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US Group Wants Canada Blacklisted Over Piracy

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the are-you-on-the-list dept.

The Internet 585

An anonymous reader writes "Following up on an earlier story, the IIAA wants to add Canada to a blacklist of the worst intellectual property offenders. A powerful coalition of U.S. software, movie and music producers is urging the Bush administration to put Canada on an infamous blacklist of intellectual property villains, alongside China, Russia and Belize. 'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections', the International Intellectual Property Alliance complains in a submission to the U.S. government."

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585 comments

tiny microchips (4, Funny)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018162)

As opposed to those huge microchips you get from Intel.

Re:tiny microchips (1)

pak9rabid (1011935) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018534)

Looks like Cory and Trevor are up to no good again. Tis a shame too. I liked getting my single cigarettes and bootleg movies from their convenient store...

Cue the music (5, Funny)

esampson (223745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018172)

Oh, sure.
 

Blame Canada

Re:Cue the music (0, Redundant)

Oriumpor (446718) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018208)

...
Liane: And my boy Eric once
Had my picture on his shelf
But now when I see him he tells me to fuck myself!
Sheila: Well, blame Canada
Everyone: Blame Canada
Sheila: It seems that everything's gone wrong
Since Canada came along
Everyone: Blame Canada
Blame Canada
Copy Guy: They're not even a real country anyway ...

Re:Cue the music (4, Insightful)

antarctican (301636) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018256)

I just fail to understand why we should care (from a Canadian point of view). Why should we let the Americans control our internal policy?

I'm offended and frankly would be extremely angry if Canada bowed to this pressure.

Re:Cue the music (5, Informative)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018540)

Well then, make sure your MP knows that you do not support the actions of the current heritage minister Bev Oda. As the person who sets policy for copyright in Canada she has been cught accepting large sums of money ('campaign funding') from American entertainment companies. At the same time, she has refused to meet with almost any groups who represent actual Canadaian artists. Michael Geist has some great reporting on the issue. Check out http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/1564/ [michaelgeist.ca] and http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/1529/ [michaelgeist.ca] to start, but there is much more there.

Re:Cue the music (5, Insightful)

narrowhouse (1949) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018568)

Really that is exactly the point, some industries would like as many countries as possible to have almost identical copyright and patent policies. Lately those industries have had the most luck influencing U.S. law so they have decided to make those laws the template. It isn't the "Americans" that are pushing this, it is a collection of huge corporations that are trying to keep from having to fight the same court battles over and over. If they can convince the U.S. government to pressure other countries to bring their laws "in line" with the U.S. laws they make their own lives a lot easier. If Canada keeps it's own laws it will be a force these industries have to deal with directly, if Canada bows to pressure they fade into the background, another "me too" country they never have to work with. Australia should think about that too.

Re:Cue the music (5, Insightful)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018656)

More to the point from my perspective as an American, most of the companies involved in this are not American, or even based in the United States. Personally, the very idea of our political leaders accepting bribes^H^H^H^H^H^Hcompaign contributions from foreign interests in exchange for modifications to our legal system smacks of high treason. Of course, that doesn't make this any less the responsibility of the citizenry of this country to fix ... as soon as we figure out how. Voting doesn't seem to work so well anymore.

When George W. Bush says jump.... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018590)

Stephen Harper's only response is "how high?".

Re:Cue the music (1)

bdr529 (1063398) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018594)

Ever hear of TRIPS and the WTO? You should be angry and offended that Canada would be involved with that... not that the US wants them to follow it.

Re:Cue the music (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018402)

It is looking more and more like Bush will have to invade Canada sooner or later.

Those pink cheeked maple syrup slurping monsters are economic terrorists! Bush said the USA can and will go after ALL terrorists!

I realize it's not the fault of every Canadian, well maybe every French-Canadian, but America has to stand up for its interests! It would be prudent if you live near a radical Canadian, or a French-Canadian, you should move. Sooner or later a cruise missile is going to lay down some smack down and you don't want to become collateral damage.

Re:Cue the music (5, Interesting)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018488)

The funny part is that until the 1970s it was the US that was the "rogue" nation on the international blacklist (and even had the gall to be proud of it), because it still held somewhat to the quaint ideas delineated in the Bill of Rights which are antithetical to a "guild" system of intellectual property.

Europe is the crucible from which "modern" (it's really fuedal, thus old fashioned, but what the hell. Nobody remembers anything before last Thursday anyway) copyright law was cast, but it's the converts that are almost always the biggest PITA fanatics; especially if there's money and power in it for them.

KFG

Tough choice (4, Insightful)

Dorceon (928997) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018200)

  1. Copyright Law
  2. Business Model
Modernize one.

Re:Tough choice (4, Insightful)

antarctican (301636) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018324)

Indeed. I fail to see how outlawing fair use and dual-use pieces of technology is "modernization."

Actually, that would be not too bad. (5, Interesting)

alexandreracine (859693) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018378)

Let's say Canada is on the black list. Then all countries on the black list would only do business togeter and not with the US anymore. Would the US make that mistake? Stoping billions in profits just for some millions lost? That would be so funny (MPAA, etc, shooting themself in the foot). But that would proove a point. When Canada and all others would be on the list, and music and movies would still be on the net, it is at that time, that the shooting in the foot would begin.

Are you talking about US? (1)

openright (968536) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018608)

Perhaps an obvious question. Are you talking about the US here?

Meaning:

1. Modernize Copyright Law - Move away from the Printing press model (Absolute monopoly control of publishing, near-infinite terms, using "DRM" to maintain old model), and towards an Internet model (Information is less restricted, business models must adjust). Meaning shorter copyright monopoly terms, less restrictions, allow non-profit duplication.
2. Business Model - Duplication happens. Abandon DRM. Listen to customer, rather than criminalize. Innovate with new works, rather than trying so hard to milk old ones.

They are part of *that* lot. (4, Funny)

stimpleton (732392) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018204)

A friend and I have discussed whether Canada is part of the Axis of Evil.

We concurred Yes. And reading this article just confirmed it, eh?

Re:They are part of *that* lot. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018370)

No dude. Wrong axis. Canada is the Axis of Eh-vil.

Re:They are part of *that* lot. (1)

cobrajk (1002829) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018394)

And don't forget France. The French don't like me saying "Axis of Evil", so guess what? They're now a part of the very same Axis of Evil that they don't like me saying. How do you like them apples, France? Next time, you keep your mouth shut. Will Ferrel on SNL

The release is backwards (5, Insightful)

davmoo (63521) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018216)

Apparently the editors of that press release got it backwards...its the US that has a "copyright regime". What they meant to say was Canada has "realistic and fair copyright laws, and we cannot accept that".

Re:The release is backwards (1)

Oracle of Bandwidth (528405) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018302)

I thought Canada has signed the International IP treaty. They may be better than the us, but that's far from reasonable and fair.

Re:The release is backwards (4, Insightful)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018532)

What they meant to say was Canada has "realistic and fair copyright laws, and we cannot accept that".

Yeah, paying a tax on all recordable media is really fair.

LK

Re:The release is backwards (1)

gamer4Life (803857) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018572)

What they meant to say was Canada has "realistic and fair copyright laws, and we cannot accept that".


More realistic and fair.

They're still nowhere close to being fair.

in other words (4, Insightful)

President_Camacho (1063384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018218)

'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections'

Translation: "We have a stranglehold on the music and movie industries, we want control over video game consoles, as well."

Re:in other words (5, Insightful)

grcumb (781340) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018372)

'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections'

Translation: "We have a stranglehold on the music and movie industries, we want control over video game consoles, as well."

No, a better translation would be:

The Conservative government needs a stick to shake at the Canadian public in order to cow them into accepting a digital media market that is more conducive to the desires of their corporate master. Conveniently, the media associations and their government cronies are happy to provide one.

Blank media tax? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018220)

Don't they pay a blank media tax, effectively giving them free reign to copy to their heart's content? Sounds like the IIAA wants to have their cake, and eat it too.

Re:Blank media tax? (1)

dtfinch (661405) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018630)

It's only for audio, very little of the money collected reaches copyright owners (much less the recording artists themselves), and fair distribution of the money is pretty much impossible.

I speak for all Canadians... (4, Insightful)

abscissa (136568) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018226)

... and all other people of the world, when I say that we just LOVE having Americans try to police us and control our affairs!

Re:I speak for all Canadians... (1)

Overunity (1064286) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018284)

We may be Canadian (myself included) and although I agree with you 100% I can't help but feel that it's just a matter of time until we bow to the Americans demands, hell I'm surprised that we've held out on the softwood debate for so long.

I speak for all Canadians...soft is better. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018322)

"I can't help but feel that it's just a matter of time until we bow to the Americans demands, hell I'm surprised that we've held out on the softwood debate for so long."

You want your "wood" to be soft?

Re:I speak for all Canadians...soft is better. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018550)

Zonk's wood is always soft.

OH NOS!!! (4, Funny)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018228)

Don't put us on your list! Whatever will we do if you put our countries name on a list? I mean I might fly to another country and the people there could say "Hey! That guys country is on a LIST! Kill him!"

It could, and probably will, happen.

Horray for scapegoats! (1)

pifactorial (1000403) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018238)

I'm from Canada and living in America, and I can't vouch scientifically on this issue, but I've seen absolutely no difference in the "copyright violation culture" between the two countries. The only difference I know is that copying music isn't actually illegal in Canada, so is maybe slightly more likely to happen, but again... I haven't seen a difference.

The MAFIAA is just looking for more lives to ruin, to make it look like they're "winning the battle" on their home turf.

The Globe and Mail - a humour paper (2, Insightful)

sugarmotor (621907) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018244)

The article about "blacklisting Canada" appears on the front page of the same paper, the Globe and Mail.

On the same page is another article, "For today's family, time's not on their side -- Hectic schedules, longer work weeks contribute to less togetherness than in 80s".

All right, say it again - both of these are on the front page of the Globe and Mail!

That's why I call it a "humour paper". (However, the National Post is actually funnier!)

Stephan

Great.... (1)

ReTay (164994) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018250)

As an American is it too late to hope that the Canadian government will extend the finger to the south?

Re:Great.... (1)

dryeo (100693) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018598)

Not with our current government (our current Prime Minister worships George W. Bush) though the fact that right now they have a minority government will slow them down.
What is really scary is if in the next election they win a majority.

Re:Great.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018618)

Why? You do a great job giving it to yourselves.

Where's David Wilkins Now??? (4, Insightful)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018260)

David Wilkins ( US Ambassador to Canada), who states that Canada doesn't dictate US policy should now go put his head back in his ass. Read about Maher Arar and the ass hattery that came out of David Wilkins mouth.

If Canada doesn't dictate US policy, so too should the US not concern themselves with Canadian policies.

Next step? Invade? Or read an opposing view. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018264)

Seriously, everyone just needs to sit back and read http://www.michaelgeist.ca/ [michaelgeist.ca] to get some balance to the story

As a Canadian to Bush (0, Flamebait)

McGiraf (196030) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018268)

Fuck You!

This is just pressure and propanganda to help Harper pass a law to make all the big media corporation happy.

The worst part it's that is probably gonna work ...

Canada should put the USA on some kind of a rogue counties list , for terrorism, meddling in the internal affairs of other countries, being way too fat and making crappy movies.

Whatever.

I wouldn't worry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018616)

"The worst part it's that is probably gonna work ..."

I wouldn't worry about that.

Harper is only one non-confidence vote away from an election where his position on the environment will be one of the deciding factors. And both leading Republican contenders for 2008 lean significantly to the left of Bush.

The xIAA crowd just have to be shitting in their pants over this. Voters are not likely to help them get friendly administrations in the next few elections. And if they miss the current window of opportunity for forcing the issue, the next time it comes around, it may not matter.

Besides, you shouldn't be categorizing all USians as terrorists just because some of their beliefs are a little strange.

The average USian is hard working, friendly, and is an individual with individual hopes and aspirations just like all of us. It's only a few extremists that are making the rest of them look bad.

As an American to Bush (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018622)

Fuck You!

My Favorite quote (5, Interesting)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018278)

"The problem of unauthorized camcording of films in Canadian theatres is now nearing crisis levels," the group complained.

Crisis levels? People are dying?

No, it's a fucking camcorder recording of a hollywood movie. All the bad things about watching the movie in the theator in the privacy of your own home.

If this is really a problem, it's because the movies suck and early word getting out about how bad the movie is is hurting sales. Simple solution to that; Stop making crap movies.

Re:My Favorite quote (1)

penguinbrat (711309) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018588)

Well, it's a crisis for their wallet - I will occasionally pull down a movie to see if the $100 for 2 hours of entertainment between the theaters and the DVD is worth it or not, the video cam versions leave a lot to be desired in matters of quality, but they do get the point across whether the movie in question is worth it or not. Those crazy Canadians saved me *MY* wallet when it came to the Starwars trilogy and a few others, yay Canada!

Blame Canada! (1)

amigabill (146897) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018280)

I hope we get a Southpark episode out of this.

It'd be funny of countries with rational copyright laws put the USA on some moral rights blackist next to China and friends because we're an evil country run by tyrants who value the dollar far more than the citizens.

Most likely... (1)

hindumagic (232591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018286)

it is just more pressure for Canada to enact the stupid copyright stance that the States are pushing every other country to take via free trade agreements and other means (i.e. Australia). Unfortunately, they're not having much traction in Canada who already have good trade agreements in place with the States.

Rogers (1, Insightful)

elzurawka (671029) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018296)

I don't know if any of you have noticed, but in the GTA rogers has as of about 2 weeks ago began to heavily block Bittorrent. To the point where random port + encryption does not even work anymore for me and some other friends. Has anyone else had this problem? Do you know how to fix it? It still connects to the tracker, and NAT is green in azureus, but the upspeed and downspeed will not go over 10, if at all. Before i was getting almost 700 Kb/s.

Maybe they don't have anything to worry about after all.

Re:Rogers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018434)

Why is this off Topic? Bittorrent is used for piracy. This article is about piracy. Rogers is one of the largest ISP's in Canada. Rogers is not aggressively throtteling Bittorrent. US group says Canada is not doing enough to stop piracy. I think its at least a little bit on topic.

Re:Rogers (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018506)

Maybe select port 22 as your torrent port? If they start blocking that, a LOT of tech-savvy people (who use SSH) are going to start complaining about degradation of service....

...or, you could switch to Bell.

"Chronic failure", you say? (2, Interesting)

Mr. Samuel (950418) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018298)

I'm not educated about this issue, but what if it's actually a chronically different ideology that prevents Canadians (I am one of them) from adapting American-style anti-consumer laws.

They should start exporting their smokes north (4, Insightful)

whitehatlurker (867714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018312)

FTFA:

The problem of unauthorized camcording of films in Canadian theatres is now nearing crisis levels

What is a "crisis level" for camcorders in movie theatres? Is that where the people behind you start attacking you for using a camera that makes too much noise (or gives off too much light, or what)?

Nonetheless, if this sanction was imposed, Canada could retaliate by putting the Yanks on the list of countries to whom they won't export oil or uranium. Then the Americans would have to nicer to Chavez ... (This won't happen. By "this" I mean Canada blocking energy exports. The Canadians put up with a lot.)

Piracy is a problem with video games? (5, Informative)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018330)

You mean the industry that rakes in more than the movie and music industries ... COMBINED?

You mean the one that rakes in more and more profits each year?

Yeah, piracy is just SUCH a problem, crippling that industry...

And Canada doesn't need any new policy since it's already a civil offence to violate the copyright of another.

Re:Piracy is a problem with video games? (1)

nuzak (959558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018490)

> You mean the industry that rakes in more than the movie and music industries ... COMBINED?

I keep seeing this figure tossed about, but I simply do not believe it. Just to compare, Disney's Net income for 2006 was bigger than EA's entire gross revenues.

Re:Piracy is a problem with video games? (2, Insightful)

QRDeNameland (873957) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018654)

Don't forget about porn, which accounts for something like 60% of all P2P traffic. By far, porn is the most pirated form of IP, yet does not seem to be in any danger of disappearing.

Height of ignorance & arogance (5, Insightful)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018332)

"failure to modernize its copyright regime" ??

Canada's copyright system is MORE modern then the US. Common sense tells us that there is no difference "If I loan a CD to a friend to listen to", or "make a copy for him to listen to." I guess we should ban libraries too since the artist is not getting "his fair share."

Copyright & Intellectual Property Rights (which are neither property nor rights) are artificial rights from a world where only people care about greed, instead of sharing knowledge.

What price do you put on a patent that could cure cancer? Why is it OK to profit off the sick & dying? Have we really made that little progress in the past million years, that we still cry & whine like a 2 year saying "mine" -- simply because we were the first to come up with an idea, that we could care less about our fellow human beings??

Copyright: Because it's _such_ a crime against humanity, that people want to share what they find entertaining with others, for free!

--
Because its easier to get mod'd down for having the courage to look at the facts, then ignore Forgotten Christian History [peopleofhonoronly.com].

Re:Height of ignorance & arogance (1)

esampson (223745) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018436)

Common sense tells us that there is no difference "If I loan a CD to a friend to listen to", or "make a copy for him to listen to."

If that were really the case then why make a copy? Just loan your friend the CD.

Re:Height of ignorance & arogance (0)

Chandon Seldon (43083) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018586)

If that were really the case then why make a copy? Just loan your friend the CD.

And then have to worry about them remembering to return it?

Sure, the difference is "only" convenience, but - contrary to the belief of certain Slashdot trolls - there's nothing wrong with making things easier for yourself. The realities of technology are such that making a copy of a CD for a friend is trivially easy. The belief that anyone even has a right to know that you've done so, much less to prevent it, is absurd. I own the CD, I own the blank CD, I own the burner, it's in my house, what I do with my property on my property - including giving the burned CD to a friend - is my business.

So would that mean... (1)

thepacketmaster (574632) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018336)

"chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections". So would that mean Canada is the "Land of the Free and the home of the Brave" ;-)

What!? (1)

Ben Feldman (1064312) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018344)

I'm part Canadian. I like Canada.

I think in this case, our government and this group need to realize that just because Canada doesn't have the same "super-duper" piracy "prevention" (if you want to call it that) as America does (remember, we're the one with almost trillions of dollars in our yearly budget) shouldn't mean that we need to "blacklist" Canada.

Why is Canada singled out? (3, Informative)

Cocoshimmy (933014) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018352)

Canada isn't the only nation with slack copyright laws. What about, say Romania, which publically declared [theinquirer.net] that they built their country on piracy. Or for example Sweden which hasn't been cracking down on piracy either?

But that is besides the point. This is just yet another attempt by a US lobby to try to use the US government to boss Canada around.

An Island of Sanity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018358)

"Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime"

We should all stand and sing a stanza of "O Canada" in honour of an island of sanity in a world gone copyright-mad.

Let's go over this slowly (5, Interesting)

rumblin'rabbit (711865) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018362)

So they want Bush to blacklist Canada, their biggest trading partner (last I heard), their NATO ally, whose troops are now fighting in Afghanistan against the Taliban, possessor of the second largest petroleum reserves in the world, and whose government is one of the very few who are not overtly hostile to the Bush administration?


Over video games?

Cool.

Re:Let's go over this slowly (3, Insightful)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018582)

So they want Bush to blacklist Canada, their biggest trading partner (last I heard), their NATO ally, whose troops are now fighting in Afghanistan against the Taliban, possessor of the second largest petroleum reserves in the world, and whose government is one of the very few who are not overtly hostile to the Bush administration?

Over video games?

Cool.


Just wait until they come to "liberate" you from your outdated copyright regime.

Biggest trading partner? Haliburton is ready to take over that.
NATO ally? Pay attention to how well they treat their EU allies lately.
Fighting terrorists? So did Saddam, didn't want any religious fundies opposing him.
Oil? And that's a.... con?
Friendly government? Wasn't that a WMD pointing at the US I saw, I'm sure I did.

And the five-year forecast: Civil war between eskimos, quebecois and english-speaking canadians.

Don't these people get a cut from each DVD burner (1)

melted (227442) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018364)

Don't these people get a cut from each DVD burner and disk sold in Canada? WTF are they complaining about then?

So What? (1)

Captain0Flash (1016826) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018382)

What exactly would this change between Canada/US relations? Is it just a matter of sales across the border? Why should Canada give a damn? I've always maintained that my enemies' insults really can't harm me, it's my friends that matter.

Turn off Canada's oil taps (1)

jstan (1064318) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018390)

America's chronic failure to modernize its foreign policy has made it a global terror for endless wars, senseless violence and tiny microchips that allow big box stores to bypass individual privacy.

Re:Turn off Canada's oil taps (1)

frasmage (1064320) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018508)

This sounds a lot like one of those trivial issues that gets really played up before an election or the like to make it seem like the party is really making progress pushing this "pressing issue", all the while forgetting what is really important. There are so many problems in the US and abroad at the moment that are far more pressing than copyright infringement. However they worry more about their pocketbooks than, say, the environment, drugs, diseases, the senseless death in Iraq etc. You don't get any sympathy over this issue until the important stufff is fixed.

No desert until you finish your dinner.

Another thing, why is it always the overly-rich corporates that complain about this kind of thing. Its not like it is really their own intellectual property anyways. Maybe it would make sense if the artists themselves actually stated how much this is hurting them... but wait it isn't.

Re:Turn off Canada's oil taps (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018584)

Canada would never turn off the oil... just charge more for it... and for electricity and water, for that matter. If the US slaps WIPO-illegal sanctions and tariffs on Canada, Canada can just do the same back.

Canada would probably do better trading with Russia and China than with the US nowadays anyway.

Wow (1)

Hercules Peanut (540188) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018410)

Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections'
I know where I'm going for vacation. Thanks for the tip IIAA.

treaty obligations? (4, Interesting)

j1m+5n0w (749199) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018420)

It would be interesting to know just what Canada's obligations are under the Berne convention [wikipedia.org] or any other IP treaties they may have signed. Is this just a bunch of large corporations whining that the rights they think they ought to have aren't universally recognized, or is Canada actually breaking a treaty obligation? Or is the Berne convention sufficiently vague that both sides can plausibly believe they are right? What if a country doesn't want to participate in the Berne convention or trips [wikipedia.org] anymore? (The US didn't sign on until 1989, now we're trying to force our IP laws on everyone else.)

Modernize ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018438)

"'Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime has made it a global hub for bootleg movies, pirated software and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections', "

sed -e "s/modernize/mimic/"

I guess that says it all.

Let's start adding them up... (5, Funny)

Kjella (173770) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018444)

...but I don't know where to start, by size or notority.

SE Asia is pretty much one big pool of piracy all around.
China is a huge one, they don't seem to care about IP at all.
Ukraine seems to be the most fucked up of the former Soviets.
Russia isn't far behind, with allofmp3 and all.
All the remaining ex-Soviet states are notorious too.
East europe in general has a long track record of piracy.
West europe got the fastest lines and places like The Pirate Bay.
South America is quite rampant too, last I checked.
Australia banned the region coding crap, didn't they?

Anyone know if the Middle East and Africa qualifies? Haven't heard much but I bet they do. Now they want to add Canada to this "exclusive" list? I have a much simpler proposition: Take the list of countries. Remove US and maybe their pet dog, UK. The remainder is their list of copyright villains.

Middle eastern Copyright (2, Interesting)

gallondr00nk (868673) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018602)

Anyone know if the Middle East and Africa qualifies?

Certainly not in Iraq. One of the first things Paul Bremer and the Coalition Provisional Authority introduced in the tatters of a starving nation back in 2003 was the implementation of US Copyright laws.

Possibly the first time a country was invaded for it's lax copyright laws. Watch out Canada!

Copyright or Oil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018446)

At some point, the US is going to realize that Canada (mostly Alberta) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_reserves#Canada [wikipedia.org] has the second largest oil reserves in the world, and the largest reserves that are not in the Middle East. At some point, Canada is going to tell interventionist/protectionist American politicians what they can do and where they can go.

Canada ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018462)

"Too close to ignore, too white to invade" - Ce message de Bloc Québécois. =)

I can see this as only good. (5, Funny)

Lordpidey (942444) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018470)

By allowing pirates within their shores, Canada is surely helping alleviate global warming. I thank them.

Anyone have a dictionary? (1)

A Guy From Ottawa (599281) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018478)

Canada's chronic failure to modernize its copyright regime...

Modernize? Is that American for "destroy", or "bend over and spread 'em for big business"?

This Means? (1)

BCW2 (168187) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018482)

If the Canadiens have managed to piss off this group of self important twits, then my hats off to my cousins to the north!

I think (5, Insightful)

AlphaLop (930759) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018500)

As an American Citizen I really hope Canada Man's up and tells the USA to go screw itself. America needs to worry more about the problems we have at home and less on other countries internal politics when they are not a threat to the U.S.'s safety.

To the best of my knowledge, copyright infringement going on in other countries in no way affects our safety (besides the weak "it funds terrorists" argument that seems to be the defacto excuse for everything around here anymore).

The only people that would benefit from the massive expense and sacrifice of civil liberty that would be necessary to enact such a stupid idea would be the media fat cats..... And they can go and (insert witty thing here) themselves for all I care.

Michael Geist (4, Interesting)

alexandre (53) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018556)

Take a look at Michael Geist [michaelgeist.ca]'s blog... he's the Lawrence Lessig of Canada.

This message proudly paid by a Montreal Pirate! (whatever that means ;)

i dont normally reply to these things.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018558)

but like, frickin' pick one:

black-list us and force us to buy content, and go after every infringer with all the legal power you have - or -

take off the damn CD-R levies that sheila copps was so kind to bestow upon us so many years ago.

Douches! Cake. Eat. Pick one.

If you're already calling us theives by attaching levies to products and media, WTF do you expect?

~spoonie

What about US SPAM ? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018562)

Would the US be happy if other countries blacklisted them because they are the number 1 SPAM source ?

Just remember.. (1)

JohnnyOpcode (929170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018566)

We Canadians are nuclear-capable, and we're getting filthy rich selling you oil & water. We won't have to take this shit for much longer because we are headed to become the next super-power. Payback is going to be a bitch!

I would like to add USA to a list... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18018596)

... of countries supporting terrorism.

Why not ?
There are "rampant" animal rights groups and anit-abortions groups that blow up people and buildings...

Same relevance. Different name.

Oh Put A Sock In It (5, Informative)

The Real Nem (793299) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018628)

The last article was completely overblown, and this is even worse.

Once put on notice, failure to address U.S. concerns could result in trade challenges at the World Trade Organization, plus possible sanctions.

Need I even go into the many ways the US has violated [www.cbc.ca] our free trade agreement. How are different copyright laws even a violation?

...and tiny microchips that allow video-game users to bypass copyright protections...

Maybe because the copyright protections violate our basic copyright freedoms? There's no DMCA here.

The industry paints a grim picture of Canada as a country where copyright pirates operate with impunity because of lax laws, poor enforcement and a laissez-faire attitude.

In case you haven't noticed, we're lax in all areas of law. How has incarceration [wikipedia.org] helped to reduce US crime rates [fbi.gov]? Why should copyright violation be a criminal offense? The last article was even so bold to say:

Frith says government bureaucrats try to placate him by saying that under the Copyright Act exhibitors have the ability to charge someone criminally. "But here's the catch. Under the Copyright Act, you have to prove that an individual camcording in the theatre is doing it for distribution purposes. That's almost impossible."

So camcording is a criminal offense, you just have to, shock, prove your case rather than assume guilt. I guess this article is *technically* right when it says:

Unlike in the United States and most other developed countries, videotaping movies in theatres is not illegal in Canada.

What else did they complain about proving?

We don't want to have to prove the economic loss from distribution. We want it to be a Criminal Code activity to be caught camcording. Period.

Is that 15th century thinking I hear? Are they going to blacklist every liberal country?

"Highly organized international-crime groups have rushed into the gap left by Canada's outmoded copyright law and now use the country as a springboard from which to undermine legitimate markets in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and elsewhere," the group said.

Please, the UK and Australia wouldn't even have these type of laws if the US and *AA and friends hadn't strong armed them into it. Are these the only shinning examples they can find?

Can we nominate the U.S.? (1)

MMC Monster (602931) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018634)

Frankly, the list should be indexed by the per capita income in the country. In which case, the U.S. would be at the top of the list.

Everyone sing along~ /o/ (1)

SaidinUnleashed (797936) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018640)

Sheila: Times have changed
Our kids are kids are getting worse
They won't obey their parents
They just want to fart and curse!
Sharon: Should we blame the government?
Liane: Or blame society?
Dads: Or should we blame the images on TV?
Sheila: No! Blame Canada
Everyone: Blame Canada
Sheila: With all their beady little eyes
And flappin' heads so full of lies
Everyone: Blame Canada!
Blame Canada!
Sheila: We need to form a full assault
Everyone: It's Canadas fault!
Sharon: Don't blame me
For my son Stan
He saw the darn cartoon
And now he's off to join the Klan!
Liane: And my boy Eric once
Had my picture on his shelf
But now when I see him he tells me to myself!
Sheila: Well, blame Canada
Everyone: Blame Canada
It seems that everything's gone wrong
Since Canada came along!
Everyone: Blame Canada!
Blame Canad!a
Some Guy: They're not even a real country, anyway
Ms. McCormick: My son could've been a doctor or a lawyer rich and true
Instead he burned up like a piggy on a barbecue
Everyone: Should we blame the matches?
Should we blame the fire?
Or the doctors who allowed him to expire?
Sheila: Heck no!
Everyone: Blame Canada
Blame Canada
Sheila: With all their hockey hubbabaloo
Liane: And that bitch Anne Murray too
Everyone: Blame Canada!
Shame on Canada
The we must stop
The trash we must smash
Laughter and fun
must all be undone
We must blame them and cause a fuss
Before someone thinks of blaming us!

---

Such a catchy tune!

Funny the lefties are pissing off Canada! (1)

CitX (1048990) | more than 7 years ago | (#18018650)

Looks like the left in hollywood are acting up now that it is hurting their income.
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