulating is that these changes will somehow better promote "Quebec culture". There's this unfounded belief out there that more and more "protections" and "rights for creators", at the expense of their customers, will result in more content. I just don't see it.

The US has some of the most restrictive copyright legislation out there, and the slide of music sales has only just now been stemmed by paid downloads. Where are the creators and all the extra content those laws were supposed to encourage? Yeah, on Youtube.com, giving their stuff away for free, rendering all these laws moot.

If the Canadian government really wants to promote Quebec culture, work with Google to put up a Canadian bilingual version of Youtube on Google.ca. This is a no-brainer, guys...

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (4, Informative)

JFMulder (59706) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605284)

Sadly, the biggest lie circulating is that these changes will somehow better promote "Quebec culture".
Seriously? I mean, no offense, but if there's one culture that needs protection, it's the rest of the Canadian culture. The music and movie industry in Quebec is going great (not as great this year as last year tough). Quebecers actually go and see movies from Quebec. It's not the majority, but it's a non negligible portion. The rest of Canada don't watch a lot of movies from Quebec, but then, they hardly watch their own either.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605664)

The rest of Canada don't watch a lot of movies from Quebec, but then, they hardly watch their own either.
Big money lies in big markets.
Canadian movies are usually made to appeal to that big market down south. So they end up with all the originality and edginess of a Hollywood movie, and the budget value of a Canadian movie. i.e. cheap and bland.
Talented people make for exceptions, but this is showbusiness, and businessmen call the shots: Spend less, sell more.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605700)

I partly agree.
Canadian 'culture' needs more help but lets be honest, NO ONE knows what that means.
The music is american. Period. Nothing about it is distinctly canadian.
There is no such thing as canadian TV. And lets not even go into canadian movies.
So Im all for Cancon because without it, it would be 100% american artists.

THe movie industry in Quebec is going great but a lot has to do with the fact that French movies from France have little to offer quebecers apart from the language but even there local quebec slang and current everday french are totally foreign with France's common every day use which is 20-30% arab nowadays.

The music industry is a total mess and there is even less variety (from Celine Dion like ballads, to Celine Dion pop).
The top 10 performers on the billboards take 50% of airtime per day and many local french bands are moving to europe (in the past 4 years, the amount of bands making a living outside the continent has skyrocketed.
Most pop and rock music played on the radio is american music sung in french. But the majority of popular french bands like Polemil Bazar, Kaliroots, Chango Family, Tomas Jensen and such all use different foreign influences like latino, african, arab, etc. so much so that the local "Montreal" sound isnt the emo-pop anglos bands that the NY magazines wrote about, its the world music played through the bars and the clubs of the city. Which is why a group like Syncop can win the respected Francouvertes music festival even though most of their songs are sung in arab. The Montreal sound isnt just american riffs sung in french but Fela Kuti, Manu Chao, Fermin Muguruza influences as well.

CanCon and QueCon are an absolute necessity to help promote local content (Israel has also quotas on their radio stations).
Im all for it.

But first you have to explain to me how english canadian music is and how it differs from american music.

I think its too late. We are a banana republic and culturally, english canada died when american cable arrived here in the 70's.
Its something that was bound to happen sooner or later but we just gave up on it too.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605370)

"If the Canadian government really wants to promote Quebec culture"

The Canadian government only wants to promote Quebec culture when the prime minister is from Quebec. Which has been the case for 37 out of the last 39 years. In Canadian elections, guess who does the counting? They were careful to rig the Harper Conservatives a minority government only. Now that the Liberals are headed by a frog, they will rig him in come the next election, which will not be far away. Be patient.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (2, Informative)

Mauriac (1048278) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605378)

It's quite clear that the conservatives don't want to promote what you call "Québec culture" with this law. There's already enough protection for Québec artists and creators, and the conservatives don't want to change this situation. The truth is that the conservative party want to protect a well-established industry, and respond to U.S. pression to change the foggy legislative background of "fair-use" in a more radical way. This change can be linked to many positions in Stephen Harper's governement towards "americanisation" of Canada. However, I'll call my Bloc député, as I'm against this change in the copyright law

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (1)

nightfire-unique (253895) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606112)

Moi aussi.. :) This attention the "conservatives" have been paying to us is utter bullshit. It shames me our hatered for the liberals allowed them into power. I mean I hope one day to call a sovereign Quebec my country, but damn this is no way to achieve that.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (1)

FridayBob (619244) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605638)

The Conservative Party in Canada is always on about cutting government intervention in the economy...
Conservative parties everywhere are all the same: hypocrites. They're in favor of cutting regulations where they stand in the way of big business, but are just as happy to introduce new regulations when industry lobbyists say it will help big business. When the conservatives are in power, the corporations gain more influence over our lives... and they're anything but subject to the democratic process.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (1)

SkyDude (919251) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605928)

Conservative parties everywhere are all the same: hypocrites. They're in favor of cutting regulations where they stand in the way of big business, but are just as happy to introduce new regulations when industry lobbyists say it will help big business. When the conservatives are in power, the corporations gain more influence over our lives... and they're anything but subject to the democratic process.


What you say is partially correct, but the fact is they are not true conservatives. They are politicians, and whether they be US, Canadian or some flavor of Islam, they are all corrupt once they are away from the people that put them in power. True conservatives want to preserve a business' right to a profit, but at the same time keep government intervention out of the lives of citizens. Although you may not see it actually happen, that's the true idealogy, not the bastardized version in power today.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17606128)


True conservatives want to preserve a business' right to a profit,


Freudian slip, or are you an honest "conservative?" Business' "right to a profit" ranks right up there with my "right to a raise"

Actual conservatives might argue that government shouldn't interfere with business' profiting and going broke, but the mere fact that the phrase "right to a profit" came up demonstrates that there are no actual conservatives in this conversation.

Re:Conservatives? Yeah, sure. (3, Informative)

nightfire-unique (253895) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606008)

As a Quebecer I can't describe how terrible it would feel to know our government used us as an excuse to damage copyright law in Canada. :(

Here's a letter I wrote in 1999 when this issue last came up:

Subject: CPCDI concern

Hello,

I am a Canadian citizen residing in Montreal, QC. I recently learned of your request for comments regarding the implementation of a Canadian version of the controversial American DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act), through provisions of the Consultation Paper on Digital Copyright Issues (CPCDI). I would like to voice my concern.

To anyone who has studied the history of the United States - from the inception of an independent democracy to the frequent creation and repeal of unjust law - the DMCA appears to be a gross perversion of both copyright law (practically, and in spirit) and the American constitution.

It seeks to impose the criminal status on individuals who would otherwise be practicing constitutionally protected freedoms, while having a questionable effect, if any, on those who are already criminals - those who wilfully violate copyright law. It allows for the criminalization of the act of making fair use (media excerpts, backup copies, transfers of ownership, research for the purpose of publishing, use under unsupported or unapproved digital devices, and others) of copyrighted material, because these fair uses can be controlled through the use of encryption.

Where formerly these would have been civil issues (contract violation), they become criminal issues.

This, as we have seen recently in the United States, has already begun to have a chilling effect on scientific research (see the cases regarding Dmitry Sklyrov, Dr. Felten, and Jon Johansen - all of whom were enguaged in previously protected activities for the good of the public). Of course, the frightening commonality in each of these cases is that the requests for prosecution were perpetrated by large media centric, for-profit corporations.

At the end of the day, many criminal acts can be prevented through proactive prosection, criminalization of related activity, and errosion of fundamental privacy.

But as a citizen of Canada, I oppose these excessive measures. To me, living in a free country means being given the choice to use tools for good or bad purposes. It is the trust instilled by the Canadian government and the Canadian people which makes this country great.

I urge the Canadian government to maintain the fair, delicate balance between copyright holders and individuals, and to remove the overbroad, anti-consumer provisions of CPDCI.

Sincerely,

etc.

I'm working on the next one right now. It's a shame we have to keep doing this.

The WTO (3, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605204)

is the most insidious thing going rght now. It has the potential to usurp most of our rights ( and not just IP type rights )

One world order, here we come ( via the backdoor )

Copyright laws, eh? (3, Insightful)

tehSpork (1000190) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605262)

"It's a big black market effect and so instead of 25 per cent [of the market], it's eight per cent here. People are simply abandoning the marketplace altogether, and they've made the decision they'll just download the music and worry about how the artist gets paid later."

If you're dealing with a major record label the artist barely gets paid anyway, I doubt they see the difference.

Sounds like Canada's copyright law might be going the way of Australia's [wikipedia.org], eh. Pretty soon we'll all have to move to Sweden to be safe. Oh wait, that didn't work out so well for TBP [thepiratebay.org] now did it...

Contact info (2, Interesting)

phorm (591458) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605270)

How about some contact info for those interesting in writing the powers that be about this issue?

Re:Contact info (4, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605374)

http://www.gc.ca/ [www.gc.ca] is your friend.

BERNIER, Maxime
Parliamentary Address
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A6
Telephone: (613) 992-8053
Fax: (613) 995-0687
E-Mail: Bernier.M@parl.gc.ca

Constituency Address
11535 1st Avenue, Suite 430
Saint-Georges, Quebec
G5Y 7H5
Telephone: (418) 227-2171
Fax: (418) 227-3093
1083 Vachon Boulevard North, Suite 201
Sainte-Marie, Quebec
G6E 1M8
Telephone: (418) 387-4224
Fax: (418) 387-8124

And

ODA, Beverley J. (Bev) (Conservative)
Parliamentary Address
House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0A6
Telephone: (613) 992-2792
Fax: (613) 992-2794
E-Mail: Oda.B@parl.gc.ca

Constituency Address
68 King Street East, Unit 2
Bowmanville, Ontario
L1C 3X2
Telephone: (905) 697-1699
Fax: (905) 697-1678
Toll Free: 1-866-436-1141

Re:Contact info (1)

RealGrouchy (943109) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605652)

How about some contact info for those interesting in writing the powers that be about this issue?

You can find your member of parliament's e-mail address here [parl.gc.ca].

I have already e-mailed mine.

- RG>

More Criminals (2, Insightful)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605326)

Once you make the entire public criminals, its easier to strip them of the rest of their rights and control them.

at the same time (1)

CiXeL (56313) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605984)

you give them a force to unify against and encourage mass movement revolution.
its about time.

Who is calling who rogue here? (1, Insightful)

gd23ka (324741) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605356)

I guess it really depends on the perspective here but I think allowing people
to make copies of Maria Carey's preovulation noises is one thing - killing
and maiming millions of innocent civilians and bystanders all over the globe
is another.

Bev Oda (5, Informative)

maytagman (971263) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605402)

Bev Oda's (Canadian Heritage minister) campaign was funded by major record companies such as Universal Records. Basically the record companies are buying these new draconian laws. 'http://bevoda.ca' has recently pulled down the contact info after an obvious flood of hateful email. This has been extensively covered on http://boingboing.net/ [boingboing.net] and as usual days, weeks and months ahead of slashdot.
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/09/11/how_hollywood s_mp_in.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/11/08/canadian_copy right_c.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/06/08/can_heritage_ ministe.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/01/04/hollywoods_ca nadian_.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/05/24/canadian_stud ents_as.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/01/15/editorial_in_ toronto.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2005/09/29/canadian_copy fight_t.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/01/03/canadian_mp_i mports_.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2005/06/21/canadas_dmca_ dissect.html [boingboing.net]
http://www.boingboing.net/2006/09/18/canadians_how to_stop.html [boingboing.net]

Re:Bev Oda (2, Insightful)

Cadallin (863437) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606110)

What, you mean corporations in the rest of world are figuring out what those in the USA have known for decades? Buying elections is CHEAP. If I was a Multinational Corporation with revenues in the Billions, I could buy an American Congress for as little as a couple hundred million dollars, which realistically is nothing. I'd guess that other, smaller and/or poorer democracies would be even cheaper. I'm not sure what it would cost to buy the Mexican government, but it can't be more than $50 million.

This is one of my huge objections to the way Democracies are run today. Any random multinational can install their very own Mussolini for less than a decent ad campaign. Democracy gets you the cheapest governments money can buy.

No problem (5, Insightful)

hammock (247755) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605414)

I don't oppose this at all, however, first they have to refund the millions they have stolen by way of the blank media tax. As soon as I see some real money back that those motherfuckers stole from me when I bought backup media for my servers, we can talk about copyright reform.

I am waiting to hear back from you.

Re:No problem (1)

micromuncher (171881) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605482)

Absolute true. The "assume its free" and other quotes from the article from the Canadian RIAA are total bullshit. You pay a levy for all blank media that goes to them that is more than the bloody media.

vote (2, Insightful)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605454)

With your wallets that is, I have not bought a single music CD or movie in many years. I wish more would follow suit...

Re:vote (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605640)

The problem in this case is that people voting with their wallets and NOT buying stuff further increases the record companies resolve: "See, we're losing money because everyone's downloading pirated music! We must crush crush crush!"

Welcome to the North American Union (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605544)

Mexico, US, Canada. Do they accept Pesos in Canada yet?

Just another attempt to blame the US? (-1, Troll)

JStegmaier (1051176) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605592)

So, Canada is setting up to lose a right we still have here in the U.S. ... Yet somehow it's the U.S.'s fault? What am I am missing here?

Re:Just another attempt to blame the US? (4, Insightful)

shaitand (626655) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605866)

You think these are rights we still have in the US? Apparently you missed the part where the DMCA makes it illegal to excercise fair use rights if there is DRM in place.

loose once and we' (4, Insightful)

ckedge (192996) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605688)

JHC. We have to fight this all over again every fucking 1-4 years. Each time we win we only win for 1-4 years, and then we have to fight all over again.

If they win once, just once, they've won. Period.

How the fuck is this considered democracy? How are we supposed to prevent a perpetual slow glide down into tyrrany if they can keep passing more new laws forever and ever?

Have you ever heard of a law being revoked or reversed?

it won't matter (1)

CiXeL (56313) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605960)

society is going to reach a point where there occurs a critical mass of unreasonable laws.
when this occurs people will simply stop following the laws.
people will break them en masse and the police will be unable to enforce all the law breakers.

Re:it won't matter (2)

Petrushka (815171) | more than 7 years ago | (#17606096)

... which leads to law-makers trying to create a surveillance society like they've got in the UK, which in turn gets out of hand, and eventually someone with power realises it's no longer working and does away with it; sure. But that process can take decades or even centuries. Life's too short.

Imagine that. A Socialist gov eliminating fair .. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17605712)

play/use.

Candadians, welcome to the American form of "Democracy", where the intangible "corpus" (corporations) has more rights than the tangible corpus (citizens).

You, too, can enjoy Democracy in America. All you need are a few million $$$ for "campaign contributions".

Oh, and don't forget to swear allegiance to Political Correctness, otherwise the Democrats will just take your money and ignore you.

I woulde hope that people understand by now (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605806)

that this is the only direction copyright (and all other IP law) can take you. With its original intent being to restrict access to mass media technologies (MMTs), it has to to take more draconian measures against that technology as it becomes cheaper and easier for the general public to use. There can be no other way . This is its purpose in life, and always has been, despite the spin being drilled into your head about the "advancement of the arts and sciences". It's a load of bull.

Fair dealing (3, Informative)

Ghost-in-the-shell (103736) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605818)

Canada does not use Fair-Use in its copyright laws, it uses Fair dealing and the constructs are totally different. The actual debate in Canada is should we move to adopting Fair Use or continue to use the restricted but spelled out uses of Fair Dealing.

 

Same old story (4, Insightful)

troll -1 (956834) | more than 7 years ago | (#17605880)

Close observers of the file say all signs point to a new regime that will improve safeguards for major music, film and media companies and artists for unpaid use of their material, but neglect to make exemptions for personal use of copyrighted content.

Bullshit! You can reform copyright laws all you want, people are still gonna record their favorite shows and share stuff on P2P. Sharing copyrighted content, for example, is at an all time high, in spite of its illegality and all those *IAA lawsuits.

Remember the US Betamax [wikipedia.org] case? Yeah, if these guys had their way VCRs would be illegal. The problem is that their business runs on a static model. They seem incapable of seeing the world differently.

You can moralize all you want about the rights and wrongs of technology but it doesn't alter the fact that it's here to stay and all the laws and lawsuits in the world won't stop people from copying (and distributing). It would be funny if it wasn't so pathetically sad.
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