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higher expectations? (4, Interesting)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225940)

like good grammar? FTA: . Reading Log - children should be reading a minimum of 15 every night.

Um. 15 what?

Ballpark estimate: 15 minutes (4, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225952)

Given the order of magnitude of what is expected of my little cousins, the 15 probably refers to 15 minutes.

Re:Ballpark estimate: 15 minutes (5, Funny)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226142)

Given how some people are when they finish school it's probably more like 15 sentences.

Or 15 minutes, whichever comes first.

Re:higher expectations? (2, Funny)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225954)

boy there are some real gems in there:

8. Special Projects - occasionally there will be projects that the children will work on at home with instructions as to when they need to come back to class.

Teacher, teacher can I have a special project so I don't have to come back to school until it's done?

Re:higher expectations? (4, Funny)

Rakshasa Taisab (244699) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226028)

Teacher, teacher can I have a special project so I don't have to come back to school until it's done?

Sure brat, just make sure you don't write anything that takes me more than 15 seconds to correct.

Re:higher expectations? (2, Funny)

FreeUser (11483) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226070)

Um. 15 what?

Fifteen words. To go with their fifteen second attention span, and their fifteen minutes of fame for being the dumbest of the dumb on the next generation of reality television shows. It could also refer to the resulting IQ of perfectly intelligent people passing through that particular gem of an educational system, after 12 (maybe 15?) years of concentrated dumbing down.

Re:higher expectations? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226096)

Words!

Re:higher expectations? (1)

mikael (484) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226240)

Um. 15 what?

Slashdot article discussions?

Expections? (1)

zigziggityzoo (915650) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225944)

Expections?

Yeah...I want to put my kids in that school. They'll get into Stanford for sure!

No Child Left Behind (5, Insightful)

antirelic (1030688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226106)

If http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml/ [ed.gov] wasnt bad enough to push the stress limits of an already completely fucked up education system, lets throw in some wild theories about whats causing stress in todays children. Maybe it isnt "homework" but the straight from school to the factory education model we use to teach children today. I've had the unfortunate experience of working as a corrections officer and a factory worker, and I can tell you that there are frightening similiarities between the three. The problem that is well known about the education system is its inability to let children accel at their own pace, when in fact, all the current system does is keep the smartest right in line with the dumbest. At least back in the day before political correctness, the dumb ass of the class was left way behind and the rest were forced to rise to an artificial standard... today we have "No Child Left Behind".... I cant wait for the re-runs "Ow my Balls"...

Re:No Child Left Behind (4, Funny)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226174)

Maybe it isnt "homework" but the straight from school to the factory education model we use to teach children today.

Let's first try criticizing something that doesn't give us as many cheap laborers. I mean, you're threatening someone's bottom line there, you communist.


Note for the humor-impaired: The above post was satire pointed at the legal system being systematically fucked over to increase corporate profits.

Re:Expections? (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226486)

I believe the teacher was trying to spell "expectorations", as it is important to know how to spit properly.

Expections (3, Insightful)

leamanc (961376) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225956)

I'd be pulling my child out of that school with their "expections," not only due to their poor grammar, but also for their militant view on homework. Or maybe things have just changed a lot since I was in grade school.

Re:Expections (3, Interesting)

Macka (9388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226108)


Lucky you. You obviously have the luxury where you live of being able to choose which school your kid goes to, and have a wealth of choices available so you can move him/her from school to school at a whim.

I'm not sure either that your kid would thank you for flipping his/her learning and social life on it's head so quickly.

Re:Expections (3, Insightful)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226398)

I'm not sure either that your kid would thank you for flipping his/her learning and social life on it's head so quickly.

We military brats did/do it all the time, every 2-4 years... What, your kid's head will explode if he/she's faced with a new environment?

Re:Expections (3, Funny)

enharmonix (988983) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226376)

I'd be pulling my child out of that school with their "expections," not only due to their poor grammar, but also for their militant view on homework. Or maybe things have just changed a lot since I was in grade school.
They have. We call it "spelling" now. :P

Cheers.

Re:Expections (1)

HAKdragon (193605) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226528)

...am I missing something? The parent spelled grammar correctly.

Re:Expections (1)

markov_chain (202465) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226562)

*whoosh*

Didn't work when I was in school (5, Funny)

not already in use (972294) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225960)

How come the ol' "My homework is driving me to smoke pot" trick didn't work when I was in school?

Re:Didn't work when I was in school (1)

blakmac (987934) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226102)

I think there's some kind of sub-motive here: to completely destroy the 'my dog at my homework' line. No homework == no doggie snack.

Re:Didn't work when I was in school (4, Funny)

enharmonix (988983) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226406)

I think there's some kind of sub-motive here: to completely destroy the 'my dog at my homework' line. No homework == no doggie snack.
Ahah! Animal cruelty, then! We've got 'em! Somebody call PETA!

Now, I wouldn't ordinarily expect this sort of tactic to work, but this is San Francisco we're talking about...

or perhaps... (0)

blakmac (987934) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225972)

I think a better way to reduce 'student stress' would be to give them more homework, so they 1) become intellegent enough to comprehend a slashdot article and 2) keep them off the streets and in the books where they belong. Another stress reducer: force the kids who bully these poor children to answer CowboyNeal polls until they puke.

Re:or perhaps... (0, Troll)

Deadguy2322 (761832) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226170)

Comprehending the shit that infests this site requires no intelligence, just a herd mentality and sheltered view of the world common to any large gathering of mouth-breathing nerds.

Helicopter Parents (5, Funny)

Brahmastra (685988) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225978)

These helicopter parents whining about homework need to take their kids and shove them up their ass. It looks like they never wanted to release their kids anyway....

Is this a new thing? (4, Insightful)

rlthomps-1 (545290) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225980)

I didn't have homework for most of elementary school. In fact, I remember when we finally did start getting it in the sixth grade, and then it was less than 3 hours a week or so. Is dumping lots of homework on kids these days a new thing or did I just go to some hippie school? I think an important part of my development was to have time to do kids things, and even learn and explore on my own. If I'm spending all my thinking time on the things that they want me to learn, where am I supposed to get any creativity?

Re:Is this a new thing? (4, Interesting)

Zephiria (941257) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226086)

From my experience, homework is used as a tool by bad teachers to teach their lessons. We had the a pretty bad Math's teacher, his idea of teaching was to provide a brief summary and then tell people to just do an entire chapter of problems as homework. Easily 2 hours work, especially as the problems got longer and longer. in my experience the class time broke down to this, 40 mins overall. 5 mins getting the class together, into the class room sorting things out etc 10-15 mins correcting and looking at homework etc. Then say 5 mins explaining something and the last part of the class finally the remainder of the time is spent assigning more homework and people maybe getting one or two of the problems done. The real problem with excessive homework is that people tend not to finish it, and far to much useful class time is eaten up either assigning more or correcting what was assigned the previous few days. Of course if you take my experience and spread it over the other 8 or so subjects we had it ended up being highly stressful and more then anything left a number of people uninterested in the subjects as they became more and more burned out on the subject.

Re:Is this a new thing? (2, Interesting)

wanax (46819) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226242)

I attended several elementary schools. The main one didn't give out homework until 6th grade (Bank Street, NYC), the school I went to in VT (Marion Cross) started giving homework in 3rd grade, the school in Berkeley (Cragmont) had homework in 1st grade, and I briefly went to a school in Bristol, England (Christ Church) that had minimal homework in 1st grade.

Of these schools, only Cragmont had heavy homework loads or emphasis at any point. I think that the problem with that, however is that I never formed the habit of doing homework, and still have difficulty just 'sitting down and doing work.' Homework outside of mathematics and reading is, IMHO of doubtful value until HS, and even then has limited utility. However, forming the habit of being able to sit down and do a set of work that needs to be done on your own time at home is highly useful throughout life.

Re:Is this a new thing? (3, Interesting)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226250)

Well, normally homework is supposed to work like this:

1. The teacher spends N lessons teaching the kids something new (N usually is between 1 and 5)
2. The students get homework repeating what was done in class (It is known that repetition is an important part of learning)
3. The teacher spends N lessons exploring the deeper areas of the current topic (N between 1 and 3)
4. The students get homework that either repeats the new stuff and/or requires them to apply their knowledge to problems that don't follow the scheme seen so far
5. UNTIL test GOTO 3


Some teachers, however, do it like bad university professors:
1. The teacher spends one lesson talking about the subject, boring the students to death
2. The students get a ton of homework where they do the actual learning
3. UNTIL test GOTO 1
...at least the professor has tutors to back him up.

hippie school (2, Interesting)

poptones (653660) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226254)

I think you must have just gone to one of those hippie schools. Like me. You know, one of those schools where they had freaky programs like art and music and history class actually taught something about the constitution. Most young people I meet today not only haven't a clue how a piano works, they seem to have no familiarity with the bill of rights, either.

Re:Is this a new thing? (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226442)

Without reading the article, but going from what I think I see going on...

I have these issues with homework:

1. Giving homework that the child can't do and that the parents have to do for them. (I see this a lot.) (Or that the child will get a bad grade for if they do it on their own.)

2. Homework that will take too long to do properly.

3. Too much too young.

There may be others, but that is off the top of my head.

all the best,

drew

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=zotzbr o&search=Search [youtube.com]

This is pathetic (2, Insightful)

bryan1945 (301828) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225982)

"They already do 6 hours of work in school... can't give them more work... blah blah"

How about we wipe their tushies and tell them they won't have to work hard to make something of themselves? Howabout just have them skip college (whole lotta more school work plus paying work)? Just tell them that a real work day is only about 6 hours, and you never have to take some work home with you, or stay late to finish that work so you don't have to take it home?

Why does it seem that the USA is progressively skimping on education? Is it any wonder that India and Japan (I am sure there are others) are surpassing us in general academic, and therefore work, achievement?

And yes, I graduated high school, got a BSEE, have worked in industry for 5 years, am going for a masters, and I did skim the TFA.

Re:This is pathetic (5, Insightful)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226032)

How about we wipe their tushies and tell them they won't have to work hard to make something of themselves?

Yes I agree, but remember, these are kids, they also have a childhood to live. Performance and the rage to be the first in everything should be something they gradually come to expect as they age, otherwise you get kids that are stressed out, mis-adjusted and nerdy.

What I mean is, there's a balance to find between too much homework, with parents on their kids' back all day long, and lazy kids who don't do jack squat. But at any rate, kids shouldn't be expected to work they butts off like adults do.

Re:This is pathetic (4, Insightful)

hyfe (641811) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226212)

Performance and the rage to be the first in everything should be something they gradually come to expect as they age
.. or never. It's really not a necessicity for a working society for every child to be raised to be a mal-adjusted competition-driven asshole. It's true!

Balance (2, Insightful)

Smackintosh (1009941) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226266)

I agree that balance is key to slowly moving children into the different stages of life, and getting them acclimated to the real world. Ultimately, they will be able to stand on their own as independents.

What I'm curious about, is how have things changed since I was growing up (I'm 35) for an average child, and how much the day-to-day school experience differs from what I was brought up in (I went to private, Catholic schools)?

I will say that I recall having a low work vs. play and recreation ratio in the early years...that gradually changed so that as I matured, I was given more work, more responsibility, and that of course related to homework as well. I mean, I'd get close to nothing in 1st grade...maybe 20-30 minutes of homework in 4/5th grade....then by high school I'd say on average anywhere from none, to 30 minutes to a couple hours each night, depending on the classes I was taking.

The key thing I remember throughout, however, was that from my parents, my teachers, and my peers, there was always an expectation to succeed, to try your hardest, and to do your very best. That environment gave me the support and willingness to push myself harder, and ultimately become a productive and successful person. I think this environment of expectation and support in the different areas (parents, teachers, peers) is key for a young person to develop as individuals and fulfill their potential as people. I think things fall down when there is lack of support in one of those areas, or when the areas don't mesh....particularly from the parent and teacher side.

While I'm at it, I'll also mention that all kids should not only have to do some kind of homework (and get a job when they're old enough...say 12 yrs old)....they should also not all get a trophy just for participating in something. Doing so shows kids that they don't have to work hard for anything, and that they are entitled for no good reason. I think there are way too many parents out there today who think children are somehow adults already, and that they deserve all consideration and entitlement that an adult does....that somehow children possess adult-like intellect and emotions...and that they come out of the womb as 21 year olds. I think this type of parental behavior damages children much more than any possible 'bruising of self-esteem' that everyone seems to concern themselves with these days. It teaches children to become manipulative and difficult.

Re: Well, look at the Up Side... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226534)

otherwise you get kids that are stressed out, mis-adjusted and nerdy

Great! More Slash Dotters!

Bring it On!

Re:This is pathetic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226060)

>Why does it seem that the USA is progressively skimping on education? Is it any wonder that India and Japan (I am sure there are others) are surpassing us in general academic, and therefore work, achievement?

Because getting an education takes work. Work requires personal responsibility, and personal responsibility means that some people might end up worse off than others. Since someone being worse off than someone else would shatter the image that we've built up over the years (Remember the evil business owner in all of those cartoons? Tell me there wasn't more to that than entertainment.), we can't have it. Instead, we must do everything that we can to make sure that no one feels bad about themselves, no matter the cost.

Re:This is pathetic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226072)

If you read TFA, you'd see that the opposition to homework comes mostly from parents in school districts that are performing well. These are typically parents that are *already* actively involved in getting their children a good education, and the addition of (typically) repetitive drone-work isn't doing anything to further educate their children, but is instead just sapping time away from other (sometimes educational) activities. Instead of learning something outside of the curriculum, the kids spend their time doing busy-work to prove they can perform to the same level as the underachieving districts.

Re:This is pathetic (5, Insightful)

timeOday (582209) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226104)

Your comment has a strong tinge of "I had to do it so they should have to do it."
But you ignore a key statement of the article:

"A University of Missouri study found high school students benefit tremendously from homework. In middle school, the results were not as strong, but homework was still found to be beneficial. But on the elementary school level, the same study found homework had no effect on students."

What is your rebuttal? And are you comparing yourself in highschool to kids in elementary?

Personally, I do think life is getting awfully institutionalized. And remember, we're not just talking about what's ideal, but what the state should force upon our kids. School is mandatory.

Re:This is pathetic (1)

Gracenotes (1001843) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226156)

As a student, I hate homework, and am fully aware of our differences in this regard. Homework it one of the reasons that I dislike school. I just don't have the perseverance to answer questions to which I know the answer, or to do calculus problems on paper when I can otherwise do them in 5 seconds by merely looking. I mostly do it anyway. I think that anyone sensible would be disillusioned upon seeing the question

What is the significance of the song "there are no cats in America"?
which, among others in a similar vein, was graded. Yes, work is important. I write essays, do extraordinarily on exams. But the problem with homework is not that it's so much work: the issue is that it's so little, but there's so much of it. In my experience, teachers don't assign homework in order to make students learn, but because they feel that they have to, or if they don't ask us questions such as "What is the symbolic meaning of Glinda in terms of progressivism", they're not doing their job. I would love for you to explain how I could tremendously benefit from that. If a real job consisted of tedious tasks, I would be fine keeping it. But this is just over the edge.

Re:This is pathetic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226326)

Perhaps this is part of a bigger problem where the system has become student-centered, where all the attention must be given to the student, and a student can do no wrong -- therefore it is the teachers responsibility to do miracles even when students slack.

In such situations the assignment of homework is merely to cover their ass, or to give them the facilities to justify the grade.

Re:This is pathetic (1)

427_ci_505 (1009677) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226462)

But on the elementary school level, the same study found homework had no effect on students.
Maybe if you ignore the notion that practice does indeed make perfect.

Re:This is pathetic (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226120)

Is it any wonder that India and Japan (I am sure there are others) are surpassing us in general academic


I don't know about India, but I do know about Japan. Kids study their nuts off to learn exactly what they need to pass university entrance exams, which are really tough. The university courses that follow are, with a VERY few exceptions, exercises in mediocrity with degrees that are trivially easy to do well in. No wonder there are two generations of extremely frustrated people, birth rate dropping, marriage age rocketing, the part time labor sector expanding rapidly. Most people below 30 know they've had a bad deal. Those above were already employed when job-for-life-in-exchange-for-industrial-servitude was ripped away from them. So Japan's not a good comparison, it's in its own little education and workforce hell right now.

Re:This is pathetic (1)

Metasquares (555685) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226162)

You assume that the more work gets done, the more learning gets done, which I would argue is not always the case for grade-school homework, especially in mathematics and spelling. Most of the tasks assigned are repetitious beyond what most students require. Why write words down hundreds of times if you can spell them correctly after 10? Mathematics is even worse, because once you discover the pattern that an arithmetic operator takes, all of the problems being asked become special cases. More than once I simply wrote "I KNOW HOW TO MULTIPLY" on my assignments, wrote down and solved 844*730 (or something similarly impressive in elementary school), and left the rest blank. Needless to say, my teachers did not approve.

Perhaps homework assignments should be individually tailored?

(You need not list your educational credentials for your point to be taken seriously)

Re:This is pathetic (1)

Elentari (1037226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226238)

I'd be scared if my government viewed this the same way that you do, and thought that loading children up with hours of extra work, solely to mould them into useful potential workers, is ethically acceptable. Actually, my government probably does think that, and it seems that anyone who's completed school does, too. The few who don't are considered to be hippies, hell-bent on destroying the economy. Why do people become so bitter when they graduate, and think that imposing hours of homework on children who are already working hard enough just to learn about the world they're growing up in is perfectly fine, and anyone who protests is some kind of wimp? Life isn't just for goddamn work. Not everyone works >6 hours a day. There are no straight career paths; people can do whatever they want, they're just not told that they can.

Re:This is pathetic (2, Informative)

don'tyellatme (837496) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226258)

Why does it seem that the USA is progressively skimping on education? Is it any wonder that India and Japan (I am sure there are others) are surpassing us in general academic, and therefore work, achievement? Because homework is not educational. The Homework Myth by Alfie Kohn is a great read on this subject. Be prepared to have your assumptions challenged.

The wrong solution (4, Funny)

digitalderbs (718388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225984)

This is silly. Homework is an important requirement in learning. The clear solution is 30 mg of Prozac a day. This has the added bonus of promoting abstinence. Win-Win.

Re:The wrong solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226178)

Brilliant! I'm giving you the Presidential Medal of Freedom for Faith Based Enterprise!

Ob. Simpsons (1)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225992)

Expections is a perfectly cromulent word.

Re:Ob. Simpsons (1)

pklinken (773410) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226152)

Ob. Blackadder ?

Why on Earth... (2, Interesting)

Alicat1194 (970019) | more than 7 years ago | (#18225998)

...do first graders need homework? Surely the first few grades of school are for getting the basics down, rather than attempting to cram as much as possible into the kids' heads?

contact information (1)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226012)

Here [oakknollschool.com] 's a list of teachers and the email naming convention if you feel someone should contact her and/or her supervisor. Alternately you can point out that she's about to go to her 40th high school reunion [cougartown.com] and should be retiring anyway.

Alarmist headline... (1)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226024)

Please note that TFA says they're only reducing homework to near zero for elementary school students:

The changes have come as a University of Missouri study found high school students benefit tremendously from homework. In middle school, the results were not as strong, but homework was still found to be beneficial. But on the elementary school level, the same study found homework had no effect on students.

So if there's really no measurable benefit to doing homework in elementary school, why give them homework just because "that's the way it's always been done?" Of course, I'm hoping that the study was conducted correctly and that its conclusions are actually valid.

Good (4, Insightful)

0racle (667029) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226026)

Maybe teachers will start doing their jobs now. Too many ended up just not wanting to deal with kids at all, they just told their students to sit down and shut up for an hour and then assigned homework that should have been covered in class.

Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpose) (3, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226034)

I wonder how they are going to explain the drop in grades? Probably blame it on the teachers or some such.

Homework exists to reinforce the learning from the schoolday. It is not punishment, and it is not surplus work to keep the devil from taking over their souls.

As much as I hated homework (even moreso because I learned very well during the class), I have to admit that it does reinforce the learning. It's the 'doing' that reinforces the 'learning'.

Re:Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpo (3, Insightful)

Rick Zeman (15628) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226220)

I wonder how they are going to explain the drop in grades? Probably blame it on the teachers or some such.

Oh hell no...they'll blame it on being "underfunded."

Re:Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpo (0, Redundant)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226274)

You misspelled "explantions".

Re:Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpo (1)

don'tyellatme (837496) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226312)

Learning is not a behavior. Speaking of it in behaviorist terms such as "reinforce" shows how uneducated you are on the subject.
The research to support your claims does not exist.
http://www.amazon.com/Homework-Myth-Alfie-Kohn/dp/ 0738210854/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-1516831-6709560?ie= UTF8&s=books&qid=1173020107&sr=8-1 [amazon.com] Read this book. It breaks down the argument for people who have not done the research.

Re:Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpo (1)

don'tyellatme (837496) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226426)

I wonder how they are going to explain the drop in grades? Probably blame it on the teachers or some such.

"Researchers have been far from unanimous in their assessments of the strengths and weaknesses of homework as an instructional technique." - Journal of Educational Psychology

"Harris Cooper and his colleagues conducted a study in 1998 with both younger and older students (from grades 2 through 12), using both grades and standardized test scores to measure achievement. They also looked at how much homework was assigned by the teacher as well as at how much time students spent on it. Thus, there were eight separate results to be reported.

Younger Students
Effect on grades of amount of homework assigned: No significant relationship.
Effect on test scores of amount of homework assigned: No sig. relationship.
Effect on grades of amount of homework done: Negative relationship
Effect on test scores of amount of homework done: No sig. relationship.

Older Students
Effect on grades of amount of homework assigned: No significant relationship.
Effect on test scores of amount of homework assigned: No sig. relationship.
Effect on grades of amount of homework done: Positive relationship
Effect on test scores of amount of homework done: No sig. relationship."

from pp 25, 33 The Homework Myth by Alfie Kohn

Re:Explaintions. (Yes, I spelled it wrong on purpo (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226474)

"Homework exists to reinforce the learning from the schoolday. It is not punishment, and it is not surplus work to keep the devil from taking over their souls."

Well, if so, how about this:

maintain an A average and you can choose to do your homework or not, turn it in late if you like, or whatever? Doing it will give you a cushion should you have a bad test result - a bit of insurance so to speak.

You have demonstrated that you do not need the reinforcement as you are getting it in class, you get a bonus.

all the best,

drew

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=834CMndtLqA [youtube.com]

About the Teacher (1)

farker haiku (883529) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226036)

wait wait this shit gets better. From the About the Teacher page:

I grew up in central Connecticut. I graduated with a B.A. from Elmira College in Education and Psychology. After several years of teaching and then working in the Rare Book Room at Syracuse University, I decided to return to graduate school, receiving a M.L.S. from Syracuse University in Library and Information Technology. In 1978 we moved to Boston and I was accepted into a Master's program ar Harvard University where I received a Ed.M. in Reading.

fi8st ppost (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226042)

is perhaps papetr towIels,

Moo (5, Interesting)

Chacham (981) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226068)

Homework, sheesh, its amazing what happens when people try to be nice but stop thinking..

It used to be that there were three groups of kids in a clasroom. One was average, one was above average, and one was below average. The teacher taught to the average group. The above average kids got bored, but hopefully were given more work if they enjoyed it. The lower than average kids did work at home in order to keep up with the average. All was good.

Then we decided to be nice. So, instead of letting the lower-than-average kids deal with being such, we'll teach to their level so everything can be done in school. Well, that left most of the kids bored, and the nostalgic feeling of homework was going away. So, they started giving homework to everyone.

Parents liked homework too, because it occuppied their kids time for them. So teachers gave more, and than the kids complained or rebelled. It's just plain sad.

One of my teachers did it best. He wrote an assignment on the board every day at the beginning of class that was due the next day, and then proceeded to teach it. As soon as you understood it, you stopped listening and started on the work. The lower-than-average kids needed help, so the higher-than-average helped them when they were finished with it themselves. There was rarely homwork for anyone, unless they needed it to keep up with the class (and that was known by whether they could do the work in class.) I consider that teacher the best one. He gave work for learning it, not just to give it.

A book (1)

Technoia (1030424) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226074)

You guys should read the book, "Hurt: Inside the World of Today's Teenagers." At least read the summary to see if you're interested: http://www.amazon.com/Hurt-Inside-Todays-Teenagers -Culture/dp/0801027322/sr=1-1/qid=1171911875/ref=p d_bbs_sr_1/105-6743750-7895649?ie=UTF8&s=books [amazon.com] .

It talks a lot about this - not getting rid of homework, but if you read the book you might understand why lightening up on homework might not be such a bad idea.

Re:A book (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226588)

At least read the summary to see if you're interested:

I read through the excerpt, and saw the same "hug the kid rather than teach/parent them" mentality that is the problem with the US today. I'd love YOU, Technoia, to identify the unique societal parameters that would necessitate the reduction of homework.

Only for younger kids (2, Insightful)

Elentari (1037226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226082)

I've never attended school in the US, but going to Primary School in England was something I never associated with what's usually defined as homework. The most I had to do there was learn some spellings, practice some multiplication tables and do the occasional bit of research for a project.

Kids are under increasing stress to outdo their peers in the rush for university places. I'm feeling the pressure at A Level, and I've no doubt that kids younger than me are sick of it as well. It's not just homework, either, it's all the extra-curricular rubbish they're pushed to do in order to "stand out" from other applicants.

I'd welcome a ban on extra homework - besides what's normal for children that young, i.e. spellings and so on - until they reach Secondary School age. Give them a little bit of time to be themselves before rushing them into a world of hard work and sparse praise.

I think it's ridiculous to restrict the time they have to play when they're all so young, and we'll end up with a generation of robots if all we learn to value is grades.

5th grade teacher weighing in.... (5, Insightful)

krswan (465308) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226084)

Homework is not a requirement for learning - practice is. With 6 hours a day of school, minus 1.5 - 2 hours a day for lunch, fine arts, etc... my students need more time to practice long division, work on drafts of their writing assignments, and read about science and social studies. I focus on more interactive learning during my classroom time, so I send reading and practice home as homework.

A better system would give students time each day, or at least a few days a week, in supervised study hall. Staff it with student teachers or assistants capable of helping with questions (which parents often can't). A longer school day with me would work too.

The real issue is that all too often homework is given because it is expected by parents, and is just busywork. The "I had lots of homework as a kid so my kids should too" attitude of some parents is not beneficial. Homework shouldn't be a punishment or given just because teachers are supposed to. The question is, what do students need to learn what they are supposed to learn?

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (1)

StringBlade (557322) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226192)

But would you agree or disagree that the amount of work listed in this article's teacher's weekly homework list was excessive for 2nd graders? I know by 5th grade I had homework that I was expected to do along the lines of what you have suggested, but I don't recall any significant homework in 2nd grade besides perhaps a list of spelling words to review for the weekly spelling test.

While I think children need to learn and homework helps reinforce their in-class education at home, I also think they need to have time to be children, particularly during elementary school years (K-6).

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (2, Interesting)

krswan (465308) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226276)

It would depend on the actual writing assignments, book reports, special projects. I don't think that a couple of math practice sheets a week, reading 15 minutes a night (probably a student - selected book) and going over vocabulary words is excessive. I don't think that 2nd graders should be spending more than 1/2 hour or so outside of school doing homework, and I don't think they should ever be given work that isn't directly related to current classroom lessons. I've known 2nd grade teachers to give 3-4 worksheets a night not really related to classwork - in my opinion that is wrong.

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (1)

Elentari (1037226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226300)

What age children would you target your study hall proposition at?

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226354)

Shouldn't the whole system essentially be a supervised study hall? People aren't one size fits all, treating them as such isn't going to work out very well.

It brings all sorts of problems with effective measurement to the fore, but is seems like it should be possible to replace approximate age, which is, as far as I can tell, the basis of current measurement.

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (1)

zotz (3951) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226538)

"A better system would give students time each day, or at least a few days a week, in supervised study hall. Staff it with student teachers or assistants capable of helping with questions (which parents often can't). A longer school day with me would work too.

The real issue is that all too often homework is given because it is expected by parents, and is just busywork. The "I had lots of homework as a kid so my kids should too" attitude of some parents is not beneficial."

My parents came from a different system.

For instance, for my mother, at the beginning the school day ended at one but with homework. Then the school day was extended to three but with the extra time being for supervised homework. As she tells it, somehow, without the plan being formally changed, at some point regular school went to three and homework began again.

They let us know that they would prefer it if we had less homework. That helped with my attitude at least.

Now I see proposals floated to keep kids in to five or seven pm. Are we going crazy? Is this forced, organized, baby sitting?

all the best,

drew

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ls1QealrmLk [youtube.com]

Re:5th grade teacher weighing in.... (1)

ifthenwhygoto (722282) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226568)

The longer school day and supervised study hall are very good ideas, and parents at home should offer a similar olive branch: Remove television from the home to help encourage reading and creative thinking.

Should go the other way instead. (4, Insightful)

Jartan (219704) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226092)

I was about to say this is a good thing because frankly the problem is that teachers don't freaking teach anything in class anymore. Some of you who are older might not realize how bad it is but classrooms have been dumbed down horribly by the lowest common denominator problem. Basically the instructor is lazy or has to explain things really slowly such that any halfway smart kid will just go to sleep. They then make up for it with stupid amounts of homework.

So reducing homework and maybe making teachers actually teach sounds good at first though but then I remembered all the busy work. So how about instead of making our kids waste a full 40 hours a week sitting in class snoozing we give them less school and actually make sure they do their learning at home at their own pace.

Re:Should go the other way instead. (2, Insightful)

MadMacSkillz (648319) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226416)

"Teachers don't freaking teach anything in class anymore." Really? I work in the public school system. I'm in schools every day. Are you? No? Then shut the f*ck up. Generalizations like "Teachers don't" label you an idiot anyway.

Homework has never been proven to improve grades (2, Interesting)

farrellj (563) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226130)

And today, when they start giving homework at k12, one really wonders what it is about...helping the children learn, or attempting to prove to the parents that they are trying to educate the children? There is no scientific proof that homework generically helps grades. Additional work, especially with a teacher, on the other *does* improve grades...I wonder if the North American school system is trying to substitute homework for time with student and class sizes?

ttyl
          Farrell

Montessori (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226230)

Montessori [a-childs-place.com] .

Re:Homework has never been proven to improve grade (1)

giorgiofr (887762) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226280)

Homework has never been proven to improve grades
Yeah and practice has never been proven to improve skills either.
When you "get" a subject and know you understand it, you need to sit down and practice for a while. Understanding how a math problem is solved is very important, but actually sitting down and solving 4 or 5 samples of increasing complexity nails it down for good.
Otherwise you end up like some people in my class who, at the age of 18, did not "remember" how to solve 2ng grade equations while everybody else was discussing calculus.

Re:Homework has never been proven to improve grade (1)

Cerebus (10185) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226584)

"Otherwise you end up like some people in my class who, at the age of 18, did not "remember" how to solve 2ng grade equations while everybody else was discussing calculus."

People in your class who, it must be pointed out, were required to do homework. What was your point again?

I have no problem with no homework. I don't bring work home, why should my kids? But I'd substitute longer class times, which is something else with which some schools are experimenting. Middle and high schools can use A/B day schedules with 1.5 hour classes and cover the same material per semester.

In deference to your point, longer class times will still allow for adequate drill. The advantage is that class time spent doing drill material is time that the teacher can spend on one-on-one instruction, grading papers, or working on lesson plans. (And don't think that reducing the after-hours work on teachers won't have an in-class benefit, either.)

Overdone for me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226158)

I'm posting as AC, so that this doesn't become a post for bragging.

I'm in a few AP classes, including Calculus and Physics, in my senior year of high school. I hold a part time job. The thing I've learned most from homework is being able to not sleep for a couple of nights in a row. School is 7:40 to 2:30, a little under 7 hours. I understand the material in class, immediately; that's why I'm in all the advanced classes that I'm in.

Most days, I immediately go to work, and get home at 8PM. Following a dinner and a shower, at about 9PM, I start homework. It all appears as busy work, since I understand it already. When I have free time, I continue doing work, except, I do more advanced work. For example, if I finish a night of homework before 1AM, I'll play with graphs of functions, interesting equations, things from the next chapter of the book, etc. I think exploring is more beneficial to me than is completing work for a subject I already understand.
Another issue, I would like to note: my religious activities are very difficult to do on top of homework. The http://crlf.ws/ [crlf.ws] (CRLF) has helped me greatly with keeping up with God, while still learning in school. As a side note, if you have too much work, and not enough time to worship God, join the CRLF.

Sweden (2, Interesting)

karji (114631) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226186)

I read somewhere that schools in Sweden (at least in the '80s) didn't give homework. How true is that?

While this particular instance is more than... (2, Informative)

rindeee (530084) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226264)

assanine, I do see a problem with the homework load kids have in lower grades (as many others have pointed out). My son is in 4th grade, my daughter in Kindergarten. While my daughter doesn't have much homework to speak of, my son does, and has since 1st grade (in the same school as my daughter) have at least 1 - 2 hours per night. He's a very bright kid, but I see him often times burning out due to sheer load. Sadly, most of it too seems like busy work. I think this is a very damaging trend in education today. Sure, highschool and college brings a heavy work load, but at a time in your life where you have the ability to look ahead in order to see the value in it. My son on the other hand is at the age where life is very much about the next 10 minutes. Things are broken.

Homework is useless for my son (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226286)

All he gets is 'stuff unfinished in the class', no interesting new things. When there is homework extra to classwork it can typically be done in half an hour and is trivial.

So we have a system in place. He earns time on the computer by studying. Currently this study is classical physics, previously it's been history, mathematics, animation (via blender) anything we felt is useful to know. By this method we manage on average five to eight hours independant study for him a week, most of which relates to schoolwork, although currently his home study is up to two years ahead of school study, depending on subject.

If self directed study was left to homework alone, his education would be crap.

Re:Homework is useless for my son (1)

Elentari (1037226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226422)

How old is your son, and do you let him select the topics he wants to learn, or are you imposing this study regime on him regardless of how he feels about it?

The fact that you need to reward him with computer time makes me suspect that this wasn't his idea.

Schools have curriculums set in place for a reason; they match what is expected of the child at that age (or what is expected of the least intelligent child in the class). To compete, and push your child so far ahead of such a curriculum is only going to make school more boring for him.

This will result in you complaining classwork isn't challenging enough, making him study more at home, and leaving you with a genius boy who never had a childhood.

Homework can be useful (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226294)

but it must be both interesting and developing. The point is that homework should be tasks that normally not can take place at school, but instead be associated with features on the way to the school or at home.

Everyday tasks can be assigned, and the point should be for the pupils to open their eyes to everyday applications of their skills. Reality is an intermix of skills, and that means that even though the task may be for biology it will require writing skills to actually document.

They should still assign homework (3, Insightful)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226306)

they just shouldn't GRADE homework, well IMO anyway. One of my favorite profs in college always assigned us homework but never collected it. Why? His philosophy was that he would know if you were actually doing your homework by how you did on the test. He would assign problems then publish the solutions on the web. And when you went to his office hours you could ask him ANY question you wanted to about the homework. Other profs who grade homework would always dance around certain questions because they didn't want to "give away the answer". What BS! I learn as much, if not more, from trying problems and being able to see my mistakes then by making sure I need to do everything perfectly all the time. Profs would usually post answers to the homeworks, but unless I made copies of what I did, I wouldn't get the homework I handed in back until weeks afterwards. By then many of the lessons have already been forgotten.

Isn't grading by both testing AND homework implying that people cheat on homework? If you believe that everyone is honestly do their homework, then the homework should show whether or not they trully understand(not MEMORIZE per se) the material. Or if you have tests then don't collect homework because the students will have to prove their mettle on the test anyway. I think it would be great if classes had either only test or only homework/discussion grades. Each would work better in certain situations, but the whole idea of having to be perfect all the time without being able to consult reference materials or collaborate with others against the spirit of education. Also, it doesn't represent the "real world" at all. I know bridge makers aren't allowed to make mistakes, but all bridge designs have to be signed off by several people and they are allowed to collaborate with co-workers and several people have to inspect the design and put their own reputation and even wallets on the line when they sign off on the design. This isn't allowed on tests or even homework theoretically. So why grade it?

As a teacher... (3, Interesting)

Wellington Grey (942717) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226308)

Speaking as a teacher, I agree with this move. The problem with homework (at least in the schools where I have worked) is that it is expected to be graded and counted toward the overall academic progress of the child. This is an issue because as a teacher I cannot trust that the work done at home is the child's own. Aside from the easy things to catch like copying there are a myriad of parents and tutors who will use homework to artificially boost a child's grades.

Homework should be used for practice, but not count for the final grade.

-CGP [colingregorypalmer.net]

Kind of a dumb suggestion, but why not change ... (2, Interesting)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226556)

the grading? Have the student get 2 grades. The first would be a grade at school and the second is the grade of homework? That way, the parent can see what the real difference is. Of course, that will leave some parents to be upset, but just explain to them, that you prefer to grade their child, not the parents work. :) Sadly, some parents will still not take the hint.

C'mon! We are not fragile as a species. (1)

Merkwurdigeliebe (1046824) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226322)

Children in other counries attend cram (make-up classes) schools as standard practice (not extraordinary) They do that day-in day-out six days a week. Could we have become so weak and decrepit mentally that we cannot put up with some additional studying? This is ridiculous.
People are begininng to treat kinds (and themselves) as if they were fragile. We are not damned fragile as a species. If we had been so mentally fragile we would have not survied so long --we would have curled up and died many millenia ago. What people can be is lazy, and the attitude is simply promoted futher by such thinking. We as a society will only suffer if this kind of thinking comes to prevail --the thinking that humans are tender fragile beings that need kind nurturing and the most basic incremental demands of one as a being. This attitude is not the real world one encounters after high-school. Why the kid gloves?

Re:C'mon! We are not fragile as a species. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226590)

That is not the attitude at all. The attitude is that we value our freedom of thought and creativity enough that we do not need to reduce ourselves down to a routine in order to succeed.

Genius is not created in an institution, it is innate.

Homework helps very few... (5, Interesting)

Ziggurat Dan (876294) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226346)

I've been an upper elementary teacher for eight years (my wife's been for 12). I have come to learn that homework benefits very few kids in the classroom each year. The upper kids, who don't need the extra work, do it splendidly, and have parents who check it over and help them with it. The lower kids rarely finish it, or do it sloppily, and more times than not have parents that are too busy or too unconcerned about their kid's homework. The middle kids, well, some DO benefit from doing it, but it takes an effort from the family for it to be successful in the long run. Many times, however, the kids who need the extra work would be MUCH better off in my classroom getting the help from me. It puts the learning in context of the lesson that introduced it instead of having a parent help who hasn't been in fifth grade in thirty years.

We've come to expect that our kids do tons of homework each and every night, and I have many colleagues who parrot that idea. When I press them as to why, they basically tell me that they need to practice doing homework. Rarely is the question answered that the lesson needs to be reinforced or whatnot.

We're in the day and age of "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB), the current incarnation of educational reform that has been around since the sixties. I live in an average-to-slightly-upper middle class neighborhood, and the vast difference among my students academically is astounding. 1/3 of my kids in the classroom have IEPs (Individual Educational Plans, which have goals tailored to the individual, and you must follow them, even if it was written in another district before the student moved to yours), and gathering homework on a regular basis from everybody is time consuming due to the amount of kids not doing it to the different expectations NCLB has forced.

The reality is that very few parents are willing or able to help at home. Kids are overextended with activities (kids are doing extra-curriculars at an all-time high), or they're latchkey, or they're in daycare for extended time. I usually get done in FIVE minutes one-on-one what could be done in half an hour at home, and of course I take that route when I can. I've moved on to pushing some work back to the next day instead of giving it for homework (yes, I still give homework, just not nearly as much as when I started, and now it's mostly reading), due to the fact that while they are learning skills they should have an opportunity to learn it from a person that is getting paid for teaching it, and it highly qualified to do it (yes, there are teachers who are not highly qualified, or highly motivated, but that's for another thread I think).

Kids who don't finish something in a reasonable timeframe in the classroom will have more homework than those who do. It's easy to tell, once you get to know the kids, whether they don't understand or are malingering. I do, however, like to give reading homework for many reasons. For one, it helps them become better readers, and they actually DO IT, especially if they self-select the reading. Another reason is that, in my grade, I encourage the kids to read with parents or siblings. I get a lot of feedback about how that has been good for the family as a whole over time.

I can't speak to the upper grades, but I know many teachers who see the same thing (the kids who can do it already, the kids who can't at home, and the middle ground) in middle school and high school. There's no easy answer, but looking back at the history of education, there was an extended period (covering DECADES) where there was virtually no homework for the kids. I wouldn't say a blanket "no homework at all" for the upper levels, but I'd certainly be in favor of limiting it to an hour or less. Just food for thought.

Yeah, probably switched topics too much, but I have no time to re-read this because I have essays to grade...

okay, but a better idea... (1)

bugi (8479) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226362)

I agree -- there's little need for formal homework prior to 4th or 5th grade.

However, give the elementary school kids just enough homework to keep the parents involved. Make a parent initial a slip that the kid drilled with flash cards this week, or something like that.

If the kid seems bored or lost, the parent should note that as well.

That which actually works (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226394)

http://www.freakonomics.com/pdf/DeliberatePractice (PsychologicalReview).pdf [freakonomics.com]

Most homework is probably ineffective. The mere act of doing something produces no learning unless there is a feedback mechanism and the learner is actually trying to improve. I'm guessing that 99% of the time the transfer function for the feedback path approaches an open circuit as far as homework is concerned.

If the homework does get marked, there is usually no mechanism for the student to learn and improve the mark. The bad students get beaten down and lose all confidence that they can learn. Bad, clueless teachers will achieve this result no matter whether or not they assign homework. They might as well save themselves the effort of whatever marking they do. They should quit giving homework to the early grade students. It wouldn't hurt the students.

What do I think works? http://www.reason.com/news/show/28479.html [reason.com] http://www.jumpmath.org/ [jumpmath.org] http://www.spiritofmath.com/about3a.html [spiritofmath.com] There are lots of amazing teachers out there who produce amazing results. The ones I link to are math teachers because math is the one subject where excellent teaching produces uncontrovertable, measurable results. What these teachers have in common is apathy or even outright hostility from school administration. The problem starts at the top folks.

from a certain point of veiw (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226410)

this is not a bad idea. There are many examples of where kids are trying to improve themselves and where the adults of the world push them a lot harder than they really should be pushed. You see 7 yr old actors that work 6 hrs a day on the set, or 9 yr olds that can out iceskate anyone in their city. (think jr olympics) Encouraging a kid to spend all their spare time doing any one thing is a waste of their childhood. I don't see why homework is any different than that. Sure, studying is time well-spent, but some parents and some teachers push the kids to overdo it. What good is it to have a straight-A student that has had a dismal childhood? Some would consider that a good trade, but not me. Life is not a contest, you don't "win" if you die successful. You "win" if you had a good ride, regardless of the outcome. Sacrificing the journey for sake of the end is a shame. That's the way I have lived my life and I have no regrets. I wonder just how many adults look back at their early lives and wish they had not obcessed so much over atheletics/grades/socializing.

spelling test are given each Friday (tests) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226476)

these are fun acitivites (activities)

as well as weekly orgnizational suggestions will be given each week (organizational, and poor sentence structure)

with instructions as to when they need to come back to class. (Don't they come back to class each weekday?)

2005 - 2007 Menlo Park City Elem SD > Christine Aronson. All Rights Reserved.
Last updated: Nov 08 2005 06:52:38 pm Pacific

(PM should be capitalized and spelling errors should be caught at least once a year, not left alone since 2005.)

See, this is what too much homework creates. People who know how to spell without a spellchecker.

Homework (3, Funny)

Rorian (88503) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226506)

I no did homework four school and me smart today

in grade school... (1)

NRISecretAgent (982853) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226508)

In grade school I didn't really learn anything outside of what I was taught in class. Homework was just an annoyance that I really didn't do anyway. In fact if it wasn't so important in college I probably still wouldn't be doing it. The only thing I did need for homework were spelling words. I studied. Homework takes time away from those who don't need it and frustrates those who do. Studying is something that a kid can do as they wish and at their own pace. And personally, my parents were always more involved in my studying than my homework. I bet you more parents would be more involved in their child's education if they had to sit down with their kids a half hour a night and help them with studying than if they just keep saying "look at the instructions." It also manages to keep the kids more interested in what their doing as well.

One of my freinds kids had problems with school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18226526)

And so they decided to unschool both of their kids who were in 1st and 3rd grade. (I thought this was a bad decision.) For a few months the older kid did nothing, and then he started learning again, mostly on his own. The parents encouraged both kids and occasionally, when asked, took on the role of instructor. The older kid just graduated from oxford with a phd in mathematics. The younger kid just started his phd in math at Brown. Not too bad and no required homework until college.

 

Way to go... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226548)

As if the US educational system wasn't screwed up enough.

      Oh yeah, let's get rid of homework because the poor kiddies are stressed out. In fact, coming to school at 8am or whatever is also a source of stress, maybe we shouldn't insist they show up on time. Math courses are also a great stressor, let's lose those. On second thoughts, why not get rid of school altogether? Then the kids can sit at home and play video games all day, and not have any stress.... /sarcasm

      I doubt very much that eliminating homework will reduce illicit drug use. It probably won't increase it, since most drug users blow off homework anyway, but reduce it? Why? I can't remember ever citing homework as a reason to use drugs in my teenage years... we did it because it was cool, because getting stoned felt good, and because it was illegal.

      Homework is a way to teach responsibility - you have a deadline to meet, you have to take time to do something you don't necessarily enjoy, and pretty much figure it out on your own. It helps train your memory as you recall what you learned in class, and it teaches problem solving skills when you have to look stuff up, call your friends because you forgot how to do something, etc. It's a way to prepare kids for a responsible adult life. Welcome to the real world.

That homework link is ridiculous (4, Interesting)

q2k (67077) | more than 7 years ago | (#18226566)

One wonders if the 2nd grade teachers at Menlo Park ES have ever actually raised a 7 year old themselves. The average 7 year old has an attention span of about 15 minutes. I've raised 2 myself, and coached hundreds of others in both basketball and baseball. The cognitive skills these teachers seem to expect simply are not there yet. The idea that you can give them a weeks worth of homework on Monday and expect them to remember to bring in Friday without mom helping is ludicrious. The only way it is going to happen is if mom and dad help them schedule out the work all week, and then personally put it in the backpack Thursday night. Even with that, a lot of the kids will walk out of the house Friday morning without it if mom isn't there to hand them the backpack on the way out the door. Punishing the kid for being a normal 7 year old is simply cruel.

It seems as though the school has outsourced reading, handwriting, math, and spelling to mom and dad. What exactly are they doing all day in school?
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  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>