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MySpace to Offer Spyware for Parents

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the think-of-the-children dept.

The Internet 282

mrspin writes "Following continuing pressure from politicians (and parts of the media), MySpace is planning to offer parents the chance to download software which will monitor aspects of their children's activities on the social networking site. From a business point of view, the move appears to be a highly risky one. The young users of social networking sites are notorious for their lack of loyalty — and history suggests that a change like this could tempt many to abandon MySpace for the 'next cool thing'."

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282 comments

Maybe I'm just wierd (1, Insightful)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659258)

for not liking being spied on. Or mass spying of other. Sure seems everyone else is gun ho for it.

Re:Maybe I'm just wierd (1, Interesting)

DJCacophony (832334) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659346)

Gung ho [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Maybe I'm just wierd (1)

Philip K Dickhead (906971) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659488)

Maybe those kids should read the previous Slashdot story...

Re:Maybe I'm just wierd (4, Insightful)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659578)

Sure seems everyone else is gun ho for it.

I seem to see it as:
Everyone's all for spying, until they're the ones being spied on.

As I said to my wife... (4, Interesting)

bhsx (458600) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659268)

My wife and I just demanded the myspace password for my step-daughter's account (she's 12). I kick myself for not paying any attention to that damned site, because of it's sheer obnoxiousness and ugly designs. If I had paid attention I'd have a better feel for all the "ins-and-outs" of the stupid site. I was glad to see this information brought up on the local news here; but like I said to my wife:
The kids will just go someplace else.
So who wants to fund the next "myspace killer" with me? :P

Re:As I said to my wife... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659468)

Why do you need her password? Can't you just view her MySpace page? The only use for someone else's password is fraud.
(Stupid "invalid form key" stuff when posting. Only happens here.)

Re:As I said to my wife... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659506)

People under the age of 13 are not allowed to sign up for an account on myspace. His daughter must have lied about her age in order to get an account in the first place.

Re:As I said to my wife... (4, Informative)

bhsx (458600) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659648)

She's 12 years old. I thought it was the parents responsibility to monitor what there kids are doing online. Isn't that right? Sure, we can just view her myspace page and take it for granted that we're seeing everything. I was just glad to see that she had actually listened to us and not given-up any identifying information.
As I already said, I don't know the ins-and-outs of myspace; but I sure as hell know what's going on if we have her password.
Label me whatever you want, but she has no right to use my computer, network, or home(for that matter) in ways that her mother and I don't see fit.
Even better that it didn't take my threatening to install a key-logger for her to cough-up the password(because I certainly would have, it's my system, she's a child).

Re:As I said to my wife... (0, Troll)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659834)

Seems to me what you really have to worry about are sexual predators, not what your stepdaughter is talking about with her friends. You'll never control the latter. And she'll never get pregnant online. ;-)

Re:As I said to my wife... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17660016)

You're her stepfather? Way to make her and her friends think you're a creep. Hope you already had a good established relationship with her. Cause otherwise here is the conversations she has at school about myspace.

Leech: "Hey do you myspace?"
PreSlut: "Yeah, my handle is Partygirl69."
Leech: "Great! I'll have to add you."
PreSlut: "That would be cool, but watch what you say. My mom's CREEPY boyfriend stole my password."
Leech: "Oh... Well I'll just give you a call if it's something important."
PreSlut: "Thanks!"

Something tells me you are A. Lying about what happened, or B. Lying about your intentions, or C. Dumb(I don't think it's this one.) You modified your story to make yourself look better while throwing in your two cents on slashdot.

I think more likely than not, your real intentions at the time were to take the opportunity to establish authority over her, while simultaneously making a show for your wife. If the pressure originated from your wife, then it was just done to get her off your back and done from a place of apathy. In either case you couldn't give a shit about real oversight.

If your intentions were as stated and you weren't stupid and naive, demanding the password was an obviously ineffective approach to getting what you want which is oversight. Getting the password via key logging would not have tipped her off to the fact that you were monitoring her and you would actually know what she is up to rather than her moving deviance outside of your supervision.

She now knows to cover her tracks by deleting offending private messages and chat logs when she's done with them, running a separate myspace/email/friendster/facebook/ect. at school for all her deviant activities, or just keeping them to her cellphone and txts. 99% of all trouble kids get in to involves the cellphone that their parents ironically gave them to keep them out of trouble. In reality it just gives them a false sense of security because "At Jane's house" translates to the bathroom of a house party, or in a car on the way to a rave.

None of this really matters though because it was a lie on your part in the first place. You do have a 12 year old step daughter though.

Re:As I said to my wife... (2, Insightful)

Propaganda13 (312548) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660232)

You're better off just talking to her.
Otherwise, you'll find out too late that
1. the account you have a password to isn't her only account
2. the monitoring software you installed was bypassed by a LINUX LIVE CD or usb drive
3. she's using a friend's computer
4. she's safe from online predators, but not her 13 year old boyfriend living down the block.
5. etc.,etc.,etc.

Re:As I said to my wife... (1)

magicchex (898936) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659766)

Heh I'm so happy I didn't have parents like you when I was a wee lad myself.

Re:As I said to my wife... (1)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659974)

You have the wherewithal to take advantage of the monitoring software, or make full use of your daughter's password when she gives it to you, but most parents aren't Slashdot readers.

Myspace is introducing this program for legal protection, not because they think it will make them more popular. They won't do much to promote it, so only a few parents will know about it at all (kids certainly won't tell). Only some of those will have the capacity to take full advantage of the spyware, so overall the adverse impact on myspace should be small.

Re:As I said to my wife... (1)

McFadden (809368) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660170)

I kick myself for not paying any attention to that damned site, because of it's sheer obnoxiousness and ugly designs.

In case she wants to become a web designer in the future? Nice to see that someone is so concerned about the impact poorly laid out sites can have on the young mind. I, for one, salute you sir.

So much for that ... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659284)

Not your space anymore, son.

Children are innovative. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659292)

Children are innovative. Even if they don't move to different social networking sites, they'll find some way around this spyware.

I'm sure the developers of this software spent much time during their youth trying to hide and protect their ill-obtained, yet sacred, copies of Hustler, Penthouse and Playboy. Just as they succeeded then, the youth of today will no doubt succeed in protecting the Web activities they hold sacred.

Re:Children are innovative. (3, Funny)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659522)

You assume Myspace users are smart enough to realie it's been installed.

Re:Children are innovative. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659674)

there is a difference between looking at porn and creating and uploading your own porn.

Re:Children are innovative. (5, Insightful)

donaldm (919619) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659964)

At some stage (normally when the child gets into their teens) the parent has to start letting go and relaxing their supervision (this is called trust). It is very important for a parent to talk to their child and as the child gets older the dialog must become more meaningful so that greater trust when given is something a child can look forward to earning.

Children are curious and will always try to see how far they can go before they overstep their boundaries. As parent it is up to you to define those boundaries with out being too restrictive although this can be a very difficult thing. Again this is were dialog comes in. It is normally a "cop out" on the parent's part to blindly agree with so called "well meaning" people who state that they are protecting their child's freedom because children are always going to do the wrong thing. Too many parents are willing to put their child's moral upbringing in the hands of people who probably have no idea of how to bring up a child themselves.

I have mainly trivialised this but common sense must prevail between parent and child and a parent must be willing (even if it is embarrassing) to discuss everything especially sex with their child, otherwise the child will find out anyway and usually from their peers who don't know that much or who have distorted view.

Hence if a parent does not know when asked a question by their child then the onus is on them to find out and come out with the correct answer that is not clouded by prejudice even though the parent may not like it because of their upbringing. If you as a parent can handle this you may actually learn something as well.

I don't mean to say that bringing up a child is easy, it is not, but meaningful dialog can go along way.

Re:Children are innovative. (2, Insightful)

RulerOf (975607) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660160)

My Bulletin Space

From | Date | Bulletin

Jim | Today | FOOL YOUR PARENTS! MYSPACE SPYWARE REMOVER!


Social networking at its best, would be the method to defeat this.

Of course, chances are really good that every bulletin like that would just link to a porn site, a pyramid scheme, a myspace layout site, or, ironically enough, more spyware.

HA HA HA (3, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659304)

I thought that MS was the only company that could so effortlessly shoot themselves in the feet. Parental monitoring should pretty much put an end to much of the MySpace userbase.

Interestingly, if parents can do this with some software, is the government already doing it for them, but just not telling? I have to wonder about any company that will offer to 'spy' on you or your kids. I'm sort of interested in finding out how they will know that it is a parent of the account holder they are willing to spy on? Does the software have to be installed on the same computer as the child uses? That would only last about a week before its cracked.... expect YouTube videos on how to disable it within the week.

Re:HA HA HA (4, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659362)

I almost forgot; queue the spammers with links to software download sites to allow you to monitor your children's activities. Nothing like a legit reason to download a keylogger... sheesh I can see it now. The next big virus will come disguised as a child protection monitoring software from https://d0wnl0ads.myspace.com/protect.cgi [myspace.com]

Re:HA HA HA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659788)

d0wnl0ads would be blocked on my firewall because of "ads" in url

and it won't be just parents (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659748)

I can see this being used by people to spy on partners,, especially if they suspect infidelity.

Re:and it won't be just parents (1)

anagama (611277) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659850)

Fact is, if you go so far as to spy on your spouse's net activites, it doesn't really matter whether he/she is guilty or innocent. The relationship has lost its value the moment the notion creeps into mind -- what is a relationship without trust? I say this as one who installed such a program about 7 years ago. It captured keystrokes and screenshots at a set interval (10 secs seemed adequate). Anyway, we got divorced but the problems started long before the spyware. The spying was never discovered by her BTW, and was not in itself a reason we split. The spying was symptom however, of the lack of trust that had been building in me. Anyway, those spousal spying programs aren't worth the money. Once you're at that point, take the $80 or so and get half and hour of attorney time, or several bottles of good whiskey. Much better way to spend the money.

Parental Paranoia (4, Insightful)

jorghis (1000092) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659314)

Just because your kids dont want you to know every single detail of their life doesnt mean that they are hooking up with 35 year olds. People take this business of monitoring their kids internet use too seriously. Would you tap your teenagers phone calls? If not whats the difference?

Re:Parental Paranoia (3, Interesting)

cdrdude (904978) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659366)

"Would you tap your teenagers phone calls?" My parents sure would have. My sister has caught them looking through saved iChat logs (iChat can be set to save all of your conversations). I routinely use a who command in terminal if I have it open to see who's looking at what I'm doing.

Re:Parental Paranoia (5, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659436)

Would you tap your teenagers phone calls?

I don't have to. Like any good parent I smothered my daughter in bubble wrap and then crated her. Nice and safe. Nothing's too good for my princess. She can come out when she's 21. If I think she's mature enough.

Oh, wait, shit, she's 26 now.

Hoooooooney? Where's the crowbar? And what's that smell?

KFG

Re:Parental Paranoia (3, Insightful)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659480)

Would you tap your teenagers phone calls? If not whats the difference?

Most parents can safely assume their kids are only talking to people they personally know? Not really advocating one side or the other here, just saying - it's a real difference; there are others, too.

Re:Parental Paranoia (3, Interesting)

snarkth (1002832) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659534)

Trust.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

nick1000 (914998) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659860)

That one word says more than what you can say in a million words.

Re:Parental Paranoia (1)

Firehed (942385) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659814)

Well, I doubt most teenagers would be paying the long-distance bill that would reveal any unusual activity. Myspace doesn't really have that same way of charging you (or your parent) more for talking to more people, nor does it automatically send out a list of people contacted at the end of the month.

I'm no parent, but I think I could still recognize some strange phone activity without tapping the thing. I won't go near Myspace with a ten-foot pole, but I could see parents appreciating, at the least, something like the rather controversial mini-feed that Facebook now has, which I doubt is a part of Myspace.

What's that sound? (5, Funny)

sporkme (983186) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659316)

NFTFA:
An source which requested to remain anonymous stated that the new feature was to be entitled Myspace DeathKnell and stated that the board of directors was optimistic about the future of the social networking giant. "The future is bright. Much like the Titanic, this ship is unsinkable. The difference is that there is not a single iceberg in sight," stated another unnamed source.

With any luck, this will be the third-to-last /. article about MySpace.

Re:What's that sound? (1)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659484)

With any luck, this will be the third-to-last /. article about MySpace.

Why would that be a good thing? I love MySpace - having one place for so many people that I don't want to have any interaction with is great! All I have to remember is: "Don't go to fucking MySpace."

What is this "MySpace" you speak of? (2, Insightful)

Nig Niggington (821939) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659336)

Could this be why nobody visits my LiveJournal anymore?

The submitter is right -- the margin of error that sites like these have before they alienate kids with the attention span of a greased weasel on crystal meth is razor-thin. It's not like most of them have invested any significant amount of time on their page; the same blinking yellow text on a bright purple background with Celine Dion screeching in the background can be recreated in The Next Great Social Networking Site in approximately three minutes.

Sure, you'll have to rebuild "your network", but most youth would ten times rather do this than conduct all of their (potentially sensitive) discourse on a site where they know that their parents are listening in.

Armageddon (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659360)

My GOD, it's DOOMSDAY. Myspace users will begin to leave myspace and begin to infect the rest of the internet. KILL ME NOW!

Re:Armageddon (2, Insightful)

HAKdragon (193605) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659740)

Just leaving some slashdot luv! Holla!

Re:Armageddon (1)

neuro.slug (628600) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659866)

Moderate -1 Brain-damaging dialogue? Or -1 Jailbait? I'm not sure which.

Re:Armageddon (1)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660004)

Oh, true...as long as they stay on myspace they can't pollute the rest of the net. Except digg. They seem to like digg.

new slogan (1)

Dr. Cody (554864) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660316)

MySpace: The HIV-positive suicide bomber of the Internet

How will they verify it's the real parents? (4, Insightful)

DrJimbo (594231) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659384)

Even if this move doesn't drive away the kids, if nogoodniks are able to pretend to be parents and monitor the activities of other peoples' kids, this is going to be a nightmare.

Perhaps I am dull witted tonight, but I can't imagine how they can make this spyware foolproof.

Well designed, ill reciecved (3, Insightful)

zokrath (593920) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659402)

According to the article, the software only shows what name, age, and location the user is claiming. It does not provide any other information.

This is a well thought-out solution, as it provides the important information while still providing privacy to the user.

Unfortunately, for many teens any information is too much to share, and many parents think that any privacy is too much to allow.

Re:Well designed, ill reciecved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659502)

According to the article, the software only shows what name, age, and location the user is claiming...........as it provides the important information while still providing privacy to the user.
...I'm sorry did I miss something? It provides....name, age, and location? And it still provides privacy? All you need to do is go to your favorite whois website and look the person up. And even if it's unlisted, if you want to spend the money you can pay for private records.......

Re:Well designed, ill reciecved (1)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660028)

Name, age and location are far too much to share, for any child. If you were interested in victimizing a child, this is all you'd need. The age lets you choose a target, the location to tell you which phonebook to search and the name tells you which page to turn to. Boom, there's your address, and you're just a break-in away from kidnapping the kid. Let them post pictures and write messages, but for the love of god don't tell people where they live.

Solution to crappy parenting? (4, Funny)

PoitNarf (160194) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659404)

Better software!

Re:Solution to crappy parenting? (4, Insightful)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659450)

So, that's a nice knee-jerk reaction there, but better parenting potentially involve having some idea of what your kid is up to with these things, no?

Better Software Magazine? (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659956)

Better Software [stickyminds.com] magazine? [grin]

Re:Solution to crappy parenting? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659988)

One word: Condom

No thanks.... (1)

blankoboy (719577) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659420)

I think I will leave the monitoring of my children up to myself instead of putting it in the hand of a complete stranger(s).

could be a disaster (1)

rolyatknarf (973068) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659424)

What if some of those kids end up here on /.?

We could be doomed!

Re:could be a disaster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659822)

Remember OMG Ponies!?!

Re:could be a disaster (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659862)

Don't worry, they'd all be trolled & flamebaited out of existance before they even knew what modpoints were.

Re:could be a disaster (1)

NcF (847200) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660062)

I think we already have quite a few on here, sadly. Either that or people are still in dire need to grow up.

Re:could be a disaster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17660264)

zOMGezs!!! I like d00m ]|[ too.

add me bro

cindy is showing me how to make my bacground do the flash thing it does on her page - its going to be totally frikkin cool you should check it out dude...

word,
dr lolez

Too Technical? (4, Insightful)

elwin_windleaf (643442) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659426)

Okay, let's disregard whether parents would/should need a piece of software to help them watch their children.

More importantly, how are these parents going to install and use this software? I would say that the majority children are more tech-savvy than their parents, and aren't likely to willingly help their parents peer into their private life.

So, how are parents going to install and configure a piece of software that will require user names and other information they might need to ask their children for anyways? What's to stop a child from setting up a dummy account to render the software useless?

Re:Too Technical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659878)

More importantly, how are these parents going to install and use this software? I would say that the majority children are more tech-savvy than their parents, and aren't likely to willingly help their parents peer into their private life.

I think you are getting close to the truth. In reality, the children will use the software to spy their parents... (<insert Soviet Russia wittiness>)

Useless (3, Insightful)

delirium of disorder (701392) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659434)

Parents who install the monitoring software on their home computers would be able to find out what name, age and location their children are using to represent themselves on MySpace. The software doesn't enable parents to read their child's e-mail or see the child's profile page

So it tells the parents the exact same information they would get by searching for their kids name, email, or username on myspace. Even the private/hidden profiles that I've seen still show username, age and location. How is downloading some proprietary software to get publicly available information useful?

You've missed it. (1)

raehl (609729) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659926)

You can only search for your kid's name, email or username if they are actually using their real name, or an email or username you know. What this does is let you search for ANYONE LOGGING ON FROM YOUR COMPUTER. See the difference? Now parents can tell if their children are posting fake profiles.

Many wont do anything (1, Troll)

WeeBit (961530) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659438)

Things wont change that much, because most parents don't use that type software. Those that do, don't know how to use it, or don't feel they need to monitor their children. Typical Window's users.

Re:Many wont do anything (3, Insightful)

Vskye (9079) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659912)

Things wont change that much, because most parents don't use that type software. Those that do, don't know how to use it, or don't feel they need to monitor their children. Typical Window's users.

As a parent, and a Linux user at home and Windows user I'd agree to a certain point. My kids want to use/see certain sites that I just don't agree with. My house, I pay the bills for internet, end of frickin story. I don't actually block sites, but I let them know which ones they should avoid.

Another thing, WTF are you grouping this as a "Typical Windows User"? Moron.

Shibboleth (-1, Troll)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659440)

Even with only 15 comments so far, it's obvious how easily this story will classify the respondents into the "has kids" and "lives with parents" categories.

Vaguely entertaining, is all.

Re:Shibboleth (1)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659508)

Except for the odd high-schooler, I'd think the average slashdotter lives at college or alone at home, certainly not with kids :)

Re:Shibboleth (2, Funny)

chimpo13 (471212) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659764)

Ha! I've got a roommate!

Re:Shibboleth (1)

xero314 (722674) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659592)

More likely it is going to separate into "those with lives" and "those without lives."

Re:Shibboleth (1)

glwtta (532858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659612)

I'm pretty sure that's pre-filtered.

My prediction (1)

snarkth (1002832) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659490)

It'll be hard to learn to use, not very effective, and some bored lawmaker somewhere will take up the cries from those frustrated by it as another reason to make more laws that protect children in "cyberspace". The media will latch on to it in the increasing numbers of obscure article references noting it as some sort of truism; and it'll set records for the largest and longest recorded redundancy orgy in history; although that won't be known for centuries. Meanwhile the effects will resonate thru our Global Village for centuries until we are finally enslaved by the Kzinti because the only scientists out there who knew how to advance laser technology were working for the hardware media companies who were still trying to make their pseudo-reality closer to real reality but kept it under deadly NDA, and meanwhile the best brain enclaves on the planet had transcended already, and kicked the Rich Ones out of the High Beyond. A revolution was coming, but few knew it. ...

  Life is starting to sound like a bad science fiction plot.
  Yawn.

  Somebody wake me from my cold beer sleep when the human race gets a clue. ;)

If you're daughter's on myspace, she's pretty much (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659498)

slutting it up online :) You don't need to spy to know this.

Seriously... (2, Insightful)

thief_inc (466143) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659524)

I say this as a parent. If US citizens do not have a right to privacy from corporations, why should a 13 year olds have a right to privacy from their parents?

Re:Seriously... (1)

physicsnick (1031656) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659774)

I agree. Now ask yourself, why do you need this software?

Go to your child and say "Show me your MySpace." If they refuse, unplug the computer and keep the cord indefinitely. It's that simple.

I can't imagine what kind of parent would want to secretly spy on their child; I can't think of a better way to lose your child's trust and respect.

Re:Seriously... (1)

nick1000 (914998) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659918)

And how do you make sure that your child has just one profile.

Most likely, a barrage of fake 'for the parents' profiles would spring up now. And that will kill the efficacy of both spying software and any other parental coaxing method.

Re:Seriously... (1)

jZnat (793348) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659802)

Because one can't get grounded by a corporation? And they can't cut off ones allowance (although they can do that to ones parents).

not expected to be very invasive (1)

adrianmonk (890071) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659532)

In a related story, when polled, several industry experts suggested that this new myspace software was not expected to be an invasion of privacy at all. Asked how software that was specifically intended to track the actions of another individual could be anything other than invasive, the experts responded, "Oh, yes that's a good point. It's pretty simple really: we are basing our analysis on software that myspace has produced in the past, like the web site, and based on this analysis, we've concluded that the software is unlikely to, y'know, work. As in... function. As in... not do something other than just produce a bunch of 'an unexpected error has occurred' messages. So really, there's nothing to worry about at all, and everyone should be able to just produce as they always have. It should have no impact."

Fixing bugs would help better (1)

melikamp (631205) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659542)

Wow, great move, MySpace. Now, how about taking all that energy and channeling it into, um, I don't know, preventing Tom's profile from being hacked?

I know who they can partner up with! (1)

neuro.slug (628600) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659552)

$sys$myspace.log

$sys$myspclgr.exe

How can I add CSS code to my /. posts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659556)

My mom installed some crappy software that like screwed up my myspace profile. Can anyone tell me how to add CSS tags to slashdot and how can I upload my warez music here? Those **** digg people wouldn't help me. They hate Slashdot like you guys hate Myspace. But then all the Myspace hated the self righteous Diggers.

Just a thought... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659558)

but kids will be thrilled since they now can monitor their parents' behaviour on myspace.

Re:Just a thought... (0, Redundant)

bhsx (458600) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659668)

I don't care who you are, that's funny right there :P

Responsible (3, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659588)

Most people's attitude about things like this change drastically after they actually have kids of their own to be responsible for.

Re:Responsible (3, Insightful)

RvLeshrac (67653) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659936)

Or perhaps the people commenting on what a stupid idea this is actually... you know... do some parenting?

I know plenty of people who see no reason to monitor their children. If you can't trust your kids, perhaps it is time to take another look at how you've raised them.

Mistrust will not help your children at all.... (3, Insightful)

gweihir (88907) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659596)

As parents, the only thing you can do is try to be as trustworthy as possible. If you have reasonable success, your children may actually heed your warnings or at least realize when they are in trouble anc come to you for advice. You cannot get more. Monitoring, threats, harsh limits, etc... will just cause your children to leave home when they can and think bach of you as cretins (and rightfully so!).

An essential component of this is to trust your children. Sure, they will do stupid things, but hey, they are children and still learning. And if they know they can talk to you they may actually come to ask for advice. Don't bbe shocked or appalled, just try to do the best you can. And if you don't know, say so. And if you are uncomfotable with some of your childrens choices, tell them that, but also let them make their choices.

Eventually it boild down to respect. Respect your children. If you do that, then there is no way in hell that you can spy on them, which in my and very likely in your children's eyes is the ultimate sugn of disrespect.

Re:Mistrust will not help your children at all.... (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659636)

Remember: Children will take care of their parents in their late term... What comes around goes around.

Who needs software for that? (1)

ghostcorps (975146) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659664)

Just type their email address in the login page, I have a $ that says the password will be auto completed. =^_^=

*NIX users? (1)

feld (980784) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659686)

Will it run in Wine? :P

But doesn't Netnanny protect them? (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659720)

Oh Lordy! I crack me up! :)

You overlook one thing (2, Insightful)

davmoo (63521) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659754)

history suggests that a change like this could tempt many to abandon MySpace for the 'next cool thing'

And history also suggests that parents are quick to file lawsuits, juries are quick to side with the parents, and legislators are quick to pass new restrictive laws. Those trump what kids might do.

Myspace already gets held accountable for a very high degree of parental stupidity. They are merely trying to cover their own asses.

Re:You overlook one thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17659922)

And history also suggests that parents are quick to file lawsuits, juries are quick to side with the parents, and legislators are quick to pass new restrictive laws. Those trump what kids might do.

Could you give me one (or more) examples of juries taking sides with the parents? I am not familiar with such examples. Otherwise, I agree with everything else you've said, this is just a minor quibble.

From the article (1)

XnavxeMiyyep (782119) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659792)

a group of 33 state attorneys general led by Connecticut's Richard Blumenthal are investigating taking legal action against MySpace if it doesn't raise the age limit to join the site to 16

Yet no one will file any lawsuits against them for creating spyware. Wonderful.

The Friends Do The Most Harm (1)

chromozone (847904) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659808)

I have modded a teen group with about 10,000 members mostly in US and UK. Most Kids aren't that stupid that they meet up with strangers who start to talk dirty like you read about in the stings. The biggest danger to kids are the friends they already know well, and that the rents let their guard down on. Being nervous about the boogey man in the shadows lets parents feel like they are doing a good job when realities are the kid is often getting worse stuff at school and with friends. The parents block those out. It's usually the "friends" that bring a kid harm. It's very wise for a parent to know what a child is doing on a computer and the best thing is to keep it out of their bedroom. It makes no sense to hover over a kids computer like a nuclear power regulator and then send them off to school without a second thought.

The really obscene parts of MySpace are the groups.

Privacy shmivacy (1)

Romwell (873455) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659816)

I think it's all about trust and respect. People need to learn how to bring up their kinds so that they are responsible for their own actions. Then there's no need to spy. Online safety can be explained and followed by a 13-year-old as well as an 18-year-old. Disclaimer: I have grown up in Ukraine, had my own room since the age of 3, no 'control' from parents whatsoever. Now I'm about to turn 20, and so far have never engaged in anything that would be worth spying on. And whenever I have a problem, I share it with my parents because I trust them and they trust me. Yeah, modifier -1 Corny, but why do the parents think that they MUST have total control ? The whole purpouse of the bringing-up process is to develop a person capabale of living a safe life and capabale of making right decisions on one's own.

Spyware?? What spyware? (1)

will_die (586523) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659892)

This is not spyware, by definition spyware has to collect information without the informed consent of the user.
This software has to be installed by the owner of the computer and since it is for use against minors the parents, who would also be installing it, provide the legal informed consent for the minor.
If this is spyware so is my anti-virus and ad blocking software.

I expect I'll be modded as a troll for this (3, Interesting)

mark-t (151149) | more than 7 years ago | (#17659966)

Thus, I have no sympathy for kids who resent being spied on by their parents... it's their parent's property, they have every right to know every detail of how it is used. If they don't like their parents spying on them on the parents' computer then they should just not use their parents' computer... and find alternative methods of keeping in touch with their buddies that the parents won't be able to monitor because it's outside their jurisdiction.

And if parents don't like that kids will inevitably find such methods, tough. They should have thought of that before they had kids in the first place if they can't deal with the fact that their kid might be more ingenious than they are. Ideally, you teach them the whole time they are young how to make smart choices so that by the time they are making their own possibly life-altering decisions they will do the right thing... then spying on your kids would just be superfluous.

Re:I expect I'll be modded as a troll for this (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660168)

Have you ever heard the saying 'The most dangerous man is the one who has nothing to lose'? Do you really suggest that parents start making sure their children have nothing? When people have no property, they do not respect the ownership of property.

Re:I expect I'll be modded as a troll for this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17660240)

Yes, they should buy their own computer. Perhaps get a job at 13?

How many people commenting here are parents...? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660102)

How many people commenting here are actually parents...?

Just asking.

Make your minds up. Parents, or big brother? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17660104)

First of all, plenty of parents know how to use computers. Even my parents, who are grandparents, know how to use a computer. It's my dad that got my a Timex Sinclair in the 70s. So yes, I am capable of installing software on my computer, thanks for the concern.

Secondly, people bitch about parents not watching their kids, and now there is a tool that may make it easier for some parents to do so, and they bitch about THAT!

Tell me, do you want us watching our kids, or not? Would you rather Big Brother did it?

Make up your minds, already. I am tired of the conflicting noises coming from those of you who want to tell us how to parent our children.

How do you know if you are a good parent or not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17660182)

You know when you are a good parent, when your 8 year old can spot, and correctly tag thinkofthechildren stories on slashdot.
Ok seriously, I'm a bit scared of some of the posters here that are basically saying kids don't have any rights and are the property of parents until they leave home.
WTF? My family couldn't be any more different. I would never and could never install rubbish like this, or any nanny software on my kid's computers. First off, they both have their own computers. Computers are very personal tools and it's up to them to keep them secure and decide which directory to store their porn collections. They have earned my trust and I know they won't do anything stupid since they are quite aware of the concepts of privacy, security and not getting caught by the RIAA. They have their own root passwords and I would never demand that they hand them over.
If I start spying on them at this early age, then they might just get used to it, and not notice when the government steps out of line and invades their right to privacy.
Oh I'm sorry, your kids are YOUR property. I have no right calling you a crap parent. Plus you probably are very busy and don't have the time to supervise them. Let the software do it.
The school isn't going to cover these important issues so you are going to have to. Shit, I know it's a lot of responsibility but you should have thought about that before you decided to/accidently started a family.

How do they know its the parents installing it. (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660198)

What about that sick librarian or teaching assistant who wants to "monitor" your kids? I cant see anything to stop them.

How well will it work for most IT literate Kids (1)

Blue_Wombat (737891) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660204)

I can remember whan Dad got his first computer for his business. A mighty 64K of Ram and one 140K disk drive. One of the first decent machines on the block so to speak. It was all greek to him. Me, as pimply kid of around 12 did all of the setup, showed him how to use it, did any problem resolution, and wrote some custom bits of code in Applesoft to help automate some of the calculations he had to do. He is long retired now, and I still admin his home machine, and show him how to do things like email and web searches when he does them for the first time. If we could rewind so that I was still 12 now, then this software might well allow one of us to monitor the other if we wanted to (hint: it wouldn't be him monitoring me).

A good thing to know! (1)

icompany731 (1052804) | more than 7 years ago | (#17660260)

The one thing you have to take into consideration when you say people might migrate to the next biggest thing because of this; is the percentage of the user base of Myspace this action will affect. In August '05, teenagers only accounted for 25% of the entire user database compared to now only 12%(http://mashable.com/2006/10/05/most-myspace-us ers-over-35/ [mashable.com] ). The one thing that surprised me though is almost half(41%) of all the people on Myspace are between 35 and 54. I see from Myspace's point of view, that this might actually increase there user base. Giving heightened since of security and well being to the 'older' majority.
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