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VeriChip Implants 222 People With RFID

CmdrTaco posted more than 7 years ago | from the i-trust-my-ass-chip-to-linux dept.

Privacy 306

cnet-declan writes "Anyone remember VeriChip, a company that came up with the idea of implanting chips in humans for tracking them? They've been behind ideas like RFID tagging immigrant and guest workers at the border, and they've persuaded a former Bush Health Secretary to get himself chipped. In this CNET News.com article, we offer an update on how successful the idea has been. It turns out that, according to IPO documents, 222 people have been implanted, with sales revenue of $100,000."

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306 comments

First Cow (-1, Offtopic)

ReidMaynard (161608) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012120)

Mooo

I'd do it (4, Funny)

2.7182 (819680) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012126)

but I'd hate to have to eventually pull that glowing red ball through my nose just to get to Mars.

666? (4, Funny)

Cpt_Kirks (37296) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012326)

Hey, if they triple the number of implanted, they will be spot on!

Re:666? (4, Funny)

SNR monkey (1021747) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012528)

Think about this... They implanted 222 people with chips. 222 is three twos, which would could write as 32. Thirty-two, as everyone one knows, is twenty-three backwards. The number 23 is everywhere!

Re:666? (1)

MarkGriz (520778) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012968)

"Hey, if they triple the number of implanted, they will be spot on!"

Great news. I just read that the number of people implanted with RFID has tripled in the last 6 months.

Re:I'd do it (1)

Silentknyght (1042778) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012558)

Every time I watch that movie, I think about how painful that would have been. On a slightly related health topic... I'd be curious to know the lifetime of said electronics within the human body, its potential for signal degradation over time, and the percent of subjects whose bodies react adversely to the foreign material.

Re:I'd do it (4, Informative)

Misch (158807) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012874)

IEEE recently published a series of papers on this subject:

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON DEVICE AND MATERIALS RELIABILITY, VOL. 5, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2005

Paper overview (PDF) [ieee.org]

Re:I'd do it (1)

solitas (916005) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012894)

That was one of the [more] stupid parts of the movie. Be observant: the extraction tool was the size of a golf ball but the part ultimately removed was a lot smaller.

Re:I'd do it (2, Funny)

Ucklak (755284) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013118)

Like triple breasted women, a baby that is conjoined with an adult that has wisdom of the ages, an elaborate fat suit with an exploding head, a martian atmosphere that somehow brings sustainable air pressure to a planet within seconds from a frozen water source?

Doesn't really matter, that movie kicked some major ass.
Double crosses, cat fights, a female midget with a machine gun, severed limbs, and using a body as a shield - just brilliant.

Re:I'd do it (3, Funny)

Mizled (1000175) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013228)

but I'd hate to have to eventually pull that glowing red ball through my nose just to get to Mars.

No need you can just put a wet towel over your head for now... >.>

Fancy that (4, Funny)

Vengeance (46019) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012136)

People aren't lining up around the block to have uniquely identifiable bits of technology inserted into 'em? How come?

Re:Fancy that (2, Insightful)

sokoban (142301) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012186)

I don't know. They've sold 222 so far for about $100,000. That's nearly $500 per person. I guess people who are getting this done are willing to pay out the nose for it.

Re:Fancy that (1)

Vengeance (46019) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012388)

Nah, that money mostly went towards the implantation devices.

Get With MY Program: +1, Insightful (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012228)

It's called the Patriot Tracking Program. Anyone who's NOT a Redubycan Party member is assigned a prison number for processing.

Thanks for your support.

Fascistically yours,
George W. Bush [whitehouse.org]

Re:Get With MY Program: +1, Insightful (0)

djh101010 (656795) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012628)

It's called the Patriot Tracking Program. Anyone who's NOT a Redubycan Party member is assigned a prison number for processing.

Thanks for your support.

Fascistically yours,
George W. Bush [whitehouse.org]
You know, it's funny how when people don't have actual facts to work with, they make shit up. It's even funnier that they don't seem to realize just how transparent and ineffective that tactic is.

Re:Fancy that (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012422)

They already carry cellphones, so they neededn't do that.

Re:Fancy that (3, Informative)

SevenHands (984677) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013098)

Kind of off topic, or maybe not. I couldn't help notice that a tracking feature is contained within the last two cell phones I've uesd. A feature called "assisted GPS" seems to mysteriously and unobtrusively be enabled by default from the factory. From what I understand, this location tracking feature is in addition to tracking one's location via cell tower triangulation.

Scary thing about this is that the vast majority of the people I talk to do not even know this feature is available, less enabled by default.

Re:Fancy that (4, Insightful)

kabocox (199019) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012608)

People aren't lining up around the block to have uniquely identifiable bits of technology inserted into 'em? How come?

Cause God beat the government to it. ;) We don't need another unique identifier. We have DNA, fingerprintes, footprints, retina scans, facial thermal imaging scans, picture photos, and voice scans. We've used race, sex, hair color, eye color, height, and wieght when searching for criminals or posting limited ID traits on DLs. Do we really need more? I could see family, friends, schools, religions, employeers, and community clubs (Greenpeace or NRA) wanting to track "their" members, employees, family, or those involved with that religion. I think it's funny. We don't know if God exists so we are going to build a system that can tell where everyone is at any given time because that's one of the things only God was suppposed to be able to do and then worship it. I have no religious reason to object to anyone trying to track or control others that's the fundamental thing that God, governments, and humans generally try to do (control those that don't have the power to stop them.) I'm fairly certain that privacy will become a myth within my lifetime and most people won't even notice its gone.

I would leave FAST (5, Insightful)

VEGETA_GT (255721) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012184)

if they tried to put one of those in me. I am a Canadian, and am working under contract in the US. but lets say they make it so all workers like me in a few years are required to have these flags, I can tell you now I would be going back to Canada fast. to me its a complete violation of my rights, and I well not stand for it and no one else should. Where I am is my business, and no one else's.

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

Chicken04GTO (957041) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012242)

"Where I am is my business, and no one else's." Not if you are a guest in a foreign country.

Re:I would leave FAST (2, Insightful)

AMindLost (967567) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012400)

Even if you've been invited into that country and you're going about your peaceful business and breaking no laws in the process?

Re:I would leave FAST (5, Insightful)

SocratesJedi (986460) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012414)

Where I am is my business, and no one else's.
Not if you are a guest in a foreign country.
The interest a government has in preventing an attack does not imply that it would be right for that government to track all foreign nationals within its borders. At least, I would not support government policy that wanted this level of surveillance on foreigners. Even if you've bought into this nationalist mentality that foreigners are inherently more dangerous than domestic citizens consider: Once that infrastructure to track large numbers of foreigners is in place it would not be difficult to expand it to include tracking of citizens. I'm not willing to support any policy that will bring the government under which I live any closer to that type of police state. Are you?

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

ccarson (562931) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012964)

I don't want my government tracking citizens because citizens have a right to live in their own country freely. The jury is still out about the foreigners though. I'm weary of foreigners who want to harm my family and I'd consider tracking them if things got bad.

Re:I would leave FAST (5, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013008)

When you consider the the rights gaurenteed through the constitution applies to all people, not just citizens. On might say they are inaliable to all men.

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

damienl451 (841528) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013164)

Don't worry. All we have to day is way a couple more years for the Constitution to "evolve" (it's a living organism, remember), and it will be recognized that "people" really means "citizens".

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012526)

"Where I am is my business, and no one else's." Not if you are a guest in a foreign country.

Why is that? Do you consider all foreigners a threat? Do you have a good reason to track all movements of citizens of friendly neighbors visiting this country? If you don't trust foreigners, why even let them visit or work here? Do you have a reason for your statement, or is it just 'cause you say so?

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

elmaxxgt (980095) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012572)

A guest? that's not the way to greet guests... arent "guests" supposed to feel welcome? oh wait, since they aren't citizens, they have no rights... correct? May the next immigration officer that "greets" you on your next travel isn't one that holds something against americans. I've heard some very funny stories.

Re:I would leave FAST (4, Interesting)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012736)

See what I hate is that's not actually true. As a visitor to the USA I have the same rights as any citizen, more specifically, I am entitled to the protection of the constitution of america and it's amendments.

Note that voting [and some similar stuff] is a right only of citizens (as prescribed by law). So the law still applies to me, and bars me from voting because I'm not a citizen [etc].

So if I entered the USA and then they decided to chip me they would be violating my constitutional rights to, among other things, the 4th amendment.

The minute they toy with their own rules against foreigners they can expect retaliations around the world. Which is why, aside from the ban on habeas corpus, they don't really infringe the rights of legitimate visitors.

That being said, I've never been questioned by the police in the USA. The only time I've had to talk to any law related folk outside of the border was a border patrol in upper state new york (re: budget exercise).

Tom

Re:I would leave FAST (2, Informative)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012858)

Follow up for the curious, See equal protection under the law [wikisource.org] which specifically grants the rights of the constituion to any person within the jurisdiction of the states.

So, no, the USA governement does not have the right to violate the rights of tourists.

Tom

Re:I would leave FAST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012882)

See what I hate is that's not actually true. As a visitor to the USA I have the same rights as any citizen, more specifically, I am entitled to the protection of the constitution of america and it's amendments.


You have the rights that the currently elected officials decide you have according to their interpretation of the constitution, dipshit. Don't think that holds? Check out what the current administration is doing.

The minute they toy with their own rules against foreigners they can expect retaliations around the world. Which is why, aside from the ban on habeas corpus, they don't really infringe the rights of legitimate visitors.


Yes, because we all know the huge number of US citizens that bother to ever travel outside the country.

Just another pansy-assed whining Canadian. Stay home. Seriously.

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012944)

I don't get your AC trolling. I was actually complimenting the states and informing the OP that visitors DO have rights and that in my experience they're not being violated.

You may have a grudge against the USA [or just a plain coward troll] but in my experience, americans behave just fine towards Canadians within their states.

Stop posting as AC you "Internet Tough Guy" (tm), it must reinforces your complete lack of character. Grow up.

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

Wateshay (122749) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012574)

There certainly are countries where foreigners don't have rights, but in the U.S. legal foreign immigrants have long been held to enjoy the same constitutional rights as everyone else (except where those rights are specifically limited to citizens, such as running for elected office). Heck, even Dubya hasn't pushed the idea of foreigners arrested within the borders of the U.S. being shipped off to Cuba or denied trial.

You may not feel that foreigners should be granted the same rights, but legally they are, and I think any politician is going to have a very hard time justifying (and getting passed) the forced implantation of a tracking device in legal immigrants or guest workers. And if he did, I just don't think the courts would uphold it, any more than they would uphold the bugging of all immigrant phones without reasonable cause or random searches of immigrant homes.

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

VEGETA_GT (255721) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012712)

Ok I never even looked for a job State side, a US company contacted me and offered. I was invited to come here, why would I want to come to a country tho that wishes to track what I do in my private life. Maybe when you go to Canada you should be branded with the date of eatery and such, the US government would have a complete FIT with with Canada. Telling us its not fair, well same goes the other way, shy should we be taged going into your country. Neadless to say its against anyones right even if you are not form that country. and when all outsiders are basically branded, then whats to stop all Us citizens to get the chip, as again security reasons. Remember some attacks on US soil where by US citizens.

So I state this again, this EVER gts implemented I would be leaving the US FAST, I could not care about the contracts I am under, or whatever, I am out of here.

Re:I would leave FAST (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012338)

I can tell you now I would be going back to Canada fast

And doing what? Sitting around wishing you had a job at American pay rates?

Re:I would leave FAST (4, Funny)

MillionthMonkey (240664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012548)

I can tell you now I would be going back to Canada fast
And doing what? Sitting around wishing you had a job at American pay rates?
Getting health care and affordable prescriptions while you sit around with a chip in your head made by the guy who has your job in China.

Re:I would leave FAST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012856)

I'd rather be unemployed and living in a box, then to put up with that bullshit

Re:I would leave FAST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012440)

Virtually all the company's revenues come from two Canadian companies it acquired in 2005. These companies, EXI Wireless and Instantel, specialize in infant tracking and "wander" detection systems in rest homes...


  Irony?

Re:I would leave FAST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012632)

If we knew it'd be that easy to get Canadians out of the Country we would've done this a long time ago.... You're taking all our good Acting, Singing and Comedian jobs!!! LOL

Re:I would leave FAST (5, Interesting)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012880)

Can someone please explain to me how this is a violation of privacy? I'm seriously curious.

The medical benefits of EMTs being able to instantly know a person's blood type, allergies, and medical history are obvious.

What isn't obvious is why people think short-range RFID is the same as battery-powered wild animal tracking collars. Are they just stupid? Look at the way RFID works. A person CAN NOT use it to track someone as they walk around a city. A device capable of generating the power to operate these over more than a very short distance would be very obvious to spot and would probably break every PDA and wrist-watch in the area. Also, it would be IMPOSSIBLE to survey a large number of RFID devices at the same time because of the way collisions are handled.

If you are afraid of this yet you carry a cellphone, you are a hypocrite. For practical purposes, small* RFID tags are a slightly-longer-range barcode.

*I realize that large tags can be read from greater distances. But that's not what we are talking about here.

Re:I would leave FAST (3, Interesting)

fishbowl (7759) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013088)


>The medical benefits of EMTs being able to instantly know a person's blood type, allergies, and medical history are obvious.

Can a person with an RFID implant get an MRI?

Re:I would leave FAST (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18013144)

The analogy you've requested is...

What's the privacy violation of having your medical history, in rather small print, on the outside of your clothing, visible to everyone you walk near?

Re:I would leave FAST (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013180)

Most RFID systems I've seen transmit only a serial number. Such number could then be used to look up medical info in a central database (authenticated with already-established methods).

Re:I would leave FAST (0, Troll)

abuthemagician (880680) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013122)

In my country (The United States of America) you should have no rights without being a citizen.

So, not yet mainstream (5, Funny)

Hrodvitnir (101283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012192)

However, sales will skyrocket as soon as the RFID chip is required to vote on American Idol.

Re:So, not yet mainstream (1)

garcia (6573) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012426)

"+5 So True it's Scary" would be the proper mod, not +5 Funny.

Re:So, not yet mainstream (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013178)

this whould be modded -1 really, really sad,But true.

I'm sure it'll get more traction... (4, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012194)

When it becomes part of the hardware required to run Vista. That way, a generation of PCs later, everyone will need an implanted RFID chip.

Re:I'm sure it'll get more traction... (1)

dan828 (753380) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012936)

Na, it'll be required for the next version of windows when it's released. So we have nothing to worry about.

Re:I'm sure it'll get more traction... (1)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013116)

When it becomes part of the hardware required to run Vista.

I think we're safe. Vista will never have the required drivers. ;)

Forehead or Back of the hand? (5, Insightful)

coren2000 (788204) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012300)

Where do they put said chip? The forehead or the back of the hand?

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (4, Funny)

Vengeance (46019) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012428)

I'll tell 'em where they can stick it.

how about the gut? (1)

elmaxxgt (980095) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012828)

if you give them the finger they they will manhandle you and insert a bug thru your belly button!

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (-1, Flamebait)

Goaway (82658) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012454)

The fact that Slashdotters are referencing the bible when arguing against things they don't like is amusing me to end.

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012534)

In this political climate, it's not an undeserved reference. A huge number of Americans believe that the Bible is the word of God, and they also believe that the events in the book of Revelations will come to pass. The question of how a self-proclaimed Christian like George Bush would allow such chipping to occur is interesting, but the question of how many Americans will object is certainly valid, and referencing Revelations in this way brings up that point.

Offtopic but I wanted to say it (-1, Flamebait)

dbIII (701233) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012622)

A lot of us have actually read the thing (even if we don't believe it) - something some anti-intellectual radical "Christian" God botherers that think Jesus hated the poor should try doing. I find it even stranger that these radical groups call themselves conservative - you can't get a more conservative Church than Catholicism and they accepted evolution years ago.

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (1)

Virak (897071) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013022)

So if we were humorously referencing another fictional work, it'd be okay?

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (2, Funny)

jsantos (113796) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012554)

Oh, but that's what's so popular about them... You get to choose!

The front of the hand (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012698)

And it'll start glowing bright red once you turn 30.

Re:Forehead or Back of the hand? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012988)

Under the skin of the wrist. They then tattoo the serial number of the chip at the implantation site to make ID possible if the reader device is broken.

People please... (5, Insightful)

JustNiz (692889) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012302)

We need to stand united against this. No matter what, don't allow yourself to be implanted.

I'm really scared about this. The most scary part is that 222 people actually paid to have this done to themselves. What were they thinking? Can they really be that stupid?

Re:People please... (2, Insightful)

InsaneProcessor (869563) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012406)

YES

Re:People please... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012416)

The people behind this project need to be shot. The slope is a right angle!

Re:People please... (1)

peragrin (659227) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013050)

actually i can see a use for this tracking technology. Think a military complex. Not only does one have an ID card, but in order to access a secured area they have to have the RFID chip.

With additional sensors placed through out a complex, tracking one person would be easier. Though not fool proof. a dedicated attacker would still get by it would be harder.

I don't see the point of having these things in the general population though. or even for Foreigners. heck even tracking inventory by them isn't that great.(how many times have you set off one a stores alarms?

My cell phone will if it attempts to call out to a tower at the moment when i am to close.

implant immigrants? (1)

elmaxxgt (980095) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012304)

An idea to implant immigrants with RFID? that's not a good idea, and will give foreigners even more reasons not to like the US.

Delivery boy (1)

ThePopeLayton (868042) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012306)

This reminds me of the futurama pilot.

Excellent! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012368)

Excellent, We've hit 1/3 of our goal!

Re:Excellent! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012650)

No silly,
We put 3 chips in each...

evil r us

Congratulations Mr Bin Laden (3, Funny)

Timesprout (579035) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012370)

Osama Bin Laden
Secret Mountain Stronghold
Durkadurkastan


You are a winner!

Congratulations Mr Bin Laden your name was selected from millions of entrants. However our couriers are having some difficulty in locating you so we are providing you with a bright new shiny RFID tag and tag injection device. Simply swab a spot on your arm (we dont want you getting an infection now do we), press the injection device against your arm and pull the trigger. Yes, its that simple! Shortly thereafter the light and sound extravaganza we have prepared for you will begin when the courier drops in your thermonuclear prize!


Yours etc.
G. W. Bush

Why stop at 222? (0, Redundant)

BayaWeaver (1048744) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012432)

They should have done it on 666 people. Now that would make the news!

prospect (0, Redundant)

mtenhagen (450608) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012448)

They predict next years sales to triple.

Re:prospect (2, Insightful)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012504)

Bringing the total number of people with the implant to 888?

Perhaps I don't get the joke :>

Dachshund (1)

G3ckoG33k (647276) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012462)

No ID tag? Soon enough my neighbor may be mistaken for a runaway dachshund - Go get'm boy.

lets have the chip... (1)

firefirefire (1064124) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012488)

fucking modded!!!!!!

Re:lets have the chip... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012596)

pshh I'm already running linux on it

Solution (5, Funny)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012542)

I read somewhere that if you want to defeat this scheme, you just need to microwave the person for like, 2 minutes tops.

story about this in Left Behind books (-1, Redundant)

peter303 (12292) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012606)

Theya re about the apocalyse and bad guys are all branded with numbers.

Re:story about this in Left Behind books (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18013020)

You forget to mention that those books are crap.

Are they trying to bring about The End? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012612)

Rev 13:16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:
Rev 13:17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
Rev 13:18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.

Re:Are they trying to bring about The End? (-1, Flamebait)

Pojut (1027544) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013014)

Hey, uh...I guess you didn't get the memo....I got drunk one night and wrote that silly book....WHAT???? Don't look at me like that...like you never did anything drunk before.

Oh, in case you missed the other memo...the Earth isn't flat.

                              -God

What's the point? (1)

DogDude (805747) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012614)

Can anybody suggest to me what the point of this may be? Is it for Alzheimer's patients who forget who they are? The website suggests that doctors can get your medical information quickly with these chips (assuming the doctors in whatever ER you land in have heard of this, or have a reader). Why not just keep your hospital ID card in your wallet? That's what I do. If I'm found dead or hurt, then whoever opens my wallet will see my drivers' license, and my hospital card, so they can call up my hospital and ask for my records.

I just don't get it.

What the hell (5, Insightful)

el_womble (779715) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012618)

What the hell is wrong with some people? Who, outside of crazy, Nazi scientists and ralieans thinks its a good idea to voluntarily put a chip in a persons body for no good reason. The few people who this might help, the few who are randomly incapacitated by illness have several, better alternatives: bracelets, id cards and if you want to get medievil tattooing themselves. A better alternative would be to place the chip in body jewelery. At least then, you can remove it.

Why would you do this to yourself, and perhaps more importantly why would you invest millions in R&D? The only way this system would work on a national level was if it was mandated by government. If that happens its time to start the revolution and get in line at the gun shop not the chip shop.

Perfectly rational behavior for some people (1)

patio11 (857072) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013068)

>>
Who, outside of crazy, Nazi scientists and ralieans thinks its a good idea to voluntarily put a chip in a persons body for no good reason.
>>

Lets say I have a condition requiring a medic alert bracelet. I don't know, lethal allergy to eggs, perhaps (causes complications with all kinds of medicines cultured on egg yolk these days). I could quite rationally say "Chip me, doc" on Feb 14th, 2007 so that I don't have to take the risk that on April 18th, 2027 I leave my medic alert bracelet (or ID card, or other Protection Against Lethal Error Security Token) on the nightstand just in time to get on the morning commute, be hit and moderately injured by a drunk driver, and be killed by a well-meaning ER nurse who checked me for bracelet and chip before dosing me with something accidentally lethal.

Personally, if I had a condition that was serious, I'd go to the chip before body jewelry, purely on aesthetic grounds. I'm sure the doctors who put it in could take it out if for some reason it needed to come out. If they can pry out a liver and put in a new one they can probably grab a wee bit of metal from a place chosen because it was easily accessible with a surgical instrument.

Similarly, in the vein of making choices today to avoid making them tomorrow, I could decide now to have my paycheck autodeducted in December to fund my retirement account. Could I decide that in December without any loss of effectiveness? Yes, but the February me might not trust the December me sufficiently to spend on the retirement account instead of extra Christmas presents. Thus, I put it out of the December me's hands unless he leaps over unreasonably high barriers to overrule the February me's decisions.

Re:What the hell (2, Insightful)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013078)

These chips are one of those technologies that would serve an amazing purpose to better humanity as as whole if it were not for the inherent flaw that they would used by a species that is inherently flawed. Imagine being able to tell instantly what medication a patient is on, their complete medical history, drug allergies, and conditions. That information could save lives. Or imagine never seeing another story of a missing/abducted child in the news. Less important things to, you could pay for goods simply by walking out of the store with you items. Now, a lot of these things can be done now with alternative technologies, but if these chips could be implemented as part of a national (or global) system the changes would be immense (although not all for the better).

But we'll never see the benefits, and if we do they'll come with so many trade offs to our freedom and privacy it wont be worth it.

Re:What the hell (1)

revery (456516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013158)

ah, but the next generation of "smart" guns will only fire for people with chips...

You didn't think you had a right to bear... [whistles nervously] own a gun, did you?

I purchased one.... (1)

Brian Ribbon (986353) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012630)

.... but it was lost during transit.

Same, but different (4, Funny)

navygeek (1044768) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012666)

I can replace those RFID's for the fraction of the cost - with the same basic outcome.

Ladies (yeah, there are so many here) and gentlegeeks, I give you....

The dog collar and leash!

Already made fashionable by Goths and kinksters the world over - these handsome and/or lovely accessories come in a variety of shapes and colors to fit every occasion. Great for keeping track of guest workers, immigrants, and wandering children.

To do list for the tech community (2, Interesting)

zyzzx0 (935520) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012680)

1)Find a few people who've been tagged and experiment w/ this RFID tagging system.
2)Develop 3rd party hardware and a web application that integrates w/ the google maps api to pin-point where such a person is.
3)Create a web page called Tommy Thompson Watch that shows exactly where in the world Tommy Thompson is at any given minute! At the very least, Tommy's wife might use the site. Hell, I would... Tommy's a sexy for an old man.

Re:To do list for the tech community (1)

Sancho (17056) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012772)

RFID doesn't work like that unless there are receivers all over the place to send you that information. Or maybe you were just making a joke.

This proves the Flying Spaghetti Monster (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18012774)

The Flying Spaghetti Monster has already created an animal with RFID. Well, close - it was a barcode actually. Anyone heard of the zebra?

In other news... (1)

Gerocrack (979018) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012816)

... A former Bush health secretary has been deported to Mexico for violating his guest worker agreement.

Upgrades (3, Interesting)

boyfaceddog (788041) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012860)

What happens when Microsoft gets into the RFID reading business? The standards in place today will be meaningless. The people with the "fist generation" RFID chips will have to have those removed and upgraded. I can see people with two, three or even four different RFID chips in their arms, legs, foreheads just to make sure all of their info is readable by whoever wants it.

Have we learned nothing from 20 years of consumer electronic devices?

are these 222 (1)

sxtxixtxcxh (757736) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012914)

the first of three?

I've seen this before (1)

jeffeb3 (1036434) | more than 7 years ago | (#18012954)

I saw an article (I can't remember where, sorry for the hearsay) about someone modding their keyboard with an RFID reader, and he programmed it to the codes of the RFID he already had injected under his skin. This must be something different though, because he had two different types and they were both relatively inexpensive, nothing over $100.

I really don't see a problem with this so long as it's provided without persuasion. I don't want to have to get one with my costco membership or anything like that, and I don't want the gov't putting it in, but if it's just an easy injection (no surgery) and it would make my life easier (I wouldn't ever need my wallet) then I'd be all for it. It would be nice to be able to deactivate it, but that would sort of ruin it wouldn't it? I could probably ruin it by swinging my arm over the counter at Circuit city anyway.

I have one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18013002)

Implanted in my wrist. Am I afraid of being tracked everywhere I go? No the distance this thing broadcasts is only a couple of inches. Implanting was pretty easy too, 1 peircing needle through the wrist then just pushed the rice sized chip through the hole, I forget it's there most of the time but you can feel it if your rub your finger across the back of my wrist. Still haven't really made much use of it though but I've got enough ideas that when I have time I'll be implementing.

Jurassic Park (1)

no_pets (881013) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013102)

Wasn't something like this done in Jurassic Park? It was proven ineffective as all of the tagged and monitored dinosaurs were accounted for. Too bad there were others that were not tagged. Untagged or unchipped terrorists would be the ones to lookout for. Although I'm more worried about chippers than the chippees.

Re:Jurassic Park (3, Funny)

AutopsyReport (856852) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013204)

Wasn't something like this done in Jurassic Park? It was proven ineffective as all of the tagged and monitored dinosaurs were accounted for.

Well I know that America has an obesity problem, but comparing yourselves to dinosaurs...

coming to the UK soon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18013110)

This is eerily familiar territory in the UK. The government has decided that everyone in the country will have to have a biometric ID card by 2013 - this will allow all sorts of (largely discredited) benefits. Inevitably this will lead to the compulsory carrying of the card with the same effect as the rfid chip. - In fact if the UK government reads this article the new ID system could well move to this (we already have electronic tagging for some). Already the country has been described as a 'police state for moslems' by someone who has been arrested without any evidence or resulting charges, it is only a matter of time before this is passed on to the rest of the population.

The price of liberty is the price of a ticket out of the country - can I emigrate to the US before they bring in the same sort of system?

(posted as anonymous coward out of fear of the state)

"Beep-Beep"? It must be Earth humor! (3, Interesting)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013152)

"During the war, I was in my world's warrior class. We saved each other's lives a dozen times over."

"Commendable! But what does that have to do with..."

"With nanotechnology? Glad you asked! You've heard of it, haven't you? Machines too small for the human eye to see? You can even shield them, make them invisible to electronic detection. Like the one you just swallowed in that drink. I imagine it's firmly latched on to your intestinal tract by now."

"What??!"

"Oh, it's nothing harmful, Ambassador! It's a location transmitter."

[He points a pen-like device at him and presses a button. A light flashes and it emits a "beep-beep".]

"See? It should dissolve in about... five years. But until then, Ambassador, my friends in my warrior caste have this frequency. And if anything should happen to [this place], they have instructions to track down that transmitter and... well, why spoil the surprise?"

"This is an outrage!"

"This is insurance. What you do here is your own business. You can scheme, and plan, and play all the games you want, but get this straight. If you ever endanger this [place] again, my people will find you. And the results will be most unpleasant."

"I'd say he took that pretty well. Think they'll ever find that transmitter you slipped [him]?"

"No... because there isn't one."

"There isn't? Wait --"

"I lied. I figured if there were a transmitter, sooner or later they'd find it and remove it. But if I just told them there was, they'd keep looking! Indefinitely!"

"Commander, do you have any idea of the tests they'll put him through, the things they'll do to him trying to find a transmitter that's not there?"

"Yes."

222? (-1, Redundant)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013168)

Wasnt that 666?

Why this can be a good thing (2, Insightful)

DoubleEdd (178052) | more than 7 years ago | (#18013170)

People have asked why it's not better to just have a bracelet, ID in your wallet, or whatever. Here's why I'd like one so that a paramedic or whoever can get the info they need about me.

Two reasons:
1) I cannot leave home without it. I can't go anywhere without it, and as importantly, I can go anywhere with it. I can go to the pool and if I have some medical emergency it won't matter that my wallet is in the locker or whatever. If you're a parent, your kid can't choose to leave it behind (and if you're wondering why they might want to leave their ID behind see point 2)
2) It actually preserves your privacy. Sure, someone with an RFID scanner might spot get some serial ID number, but without access to a corresponding database they don't get my medical info. There are tracking issues, but they're minor. On the other hand, anyone who sees I've got some bracelet on immediately knows I have some medical condition, and they don't need to be scanning for RFID to tell that.

The sooner some of us have the option to get these the better.

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