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Material Tougher Than Diamond Developed

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the diamond-is-so-20th-century dept.

Science 237

sporkme has handed us a link to a New Scientist article. The piece outlines the development of a new substance reported to be stiffer than diamond. A team of scientists from Washington, Wisconsin, and Germany combined the ceramic barium titanate and white-hot molten tin with an ultrasonic probe. The new material was, in some tests, almost 10x more resistant to bending than diamond. Composite materials researcher Mark Spearing of Southampton University comments on the result: "The material's stiffness results from the properties of the barium titanate pieces, Spearing says. As the material cools, its crystal structure changes, causing its volume to expand. 'Because they are held inside the tin matrix, strain builds up inside the barium titanate,' Spearing explains, 'at a particular temperature that energy is released to oppose a bending force.'"

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237 comments

Wait a minute (3, Funny)

BenjiTheGreat98 (707903) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878460)

Stronger than adamantium?!?!?

Re:Wait a minute (2, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878494)

Maybe this is the fabled adamantium we have been waiting for. What I want to know, is how likely is it that this stuff can be produced with any kind of industrial volume in the next 10 years.

Re:Wait a minute (5, Informative)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878586)

Actually the word diamond is derived from the Greek word adamas, so in fact diamond is adamantium.

Re:Wait a minute (1)

mblase (200735) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878766)

so in fact diamond is adamantium.

Diamond is a metal?

Re:Wait a minute (2, Funny)

Nicholas Evans (731773) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878942)

It's the hardest metal known to man. Duh.

(Note to mods: Yes, this is an old joke. [wikia.com] )

Re:Wait a minute (2, Funny)

Ltar (1010889) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878956)

if they could make a car out of this.... and run it into a wall of it... what would happen?

Re:Wait a minute (3, Informative)

dsanfte (443781) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878780)

adamas, adamantis  N  M     3 6  M   [XTXCO]
steel, hardest iron (early); anything hard, adamant; white sapphire; diamond;

Re:Wait a minute (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878786)

Actually, the term Diamonique(tm) is derived from the word diamond, which is in turn derived from the Greek word adamas, so in fact cubic zirconium is diamond and adamantium.

Riiiight.

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878638)

> Maybe this is the fabled adamantium we have been waiting for.

I always got a chuckle from the (presumably uinintended) implication that adamantium was discovered by Adam Ant. :)

Re:Wait a minute (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878968)

And how, pray tell, would you machine it?
Anything cast at high temperature will need to be machined to have a precision fit (cylinder sleeves, piston heads, valves, etc.). If nitride or diamond tools are softer then they won't, well, cut it.
-nB

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878996)

Same way we shape diamonds today--we use other diamonds to cut/abraise them. So, we'd just be using [insert material name here] to cut/shape [material name here].

Re:Wait a minute (5, Informative)

mollymoo (202721) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879070)

TFA says it's stiffer than diamond, that doesn't mean that it's harder than diamond.

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878502)

Stronger than geek BO?

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878772)

Stronger than adamantium?!?!?

It don't drink, don't smoke. What does it do?

Better than... (2, Funny)

Thirdsin (1046626) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878484)

"Faster than a speeding bullet, more powerful than a locomotive, and able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!" What are they going name this new SuperMaterial??
Sorry, I couldn't resist

That's impossible! (3, Funny)

Bobdoer (727516) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878486)

Diamond is the hardest metal known the man!

Re:That's impossible! (3, Informative)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878514)

Actually, according to wikipedia [wikipedia.org] it isn't. It's the hardest natural material (which I think is what you meant, not metal). There are actually 2 known matericals that are stronger, and probably a third material after the one in this article is added to the article.

Re:That's impossible! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878538)

Whoosh?

Re:That's impossible! (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878686)

Why is it always assumed someone miss a joke when staying on topic just to give some info. I for one was happy for the information, but sure, the joke was kinda funny too. Can't we just leave it at that for once? :-p

Re:That's impossible! (0, Flamebait)

GigsVT (208848) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878770)

No, because it's incredibly fucking nerdy. And annoying.

Re:That's impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879030)

Unfunny jokes are way nerdier than facts.

Re:That's impossible! (0, Flamebait)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879036)

Bzzt! WRONG!

It's geeky rather than nerdy. It always annoys me when people confuse a geek, someone highly intelligent and knowledgeable with a nerd, someone with no social skills. Read pages 358 and 654 of Mirriam Webster Extended Edition, 1997 issue.

Re:That's impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878546)

It's obvious that you don't frequent 4chan's /b/ and didn't get the reference.

Don't worry, this is by no means a bad thing.

Re:That's impossible! (0, Redundant)

Broken scope (973885) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878670)

Your response would work if he had said "mineral", diamond is not a metal.

Re:That's impossible! (1)

Silver Gryphon (928672) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878954)

I dunno, man... down here in Alabama we use it in runnin' boards, tool boxes... hell, whole trucks. Ain't nothin' stronger'n diamond plate.

Re:That's impossible! (5, Informative)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878924)

Don't conflate hardness with strength or stiffness. Hardness is not well quantified. For hardness we refer to the Mohs scale [wikipedia.org] , which will tell you which of two substances is the harder, but doesn't strictly quantify hardness. A claim that substance A is "twice" as hard as substance B probably refers to the Young's Modulus [wikipedia.org] , or stiffness, rather than to hardness.

A common way to measure the Young's modulus is to support a sample of the material on two struts, and then apply pressure from above to the center of the sample. The less it bends, the higher the Young's modulus. The apparatus looks like this [doitpoms.ac.uk] .

Strength is a different quantity. Strength is the amount of force needed, per unit cross-sectional area, to cause the material to fail. For tensile strength, this means pulling apart. For compressive strength, it means collapsing. A material with great tensile strength can have a great weight hung from it without snapping, and a material with great compressive strength can act as a pillar to support a great deal of weight.

The article claims nothing about the strength of this material.

stiffer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878492)

i think you mean stiffer, fool

Space flight (4, Interesting)

Ekhymosis (949557) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878496)

Will this material be light enough for future space exploration, such as space stations and colony materials? Or is the cost associated with making it too prohibitive? How about the melting temperature/pressure resistance for deep earth exploration?

Stronger than...? (0, Offtopic)

Thirdsin (1046626) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878498)

Stronger than CowboyNeal???? YOWZERS!! 8-)

Re:Stronger than...? (1)

chawly (750383) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878912)

..than CowboyNeal ? Can this be possible ? Great strength is required of our Editors - this is well known. We may be on the way to discovering what CowboyNeal is, in fact, made of. The real questions which we must face are, of course, the follwing. Are we sure that we really want to know ? Should we not just keep a respectful distance - to worship, as it were, from afar ?

And cue... (0, Offtopic)

d12v10 (1046686) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878508)

the corny penis jokes!

Re:And cue... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878660)

They'll call it Viagranite!

Re:And cue... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878760)

Now is that a corny penis or a corny joke?

Re:And cue... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878822)

corny penises are nothing to joke about.

Ah misleading Slashdot article titles... (5, Informative)

tylersoze (789256) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878510)

I love them almost as much as dupes. :) Material Tougher Than Diamond Developed...(in some tests), like say: "The tests were carried out at a variety of temperatures. Between 58C and 59C the samples became stiffer than diamond."

Not to knock the experiment though, it seems interesting, and I'm sure there are all sorts of new exotic materials on the horizon.

Re:Ah misleading Slashdot article titles... (2, Interesting)

topical_surfactant (906185) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878548)

...and within that narrow temperature window, only some samples proved to be significantly stiffer than diamond. I agree - article title gets an F, but experiment maintains interesting factor.

Re:Ah misleading Slashdot article titles... (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878622)

I'm not so sure this is a particularly interesting experiment - the stiffness arises from the internal stresses in a two phase matrix rather than an intrinsic property of the material. As such this is going to have a relative small number of applications.

Re:Ah misleading Slashdot article titles... (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878712)

This specific material may have no practical applications at all. The knowledge gained from developing and studying it, however, may lead to many useful applications.

Bah (4, Informative)

MadUndergrad (950779) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878526)

Toughness != Stiffness

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toughness [wikipedia.org] : Toughness

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stiffness [wikipedia.org] : Stiffness

Re:Bah (1, Interesting)

robbiethefett (1047640) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878570)

well, if you want to get techical.. Wikipedia != Fact but seriously.. it seems whenever some new material is concocted, they use misleading terminology to try and hype it up. although i may just find it confusing, because i'm a layman. all that aside, i'm always excited about these types of breakthroughs.. the possible applications of new materials is really limitless and as a student of mechanical engineering, i'm sure i'll get to discuss this tomorrow in class. cheers -rob

Re:Bah (1, Interesting)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878966)

These wikipedia articles are 100% correct. Toughness and hardness are very simple concepts. Wikipedia might be unreliable for soft sciences, but for physics and materials science it's a great source of information and very rarely in need of correction.

Your other posts don't make you look like a troll, but I suspect you might be prone to flippant comments like this one. Try to restrain yourself.

Re:Bah (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879046)

Anybody can edit Wikipedia, which means anybody can insert false information or make subtle changes to articles. Some of it gets detected and fixed pretty fast, and sometimes it stays for quite a long time before the embarrassment is revealed weeks or months later.

Wikipedia is great, regardless, but I will not be one of those fanboys who insist its infallible or that anybody who disagrees with it is a "troll".

Re:Bah (1)

be-fan (61476) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878900)

The funny thing is that, like most materials which are very stiff, diamond isn't very tough at all.

Re:Bah (3, Informative)

Andy Dodd (701) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878998)

And also, hardness != either of the above, and *hardness* is the material property diamonds are known for (in addition to having a reasonably high index of refraction, although not the highest by any means.)

The most typical test of hardness is attempting to scratch a material. (To measure a material's hardness on the Mohs scale, essentially a series of scratch tests are performed, and a material's place on the Mohs scale was determined by what it could scratch vs. what would scratch it.)

I don't know about stiffness, but diamonds are definately not *tough*. As your links above show, "toughness" is resistance to fracturing under stress, and one of the ways diamonds are cut and shaped is by fracturing them along their crystal lattice planes. There are plenty of materials (Including, I believe, many plastics) that are *tougher* than diamond, but not necessarily harder. (For example, I believe ABS plastic and polycarbonate plastic are extremely tough, but neither are hard - i.e. they are VERY difficult to break via stress and impact, but scratch easily.)

Re:Bah (1)

sasami (158671) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879022)

Moreover, diamond is decidedly not tough. It may be hard (resists scratching), and stiff (resists bending), but it does not resist fracturing or shattering.

The toughest natural mineral is probably jade (both varieties), even though it's decidedly not hard. You can scratch it with a good knife, but if you take a hammer to a slab of jade, you're liable to damage the hammer. Interestingly, the microscale structure of jade is not unlike the material in TFA -- interlocking crystals, which are responsible for its physical strength.

The perception of diamonds as "forever" and "indestructible" was constructed by the diamond industry [theatlantic.com] . Diamonds aren't rare, either.

--
Dum de dum.

Obligatory... (0, Offtopic)

Rix (54095) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878530)

Bend over, I'll show you something stiffer than diamond.

Re:Obligatory... (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879052)

What's on your other window?

Seriously, this is the website for nerds?! For god sake, you would think they'd know the difference between being stiff and being "tough." Did any of you /. editors actually took any science/engineering classes?! Mat Sci 101?!

Stiffer than diamond? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878532)

I can't wait to get that spam...

so is it 11? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878536)

If diamonds are 10 on the Mohs hardness scale, is this new material "11" or what?
If so, it's time to burn yr geology texts!

Re:so is it 11? (-1, Redundant)

Evilest Doer (969227) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878698)

If diamonds are 10 on the Mohs hardness scale, is this new material "11" or what?
Didn't you know? The Mohs hardness scale goes to 11, ever since they measured the hardness of my cock!

Diamonds are for toughness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878572)

Diamonds are used for their toughness, not so much their bending resistance. Many applications require toughness to resist chipping in tooling applications and such. You don't often find diamonds going across (relatively) large spans and needing to resist bending moments...

Got to wonder about other properties? (1)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878610)

Diamond is the best conductor of heat known. Given it's crystlian structure I wonder what it's thermal properites are or even it's electrical conductivity? Even if it's expensive it could be useful in applications like computer chips.

Re:Got to wonder about other properties? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878920)

"Even if it's expensive...."

EXACTLY! - There is no rational reason that diamonds need to be expensive, aside from greed.
Diamonds have been artificially inflated in price by DeBeer's et al since the late 1800's when huge deposits where found on the African continent.

Before that time diamonds where expensive due to relative scarcity. There is no logical reason nowadays that they have to be as expensive as they once where. Hell, we have the ability to mass produce them now in labs.

Just one more reason to avoid giving expensive jewelry to your "better half".
This being /. though, it is probably not a significant issue for most.

Re:Got to wonder about other properties? (1)

Spetiam (671180) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879018)

no, it's not. one material that has a higher thermal conductivity is a diamond simulant, "moissanite" (silicon carbide).

Re:Got to wonder about other properties? (3, Funny)

bmo (77928) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879136)

Obligatory movie quote:

Sol: No, it's a moissanite.
Lincoln: A what?
Sol: A moissanite is an artificial diamond, Lincoln.
Sol: It's Mickey Mouse.
        Spurious.
        Not genuine.
        And it's worth... ...fuck-all.

from "Snatch"

--
BMO

Hardness != toughness, get it right (4, Informative)

Dr. Zowie (109983) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878630)

Toughness is a measure of the amount of energy necessary to break a material. Hardness is a measure of the amount of pressure required to deform it. The two are not the same. In fact, diamond is not a particularly tough material -- which is one reason why folks are discouraged from wearing diamond jewelry when, say, rock climbing. It's easy to fracture a diamond by bashing it against something even moderately hard -- even though no mineral is harder than the diamond, good ol' granite is much tougher.

Re:Hardness != toughness, get it right (1)

Cedric Tsui (890887) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878756)

Indeed.

http://focus.aps.org/story/v9/st16 [aps.org] in 2002, they discovered that Osmium which is rather soft compared to diamond was the stiffer material. That is to say it has the higher bulk modulus.

Re:Hardness != toughness, get it right (0, Redundant)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879068)

Cool! So of hardness, toughness, strength and stiffness, no two are always directly related. Thanks, man!

Re:Hardness != toughness, get it right (2, Informative)

Tomfrh (719891) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879142)

even though no mineral is harder than the diamond, good ol' granite is much tougher

Toughness (units in MPa m^0.5)

Granite: ~2
Diamond: ~3.5
Steel: ~100

Toughness is a combination of strength and ductility. Granite is medium strength and very low ductility. Diamond is high strength and very low ductility. Steel is medium strength and high ductility.

Nope (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878708)

Try again. Chuck Norris is the toughest material on earth, and he just snapped it in two using a karate chop.

Re:Nope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878858)

Try again. Chuck Norris is the toughest material on earth, and he just snapped it in two using a karate chop.
That's wierd.
I heard it snapped just as he was reaching to grab it...

Site is down! (0, Offtopic)

Cedric Tsui (890887) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878722)

How does a newscientisttech.com get slashdotted after 22 comments?

Because it's a crummy site. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878870)

And a crummy magazine. It's the National Enquirer of science, only less reputable.

resistant to bending .... (4, Interesting)

Ace905 (163071) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878796)

There's so many ways to measure the qualities of a material, I don't think anybody would be surprised to know steel is more than 7 times denser than water. But some people would be amazed to find Mercury is almost twice as dense as steel.

This, "resistant to bending" terminology seems like a real stretch of imagination to me. When do we, as average people ever consider the force involved in -bending- a diamond? It really doesn't sound like a practical thought experiment, and therefore doesn't sound even mildly interesting.

Spider's Silk is 'stronger' than steel - we've all heard. But there's about 1000 reasons you can't build a ship, or a building or even a walking-cane out of spider's silk.

This just sounds like bad hype to me ; what I want to know, and what I think everybody wants to know is - will you be able to CUT THE DIAMOND with this material. Diamonds have been the upper-limit of our prowess with cutting-wheels ; do you have a better material for grinding and cutting? Don't confuse the issue.

Unfortunately I couldn't read the article (slashdotted? what the hell) so I'm going based on the write-up available. don't hate me if the article answers my question.

---
hate me? nahhh [douginadress.com]

Re:resistant to bending .... (5, Interesting)

Falladir (1026636) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879044)

will you be able to CUT THE DIAMOND with this material

No, you will not. The material is only stiffer than diamond in a narrow temperature range. If you tried to cut with it, it would heat up and lose this stiffness.

The article does a lousy job of explaining this temperature-dependent stiffness to non-experts. From what I understand, this is how it works: one of the two components is like a framework of tinkertoys, and the other is like a bunch of water balloons filling up the gaps in the tinkertoy structure. Both the tinkertoys and the water expand as the material's temperature is increased, possibly at varying rates. In that small range at 58 degrees F, the water baloons fit very tightly in the structure. They strain the tinkertoys, but don't break them. The tinkertoys flex as they usually would because the water balloons are holding them in place, so the entire assembly is very stiff.

Re:resistant to bending .... (2, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879080)

Here's the most relevant portion of TFA:

Once ingots of the new composite had cooled, rectangular or cylindrical samples 3 centimetres long and 2 millimetres across were tested for stiffness. The response of the samples to bending was tested by gluing one end to a strong support rod and the other to a magnet with a small mirror attached.

Rhythmic force
An electromagnet was used to exert a rhythmic force on the material one hundred times per second. The resistance of the composite to the bending force - called the Young's modulus - was recorded by a light sensor monitoring laser light bouncing off the mirror.

The tests were carried out at a variety of temperatures. Between 58C and 59C the samples became stiffer than diamond. Some were nearly 10 times as resistant to bending.
...
Since energy has to be stored in the material to make it super-stiff, the creators have only really measured an "apparent Young's modulus", says Spearing. A true Young's modulus is an inherent property of a material, and would also be more constant across a greater range of temperatures, he notes.
So no, this isn't going to be used for cutting diamonds AFAIK.

But since this stuff seems relatively easy to make, I imagine it'll have a wide range of uses. Price is usually the number one obstruction in using high strength materials.

Copy/Paste... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878800)

Well, it's late... and this sounds really cool...

And there's only 15 posts... so maybe somebody can copy/paste me as I think my IP has been bitchslapped to infinity.

Neways... this is cool news.

The tests were carried out at a variety of temperatures. Between 58C and 59C the samples became stiffer than diamond.
I'm not sure if this means that the only sweet spot is between 58 and 59. Somehow limiting, but noteworthy.

As the material cools, its crystal structure changes, causing its volume to expand.
Kinda like water.

Interesting stuff...
It's going to be very cool in the future when we have specific control over individual atoms and molecules, to be able to build something like this custom to our necessities.
I can imagine that once this matrix/crystal/material is better studied and nailed down, with nano abilities, we'll be able to make a material even STRONGER than this one. I would guess that using, yeap, diamond (carbon) into a similar matrix/crystal structure would make a kick-ass product.

Can't wait for the nano age... well... it might go well, it might go to hell.

Grey Goo is over-rated.
Something I like to tell people, so they can sort of "grasp" nanoTech and its posibilities, is regarding themselves. We all come from (with the exception of CowBoy Neal) a tiny spot of "stuff". The process goes something like
alcohol-hornyness-sex-conception-badtrip-birth-ene rgyIN-growth-humanBeing

From that tiny spot of stuff, comes out full fledged super AutoCAD instruction sets for everything from a nose, eyes, hair, skin, organs, hands, a brain, etc, etc. We never upload stuff to our bodies! We never update our DNA with "new one" because 'now we hit puberty'.
To me, it's amazing that we come out of that group of cells.

In the future, we'll grow buildings.
Recycling will be a zinch.
We will clean up the Earth to its pre-Industrial era state.
We will go to the Moon and Mars.
Poverty, illiteracy will go down, health will go up.
Cheaper ways of living will surface.
Energy will be abundant.
War will be 100 times more interesting, and probably destructive.
Changes in techonology will be even faster than today (duh)...

I'm sure uprising will ensue.
How do we work with the 'crazies'?
If everybody gets a small nanofactory...
What stops them from building a gun?
What stops them from building a flower?
If we control that, with something like "the feed" (thanks Neil), then who decides what can and what can't be built?
Government?
Which one?
THESE ones? I think all present ones fail the grade...

So who will control what?
Where and where?
Digital Rights Management?
BAHAHAHAaaa!!!!

Imagine if you will, a place where ThePirateBay.org carries torrents for AutoCAD files.

/. 2022: INTEL'S LATEST PROCESSOR LEAKED - TORRENT AVAILABLE

Download, unzip, crack, open, print.
Bam! Latest intel processor... couple of hours later. (minutes?! :)

Latest gadget from... hmm... let's pick a company... Apple!
Apple iPhone... Joe Johnsson buys it... goes to his nanoDeCompiler... makes a reverse engineered AutoCAD file (with a Linux box, of course -- can I get un-BitchSlapped now pleasE?), and uploads.
Bam! Bye bye sales.

Exactly the same problems we're seeing right now with fucking music (music people!!!! MUSIC!), we'll have in the future with "stuff".
Everything.
Uploaded.
Nice.

I mean... music/movies are chump-change in contrast to the future.
Open Source will be THE way to do stuff...
I can see, what we see now with things like SourceForge.net, but with future things.
Say I'm a Volvo freak... and I spend lots of manhours designing/testing/re-prototyping a super cool turbocharger made out of (HA!) this new diamond/barium material.
Just for the sake of "pride in my work", I uploaded, no strings attached.
Anybody that wants it can get it.
Quickly, people download it, build it, find stuff to improve.
Some improve... some complain... some don't RTFM...
We end up with an even better turbocharger than the one I started with.

That applies to computers.
Medicines (I know, I know... touchy subject).
Food... drinks...
Car parts.
Music (!) instruments.
Light bulbs.
Dog collars.
etc. etc.

Imagine what we can do when we can download and build @ home equipment for radio transmission... WiFi? 2.4GHz? Bah!
What's Cingular's frequency?
Verizon's?
THAT's the ones I'm building!
FCC?
Die already damn it.

What are they going to do?
Fine me?
Ok.
And the next 1,425,942 motherfuckers that download and build the antennas and start broadcasting?
Psfff... no they won't.

The airwaves will be chaos... / free.

The nanoFuture kicks ass.

Ok, I'm going to post now...

It's late, hope somebody enjoys this... I'll be reloading to see if some interesting discussions can start. :)

Re:Copy/Paste... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879032)

Sorry... Scrolled right past it.... (:

So, this stuff may be tough enough? (1)

GMontag (42283) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878820)

So, this stuff may be tough enough to survive my clumsy fumbling for longer than a week or so?

Test sample envy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878848)

This phenomenon occurs naturally, following a similar pattern: the hotter she is, the stiffer I get. My stiffness test sample is significantly bigger than 30x2mm too. PWNT!

The stiffness testing follows a similar pattern also: by applying some rhythmic force accompanied by background music and doing certain physically demanding tests whilst viewing the results in the mirror. Laser lights bouncing off the mirror were optional extras and not required.

The stiffness results from the properties of the bare' tit' pieces. As the material cools, its structure changes, causing its volume to expand, again, significantly.

I could go on about the force transmission possible but, I do not wish to brag.

New material? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17878856)

Sounds like the perfect material for a penile implant.

But what I really want to know is... (1)

Corossus (1059638) | more than 7 years ago | (#17878932)

can I get some of this with three month's salary and still feel underwhelmed?

Yeah, I've got something stiffer than diamond... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879014)

RIGHT HERE!

Re:Yeah, I've got something stiffer than diamond.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879072)

RIGHT HERE!

Jesus Christ! The punchline to that joke is "in my pants"

If you're going to take the time to make a mockery out of modern scientific developments at least take the time to get the joke right.

I guess then (1)

sokoban (142301) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879028)

Tin Barium Titanate is forever? (at a very specific temperature)

Is it also a girl's best friend?

New tagline... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879038)

Ceramic barium titanate alloy is forever.

Stiffer and Tougher (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879074)

There's a distinct difference in materials science between toughness and stiffness.

Can we please get this right? (1)

Bored Huge Krill (687363) | more than 7 years ago | (#17879088)

Article title says material is "tougher" than diamond. Article actually says material is "stiffer" than diamond. That's a completely different material property. Can we please get stuff like that right?

The big breakthrough was achieved when... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17879124)

...Natalie Portman walked into the room and stripped down.

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