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Can Nintendo Save the Adventure Game Genre?

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the start-the-life-support-please dept.

Classic Games (Games) 126

Gamasutra is running an editorial wondering whether the Wii can save the adventure game genre. With the intuitive nature of first-person control and interaction the Wiimote/nunchuck combination provides, it's been an open question since the console's concept was announced whether or not the Nintendo could revive a much-beloved but sadly absent game genre. Scott Nixon writes of the future for point-and-click titles, talking about their hearty success on the DS (with Hotel Dusk and Phoenix Wright) and the requirements of design such games would make of the Wii. With word that a Wii developer for the Sam and Max series is being sought, the question isn't if but when adventure titles begin appearing on the system. Here's hoping they get a warm reception, from an audience ready for their reintroduction. Update: 02/07 01:03 GMT by Z : Fixed the link. Sorry.

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Maniac Mansion. (2, Interesting)

headkase (533448) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912702)

I played Maniac Mansion [wikipedia.org] when it was brand new (I was a kid) and it kicked off and defined a golden era of adventure games that lasted from the late '80s well into the '90s. Something like Broken Sword: Angel of Death [wikipedia.org] is the spiritual successor in our present day for this genre.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

Luminus (34868) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912778)

I recently played Maniac Mansion (and its sequel) another time around, and I swear they never get old. I hope beyond hope that we can move out of the fast-paced, shoot-first-or-be-shot style of game and that this intellectually fascinating genre can be saved.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

jackharrer (972403) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912994)

Problem is that less and less people are intrested in thinking. They just prefer to point and shoot.
They don't admire power of imagination, problem solving, and such...

Just my 2c.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (4, Funny)

prockcore (543967) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913524)

Problem is that less and less people are intrested in thinking.
<irony>"fewer and fewer people are interested"</irony>

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 7 years ago | (#17917546)

<irony>"fewer and fewer people are interested"</irony>

what are you, some sort of looser? i could care less about you spelling nazi's.

Did I miss anything?

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

Branor (992046) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919178)

> Did I miss anything?

It's "loser".

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

jackharrer (972403) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918334)

Good point ;)
Sometimes when you write quickly shit happens.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (Rapidly Heading Off-Topic) (1)

Half-pint HAL (718102) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919466)

Why should be write "fewer and fewer"? Fewer and fewer people are saying "fewer and fewer" -- more and more are saying "less and less". Less and less people subscribe to the preposterous notion that there is a "correct" way to speak/write -- rather we should speak/write like the majority.

HAL - English language graduate.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (Rapidly Heading Off-Topic) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17920426)

which is exactly why noone takes you english majors seriously.

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913190)

But if they re-release that now, will it be censored [incorporeal.org] again?

Re:Maniac Mansion. (1)

jedi_chemist (995286) | more than 7 years ago | (#17917224)

yeah, all Nintendo has to do is make "Return to Maniac Mansion" for the Wii...Wiimote, 3-D graphics, purple tentacles...wiill make it even harder to get a Wii... I think the Wii AND the DS both have potential to revive this genre. The fusions-such as Zelda-an action adventure game simply do not catch the meaning of a true adventure game. I think the problem with the genre is that it is too cerebral for most players. The problem is that the Wiimote is a stand up throwin' controllers at the TV hit right now and adventure games, well, would require less action. Additionally, most true adventure games are very one-player oriented and the true purpose of the Wii is to be a family thing, of course this could be remediated, but it is harder for CS major Hal to play on level in a game like Myst with his 1st grade sister Sal...

No brainer (3, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912712)

Adventure games never really died. They just got lost in the massive push toward All Things 3D(TM). I'm happy to see that companies are starting to understand that these games are still popular, in the same way that RPGs are still popular both in 2D and 3D.

Translated to Marketeeringese: Good Adventure Games = $$$Ka Ching!$$$

While you're waiting, consider playing a little Stargate Adventure [bigbluecup.com] . It's short, but it will take you back. :)

Re:No brainer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17913012)

I have played it, its guite good actualy (especialy if your a stargate fan).
But saddly, im stuck at a puzzle where i have to rearange a bunch of crystals to open a door :(

Re:No brainer (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913098)

But saddly, im stuck at a puzzle where i have to rearange a bunch of crystals to open a door :(
Here you go: Stargate Adventure Walkthrough [danwa.net]

The puzzle you're talking about isn't actually that hard. But IIRC, there's something about putting the crystal in its proper place before you can solve the puzzle. Or maybe you needed a scrap of metal. Something like that. Read the walkthrough if you're really stuck. :)

Haven't they already appeared? (5, Insightful)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912766)

the question isn't if but when adventure titles begin appearing on the system
Ummm... Zelda?

I am starting to wonder if the whole 'adventure gaming is dead' notion comes from a failure to recognise that games like Zelda, Oblivion, Deus Ex and so on are, in effect, adventure games. You freely explore a large environment solving problems, frequently involving puzzles, the need to talk to characters in the world, or the need to acquire specific objects, all within the framework of a larger story. Just because it doesn't involve 2D sprites and some hand-painted backgrounds doesn't mean that what is often called an 'RPG' isn't a traditional adventure game.

However, it is a reasonable assertion that the Wiimote does offer the possibility that mouse-driven adventure games could finally work well on a console.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (5, Insightful)

frederec (911880) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913040)

When people say "adventure gaming is dead," what they're probably talking about is "point-and-click" adventure gaming is dead. The adventure games you're talking about are classified more as "action adventure" games.

I'm not terribly fond of pigeonholing everything into miniscule subgenres, but here I think it's relevant.

Action adventure games do involve a fair amount of item collecting and puzzle solving. But they also involve a lot of fighting, frequently repetitive fighting. The point-and-click style of adventure gaming (unless you want to go real old school and talk about text adventures, but it's a similar thing) is more cerebral. There is little to no direct violence. Virtually everything must be done by puzzle solving, and there is a much lower emphasis on things like reaction time. It's part of the reasons people have been referring to the new Phoenix Wright game as being almost a visual novel.

So the difference is not 3D vs. 2D (many adventure games went for at least pseudo-3D), nor is it sprites vs. rendered graphics. It's all about action with some puzzles vs. all puzzles, all the time. It drastically changes the tone and feel of the game. Zelda, Okami, and the like, while good games, do not have the "feel" of pure adventure games. Hence "action adventure."

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (2, Interesting)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914126)

I take your point, but I would argue that 'action' adventure is a natural evolution. As game worlds become more immersive it is logical that players be given more freedom of action. As such, whereas in an old style point-and-click adventure there might be one single way to solve a given problem (i.e. solving a 'puzzle'), in more modern games it is possible to give the player the freedom to solve the problem as though it were real. One way of solving it might involve violence, but another might involve traditional adventure game-style puzzle solving.

For instance, it is possible to complete Deus Ex by killing few, if any, of the hundreds of potential enemies. Virtually every problem in the game has a non-violent solution if the player chooses to pursue it.

Perhaps what will 'save' adventure gaming is games like DX and Oblivion, but ones in which weapons are not absolutely ubiquitous and in which violence has realistic and immediate consequences. As such the limitations on violent problem solving would reflect those found in reality, but the player would not be artificially constrained in their choices as they would be in an old-school adventure game.

(PS - I am playing devil's advocate to a certain extent, I miss the golden era of LucasArts and co as much as anyone).

Amount of "twitch" or reflex involved (1)

jchenx (267053) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914728)

I take your point, but I would argue that 'action' adventure is a natural evolution. As game worlds become more immersive it is logical that players be given more freedom of action. As such, whereas in an old style point-and-click adventure there might be one single way to solve a given problem (i.e. solving a 'puzzle'), in more modern games it is possible to give the player the freedom to solve the problem as though it were real. One way of solving it might involve violence, but another might involve traditional adventure game-style puzzle solving.
I agree that the "Action Adventure" hybrid is a nice evolution, and can bring a lot more realism or immersiveness to the overall adventure games genre. That said, though, there is something to be said about pure adventure games that really don't require much "twitch" or reflexes in the gameplay.

Action Adventure games such as Deux Ex and Zelda, still require much in the way of reflexes. It's not something I can easily non-gamers just getting into. However, something like Hotel Dusk (new adventure game for the DS), is something much more approachable, even by those who haven't spent years playing video games.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914914)

### I take your point, but I would argue that 'action' adventure is a natural evolution.

Evolution as in one step forward, and two steps back. Adventure games, the good ones, are about telling a story, characters and dialog. You also have to solve puzzles along the way, but those are there to drive the story forward, not the sole purpose of playing the game. That said, in the last years, well decade, the genre has already made a step back, a lot of classic point&click adventure games today feature extremely weird puzzles (tape cellphone to cat, feat salty pizza to cat, to make cat walk into the house for water to let the player listen to some talk going in there...). But thats for large part because the genre is down to life support, small developers for small budgets are doing these games, taking the low-risk route by recycling classic gameplay. While the resulting games might still be interesting for adventure fans, they are never great and never able to capture the masses.

I don't think that Oblivion or DeusEx are rescuing the genre, they incooperate some adventure like elements, but thats all they do. The very thing that makes adventures games interesting is that they don't are not based around action and what we would call gameplay, this frees the developers from integrate hundreds or thousands of monsters into the story that the player has to slash in the course of the game, instead the story can be written the way it was intended, the world that is presented can stay realistic or comical and most important non-video-gamey.

One thing I hated about Psychonauts was how that game spend a ton of dialog in the beginning to explain all those useless video-gamey elements it had, the items to collect, the monsters you had to destroy and all that stuff that you expect in a video game, all of that however simply didn't fit into the story very well and simply felt extremely forced.

Now I don't disagree that the genre needs to go into an 'action' direction, but action should mean more interactivity and more realistic characters, not fighting and violence. One game that demonstrates where the genre should go is The Last Express, unlike most other adventure games or almost all games for that matter, the game is completly real-time (or at least close), this means the world around one always does something, characters walk around, talk with each other, meat to listen to a concert and whatever. The world in that game simply has a life of its own, it doesn't much care if the player did collect this item to trigger that event, it just continues going no matter what. Another great example for this is Facade, that game is also realtime based, but not only that, it also offers a lot of freedom, there is no 'right way' to play the game, no puzzle to solve, instead its interactive drama where the player simply plays his small part. Its one of the few adventure games that provides plenty of replay value and basically has to be played multiple times.

The sad part is simply that far to few developers ever try to push the genre in a new direction, by far most adventure games these days are just the boring point&click stuff all over again, only every few years comes something like Fahrenheit along that tries something new, something not just improving the point&clicky, but throwing it away doing something completly new.

Real-time eh? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916512)

One game that demonstrates where the genre should go is The Last Express, unlike most other adventure games or almost all games for that matter, the game is completly real-time (or at least close), this means the world around one always does something, characters walk around, talk with each other, meat to listen to a concert and whatever. The world in that game simply has a life of its own

If the player saves the game and loads it up three calendar days later, will three days have gone by in the game world?

Re:Real-time eh? (1)

grumbel (592662) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918856)

### If the player saves the game and loads it up three calendar days later, will three days have gone by in the game world?

No, but if he leaves the game on for three days the game will be over. To be more exact his character will likely be dead, since in all that real time the player still has to solve a mystery and if he doesn't do that he might meet an unpleasant faith. That said, the game doesn't actually have classic load/save states, instead the game has a build clock which the player can rewind if he wants to go back to a previous point in the game.

King's Quest 8 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17920886)

I agree with this. King's Quest 8 might not have been a great game, but it took the very familiar style of puzzles found in earlier KQ games, and put them into a 3D world with bad guys to fight and lots of exploring. While a lot of the fighting was unavoidable, most of it wasn't too difficult, and there were a lot of times when there would be alternate ways to get past certain enemies.

Because of its roots in the adventure genre, the puzzles were a lot different from what you'd see in Zelda or other true action adventure games. There are a LOT of one-of items to find that did specific things to solve particular puzzles. I guess I just really like that. Zelda puzzles are more about generally useful items that are important all over the place.

Click-and-point is the lightweight newbie (^_^) (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914560)

When people say "adventure gaming is dead," what they're probably talking about is "point-and-click" adventure gaming is dead.
Well, you said it yourself-

unless you want to go real old school and talk about text adventures, but it's a similar thing
Text adventures used to be considered the "real" adventures (until the market died out in the late-80s/early-90s), with graphical adventures being considered more lightweight.

(Disclaimer for following: I haven't played anything like a recent point-and-click adventure; plese correct me if I'm glaringly wrong here).

There's perhaps a case to be made that even the best point-and-click adventures have (by necessity of interface design) to lead the player somewhat.

Consider it like a GUI versus a command line; the GUI presents you with the actions you can do. In a click-and-point adventure, this translates to "presents you with all the actions you can do" and thus implies those you can't. (Unless it presents a generic action list, possibly checking off impossible actions after trying once; but how long do you want the list to be?)

A command line does neither, and so could be considered to not be "leading" the player.

(Of course, a graphical adventure could be designed to mimic the human body (hands, etc) and eyes closely, making it like real life, and avoiding leading- but quite how practical- and desirable- this is for a game is open to question.)

Actually, the point I make above is slightly disingenuous; traditional text adventures, particularly cassette-based ones that had to fit in 16KB(!) had a limited range of actions, and clearly differentiated and signposted objects, simply because the elements had to be kept clear and simple to fit into that space. But if mainstream development had continued, imagine what modern text adventures could be like; this certainly wouldn't be an issue.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

Tet (2721) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915166)

unless you want to go real old school and talk about text adventures

Apprently I'm "old school", then. To me, the very phrase "adventure game" refers to text adventures -- the sort of thing you'd find in Crash's "Adventure trail" pages, or Personal Computer Games/Zzap!64's "The White Wizard" column. I spent many hours engrossed in them during my formative years, and even rediscovered them recently, when I was able to play Level 9's "Lords of time" again, through the magic of BeebEm. It's a shame that nothing comparable exists for modern gamers.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

philicorda (544449) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915390)

One reason I prefer adventures is that most 3D first person games are in incredibly restricted in the way the player interacts with the world around them.

In a text adventure you can smell, turn, press, rub, squeeze, push, eat, drink, examine, feel, rotate, bury, steal objects.

In an FPS game you can shoot, activate or sometimes take objects, which is quite limiting for interesting puzzles, or at least those that involve more subtle interaction with the game world.

There was a FPS games ages ago (pre 3d accelerators) , set on an island with dinosaurs, where the player could pick up and manipulate objects as if they were held in their hand. Very ambitious, and unfortunately very annoying to control as well. Anyone remember what it was called?

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17915794)

You thinking of Trespasser? [wikipedia.org]

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

philicorda (544449) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919928)

That's the one. Ta.
It seems a community has sprung up doing many mods and improvements too.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17913360)

I'd agree on Zelda, but I think Oblivion is pushing it a little, unless you want to just fold almost all of RPG itself into a subset of Adventure. Maybe I'm just bitter, because I'm the only person in the world who likes RPGs (Western-style as opposed to Japanese-style RPGs) and Adventure games and found Oblivion to be incredibly boring, just as I found Morrowind.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913680)

You are not alone.
I was even let down by NWN2.

Somehow, those AD&D conversions just really give the same nice feeling the old might&magic (before6) and wizardry games had.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (4, Insightful)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913720)

No, you're not the only person. Morrowind and Oblivion are garbage if you think of all the potential that Daggerfall hinted at. What's the point of an open-ended RPG if you can't do anything to affect the world?

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913752)

Is there a way to mod that "-1 clueless"? Because you have no idea of what an adventure game is!

Just because it doesn't involve 2D sprites and some hand-painted backgrounds doesn't mean that what is often called an 'RPG' isn't a traditional adventure game.
Nor does Myst. Nor does Grim Fandango. But they play like adventures, so they are adventures. The ones you mentioned are not adventures because they don't play like adventures. They are action RPGs.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

caitsith01 (606117) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914046)

Hmm, are you familiar with a language called 'English'? I'm pretty sure that if you look it up you'll find that the definition of "adventure" is probably apt to describe a story in which the protagonist escapes from prison, meets a king, commences a sacred mission, rescues a prince, becomes a great and famed warrior and magician and attempts to banish evil from a magical land (Oblivion), or a story in which a man with no past gradually unravels a massive government conspiracy and the secrets of his own creation as he travels around a dystopian future (Deus Ex).

You are talking about the outdated concept of a point-and-click adventure. I am saying that gaming has evolved, and 'adventure' games are no longer restricted to this archaic style of interface.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (2, Informative)

Goaway (82658) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914132)

The dictionary is not a good place to look up definitions of gaming genres. Try looking up "action" and see where that gets you.

Nothing has "evolved". Action adventures have existed for a long, long time alongside pure adventure games. Zelda started out on the NES, remember? The former genre is still alive and well, the latter isn't.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (3, Insightful)

TempeTerra (83076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914414)

'Adventure games' has a meaning more specific than just "a game in which you have an adventure". Look up "adventure games" on Wikipedia. 'Adventure games' are heavily story based, rarely have arcade-style game play and have non-trivial puzzles. Fetch quests in Oblivion don't count.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914510)

I don't think most people consider Zelda an adventure game.

But Xbox 1 had both Syberia and Dreamfall (and perhaps Syberia II, I'm not 100% sure), those were great adventure games, and people weren't saying that Microsoft had "saved the adventure genre." This article is just more breathless Nintendo praise without much fact behind it.

Did the Game Cube have *any* adventure titles? Why would the author assume the Wii would? (And why ignore the Xbox, which has a proven record of adventure titles?)

Because... (1)

LKM (227954) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918426)

Why would the author assume the Wii would?
  1. Because it will have at least one: Sam & Max
  2. Because it has a pointer
  3. Because there are lots of adventures on the DS

The Wii and the DS are quite simply the only two consoles well-suited for "point and click" adventures.

Re:Because... (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919710)

As evidenced by those games ported to Xbox, nothing about adventure games requires "point and click."

And I still say it's kind of daft to argue that Nintendo will "save the adventure genre" because the Wii will have 1 adventure game when the Xbox had several and nobody proclaimed that Microsoft was "saving the adventure genre." If you're going to make some proclamation about some company saving some genre of games, you might do a teeny bit of research to find which company already supports that genre the most.

Re:Because... (1)

LKM (227954) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919864)

As evidenced by those games ported to Xbox, nothing about adventure games requires "point and click."

Yeah, and the GBA has a port of Broken Sword. It doesn't require point and click, it just sucks without it. Adventures without Point-and-Click usually either suck, or aren't real Adventures, but Action Adventures.

So, what games are you talking about? Psychonauts? How well did these Xbox Adventure games do?

Re:Because... (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17921400)

I'm talking about Syberia and Dreamfall. I always kind of assumed Psychonauts was a platformer, but I haven't played it.

In any case, Syberia and Dreamfall are most certainly adventure games, don't use "point and click" and also do not suck. Try playing one.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

TempeTerra (83076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914536)

Zelda is almost an adventure game - action-adventure would be most appropriate. Deus Ex could be counted if you don't mind FPS game play in with your adventure. Oblivion has a weak story and no puzzles.

Adventure games from the 'golden age' of LucasArts and Sierra had a similar presentation style to each other, but the significant point is that they also shared the same gameplay style. That gameplay is what is missing from modern games, and nobody knows exactly why.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916554)

Zelda is almost an adventure game - action-adventure would be most appropriate.
Prince of Persia is the very definition of action-adventures. Is Zelda like Prince of Persia? If not, you're wrong.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

TempeTerra (83076) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918322)

What's that meant to mean? Zelda has more story and more difficult puzzles than PoP, but they're more like each other than either is like Monkey Island.

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

nEoN nOoDlE (27594) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914932)

Your point is well made. Adventure game elements have been incorporated into pretty much every genre, but calling Oblivion an adventure game is a pretty big stretch. It's an RPG by any definition of the genre. It's just more related to the Computer RPGs than traditional Console RPGs like Final Fantasy. But back to the main point, while adventure game elements have been incorporated into many other genres, the traditional adventure game is pretty much gone. Adventure games are geared more toward players who want games based on story and thinking puzzles instead of action, so a game who's primary gameplay mechanic is action is already out. This includes Zelda and Deus Ex, although those could be (and usually are) considered "action-adventure" since their adventure elements are as ingrained as the action elements. Full Throttle, for instance, was a pure-bred adventure game and was criticized primarily for the action segments that were implemented in it (although, to be fair, those action segments would have been bad in any genre)

Re:Haven't they already appeared? (1)

Pokerstars com (1060832) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915324)

I sure hope so. Back was I was a kid these are the types of games we used to play. While Zelda was and still is the best game in my opinion, I never really played Wii.

Definition (3, Insightful)

ObiWanStevobi (1030352) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912768)

Depends on they definition of adventure game. If you include RPGs (which I certainly would), I say they are as strong as they every were. Zelda, Elder Scrolls, and Final Fantasy all have great new releases. All consoles have a great adventure game. BTW, the problem with them hasn't been with the controls, so no, the Wii will not fix the plot staleness of adventure games, developers willing to take a chance on an unproven concept will.

Re:Definition (4, Insightful)

Mr2001 (90979) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914804)

As others have pointed out, the subject here is "point-and-click adventures" in the style of Monkey Island, Maniac Mansion, Space Quest, etc. Those games don't rely on action scenes or leveling up, and in the LucasArts games, you can't die even if you try(*). They're all about solving puzzles, combining objects and working your way through conversations to achieve a goal. They share with RPGs an emphasis on story and some of the more superficial puzzle solving aspects, but they're really a different genre.

And yes, I think one of the problems with those games on consoles has been the controls. When the game is all about moving a pointer around on the screen to select verbs and items, a D-pad just doesn't work very well.. but the Wiimote certainly does.

(* OK, there are a couple places where you can die, but you have to try really hard. Dying is an easter egg.)

Re:Definition (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915338)

And yes, I think one of the problems with those games on consoles has been the controls. When the game is all about moving a pointer around on the screen to select verbs and items, a D-pad just doesn't work very well.. but the Wiimote certainly does.
There are these things called analog sticks, they work pretty well. Also some consoles have USB ports, making porting a PC point and click game easier since you don't have to change the controls/UI at all.

Re:Definition (1)

ECMIM (946033) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915526)

Except that (at least in the case of the 360) you can't.

Re:Definition (2, Informative)

Mr2001 (90979) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916066)

There are these things called analog sticks, they work pretty well.
An analog stick is slightly better than a D-pad for controlling a cursor, but not much. Nowhere near as easy as moving a mouse or just pointing at the screen.

Also some consoles have USB ports, making porting a PC point and click game easier since you don't have to change the controls/UI at all.
They didn't have USB ports until the PS2 came out, and in the meantime, adventure games sort of died. (The SNES had a nonstandard mouse, and it's hard to sell a game that needs a special peripheral.)

The current generation of consoles all have USB ports, but they also have wireless controllers (except for the sucker version of the Xbox 360), which encourages players to put the console somewhere it'd be hard for a mouse to reach. And who wants to use a mouse in the living room anyway? I've tried it with Halo 2 and a SmartJoy FRAG, and it's just not comfortable, because couches and coffee tables aren't set up like computer desks.

Re:Definition (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916960)

Wireless optical mice are a solution, they work on any surface even uphosltery/pillows

Instead of putting the mouse in front of you use it on the cushion beside you. Use a lappad if necessary again, beside you, not in front. Try playing Deus Ex or Half Life that way on the PS2. Not with the keyboard controls for movement, but with the joypad and the mouse. use the analog stick to move, mouse to aim. You can keep the keyboard plugged in for the ocassional menu button function if you want. tap it with a finger on your left hand while still holding on to the controller, or take your hand off the mouse, whatever.

Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (3, Insightful)

HappySqurriel (1010623) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912798)

Honestly, why does it have to be Nintendo's job to save the adventure game?

Why did Sierra (Leisure Suit Larry, Kings Quest, Police Quest, Space Quest) and Lucasarts (The Dig) ever give up on the Adventure game in the first place, and why can't they save it?

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (3, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913018)

Honestly, why does it have to be Nintendo's job to save the adventure game?
Because it's Nintendo's job to save the industry from itself? The gaming industry has been on a headlong dive for extremely high mediocrity to high price ratios for a long time now. Only Nintendo has taken the time to step back and say, "Wait! Where are we going with this, again?" If Nintendo didn't take a stand, it's unlikely that anyone else in the industry would have.

It's like asking the question, "Why me?" The only good answer is, "If not you, then who else?"

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (4, Interesting)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913282)

I hear this sentiment echoed all over the place these days. I seem to be the only one left who does not share it. The truth of the matter is that it's the customers who have taken the industry down this so called "headlong dive". Go look in any bargain bin and you'll find countless gems like Psychonauts or Oddworld or Darwinia that did not hold to the status quo of GTA rip-offs, medieval RPGs, or Sci-Fi/WW2 shooters. The problem is that nobody buys them. You can hardly fault a publisher for not making games that nobody will buy.

The truth is that there have been many companies in the industry to take a stand only to get run over by the rush to pick up "Japanese RPG #25". The only reason that Nintendo gets any credit is because they have a rabidly loyal fanbase that even Steve Jobs would envy. For some reason they can put out a console supported pretty much by mini games and a 20 year old franchise and their fans hail it as a rebirth of the industry. They can produce a single adventure game for their hand-held platform and they "saving the genre".

Hotel Dusk is a fantastic game, as are a myriad of other games for both the DS and the Wii. Why can't they just stand as that? Why do they always have to be saving something or taking a stand for something?

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (3, Insightful)

Omestes (471991) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915034)

There is a term for this (borrowed shamelessly from polisci) "The tyranny of the masses". Even if the majority of consumers wants to digest pap, unoriginal games, and idiotic sequels, there should still be niches for gamers who want to play something unique and creative. Yes, the average consumer is an idiot, most of us agree when looking at Hollywood, or in your local Gamestop), since 90% of whats out there is crap, profitable crap, but still crap. For every Katamari or Elebits there is 900,000 WWII clones, and 10,000,000 stealth shooters. People don't play creative games, because they are rare and thus people don't get to experience difference. Creative games are rare because no one buys them. The only people who can short circuit this are the developers and publishers. (Just like the indie film market created exposure, which creative desire, which created a larger market, which created more indie films). Nintendo is, though, the last show in town with exposure, PCs comes second.

I'm sick of the "nintendo only pops out sequels" myth. Yes, there are shared characters, and series. BUT, how much gameplay do these share with other games with "Mario" or "Donkey Kong"? Not much. They at least shake things up, unlike other popular series, such as the much beloved Halo series, which is the exact same game, going on 3 iterations now.

The minigame thing for the Wii is scary though. I love Wii Sports, Rabbids, and Wario, but 3 is enough for so close after launch, and perhaps another year. Sure, it is nice to be able to play a game for 10 minutes, and still get a good experience, and have something to break out at parties. But still...

As for adventure (classic, hunt the hotspot type), I rather doubt they will be big ever again. The audience is aging, and has less time on their hands, the younger folks don't have the patience to stare at a static screen for an hour, trying to figure out you need to shove the fence post into the giant evil space pumpkin, to kill her.

Yes, I want a Wii version of Sanitarium.

Insolent meat! Your cells lack structure!"

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (1)

sesshomaru (173381) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919772)

The audience is aging, and has less time on their hands, the younger folks don't have the patience to stare at a static screen for an hour, trying to figure out you need to shove the fence post into the giant evil space pumpkin, to kill her.
You've described the gameplay of Phoenix Wright here.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (1)

chromatic (9471) | more than 7 years ago | (#17917432)

The truth of the matter is that it's the customers who have taken the industry down this so called "headlong dive".

Contrarily, you could argue that if the industry tried to expand its customer base far beyond sports, JRPG, and FPS fans, it might have better success selling outside of those niches.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (3, Insightful)

Grey Ninja (739021) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913332)

Exactly. I think it's also worth noting though, that Nintendo has ALREADY DONE THIS once before, when it rescued the industry from the crash [wikipedia.org] . It's long been my belief that the industry is headed for another crash. But with the introduction of the Wii and the DS... I am starting to have my doubts. The PS3 and the Xbox 360 may well be headed to a crash. But I think Nintendo has a bright future ahead.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913056)

Seriously, I wish what's left of Sierra would work on moving their Quest game series into this century. If nothing else, I think Hero's Quest (aka Quest for Glory) has enough RPG/Action elements that the transition to a modern game could be accomplished.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (1)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913938)

A new Quest for Glory game would be incredible, though I think QFG5 was a bit of a letdown. I really doubt Sierra will revive the series, but you can always bug the Coles [transolar.com] to make something new.

Sierra and their later adventure games (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17914948)

I think Sierra's downfall may have been attributed to their later "style" of adventure games(i.e. King's quest 5, their other remakes of the early agi games and others I care to forget). I may not even speak for the majority, but the point and click, while it made the game easier to solve and less frustrating, made it too bland. I had more fun with the older text/parser games, I even prefer the older agi style vs. the sci, but that may just be the game content or the ability of the parser itself. Text parsing allowed for more easter egg type content since it was free form typing (even with the sometimes unforgiving syntax requirements). It probably was a welcome feature for many, but the games lost their zest.

- Many thanks to all the creators/testers/and SierraBBS support staff of games like King's 1-4/Space 1-3/Police Quest 1-3, [Hero's quest 1|Quest for Glory 2], (Codename Iceman, a very cool forgotten game) and of course who could forget Leisure Suit Larry 1-3.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (2, Informative)

VGPowerlord (621254) | more than 7 years ago | (#17917688)

Why did Sierra (Leisure Suit Larry, Kings Quest, Police Quest, Space Quest) and Lucasarts (The Dig) ever give up on the Adventure game in the first place, and why can't they save it?
Well, this is how it worked:

LucasArts noticed that it made a lot more money on mediocre Star Wars titles than they did from their best selling adventure games... although the move away from point-n-click with Grim Fandango and Escape From Monkey Island probably didn't help their sales.

The creative minds behind Sierra, Ken and Robert Williams, sold the company in 1996; leaving the company altogether in 1997. Since then, Sierra has made four "adventure" games:
1998: King's Quest: Mask of Eternity - a King's Quest game that was really more of an FPS than an adventure game
1998: Quest for Glory V: Dragon Fire - a Quest for Glory game that was more of an RPG than an adventure game
1999: Gabriel Knight 3: Blood of the Sacred, Blood of the Damned - The only good one of the bunch... not surprising, as it is the only one whose series creator was still with Sierra
2004: Leisure Suit Larry: Magnum Cum Laud - a third rate Leisure Suit Larry game derided [allowe.com] by series creator Al Lowe, who was not involved with the game's creation

Vivendi bought Sierra's parent company in 1999 and, over the years, shut down all of its studios, including Sierra's main branch [nwsource.com] in 2004.

Sierra is dead, even though Vivendi continues to use the name. Rumor has it that you will never see the name Vivendi on any products in North America; they will all be published under the Sierra name instead.

Re:Why is it "Nintendo's" Job? (1)

master_p (608214) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918740)

They gave up because the people behind those adventures either are dead, got bored and moved on to other things.

An adventure game needs people who love to write those types of games; an adventure game can not be treated just another instance of the same game with different graphics and sounds. Just like comedy is the most difficult of plays, adventures are the most difficult of games.

oh Nintendo (4, Insightful)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912840)

I saw this article, and frankly I'm not convinced. There's so much hype surrounding the Wii right now and all the amazing innovative things people expect out of it. If adventure games succeed on the Wii, it won't be because there was some kind of pent up demand for adventure games that wasn't being served. There have been some excellent titles over the last couple of years like Dreamfall and Indigo Prophecy the people just flat out ignored. Rather, if Adventure titles succeed on the Wii, I think it will be because of the excitement that surrounds that machine. Nintendo has done such an amazing job marketing this thing that people are practically falling over themselves to just to play games like Mario Party 8. Pretty much any game that comes out for the system is viewed through rose colored glasses at the moment. I suppose in that sense, it certainly could bring back the genre.

Re:oh Nintendo (1)

Shados (741919) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913508)

So true, and I'm a victim of that amazing marketing myself. Everything feels better on the Wii. I'm sure its just an illusion...but in the end, its what videogames are for in the first place.

Microsoft probably should hire Nintendo to market Vista or something :)

Re:oh Nintendo (2, Insightful)

Itchyeyes (908311) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913654)

I did the same thing when I ditched my PSP for a DS. At first I thought it was the most amazing machine ever. It wasn't until several months later that I realized that there wasn't anything special about the system. I was playing the same Mario Kart, SMB, Animal Crossing, etc... that I had played on Nintendo systems for years. There wasn't something inherently special about the DS that made these games good. It was the games that made the DS good.

Re:oh Nintendo (1)

Jefe (2093) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915904)

Actually, I think that if anything 'saves the adventure game', it'll be the DS where it's already started. The sort of games we're talking about just don't feel right on a big TV, but in a handheld they FIT. They feel more like a living novel, and are paced well for that sort of interaction. I think developers recognize this, and we're starting to see the results. We could equally comment on the dearth of FPSs on the DS. It's not for a lack of horsepower, really, it's just a poor fit. I don't see the Wii's remote changing the living room dynamic such that adventure games take off there. I'd love to play MYST on the DS though...

Bad link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17912862)

First link in the article points to a Eurogamer article about hiring a US editor. Anyone have a link to the Gamasutra article?

Sure, if they start including a C64 emulator... (0, Flamebait)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 7 years ago | (#17912946)

...whether the Wii can save the adventure game genre.
Sure, if they start including a C64 emulator. Seriously, "adventure" hasn't been a game genre for what, now, 20 years? (I think it's mostly been replaced by "RPG" or "FPS".)

Re:Sure, if they start including a C64 emulator... (1)

shimage (954282) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914518)

I guess, if you don't count the so-called point-and-click adventure games. But in that case, I think you'd be missing the point, since the article is talking about point-and-click adventure games. The last one I enjoyed was Monkey Island 4, but they're still coming out with them (e.g., Broken Sword, Dreamfall, Syberia).

Point and Click is nice, but Motion Sensing rocks! (1)

JoshDM (741866) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913010)

I'd like to see better sports and FPS adaptations. Use the nunchuck to move (turn?) and reload; use the Wiimote to aim, (turn?) and shoot.

Heck, bring ROCKET JOCKEY to the Wii!

Myst... (2, Insightful)

quark101 (865412) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913330)

Granted, I'm not old enough to remember any of the adventure games from the 80s, but Myst essentially defined video games for me, and I've played through the 4 sequels and abolustely loved them. Point and Click will always have a fond place in my heart, and I've been really sad to see it go.

Games like Final Fantasy and Oblivion, while they are really, really nice, just aren't the same. The basic concept of the game is different. There are puzzles yes, but they are a secondary element, instead of being an integral part of the story and experience.

Re:Myst... (4, Interesting)

Shados (741919) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913456)

In this day and age, Myst-like games have a lot of trouble getting through to the mass... The mass simply doesn't like hard games. They want to be spoon fed, and they don't want to have to think. The only real challenge you'll ever see involves button mashing in the right order, and aiming well, and while they require a lot of skill (more than I have!) in their own right, it is a different skillset entirely.

Puzzle games that make you think don't have a place anymore, in a world where if there's no walkthrough or FAQ about a game, it is considered "frustrating and impossible".

Re:Myst... (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913686)

My problem with Myst is it took out most interactivity with the environment. As a gamer who grew up with LucasArts-style adventure games where you can walk around, being offered what's basically a slideshow was not that appealing.

Re:Myst... (2, Interesting)

Leto-II (1509) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913888)

I agree 100%. I never understood the whole fascination everyone had with Myst. Okay, the pictures were pretty... And? It was not fun.

Re:Myst... (1)

secolactico (519805) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916056)

I agree 100%. I never understood the whole fascination everyone had with Myst. Okay, the pictures were pretty... And? It was not fun.

I didn't care much for the puzzles or the pretty pictures in Myst. But I did like the illusion of wandering around places abandoned, yet well preserved. I liked going from age to age and examine everything and trying to imagine who lived there and how. Where they happy? Where they scared? It was rather voyeuristic.

Then the new games came, with actors and such and ruined it.

Sierra games where nice. I remember fondly Colonel's Bequest and Quest for Glory. I never really cared for Space Quest of King's Quest. Larry was fun, but the stories were nothing to remember.

Re:Myst... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17915856)

I got fed up with adventure games because they stopped making sense after a certain point. The early games were good and had a lot of thought put into them. Newer ones are just art showcases with a cliche story behind it. The worst thing about them is that they throw in a bunch of crummy puzzles that don't have logical solutions.

Puzzles with illogical solutions are NOT fun, and drive people to FAQs, and eventually drive people away from the genre altogether.

For me, a really funny comment... (1)

master_p (608214) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918774)

...because all I am playing these days are adventures! I can not bear mindless violent games any more...I've played so far: the Maniac Mansion, the Day of the Tentacle, Sam and Max hit the Road, Indiana Jones and the temple of Atlantis, All 4 Monkey Island games, King's Quest 1 to 4, Grim Fantago and many others!

And you know what? the fun I had was tremendous, much more than killing enemy soldiers and blasting aliens. There is nothing like getting a cup of your favorite drink (coffee for me) and try to solve those puzzles!

Wii Hype Running Out Of Steam (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17913402)

Ah yes, who would have seen this?

My god!!! The Wiimote has unlimited potential!!! Just think of the amazing things you will be able to do with it! Just wait until developers tap the amazing gameplay potential in the revolutionary new controller from Nintendo!

Just think of all the incredible things you'll be able to do...

Like...

Uh...

Pointing. Yes, pointing!!!

And...

Uh...

Hmm...

Replace button presses with a flick of your wrist!

And...

Uh...

Just a minute...

There's got to be a million more amazing and innovative gameplay elements to the Wiimote...

Like...

Uh...

Did I say pointing???

Adventure Games Killed Themselves (5, Interesting)

hardburn (141468) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913480)

No discussion of adventure games is complete without Old Man Murray [oldmanmurray.com] .

I miss Old Man Murray.

Re:Adventure Games Killed Themselves (1)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918658)

That link is hilariously funny. Great read and great laugh. And some nice insight on the topic.

Ahem (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 7 years ago | (#17913614)

Adventure games are not really dead, they dont even smell, in the last 2 years 10-20 of those games habe been released. They are definitely not anymore high profile, double page ad games, but they are released on a constant scale with about 20 titles per year. Thing is, nowadays those games are cheaply produced with many tools already available, so smaller studios nowadays do them (except for Nintendo who has Cing on their Payroll for the DS adventure games) they do not have to sell millions but those studios seem to survive.

Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (2, Insightful)

ChaosDiscord (4913) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914034)

Sure, Zelda, Deus Ex, and RPGs like Oblivion provide many of the same pleasures of a good adventure game. I like all of them. But you know what's meant by "adventure games" in this case. There is a strong emphasis on puzzles and a traditionally paced plot. These games are typically more slow paced with a strong focus on thinking. They have little to no emphasis on action, combat, or character skills and attributes. These are games like Zork, King's Quest, the Secret of Monkey Island, Myst, or Hotel Dusk.

Suggesting that Zelda, Deus Ex, or Oblivion are somehow replacements is as unhelpful. You might as well suggest that Oblivion is a first-person-shooter since you can shoot arrows or spells at people, or the Rainbow Six series of games is interchangable with real-time strategy games like Warcraft, since in both games your success relies on your ability to give AI controlled units commands. Sure, you can make reasonable definitions that blur those lines, but those lines are useful as they distinguish very different styles of play that different people like.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (2, Insightful)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914474)

A better argument is one expressed a few posts ago which sums to:

If great modern adventure games like The Longest Journey, Dreamfall, Syberia, Syberia II and Indigo Prophecy were basically ignored by the gaming press, what makes him think anything can "save" the adventure genre? All of those games were well-done and very entertaining.

Frankly the adventure genre is only dead in the first place because the gaming press mostly ignores new adventure games that come out, for some reason. I think it's all just nostalgia-- what people want isn't "adventure games" but they want "my childhood as I was playing Kings Quest VI". You can't package that in a box and sell it in stores. Nostalgia is a powerful force.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (1)

potaz (211754) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915968)

Hey, how do you get the frozen crunchberries out of the Mastodon wall in Kate Walker II? I am stuck.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | more than 7 years ago | (#17917078)

That's it exactly. You can't package your childhood in a box and sell it.

I've learned that a really good game is only a really good game in your memory. It's fun to think about it later, but it's really not worth buying / dusting off the old equipment.

What you get isn't as good as what you remember.

That said, games where brains and thinking are more important that reflexes and a fast video card are few and far between.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17917604)

Nuts to that. I still have and occasionally play games on 15-20 year old systems. The good games are as good as I remember, and the shitty ones are still shitty.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (1)

zoney_ie (740061) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919456)

I think that if you simply had good enough writers, artists, what have you, you could do another Monkey Island. I've played The Longest Journey through (and will play Dreamfall once I figure out how to avoid installing Starforce or downloading the entire cracked US version).

But nothing other than Monkey Island has the same quirky humour, laid back style, and well, MONKEYS AND PIRATES! OK - so it doesn't have to be monkeys and pirates. But seriously, TLJ wasn't exactly a light-hearted amusing little romp.

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (1)

Blakey Rat (99501) | more than 7 years ago | (#17919684)

That's fine, but "light-hearted amusing little romp" isn't part of the definition of "adventure game."

Re:Defining "adventure game" broadly isn't helpful (1)

zoney_ie (740061) | more than 7 years ago | (#17920422)

Yes - but my point was that certain types of adventure game are not now prevalent. I mean, my comments apply not just to Monkey Island, but Simon the Sorcerer, Discworld, etc.

That's not just childhood nostalgia as the gp was attempting to say. It's about wanting something similar again, because its good fun in a way that even other adventure games aren't.

I think Ubisoft's... (1)

sandwichtron (1044480) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914252)

Assassin's Creed will save the genre.

Bring Myst to the Wii (2, Interesting)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 7 years ago | (#17914532)

With the introduction of the Wiimote, Wii can bring back point-and-click interface gaming.

Games like Myst were appealing to a wide range of players; the beautiful graphics, interesting puzzles, and simple play style (no spells to memorize, just use your brain) made it a hit seller.

I think that could happen over again on the Wii. While it doesn't have the best graphics of this generation, I don't think it will be a stretch to move the graphics of the various Myst games to the system, since much of it, to my knowledge, is pre-rendered.

It would also be another way for Nintendo to reach out to the "non-gamer" audience. Myst doesn't involve frantic violence, movements, sexuality, or most of those other things games are usually chided for. It's simple point-and-click, point-and-click, point-and-click. A great game for parents or grandparents, aside from those nostalgic for days of yure.

Re:Bring Myst to the Wii (1)

PixelScuba (686633) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916152)

I disagree that Myst was widely loved by audiences... I think Myst is a prime example of "right place right time" When Myst was released, people were buying their first PCs and they were coming with these awesome "CD ROM" Drives. People were dying to see what this $2000 dollar caluclator could do, and Myst delivered that. The game is not much more than a glorified Powerpoint presentation. It was filled with breathtaking 3D images and a "story" to accompany them. Even more amazing... players were treated to FULL MOTION VIDEO postage stamps (this was 1994 and I was truthfully blown away). Yes I played Myst and solved all the mysteries (some how), but looking back and trying to play the game again... I don't find it to be particularly fun, and it's almost a chore to play it. Who knows, maybe this "right place right time" bit made it important and fun for that period, but for me, the game hasn't aged well and the only thing it has going for it is the power of nostalgia.

Ummmm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17914622)

The link in the summary seems to go to something that is much less a Gamasutra article on adventure games and much more a blurb about Eurogamers hiring a US editor.

Sanitarium 2 (1)

grapeape (137008) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915154)

Whatever happened to Dreamforge? Sanitarium was one of the most enjoyable adventures I have ever played. Ditto for Silver though it was technically an RPG, the linear storyline and point and click interface made it more like an uber adventure game IMHO.

Re:Sanitarium 2 (1)

psychokitten (819123) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915826)

Agreed - Sanitarium was a wonderful game, one of the last greats of the 'graphic adventure' genre. If adventure games make this so called comeback, I hope it's games more along this line, and not the exercise in tedium that is the Myst/7th Guest-like adventure. As for Dreamforge? They don't exist anymore :(

Adventure (1)

HAVOC0301 (991818) | more than 7 years ago | (#17915280)

Maniac Mansion was a blast. Played many many times and got nearly all the endings. Nother Awsome game from its day that would really shine would be some thing like Shadowgate. The Wii would do the game justice w/ the point click Wii interaface. Oldschool is making a come back so lets be sure to show the true Gems that made up the basis that games are made by now, not who had better marketing ploys just to sell more titles !!!

What killed point and clicks! (1)

king-manic (409855) | more than 7 years ago | (#17916680)

What killed them was when there were so many games that didn't use "logic" but resorted to random puzzles to cram into them. We remember the well made ones like grim fandango and sam and max but how about the other wretched sierra tittles liek space quest 6 and their lot. Thats what killed them. they may come back but in hybrid form. For instance didn't Planescape feel a lot like a poitn and click? you had to get X item to advance Y plot and repeat. It did it well but it was a lot of fetch and kill quests that made it feel very poitn and clicky.

The natural platform for adventures is the PC. (1)

master_p (608214) | more than 7 years ago | (#17918820)

The mouse is the best controller for adventure games, and the PC the best platform. Console games should stick to what they do best: action games. The whole point of the Wiimote is that it enhances the action experience, not acting as a mouse...

Re:The natural platform for adventures is the PC. (1)

Half-pint HAL (718102) | more than 7 years ago | (#17920132)

The whole point of the Wiimote is that it enhances the action experience, not acting as a mouse...

But then wasn't the main problem with point-and-clicks that the mouse made you feel removed from the action? The whole point of the Wiimote is to try and replace unintuitive control systems with something more natural. Note that the control-pad is only one unintuitive control system, and the mouse is quite clearly another.

HAL.

Re:The natural platform for adventures is the PC. (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 7 years ago | (#17920556)

Strangely enough, I'm quite fast at typing URLs in Opera using the Wiimote. It really feels like using a mouse on a virtual keyboard. Let me tell you I was the first to be surprised by this.

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