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iPhone Roundup

kdawson posted more than 7 years ago | from the twisty-items-all-different dept.

Quickies 149

Some of you are tired of the blizzard of coverage the iPhone is getting, so this roundup of iPhone stories is running off the main page. First off, EMIce points out what seems to be plenty of prior art (as well as a booming research scene) on the multi-touch interface that Steve Jobs demo'ed, boasting of having "filed for over 200 patents." FastCompany has a profile of NYU researcher Jefferson Han and his killer demo of a multi-touch interface at TED. Next, Toreo asesino writes in with Microsoft's Steve Ballmer's take on the iPhone; the Microsoft CEO doesn't sound very impressed. And finally, an anonymous reader notes CNet's article on why the iPhone, once it's in the hands of consumers, may be the most muggable item of consumer electronics ever.

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Not impressed (-1, Troll)

El Lobo (994537) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663174)

I've seen a limited demo (prototype??) in Stockholms Apple office and I'm not even remotly impressed. Yes, it's pretty, but where are the brains? It's like a pretty blond bimbo that impresses you at first but after you married her, you rather expend the whole day talking to your cat.

This is not so terrible as the HORRIBLE AND STUPIDLY DESIGNED Mighty(???) Mouse, but almost.... Anyway, people will buy it. People are easily blinded by futility.

Re:Not impressed (4, Informative)

avalys (221114) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663880)

Your comment makes no sense. What brains are missing? We've already seen what the phone can do in the Keynote and the Apple website: play music, play videos, surf the web (rendering pages correctly), check e-mail, send text messages, visual voicemail - the list goes on and on, and it looks likely that Apple will allow the release of third-party widgets, if not full-fledged applications.

And it will do all of this with Apple's usual ease-of-use and pleasant aesthetics. Not to mention, they have six months to refine it further.

What brains are missing, exactly? I can't really think of much else that I want a smartphone to do. 3G would be nice, but I can live with that omission for now.

Re:Not impressed (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664496)

I can't really think of much else that I want a smartphone to do.

I want it to cook me breakfast in the morning.

No, wait, I'm thinking of something else. Never mind.

Re:Not impressed (0, Flamebait)

7Prime (871679) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666280)

That's what women are for...

"Wait, no honey, I'm not talking about you, now get back in the kitchen and make me a goddamn sammich!"

Re:Not impressed (1, Redundant)

0xdeadbeef (28836) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664674)

Holy geezus crisco, do you apply fanboys rove in packs? The grandparent gets modified 0 Troll and this is 3 Informative?

The iPhone does nothing a two-year-old Treo can't do, except do it all with an obnoxious gesture-based user interface. And I use Treo as an example because I consider it one of the worst platforms on which to implement that functionality.

And the lack of third-party applications disqualifies it from the moniker smartphone.

Re:Not impressed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17666768)

@-moz-document domain(slashdot.org) { * { font-family: sans-serif ! important; font-size: large ! important;}}
or
@-moz-document domain(slashdot.org) { * { font: large sans-serif ! important;}}

Re:Not impressed (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664982)

it looks likely that Apple will allow the release of third-party widgets

Can a game be built as a widget?

Re:Not impressed (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667756)

Yes. See Apple's Dashboard widget collection.

Widgets are worthless. (1)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666322)

and it looks likely that Apple will allow the release of third-party widgets, if not full-fledged applications

Widgets can't replicate the functionality of the software that would have made an OSX-based phone really useful, like VNC, VLC, mplayer, Skype/VoIP, IM software, etc.

Steve shows no signs of relenting on this. Apple wants top-down control of everything they produce. Their justification for this is pretty weak -- if someone is worried about the stability of their phone, let them not install any non-Apple-approved applications. It's really quite simple -- especially when the mechanism exists to completely restore the phone to factory defaults and wipe it out just by plugging it into the dock and clicking a button.

Third party software, Phone locked tight (4, Insightful)

iendedi (687301) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667032)

The lock on the phone has nothing to do with Steve Jobs being a control freak. Apple is introducing a very sophisticated handheld computer into the marketplace and selling it as a lifestyle device. If the system were open to third-party developers, in the traditional way, how long would it be before phone-spyware, phone-adware, phone-rootkits and other nastiness appeared? There is also the consideration of having a wave of voip software alienating the carriers that Apple NEEDS to ensure the success of this expensive venture, a wave of peer-to-peer filesharing apps on the handset that would alienate and anger the media companies that Apple is in bed with for iPod content and many other potential catastrophes.

Can you image phone spyware? Where you are, who you are calling and texting and potentially even sly use of your camera and microphone? This is no joke. If Apple gets this wrong it will be a complete disaster.

My prediction is that Apple will allow third-party development, but it will be through some certification system. Applications will have to be submitted to Apple for digital signatures or somesuch. This is an expensive proposition for Apple, so I wouldn't expect it to happen right away. But there will be a very serious call for Apple to open the platform and eventually, this will happen (or something similar).

We should be applauding Apple. They have done something very significant here. This device is unique and shatters the envelope. Follow-on models are guaranteed to be amazing with features such as iChatAV, even larger screens, perhaps even docking stations with keyboards, graphic cards, etc... We are witnessing a true paradigm shift. Apple is attempting to ensure the success of this venture. Their behavior will change radically once these devices are ubiquitous.

I saw an interesting discussion regarding Flash and Java. If Flash and Java are supported through Safari on the iPhone, then it is reasonable to assume that application deployment could be completely tied to those technologies. It isn't ideal, but it is a far cry from having no way to run custom apps. Also, everyone here should know, without question, that it will be a month before a root-kit is released (in our community) that allows us to take control of this device and install software.

Clearly, iChat would be seen as a threat to Cingular's revenue stream. It's pretty obvious why this wasn't included. That is an artifact of the Network monopoly marketplace we live in. It sucks, but it is what it is.

However, I know what Steve is doing. He knows that he cannot deploy a cellphone without a network. But once there are enough users of iPhones, his negotiating position will change. People will become loyal to the iPhone product, willing to switch networks rather than switch phones. The two year window with Cingular is the gestation time for this to happen. After that, you can bet your *ss that iChat and all manner of liberation will emerge. If it doesn't, then people will abandon iPhone for similar products guaranteed to ship from the likes of Nokia, Samsung and Motorola.

Elimintating the possibility of third-party software installation is not the only way to protect the phone, clearly. But it is the only sane way to enter the intensely competitive and huge cellphone market. A privacy disaster or virus disaster (etc..) would quickly eliminate Apple from carving out any significant piece of that market. Steve is entering with all the control in his pocket in order to ensure a successful birth. Wait for the child to grow a bit, it will open up.

Re:Third party software, Phone locked tight (2, Insightful)

aaroneous88 (809876) | more than 7 years ago | (#17668618)

If the system were open to third-party developers, in the traditional way, how long would it be before phone-spyware, phone-adware, phone-rootkits and other nastiness appeared?
Because we're all suffering from the plethora of Treo and Blackberry malware!

Re:Not impressed (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17669274)

It's kinda funny how Apple makes a big deal out of the browser, when it's the exact same browser that has shipped on all new Nokia S60 phones over a year earlier. Check it out from this December 2005 article [osnews.com] . It's KDE's Konqueror. The Safari branch of that, more specifically.

Re:Not impressed (1, Interesting)

Lazerf4rt (969888) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664428)

People are easily blinded by futility.

We're easily blinded... by futility? How does that work? "Hey, check this thing out. It's sooo futile, there's no point to it whatsoever! Wow! I'm blind now, and I'll pay any price! That's how pointless I think this thing is."

What you probably meant to say was that people are easily blinded by something else, perhaps a good sales pitch, and that makes them overlook futility. That makes more sense. There, I fixed your flame. You're welcome.

Re:Not impressed (3, Insightful)

tgibbs (83782) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666686)

This is not so terrible as the HORRIBLE AND STUPIDLY DESIGNED Mighty(???) Mouse, but almost.... Anyway, people will buy it.


I'm glad that you put in the comment on the Mighty Mouse, because it gives me a good index on how much to trust your opinion. I really love my MIghty Mouse. I gave up a wireless 3-button scroll Mouse for the initial Mighty Mouse, just because it was so comfortable and so much easier to use, seeming to magically know what I wanted to do, that it was worth the inconvenience of going back to the wire. Now of course, I have the wireless version. These days, it drives me nuts when I have to use an old-style scroll mouse.

Re:Not impressed (1)

gordyf (23004) | more than 7 years ago | (#17670050)

Just to add more anecdotal evidence -- I used a Mighty Mouse at work for awhile, and while it wasn't terrible, it was not really that great. The right/left click detection worked well, but the scroll ball kept gumming up and would no longer scroll (the ball would move but no movement was detected by the mouse.) Apple has directions [apple.com] for cleaning it, but those directions eventually stopped working. At least I'm not the only person [macosxhints.com] to have this issue.

Hiding the iPhone (2)

billsoxs (637329) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663238)

I like the CNET.co.uk story on 4 ways to hide the iPOD from muggers.... (You have to dig in a bit on the links.) One of which involves the sun not shining. They suggested the same for the iPhone.

Re:Hiding the iPhone (4, Interesting)

Thansal (999464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663370)

Yah, the entire iPhone/iPod mugging article was rather stupid.

Honestly, the best way that I can think of to protect iPhone owners from mugging is for the GSM carriers to get to gether and share ESNs of stolen phones, and then simply black list them (this would have to be a group effort as unlocking the phone would get around each network blacklisting phones stolen from their customers).

I know Verizon will blacklist the ESN of a phone that has been reported stolen, and they don't have to share these numbers around, as there are only 2 CDMA carriers that I know of (can you unlock a phone between Sprint/Verizon?).

also, the incentive for the carriers is that with fewer stollen phones, they can sell more handsets.

Re:Hiding the iPhone (2, Interesting)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663608)

Honestly, the best way that I can think of to protect iPhone owners from mugging is for the GSM carriers to get together and share ESNs of stolen phones, and then simply black list them (this would have to be a group effort as unlocking the phone would get around each network blacklisting phones stolen from their customers).
Or take it a step further and use the phone to track the person who stole it / bought it hot and bust them.

Re:Hiding the iPhone (1)

tbone1 (309237) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665310)

Or take it a step further and use the phone to track the person who stole it / bought it hot and bust them.

"That's profiling, and profiling is wrong." - Ron White

Re:Hiding the iPhone (2, Informative)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664358)

"I know Verizon will blacklist the ESN of a phone that has been reported stolen, and they don't have to share these numbers around, as there are only 2 CDMA carriers that I know of (can you unlock a phone between Sprint/Verizon?)."

You used to be able to unlock the programming mode of Sprint phones and reset the access codes to 0000, which allowed you to activate the phone with Verizon.

You couldn't go the other way - In addition to a stolen phone blacklist, Sprint keeps an ESN whitelist of phones they have sold. Sprint will refuse to activate anything not on that whitelist. I have heard rumors that Verizon has recently started doing this too, but back in the days before Verizon sold the Treo 650, unlocked Sprint phones were a common way to combine the 650 and Verizon service.

BTW, there is a third CDMA carrier (Alltel), but they're small.

Re:Hiding the iPhone (1)

Thansal (999464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665584)

Huh, I didn't know alltel was CDMA (they don't exist in my area AFAIK).

I also didn't know that you were able to swap a sprint phone over to verizon. Knowing that I am not surprissed that both verizon and sprint now use a white list to keep track of ESNs that are from their retailers, they REALLY like locking you in.

This all makes me start to wonder if the US will start to have laws about unlocking cellphones, and what will happen if we do. I know that in other contries providers are generaly either required to provide an unlocking service, or not even alowed to sell locked phones at all. I know cellphone popularity is not nearly what it is in other countries, but it is growing.

I admit that I hate cellphones (despite carying one), but am still morbidly fascinated by them...

Re:Hiding the iPhone (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666164)

Alltel is both CDMA and GSM, but they don't actually sell GSM service, they only run towers for roaming from other networks. They actually sell CDMA service (and provide CDMA roaming as well, AFAIK.)

Re:Hiding the iPhone (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665116)

there are only 2 CDMA carriers that I know of

And there are two US-wide GSM carriers: Cingular and T-Mobile. Your point?

NO KEYBOARD?! (0, Troll)

ILuvRamen (1026668) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663284)

Omg I didn't realize it has no real keyboard. That's gonna kill it pretty fast considering all what it's supposed to be able to do.

Re:NO KEYBOARD?! (2, Insightful)

KonoWatakushi (910213) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664022)

I doubt it; I am typing this on no real keyboard, and once you get used to it you will never want to go back.

The Fingerworks TouchStream--a multitouch keyboard--presents a very nice interface, with gestures, mousing, and keyboard combined. Typing is somewhat difficult, but that is only due to the (relatively) crude design. (and the other aspects more than compensate for it.) As Jefferson Han pointed out in his presentation, on a more dynamic device, the keyboard can adapt itself to an individuals typing. As software improves, it should work very well; in fact, much better than existing keyboards.

LOL, iPhone is gay (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17663286)

Gay gay gay. More lame pop-culture "cool" garbage. If you don't like the evil PC, that makes you cool 'cause you automatically buy Apple. Go apple!

Most muggable item? (5, Insightful)

hansamurai (907719) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663304)

I'm sure the iPhone may well become the most "muggable" item on the street, but I'm still a little confused. The Cnet articles says this:

The Apple iPhone will trigger a revolution in street-crime convenience. It's a three-for-one deal: not only is it a mobile phone, it's also a cutting-edge video iPod and a Wi-Fi enabled Internet browser. The Met says that people are stealing mobile phones even if they are locked, so that they can access the other features, such as the camera and games. The highly functional iPhone couldn't fit more perfectly into a mugger's dream.

So it's a 3-for-1 deal, an iPod, mobile browser, and phone. If I'm not mistaken, without a usable service (which would no doubt be disabled within minutes of it being reported stolen to Cingular), what are you left with? An expensive video iPod with "camera and games." This is all well and fine in itself, and the article went on to explain how obvious it will be that someone has an iPhone when they're talking into their white headphones, but still, I'm not seeing what's so lucrative when a wallet, purse, Rolex, laptop, or small dog may also be available. At least those don't immediately lose two-thirds of their value when stolen.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

shawn(at)fsu (447153) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663680)

what are you left with? An expensive video iPod with "camera and games."

If you stole it from some one the cost to you is Zero. So you just got an iPod with a camera and games for free.

Re:Most muggable item? (2, Interesting)

Thansal (999464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663912)

However the point is to mug and then sell, thus turning a nice proffit.

Also, remember the cost can be very high, as the cost of mugging someone is the chance of getting caught and going to jail. Obviously getting caught far outweighs the worth of the iPhone, however that cost is tempered down as it is only a possible ending, and the ocst is further adjusted up/down based on the effectiveness of the local police.

On the note of reporting the phone stolen.
Cingular does not kill ESNs if a phone is reported lost/stolen. Also, most contries now have laws requireing phones to be unlockable (even with out the laws it is not hard), and thus the blacklist would need to be shared amongst the GSM carriers.

Re:Most muggable item? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17664538)


Uhh, if I read the BS when it was announced correctly, Cingular is the only network with the features (visual call waiting, etc) necessary to drive the iPhone. Until the other phone makers support those features enough for the other carries to implement those features, it's a one-provider show.

The case in Canada is even worse -- Rogers is the only GSM network here period, so the iPhone is only even usable on one carrier.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

Thansal (999464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665972)

Well, cingular will unlock phones if your account is in good standing (pay your bills on time and had your account for 3 months). So I am willing to bet that the other companies will want to make sure that the phone works with them.

BTW, the feature you are refferign to is Visual Voicemail (it showes you what voicemail msgs you have with out having to call into your voicemail). That is the only thing I see that is network driven. (Visual call waiting is already here on most phones, it will show you the photo you have slelected to the address book entry).

Re:Most muggable item? (3, Informative)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663980)

I don't really see this working too well. iPhone will be eminently lo-jackable. It's got the cell phone's GPS, and is a closed platform meaning that the thief probably won't be able to disable it. Steal it, and you're inviting the cops to come pick you up.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

walt-sjc (145127) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664378)

It doesn't have GPS. That is one of the complaints about it...

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664724)

Are you sure about that? I thought all cell phones were required to have GPS transmitters. Maybe the complaints are that the phone's user can't use the GPS for navigation? But perhaps big brother can? I'd be curious to find a definitive answer to this.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

DDLKermit007 (911046) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666044)

Yes mobile carriers can triangulate your location from whats in the phone normally based on cell tower triangulation. I think the name of the day is GPRS. I know this partially because I'm in talks with Cingular to use that ability for my job. It won't let you see your location on your phone, but it will allow an outsider to narrow down your location within a 100meters area or so at minimum.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666082)

Are you sure about that? I thought all cell phones were required to have GPS transmitters. Maybe the complaints are that the phone's user can't use the GPS for navigation? But perhaps big brother can? I'd be curious to find a definitive answer to this.

They're not required to have GPS transmitters, but the phone company is required to provide positioning data. A number of GSM providers (including T-Mobile; no idea for sure on Cingular but AFAIK they're in bed together now anyway) are using TDOA or Timed Difference Of Arrival which is a GPS-like positioning system in which your phone is the transmitter and the time for packets to travel from your phone to a number of cell sites is compared and your position estimated. It works much better than triangulation because the speed of the radio signal is not substantially altered by walls and such as the strength would be. In many real-world cases it actually provides much higher positional accuracy than GPS does.

The fact that the cell company will give this information to the cops (at least for E911) but not to you is utterly repugnant.

pseudo-GPS (1)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666492)

The fact that the cell company will give this information to the cops (at least for E911) but not to you is utterly repugnant.

I agree. But why wouldn't they? Is it possibly because it's not terribly reliable and they don't want to be subject to lawsuits if it doesn't work the way it should?

Re:pseudo-GPS (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667472)

I agree. But why wouldn't they? Is it possibly because it's not terribly reliable and they don't want to be subject to lawsuits if it doesn't work the way it should?

I guess that's an option, but as per licensing you're already supposedly not allowed to sue the maker of a navigation device for misleading you. I don't see why this would be any different.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666216)

No, they're required to support E911 services, but that doesn't necessarily mean GPS. In the case of Cingular, they use a technology called U-TDOA to triangulate which doesn't require any special equipment in the phone or the towers. The accuracy required for E911 services can be up to 300 meters, which likely isn't good enough for most consumer applications and I'm fairly certain it wouldn't scale to real-time use from handsets rather than one time radiolocation for emergency calls.

Re:Most muggable item? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17668108)

I thought all cell phones were required to have GPS transmitters.

No. And if they were it would a receiver, not a transmitter.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664394)

Three words: New SIM card.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

p0tat03 (985078) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664500)

Can we not register the device's serial number against the user's account, such that when I call in to report a stolen phone they can blacklist that S/N and share the blacklist with all other US carriers? Street crime and muggings are generally not international, so the odds of a thief being able to turn a profit locally is slim if the phone they just stole is useless.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

Thansal (999464) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667106)

yup, that SHOULD be done. The sad thing is that atleast Cingular (and I am rather sure about T-Mobile) does not even blacklist ESNs (Electronic Serial Numbers) on their own network for stolen phones, let alone ussing a shared blacklist.

As previously stated, Sprint and Verizon DO (though they do not share the blacklists, but you can not unlock a phone between sprint/verizon).

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

steveo777 (183629) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664656)

I don't understand what's so hard about reporting it stolen, Cingular sends a signal to the ESN, effectively bricking the phone. It transmits it's signal until the battery dies, regardless of if there is a SIM card in it. Pull the battery and it stops, replace that battery and it broadcasts "I'm stolen, here I am." again. Stealing it would get you nowhere. No camera, no games. Nothing. Just a brick with a battery.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

poot_rootbeer (188613) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664836)

without a usable service (which would no doubt be disabled within minutes of it being reported stolen to Cingular), what are you left with? An expensive video iPod with "camera and games."

And what use would a thug have with an expensive video iPod with camera and games that they didn't have to pay for?

Even without phone or internet connectivity, getting an iPhone for $0 sounds like it would be a good deal. And that's not even including the value of an iPhone as a status symbol.

Re:Most muggable item? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666014)

So it's a 3-for-1 deal, an iPod, mobile browser, and phone. If I'm not mistaken, without a usable service (which would no doubt be disabled within minutes of it being reported stolen to Cingular), what are you left with?

It's not that simple. The phone will probably be locked to Cingular, but who's to say there won't be an unlock available? Some phones are AFAIK only unlocked with assistance from the manufacturer, but who really believes the iPhone will be among them?

Meanwhile, there are IMEI changers for a lot of phones. You can change IMEI on most Motorola phones for example. These work even without unlocking the phone. It's illegal to change IMEI in most places AFAIK but they're unlikely to catch you. So if you are willing to use Cingular you could potentially steal the phone, change the IMEI, and slap a different Cingular SIM in there.

Could it be..? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17663314)

First poARGH NO LEGGO

(thump thump whack thump squish thud)

If Ballmer thinks it's a bad idea (4, Funny)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663318)

that's a plus for Apple, right?

Re:If Ballmer thinks it's a bad idea (1)

Twixter (662877) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664816)

Cause' Microsoft has such a fantastic track record of finding features that people really need and want, and implementing them in a way that...Oh wait. I'm sorry. I think I must be high.

Re:If Ballmer thinks it's a bad idea (1)

Shisha (145964) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665526)

At least he didn't say anything about "squrting" anything on pictures of your kids or whatever it was he was on about the time when he talked about Zune.

The plan will make or break the iPhone (3, Insightful)

CyberSnyder (8122) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663326)

Most anyone that is interested in the iPhone will already have a cellphone and be locked in to a 2 year contract already. Personally, I have a pretty good deal for my Family plan with Sprint. Moving everything over to Cingular will likely end up costing an additional $100 per month on top of the $599 I'll need to pay for the phone. So, over 2 years, the iPhone will cost about $3000. As much as I like the phone, that's a little too expensive for a gadget. Now if Cingular introduces a plan as revolutionary as the iPhone at launch then they will sell these phones as fast as they can make them.

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17663838)

The question is how much more than your current plan will it cost and whether that additional expense is worth whatever you gain (minus whatever you lose) by using the phone. I know people who are against the phone always like to quote the higher figure, but please remember the iPhone costs $499 at baseline. And, at any rate, this is all speculative. The device is not shipping and could see some major changes come June.

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (1)

CyberSnyder (8122) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664522)

The current data plan for Cingular is higher and the minutes are considerably higher than what I'm currently paying. My situation is complicated a bit by having a family plan, but at least by pricing on the website it will cost around $100 more per month to switch to Cingular. I really like the iPhone, but I'd rather stick with a basic phone and buy a maxxed out MacBook. But who knows, maybe Cingular will release it with a plan as innovative as the phone itself. T-Mobile's Sidekick can be purchased with a $20 data plan, IIRC.

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (2, Insightful)

phoenixwade (997892) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663882)

Most anyone that is interested in the iPhone will already have a cellphone and be locked in to a 2 year contract already. Personally, I have a pretty good deal for my Family plan with Sprint. Moving everything over to Cingular will likely end up costing an additional $100 per month on top of the $599 I'll need to pay for the phone. So, over 2 years, the iPhone will cost about $3000. As much as I like the phone, that's a little too expensive for a gadget. Now if Cingular introduces a plan as revolutionary as the iPhone at launch then they will sell these phones as fast as they can make them.
lets see:
    ($100.00 x 24) + 599.00 is certainly in the ballpark of 3k.
the more likely figure for cost is going to be closer to:
    ($100.00 x 24) + 599.00 - (the rate you already pay for your service X 24)
    And it seems to me that the target market is already paying premium service fees (so the monthly fees will likely be a wash or, perhaps there will be some savings, since the phone itself will be able to do some of the things that you used to have to pay the service provider extra for.) The iPhone is capable of doing a lot of things without connecting to the providers pay services when (Wireless Broadband) is available, so you may actually save money, potentially quite a bit. I believe the, at least in urban environments, wireless broadband is becoming the rule, rather than the exception.

I cannot understand why Apple is getting so much negative press for this item, I'm not buying one any time soon, but I'm happy with my basic no camera 3 year old flip phone, and not someone Apple is trying to sell the phone to. But it looks cool, has an impressive set of features, and is priced in line with other high-end phones. So is all the negative press fanboy action, a targeted campaign by a competitor, or just a natural reaction to a stupid or overhyped product?

( I know the /. answer to that.... since the point of the post was to highlight negative iPhone press, but /. readers, in general, are smart enough to figure that out. )

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (1)

The Lone Man (1017800) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665308)

Perhaps, but he said $100 more, not $100, so the rate of his old carrier has already been subtracted.

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (1)

phoenixwade (997892) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667332)

Perhaps, but he said $100 more, not $100, so the rate of his old carrier has already been subtracted.
Well ONE of us knows how to read, at any rate....

lets see:
        ($100.00 x 24) + 599.00 is certainly in the ballpark of 3k.
the more likely figure for cost is going to be closer to:
        ($100.00 x 24) + 599.00 - (the rate you already pay for your service X 24)
in other words: I acknowledged his remark of "More" and then said "The More Likely Figure is....." (so you have a clue, that means I'm correcting him to a different figure..... I may be right, or may be wrong, but I did read his whole remark...)

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (1)

Wdomburg (141264) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667860)

So without knowing any of the details of what his service plan is, you're saying it's "more likely" that Cingular will offer it for $100 flat. I think it's more likely that the original poster knows his plan better than you do.

Re:The plan will make or break the iPhone (1)

tgibbs (83782) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666436)

Most anyone that is interested in the iPhone will already have a cellphone and be locked in to a 2 year contract already.

I've specifically refrained from updating my cell phone and entering into a new contract while waiting to see what Apple comes with. Now I'm glad that I did. I suspect that I'm not along, and that there could be a significant amount of pent-up demand.

You know what (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17663332)

Steve Ballmer is a fucking piece of shit. I wipe my ass with Microsoft products.

Glass

iFiasco (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17663366)

Who the hell is going to be brave enough to walk around in public with one of these overpriced phones from Apple?

Re:iFiasco (5, Funny)

EGSonikku (519478) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663690)

If the biggest negative about your product is that people will bury you in the desert to take yours, you must be doing something right.

Re:iFiasco (1)

LittleImp (1020687) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663932)

If the biggest negative about your product is that people will bury you in the desert to take yours, you must be doing something right.
It could also mean that the product is extremely expensive...

Re:iFiasco (3, Insightful)

franksands (938435) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663766)

Tecnology becomes frugal very quickly. Watch the streets today, and see how many peoply walk without problems talking to their cell phone or listening to their iPods/any other audio player. The iPhone may be all shiny and glamorous when it is launched, but a couple of years from now, it will be as common as any other gadget.

Re:iFiasco (1)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664460)

Watch the streets today, and see how many peoply walk without problems talking to their cell phone or listening to their iPods/any other audio player.
It depends on which streets you're watching. Somewhere, people are still getting beaten up for their wristwatches.

Re:iFiasco (1)

Thraxen (455388) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663812)

Lots of people. I bet a large percentage of iPod owners will be buying this thing. I won't be buying it at that price though (not an iPod owner).

It also has a couple of major flaws that really irk me. One, why didn't they not include a user replaceable battery? I thought that was stupid enough on the iPod, but it's vastly more stupid for a mobile phone. I know people that are so attached to their mobile phones that they carry around multiple batteries. Batteries die somewhat quickly in mobile phones and I'd wager that quite a few will be dead before the 2-year contract is up. So that means you'll likely have pay some ludicrous fee to have your phone sent off to Apple for a new battery and be stuck without your phone for a couple of weeks. That is going to piss quite a few people off.

Second, even though they advertise it as "widescreen", it's not even truly widescreen (16:9.. or 1.78:1). I think it actually has an aspect ratio of 1.5:1. So it actually falls between the standard 4:3 and 16:9 widescreen.

Re:iFiasco (1)

dr.badass (25287) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667946)

Second, even though they advertise it as "widescreen", it's not even truly widescreen

On a 480x320 display, the difference between 1.5:1 and 1.78:1 is 25 pixels of letterboxing on top and bottom. At 160ppi, that's about a quarter of an inch. Complaining about that is like complaining that it doesn't have surround sound.

Also, all of Apple's widescreen computer displays are 1.6:1, do they not qualify as "truly widescreen"? There are widescreen DVDs with 1.85:1 and 2.35:1, are they not "truly widescreen?

Re:iFiasco (1)

avalys (221114) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663956)

I don't know, people who are sick of how much the interfaces and functionality of most consumer electronics suck these days?

I have a cell phone that ostensibly does everything the iPhone will, but it is such a PITA to navigate through the convoluted menu system and shitty desktop software that I don't bother.

And as for the price, people seem to be forgetting that this is an iPod too. I'm willing to pay $250 for an iPod Nano, and $250 for a smartphone. $500 to have both of them in a single device without any compromised functionality is worth it, I think.

Subdued response from Ballmer (1)

Merkwurdigeliebe (1046824) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663706)

Do you think that if Microsoft had had this product they would have been ho-hum about it? Do you think he'd be saying, well, "Our phone is okay, but there are better"? No, he'd be extolling the greatness, the features, the "innovation", etc.. He'd say that it would burry the rest of the industry, etc. He's probably wondering why can't he (MS) and its partners not make something as appealing as what Apple does?

Re:Subdued response from Ballmer (3, Insightful)

Albert Sandberg (315235) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664560)

"He's probably wondering why can't he (MS) and its partners not make something as appealing as what Apple does?"

From pirates of silicon valley, which is of course no good for quoting, but still, "We have culture, they don't".

Re:Subdued response from Ballmer (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666386)

I think Ballmer also misses the point. Can you get a phone cheaper than the iPhone? Yes. Will it match up to the iPhone feature for feature. No. Then it's not a fair comparison.

What Apple is gambling on is that they will reduce the complexity of smart phones to where the average grandmother could use it like they did with MP3 players. To this day, iPods are not the cheapest MP3 players compared to Creative, Samsung, etc. But none of those other players sold 21.1 million players in the Q3 2006.

Possible Anti-Mugging prevention (2, Informative)

abb3w (696381) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663836)

Old news [appleinsider.com] .

It might be amusing to add a GPS system. Then, write an app that, on receiving a certain type of SMS from Apple, proceeds to start phoning the police asking for help, and posting its position and a picture of its surroundings to a website. Screaming for help [appleinsider.com] might be another nice touch... or perhaps just making the sound of police sirens as an unsubtle hint.

Yeah, it's a problem; however, there are enough easy solutions that I'd be surprised if Apple doesn't stuff one (or more) in by deployment time.

Uhm. (1)

Khakionion (544166) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663876)

That Jefferson Han article points out that Apple "may" be coming out with a "touchscreen iPod" in the future, so I doubt it was written knowing that Han has already posted on his site [nyu.edu] that "Yes, we saw the keynote too" and that they "have some very, very exciting updates coming soon- stay tuned!" The site may say "February 2007," but it's straight from last year. Yay for magazine-caliber latency.

So, way to not point it out by using an outdated article, but I would be so bold as to venture that Han and Apple are working together.

"Smartphone" (0)

jeffy210 (214759) | more than 7 years ago | (#17663894)

My biggest issue with taking this as anymore than a cell with games and keeping it out of the smartphone category is it's lack of any enterprise mail support. From what i have seen/read it does not support Good, Blackberry Connect or even Exchange ActiveSync. The latter would be one of the easiest to implement, even Palm has Exchange ActiveSync support on it's palm based Treo's.

Hopefully they'll include this at some point, but for now I (personally) just can't justify getting it for a smartphone, maybe a nice ipod/phone combination, but that's it.

Re:"Smartphone" (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666626)

My biggest issue with taking this as anymore than a cell with games and keeping it out of the smartphone category is it's lack of any enterprise mail support.

What exactly is enterprise mail, and how does it differ from, say, IMAP?

Re:"Smartphone" (1)

jeffy210 (214759) | more than 7 years ago | (#17668188)

Enterprise based mail offers more than traditional imap solutions. Good/Blackberry/ActiveSync (just gonna use AS after this) allow you to syncronize your contacts, mail, calendar, and even tasks with your work computer. Additionally they have support for instant notification and also allow tighter integration with your client. (Say for example you send an email from your phone, it does not go through the SMTP server, rather it follows the same path your client takes, looks like it was sent from your desktop client, deposits a copy in your sent items, etc).

Also if you get a meeting request, you can accept it, and it will automatically add it to your calendar. Same with new contacts. These are all things that IMAP just was not designed to do.

Re:"Smartphone" (1)

CrawlingEvil (750859) | more than 7 years ago | (#17670002)

Enterprise based mail offers more than traditional imap solutions. Good/Blackberry/ActiveSync (just gonna use AS after this) allow you to syncronize your contacts, mail, calendar, and even tasks with your work computer. Additionally they have support for instant notification and also allow tighter integration with your client. (Say for example you send an email from your phone, it does not go through the SMTP server, rather it follows the same path your client takes, looks like it was sent from your desktop client, deposits a copy in your sent items, etc).

Apparently, you've never used a good IMAP e-mail client. Much of what you describe is actually a function of the software using IMAP, not the IMAP protocol itself. Although you're right in one respect, IMAP only supports e-mail. However, the iPhone will sync your contacts, calendar, etc... every time you plug it into charge. For me, that works find, since I don't really need a new contact on my computer until I actually sit down to use my computer again. The iPhone will also be able to synch music, movies, and TV shows in a similar manner.

Likewise, while IMAP doesn't "send" mail, as it's primary used for managing mail boxes, most corporations also configure SMTP services, which, when you send mail through them will make it look like you e-mail is coming from one e-mail address. This is has been pretty standard e-mail practice since I started using SMTP in the early 90's. Remember, the iPhone is an internet device. That means it can use industry standard protocols used by millions of computers on the internet rather than having to rely on standards created for specialized mobile devices.

Another nice thing about IMAP is that it isn't limited to the iPhone. It's used all over the place. I like IMAP because I get the same view of my e-mail no matter which OS or computer I'm using. I currently access my e-mail from three different Macs using Mail, two different XP boxes using Thunderbird, and via the web (in a pinch) via Squirrel Mail. Being able to access my IMAP mail on my cell phone would just be an added bonus.

Finally, Apple themselves has said that the software for the iPhone is not yet complete. On top of that, Apple's Mail program for OS X supports Exchange, therefore, it's reasonable to assume that the iPhone's e-mail program may support Exchange before final release, especially if a lot of people call for it.

Also if you get a meeting request, you can accept it, and it will automatically add it to your calendar. Same with new contacts. These are all things that IMAP just was not designed to do.

Again, this is a function of your mail client, not the underlying protocol. When Apple's Mail program receives a meeting request, you simply click on the request and it's automatically added to your calendar. I expect the iPhone mail client will do the same.

Multi-Touch Innovation (1)

ironwill96 (736883) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664088)

I was sort of surprised when Steve Jobs acted like Apple had "innovated" the idea of multi-touch and even the finger pinch image resizing, because I had recalled Jeff Han's video from last year demonstrating a working multi-touch product with the same type of gestures Steve Jobs was using. I wonder if its possible that Apple licensed the tech from Jeff Han's company?

If not I wonder who filed patents first on a lot of these technologies as the article linked above mentions that many different companies are working on basically the same product ideas using infrared light detection to detect multiple touches on a screen surface. I can definitely foresee a huge patent lawsuit war brewing in the multi-touch screen arena as everyone claims to be the first innovator. One thing I know for sure is if Apple has only been working in the iPhone for 2 years, they did NOT "innovate" the multi-touch technology as the idea and prototypes for such existed before then.

Apple bought the company (4, Informative)

pjcreath (513472) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664344)

Apple bought FingerWorks [fingerworks.com] several years ago.

You may remember them for their Multi-Touch keyboard [slashdot.org] nearly 4 years ago. Apple first began incorporating the technology into their scrolling trackpads [apple.com] about 2 years ago. Now it has found its way into the iPhone.

Re:Apple bought the company (1)

Abreu (173023) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664556)

But FingerWorks as a company has ceased operations... And it doesnt seem like Apple is going to reissue their products...

Re:Apple bought the company (2, Insightful)

rsborg (111459) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666674)

But FingerWorks as a company has ceased operations... And it doesnt seem like Apple is going to reissue their products...
It's not about the products. When companies acquire other companies, many things are considered assets... products, as you mention, but also the workers/knowledge, the IP, the customer lists... often times the products sold by the acquired company themselves are not nearly the most valuable thing in an acquisition.

In this case, it was clear the patent portfolio of Fingerworks was the value-add to Apple.

Re:Multi-Touch Innovation (1)

vonPoonBurGer (680105) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664946)

Jeff Han's invention is a plexiglass screen with LEDs at the edge, and an infrared camera positioned well behind the screen. As commendable as it is, it's not at all suitable for use in a mobile device. If you were to scale down the multitouch display shown at TED, you'd end up with a phone that looked like a pyramid. At least one part of the "innovation" Jobs is referring to is their pocket-sized implementation of multitouch. Several of the "more than 200" patents probably cover the specific implementation of multitouch used in the iPhone, as well as any alternate designs that Apple can think of. Yes, the idea has been around for a while, but no one else has made it *flat* before now that I'm aware of, and that's an innovation worthy of a patent.

Muggable? Retarded (1)

jtshaw (398319) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664486)

Basically all they are doing is blaming Apple for putting in too many nice features in the device. It is just stupid.

Many of us wear watches on our wrist that make the iPhone's price tag look meaningless. If I were a mugger I'd much rather steal them. The black market for expensive watches has to be better then the black market for a device in which you can't use one of its main features (the phone part) and of which is easily to track if you turn it on and let it connect to the cell network (which phones do even without a sim card installed so they can dial 911). It isn't like you could just swap out the sim card and use it as your phone... Cingular would be able to tell the handsets IMEI number and thus catch you in the act of using a stolen phone.

Re:Muggable? Retarded (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17664570)

I don't think they're blaming Apple for putting in too many nice features as you state. They are merely corroborating the Metropolitan polices annual figures which clearly show that many people are being mugged for their iPods and mobile phones - not watches!

Re:Muggable? Retarded (1)

jandrese (485) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664662)

When did muggers stop taking nice watches? I suspect if someone has their iPod stolen they would also lose their watch if the mugger thought they could get money for it (IE, you're not wearing a Wal*Mart special or some 10 year old Casio).

One could argue that there are more people with iPods than nice watches in rough neighborhoods I guess.

Re:Muggable? Retarded (1)

PrescriptionWarning (932687) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665098)

Its that classic stupid debate of who is at fault: the Victim, or the Criminal.

I have a solution, equip these things with a dead man switch Booby Trap (Improvised Explosive Device for those of you that watch FOX news) ... criminal steals iPhone, criminal loses arm and possibly hand. Oh yeah, they wouldn't steal em then eh, street justice!

too bad you wouldn't be able to take your iPhone on a plane though, but hey we gotta protect our rights, er, stuff... right?

A few random thoughts (4, Interesting)

sootman (158191) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664572)

Here are some thoughts I've had in the last couple weeks.

Success:
- Will it be a success? Yes. Is it pricey? Yes. Is it gorgeous? Yes. And the price will eventually drop, just like the iPod did. It's Apple's famous method: release a really nice, almost perfect product for a bunch of money, sell a bunch to the first batch of buyers; then, when that supply is exhausted, improve it, drop the price, sell again to the next round who weren't willing to buy the first time. Lather, rinse, repeat. (Note: don't look for a widescreen, touchscreen, iPod until MAYBE September for the 2007 Xmas season; more likely, you'll have to wait until Spring 2008. Apple won't let a nice iPod cannibalize sales they'll get to people who buy the iPhone MOSTLY because they want a widescreen iPod. Oh, and by the way--current iPods have 4:3 screens. (1.33:1.) All Apple's computers are 16:10. (1.6:1.) The iPhone, like the original PBG4, is 3:2. (1.5:1.) So: what shape should iTMS movies be?)

- BUT--the iPod wasn't a success just because it was pretty. It really is a better, easier-to-use MP3 player than anything else out there for most people. The iPhone will ONLY succeed if the touchscreen system works as well as Steve says it does. I can tell it'll be mostly great just by looking--a regular touchscreen could easily handle 90% of the single-finger action he demo'ed--but I'll have to see the keyboard in person to become a believer on that.

- will Apple work out a deal with Cingular to offer a reasonable data plan? No one will be happy with the Internet Communicator of the Future if it costs $100/month to do anything with. For this to really, really work, there has to be reasonably-fast, reasonably-priced data. If it becomes a situation of "Oh, I can't use Safari until I get to Starbucks or Panera" that will be a big buzzkill.

- will they meet their goals? They said they want to sell 10 million phones--have 1% of the market--in 18 months. (God, that sounds like so many WWW business plans I heard in 1995-97--"If we could just get 1% of all web users to visit our site...") That sounds good on the one hand, given that they want 1% of a billion phones, BUT--Cingular only has 60M customers. Is the iPhone so great that ONE SIXTH of Cingular's customer base will spend $500? If not, are that many people going to get out of contracts and switch carriers in the next 18 months? I'm not so sure. Like I said, I really think the iPhone will be a success, but their expectations are pretty high.

Other thoughts:
- no iChat! no iChat A/V! How LAME! Either a) it's part of the deal not to step on Cingular's toes by offering anything like VOIP, or b) it's waiting for Rev B. Unfortunately, my money's on A. Well, at least you can use the browser to access Meebo [meebo.com] .

- Proximity sensor--nice. But I hope that's not one of their patents. My Canon XTi turns off the screen when you put it up to your face--and it already exists. ;-)

- Apple will need to add 'Cingular' and 'iPhone' to Leopard's spellcheck dictionary. :-)

- I'll pick one up in a couple rev's just to have a decent browser. Despite having twice as many pixels as the iPhone, browsing on my Axim mostly sucks. [slashdot.org]

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

TokyoJimu (21045) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665562)

Apple will need to add 'Cingular' ... to Leopard's spellcheck dictionary

No they won't. The "Cingular" name will be gone in a matter of weeks. Welcome to "AT&T Wireless".

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

Skadet (528657) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665892)

- will Apple work out a deal with Cingular to offer a reasonable data plan? No one will be happy with the Internet Communicator of the Future if it costs $100/month to do anything with. For this to really, really work, there has to be reasonably-fast, reasonably-priced data. If it becomes a situation of "Oh, I can't use Safari until I get to Starbucks or Panera" that will be a big buzzkill.

I do most of my communicating via email and IM. My Blackberry is my only phone, and I try and use it sparingly. However, it still costs me >$100/mo with Verizon's unlimited data plan.

Perhaps the bugdet shoppers using the free phones and rollover minutes won't be happy, but there are plenty of us who have been paying the premium for a long time. I'm guessing that Apple's target market isn't the first group.

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

conigs (866121) | more than 7 years ago | (#17666668)

current iPods have 4:3 screens. (1.33:1.) All Apple's computers are 16:10. (1.6:1.) The iPhone, like the original PBG4, is 3:2. (1.5:1.) So: what shape should iTMS movies be?)

Ultimately, it should remain 640x480 with a Pixel Aspect Ratio field to enable anamorphic widescreen. I really wish they would use this now. I'm really not fond of the idea of getting a 640x480 quicktime file with a matted letterbox format. Too many wasted pixels.


Oh, damn... I hope I didn't just turn this into a torrent vs authorized movie download debate.

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667608)

Oh, and by the way--current iPods have 4:3 screens. (1.33:1.) All Apple's computers are 16:10. (1.6:1.) The iPhone, like the original PBG4, is 3:2. (1.5:1.) So: what shape should iTMS movies be?)

16:9, with a subtitle bar below the active area.

Well, at least you can use the browser to access Meebo.

Unless it's blacklisted, or one of the technologies it relies on (Flash, Java, or XMLHttpRequest) is not supported.

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

nissu (823183) | more than 7 years ago | (#17668130)

- I'll pick one up in a couple rev's just to have a decent browser.

Nokia's high-end smartphones have had a WebCore and JavaScriptCore based browser for a long time now. It offers very similar feature set as the Safari on iPhone (including full page view, ability to zoom in, good JavaScript support for AJAX applications etc.), which isn't surprising since Safari is based on the same core.

http://www.s60.com/business/productinfo/applicat ionsandtechnologies/webrowser/

However, it sounds much nicer than it is in practice. All that scrolling around (especially horizontal) drives you mad after a while if you actually want to *read* something. If the iPhone supports browsing in landscape mode (480 pixels if I recall correctly) it might be close to usable. Have a look at the flash demo in the S60 page ("See the big picture"). Also, you must be using WiFi or 3G as otherwise loading the pages takes ages.

Still, there are people who think that the S60 Browser is the best thing since sliced bread, so maybe it's just me. My mobile browsing is mostly just checking some news sites, not shopping at Amazon.com like in the S60 demo :)

Re:A few random thoughts (1)

Thumper_SVX (239525) | more than 7 years ago | (#17668176)

- no iChat! no iChat A/V! How LAME! Either a) it's part of the deal not to step on Cingular's toes by offering anything like VOIP, or b) it's waiting for Rev B. Unfortunately, my money's on A. Well, at least you can use the browser to access Meebo.
That's presuming that Apple doesn't do something with the browser like disable the ability to use the microphone into the browser session. From a coding perspective, that's trivial and would make sense so they would not step on the toes of their partner. Don't expect any VoIP to work; that's a danger to Cingular's business model and will lead to the dissolution of their partnership incredibly quickly.

I won't be buying an iPhone... at least not in the incarnation that seems inevitable at this point. I've spoken about it at length in my blog, and here on Slashdot... I will wait until Apple produces a product that won't. If I don't there are plenty of others who do... like E-Ten, HTC etc.

Balmer doesn't sound impressed? What a surprise! (4, Funny)

TheWoozle (984500) | more than 7 years ago | (#17664938)

WTF do you expect him to do, fake an orgasm at the mention of a competitor's product?

Apple could develop a cure for cancer, and Steve Ballmer would say "Meh, we've got an offering in the works that will do everything Apple's cure will do, but at a lower price point. And our solution leverages our synergy with our business parterns to enable innovation by developers, developers, developers! in this new market. It'll be brown and you can squirt it to all of your friends!"

New category icon (1)

P. Niss (635300) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665238)

In light of the tone of the recent iPhone stories posted here, can we please have a new story category icon depicting a person taking a massive shit on an iPhone? Thank you for your consideration.

Biggest problem: No Push Email (1)

goatpunch (668594) | more than 7 years ago | (#17665504)

Until then it can't hope compete with Windows Mobile, Palm, or Blackberry.

Re:Biggest problem: No Push Email (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17666608)

> Until then it can't hope compete with Windows Mobile, Palm, or Blackberry.

Actually, no that's incorrect. In the keynote, Jobs mentioned that it will have push mail support from Yahoo Mail, for free. No exchage server needed.

Hopefully GMail will also be able to do push mail, and third party plugins for the various enterprise mail servers could allow push mail from anything.

Re:Biggest problem: No Push Email (1)

DECS (891519) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667430)

Well the Keynote specifically pointed to Yahoo! offering push mail service for it, so it's odd you got that on your list of OMG's.

What's really interesting is how the press has responded to the iPhone, particularly in comparison to their reporting on the Zune from Microsoft:

Inside the iPhone: Five Phases of Media Coverage [roughlydrafted.com]

The geeks will never get it... (1)

mpitcavage (655718) | more than 7 years ago | (#17667896)

All I ever see is arguments about how it's crippled, and it could do more.

IT'S NOT THAT DEVICE!

It's a slick liitle gadget that lets you talk on the phone and listen to blink182. Steve-o isn't trying to sell the ultimate geek toy, he's trying to sell another piece of crap to people that think their iPod should be replaced because it's more than 3 months old.

It's hella easy to armchair quarterback and say "but it could blah to my blah blah if only blah and blah was opened up". But IT'S NOT, AND WILL NEVER BE THAT DREAM DEVICE FOR GEEKS, it's that other device for wanna-geeks.

And realy, wait around for rev B, cause I'm sure they'll hear that huge market segment that's screaming "I want to SSH into my Debian box from the comic book store so I can retreive the ODF list of Sandman (Vertigo) titles, then hack a custom app that retrieves current market value." Really huge market there waiting to be tapped.

Anonymous CNET Reader (1)

ProfessionalCookie (673314) | more than 7 years ago | (#17668512)

I'm not buying this appeal to "authority"
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  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>