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Ocean Floor Crust Wound to Be Explored

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the journey-to-the-top-of-the-earth dept.

Education 148

eldavojohn writes "A group of scientists are disembarking right now to study an open gash in the ocean floor where earth's mantle lays exposed without any crust covering it. The scientists describe this as the result of the mantle moving too quickly for the crust to keep up. Either that, or the mantle was never covered by the crust and just has always been like this. From the article, 'Regardless of how they formed, the exposed mantle provides scientists with a rare opportunity to study the Earth's rocky innards. Many attempts to drill deep into the planet barely get past the crust.'"

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148 comments

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It was that whore mermaid Aerial (-1, Troll)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229168)

she gave the ocean floor herpes!

Re:It was that whore mermaid Aerial (0, Troll)

jjacksonRIAB (1050352) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229680)

"Once you scrape the crust off and withdraw the mantle, you get to see Mother Earth's gash!" - Arial, after observing the phallic spire

Oh no! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229176)

Come here little ocean, tell me who hurt you? Who put this crust wound on you? Was it the evil marine biologists, or the fishers? Or was it oil riggers? It was, wasn't it!! Come with me little guy, I can protect you! We have to get out of here!

Gotta say it (2)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229204)

The earth has it's own goatse area

Re:Gotta say it (2, Funny)

c6gunner (950153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230434)

and, ofcourse, a bunch of nerds are gonna go stare at it.

ohhh (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229214)

Nothing like a nice, wet, open gash down below to explore!

I wonder what they'll find? Might be too deep for the little man in the boat.

Bow Chika Bow Wow (1)

Khaed (544779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232614)

Insert porno music as we go down on Mother Earth and "inspect" and "explore" her gash.

Re:ohhh (2, Funny)

Viceroy Potatohead (954845) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232754)

I wonder why it smells like fish?

Wake me (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229220)

Wake me when they get to the creamy nougat center.

Re:Wake me (1)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230972)

Don't they know that if you pick at it, it will never get better?

disembarking? (0)

snarfbot (1036906) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229228)

bark bark bark

Why hasn't a volcano formed there? (1)

Apple Acolyte (517892) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229232)

One would have thought a volcano would form there, instead of it just staying in that exposed state.

Why hasn't CRUST formed there? (4, Interesting)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229646)

I don't understand how [water (cooling agent) + magma (what the mantle is made of] != crust evaluates to 1.

Re:Why hasn't CRUST formed there? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230012)

If i recall my school years correctly, the mantel is made of rock, not magma. In between the crust and mantle is the lithosphere (or whatever its called) that contains all the magma. I would assume that since crust hasent formed, there is no magma around there, which i would ask, why is that?

Re:Why hasn't CRUST formed there? (4, Insightful)

Bellum Aeternus (891584) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231578)

You're right magma + coolant (water) = rock. The mantle is a section of the planet, comprised of different materials than the crust. This an opportunity to look at those materials without having to drill do far. Trust me, not many scientists was to be looking at 2000 degree molten rock up close.

There's a lot of other cool things we can see while we're down there, like how the rock crystals formed under that kind of pressure and how fast they cooled. All kinds of cool things can be interpreted by the rocks crystalline structure.

Wait, what? (1)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231956)

How can rock THAT hot (rock closer to the core must necessarily be hotter than rock closer to the surface) NOT be magma? Pressure?

Re:Why hasn't CRUST formed there? (0, Offtopic)

dwater (72834) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231642)

I think you'll find it evaluates to 'true'.

I hate all this 0==false/otherwise==true crap. It makes for some really unreadable code. Is it really that much more effort to make a boolean var with a meaningful name? I expect a compiler would optimise it out easily...

Re:Why hasn't a volcano formed there? (4, Informative)

dwarmstr (993558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230790)

The mantle is a solid, albeit warm and plastic, material. It's solid because of the immense pressure the material is under. Brought up via plate tectonics, the material can melt as the pressure is released.

Re:Why hasn't a volcano formed there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230882)

yay for adiabatic decompression!!

Re:Why hasn't a volcano formed there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18231398)

So, do you think the water pressure at this location is keeping it solid, in lieu of a few km of crust? The article says it's about 3km deep.

disembark? (3, Informative)

mr_zorg (259994) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229234)

They are embarking, not disembarking...

Re:disembark? (3, Funny)

moonbender (547943) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229316)

Inflammable means flammable? What a country!

Re:disembark? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229710)

While inflamable and flamable have the same meaning, disembark and embark mean different things.

Re:disembark? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229880)

Inflammable and flammable have the same meaning. Inflamable and flamable have completely opposite meanings. For example, this post is inflamable, while yours is extremely flamable.

Re:disembark? (1)

JoGlo (1000705) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232644)

But inflatable and flatulence have DIFFERENT meanings!

Re:disembark? (2, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229434)

They are embarking, not disembarking...

So we're letting dogs sniff our crack, eh?
     

Re:disembark? (1, Informative)

The_Wilschon (782534) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229780)

They are disembarking from their port of origin, and embarking on a mission to study the ocean floor gash. The summary used the word correctly. s/disembarking/embarking/ without changing anything else in the summary would result in something that didn't make sense.

Re:disembark? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230066)

To disembark means to go ashore, you can't "disembark from [a port]".

Re:disembark? (1)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230312)

Either that, or they've arrived, and they're going for an EVA. The post is just ambiguous.

Re:disembark? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18231162)

To embark is to get on a ship, generally to go somewhere. To debark is to get off, usually after arrival. Disembark would seem to be better used to describe those who get on a ship but then get off before it sails. I know that this is not the actual usage of the word, nor is it likely to ever be, but I still dream...

Re:disembark? (1)

David Chappell (671429) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232396)

>They are disembarking from their port of origin, and embarking on a mission to study the ocean floor gash.

The first part of this sentence would make sense only if disembark meant to set out on a journey. It actually means to get off a barque which is a type of ship. It is frequently used loosely to mean to get off any ship or even any large conveyance. But it never means to set out on a journey.

The second part of the sentence is probably correct since they will most certainly have to get on a ship in order to visit the ocean floor.

Re:disembark? (1)

The_Wilschon (782534) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232860)

Well, you're right that I'm wrong, but you're not right completely.

The first part of this sentence would make sense only if disembark meant to set out on a journey.
"They are disembarking from their port of origin." -> "They are setting out on a journey from their port of origin." Ok, that would work. But that isn't the false meaning of disembark I really had in mind. I was thinking more like (first sentence) -> "They are leaving their port of origin." This also works.

The second part of the sentence is probably correct since they will most certainly have to get on a ship in order to visit the ocean floor.
Even if they were not getting on a ship, "embark" means, among other things, "To set out on a venture; commence". "They are setting out on a mission to study the ocean floor gash." I'm sure the word embark came from getting on a barque, but words do take on new meanings over the years, and embark certainly has.

But, the main point is that I had made up a false meaning for disembark. And you are right about that. I was taking embark to point at the future, and disembark to point at the past, like the difference between go and come. This works for embark, but not so much for disembark.

Re:disembark? (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232784)

http://209.161.33.50/dictionary/disembarking [209.161.33.50]
(merriam webster online):

disembark
One entry found.

disembark

Main Entry:
        disembark Listen to the pronunciation of disembark
Pronunciation:
        \dis-m-bärk\
Function:
        verb
Etymology:
        Middle French desembarquer, from des- dis- + embarquer to embark
Date:
        1582

transitive verb : to remove to shore from a ship intransitive verb 1 : to go ashore out of a ship 2 : to get out of a vehicle or craft

http://209.161.33.50/dictionary/embark [209.161.33.50]
embark
One entry found.

embark

Main Entry:
        embark Listen to the pronunciation of embark
Pronunciation:
        \im-bärk\
Function:
        verb
Etymology:
        Middle French embarquer, from Old Occitan embarcar, from em- (from Latin in-) + barca bark
Date:
        1533

intransitive verb 1 : to go on board a vehicle for transportation 2 : to make a start transitive verb 1 : to cause to go on board (as a boat or airplane) 2 : to engage, enlist, or invest in an enterprise
-- embarkation Listen to the pronunciation of embarkation \em-bär-k-shn, -br-\ noun
-- embarkment Listen to the pronunciation of embarkment \im-bärk-mnt\ noun

Please provide a dictionary reference for any further discussion of the meaning of embark vs disembark.
The slash summary is wrong.

Disembarking? (0, Redundant)

dmbrun (907271) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229260)

I think you'll find its embarking right now instead of disembarking.

Dr Nick knows the difference... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229332)

"Inflammable means flammable? What a country!"
    - Dr. Nick Riviera

Disembarking? (0, Redundant)

Makenai (223604) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229266)

If they're set to leave next week, wouldn't they in fact be embarking on this voyage rather than disembarking (as in from their research vessel)?

Re:Disembarking? (1)

Oktober Sunset (838224) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229792)

maybe they plan on swimming all the way there and are jumping off the ship into the ocean right now.

Re:Disembarking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230068)

It's good news-- it means they don't have to go, because they're already back! :)

Thin Crust (2)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229278)

Imagine if this had formed on land, say in LA...

Re:Thin Crust (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229522)

It has silly.. just call 1-800-PIZZAJOE

Re:Thin Crust (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229536)

You say that as if it would've been a bad thing.

Re:Thin Crust (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229676)

happy thoughts.

Re:Thin Crust (1)

dwater (72834) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231360)

I'd vote for DC.

Mid atlantic ridge? (3, Insightful)

ruiner13 (527499) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229286)

Hasn't the mid-atlantic ridge always been there? How is this a "rare opportunity"? I don't think it will be going anywhere anytime soon.

Re:Mid atlantic ridge? (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229416)

Hasn't the mid-atlantic ridge always been there? How is this a "rare opportunity"? I don't think it will be going anywhere anytime soon.

In B sci-fi, the portal *always* starts to close at an inopportune time. Thus, we gotta rush.
     

Re:Mid atlantic ridge? (2, Insightful)

Stormx2 (1003260) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229540)

The wording is pretty terrible:

'Regardless of how they formed, the exposed mantle provides scientists with a rare opportunity to study the Earth's rocky innards. Many attempts to drill deep into the planet barely get past the crust.'


Barely get past the crust? So they do get past the crust? Then how is exploring this bit of mantle different from exploring the parts we've drilled to?

Re:Mid atlantic ridge? (5, Informative)

Mr2cents (323101) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231064)

A few months ago I was wondering how deep mankind has drilled, and found some interesting [damninteresting.com] stuff [wikipedia.org] . Basically, you should read "barely" as "didn't".

As always, when you think something's easy (make_small_hole(); while(1) { make_hole_deeper(); } ), it's just because your ignorance doesn't let you appreciate the problems, like the extreme temperature and pressure. For example, I didn't realize that the pressure compresses the rocks and when you drill a hole that deep, the rocks around it want to expand, causing engineering nightmares.

And while measuring the straightness of a hole seems quite doable (or put otherwise, I accept the assumption that there exists technology to do that), I still wonder how they can adjust the drilling direction.

Fascinating!

Not just technical limits (2, Insightful)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232558)

If you read Robert Ballard's autobiography, or one of many other books on oceanography, you'll find that plate tectonics only started to become accepted as a credible theory in the 1960s, with many significant researchers still dismissing the theory in the early 1970s.

To put that in context: people had visited the moon before plate tectonics was widely accepted.

Since then there has been research, including drilling, but it is probably fair to say they mankind still only has a pretty fuzzy picture of what is going on. The limit is not just technical, but also political and funding limits etc. It is easy to get a big ego boost/career advancement from, or funding for some flashy work in space etc, but difficult to do so for digging a hole in the ground.

Re:Mid atlantic ridge? (1)

the_brobdingnagian (917699) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229640)

I think they mean "rare" as in there are not many PLACES you can find this. As opposed to there are not many TIMES you can find this.

Re:Mid atlantic ridge? (1)

timothyf (615594) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229784)

Normally, even ocean ridges are covered by a thin layer of crust. What does come up is usually magma, which is not mantle material. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oceanic_ridge [wikipedia.org]

Analogy (5, Informative)

Renfield Spiffioso (982789) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229302)

MacLeod likens this process to stretching a person's skin until it ruptures, exposing the flesh underneath.
That's the most horrifying scientific analogy I've ever heard.

Re:Analogy (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229342)

You don't want to hear his analogy for a volcano - it involves a donkey and a chambermaid.

Re:Analogy (1)

fbjon (692006) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231586)

You don't want to hear his analogy for a volcano - it involves a donkey and a chambermaid.
...and a bathtub.

Re:Analogy (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229436)

MacLeod likens this process to stretching a person's skin until it ruptures, exposing the flesh underneath.
That's the most horrifying scientific analogy I've ever heard.


      Not to mention the stunning implications - that the Earth is suffering from pemphigus! [nih.gov]

Re:Analogy (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229570)

Wait 'til he explains volcanos as earth's pimples. And when they get clogged up and are about to rupture, they resemble...

Ok, I'll go puke now.

Re:Analogy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18232660)

Wait 'til he explains volcanos as earth's pimples. And when they get clogged up and are about to rupture, they resemble...

John Belushi?

yes mother... (1)

sponga (739683) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231326)

"stop picking at your wounds!!"

Re:Analogy (1)

noidentity (188756) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231932)

"MacLeod likens this process to stretching a person's skin until it ruptures, exposing the flesh underneath. That's the most horrifying scientific analogy I've ever heard."

He must have recently seen goatse for the first time and still suffering after-effects.

Re:Analogy (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232582)

That's the most horrifying scientific analogy I've ever heard.

But quite accurate.

When I broke my hand, it swelled up so quickly that it made a roughly half-inch long tear in the skin.

Needless to say, once the pain meds kicked in, I was fascinated.

Anti-Crust (4, Funny)

RancidMilk (872628) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229304)

If you tamper with the anti-crust, you will get burned.

Second-hand mandatory joke (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229318)

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

Re:Second-hand mandatory joke (1)

NoseBag (243097) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230850)

Ia! Ia! AlGore! AlGore!

Embarking (-1, Redundant)

caluml (551744) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229340)

Shouldn't they be embarking on a mission?

Re:Embarking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229450)

yeah and inflammable means flammable... what a country...

don't get too close (1)

blakmac (987934) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229354)

the laaavaaa boat......

I want to (1)

jjacksonRIAB (1050352) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229370)

Stick my / in your gash and maybe your . too

I prefer the Term (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229386)

I prefer to refer to it as the "Axe Wound"

Please don't (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229406)

Please do not anthropomorphize our planet. He really hates that.

Re:Please don't (1)

jimmydevice (699057) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230854)

That's SHE.

Re:Please don't (4, Funny)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232064)

Thats it, not "He" or "She", you insensitive sexist clod!

-jcr

Re:Please don't (1)

jimmydevice (699057) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232178)

I'd mod you up, but my points expired today. ( also posted )

Re:Please don't (1)

Surt (22457) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232818)

Our best evidence actually supports the earth is a she argument (e.g. probably colonized by mars microbes, surely a receptive act if ever there was one).

The Gate (1)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229414)

Better close that hole up before the legions of nasty aquatic underworld ghoulies come pouring out into the world

Re:The Gate (1)

pla (258480) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231098)

Better close that hole up before the legions of nasty aquatic underworld ghoulies come pouring out into the world

Nonono, you have it all wrong - this will let scientists discover the LifeStream, so we can finally start building Mako reactors.

Chacun a son gout (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229418)

I say we brush the split crust with garlic butter so it develops to a tasty golden brown.

Congratulations... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229444)

It's global warming!

Can't wait (3, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229452)

Someone is going to use this as evidence of humans causing global warming in 5...4...3...2...

Re:Can't wait (5, Funny)

jjacksonRIAB (1050352) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229468)

Al Gore will not fall for your Jedi mind tricks.

Re:Can't wait (1)

fuego451 (958976) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229604)

Well, there's always the chance cube.

Re:Can't wait (1)

jimmydevice (699057) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232258)

or the time cube http://www.timecube.com/ [timecube.com] Is this the genetic religosity thread, i'm lost in tequila and beer? Cop scanner: Thir'is is a large goat in the road. Cops removing equestrians from the roadway. Is a goat a equestrian?

Re:Can't wait (1)

Opportunist (166417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229590)

Hey, we already do enough for global warming, I think at least a little bit can come from the planet itself!

Re:Can't wait (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230238)

Why was this marked as a troll when the very post before it was from one of those envirowackos blaiming global warming?

We've made it through the crust? (4, Informative)

Slippery Pete (941650) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229476)

"Many attempts to drill deep into the planet barely get past the crust." I wasn't aware of any drilling that has past the crust. The deepest I knew about was the Kola Borehole [wikipedia.org] which only reached 12,262 meters. I understand drilling the seafloor saves us time and depth but I wasn't away of anyone getting through the crust yet.

Re:We've made it through the crust? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18229598)

Moreover if you HAD drilled through the crust to get to the mantle, wouldn't you stop there because you had reached your goal? So what drilled hole WOULDN'T barely get through the crust?

IGY - International Geophysical Year, 1957-ish... (3, Interesting)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229820)

...and the beginning of the Space Age. There was an attempt to drill past the crust to the mantle in a spot where the transition came up fairly close to the Earth's surface, called Project Mohole http://www.nas.edu/history/mohole/ [nas.edu] . This referred to the Mohorovicic Discontinuity, or "Mohole". The IGY was an early attempt at an international cooperative effort in Earth studies.

The importance of this effort was underlined by the fact that Walt Kelly's "Pogo" sent it up. Since the event was a "year" of 18 months, Pogo suggested naming the extra months after foods -- Octoberry, Novemberry etc.

In a side note, the US response to Sputnik included a science payload named Nora-Alice 1, beacon transmitter for Discoverer satellite, which took it's name from a poem Pogo wrote in honour of the IGY. http://www.ece.uiuc.edu/about/history/reminiscence /space.html/ [uiuc.edu] has a picture and a small quote down the column a bit.

So as you can see, drilling a hole in the Earth past the crust to the mantle inspired some of the first orbital satellites. Remarkable! Oh, and then there was LAGEOS, of course, but I'll let you look that one up.

Global Warming? (0, Troll)

friend.ac (1071626) | more than 7 years ago | (#18229480)

C'mon.. How long before the tree-huggers and Al Gore find relates this to Global Warming and we're all doomed!

Re:Global Warming? (-1, Troll)

vandan (151516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231410)

How long before some fugly guy having a mid-life crisis puts a link to an online dating site in his signature, and gets marked as a troll in his first post?

Re:Global Warming? (1)

friend.ac (1071626) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231582)

hahaha, I don't think 30 is having a mid-life crisis.. I run the site! :-)

Re:Global Warming? (1)

vandan (151516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232120)

Yuck. That's even worse. And it's also ironic that you feel the need to refer to people with an understanding of current environmental issues as 'tree-huggers' when trees are pretty much the only thing you and your users could hug without getting slapped.

Re:Global Warming? (1)

friend.ac (1071626) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232718)

i actually agree with the most part of the environmental debate - especially when it comes to the US and China and the lack of acceptance and moral responsibility towards the issue. I also agree as well with the scientific studies that planets such as Mars and Pluto have also shown unusual warming over the past 10-20 years. But I'm not interested in a flame war - and perhaps should have enclosed my statement in [sarcasm][/sarcasm] tags.

"...LIES exposed..." (1)

Kapiti Kid (1003167) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230326)

Hens lay eggs. They don't lay down.

Last words heard from disembarked scientific team. (1)

dwayrynen (304160) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230498)

"My God, it's full of lava!"

--
"How inappropriate to call this planet earth when it is quite clearly Ocean." - Arthur C. Clarke

Tough scientists! (2, Funny)

Stephen Tennant (936097) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230680)

These guys are hardcore!

I mean, the last time I was invited to inspect an open wound in someone's gash, I ran.

mod dowN (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18230962)

for the reco8d, I

Obligatory "The Core" Reference (1)

SeaDour (704727) | more than 7 years ago | (#18230992)

Col. Robert Iverson: People. Doctors Zimsky and Keyes? You guys are our resident geophysicists, so what do you make of this?
Dr. Conrad Zimsky: The mantle is a chemical hodgepodge of, a, variety of elements...
Dr. Ed 'Braz' Brazzelton: Say it with me: "I don't know."

Smaht Remahk (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231634)

"MacLeod likens this process to stretching a persons skin until it ruptures, exposing the flesh underneath. You take the crust and you stretch it and you pull it and pull it until it breaks, he said."

They found the goatse.cx guy.

--
BMO

Project wont finish... (3, Funny)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 7 years ago | (#18231830)

They'll just run away in fear [jesus-is-savior.com] like the commies did :P

"Abduction" by Robin Cook (1)

meowsqueak (599208) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232134)

This reminds me of a book I read recently by Robin Cook called "Abduction" - about a civilisation of humans (who evolved independently from surface humans) who live under the sea - a place they call "InterTerra".

http://www.amazon.com/Abduction-Robin-Cook/dp/0425 17736X [amazon.com]

Anyway, the plot is terribly contrived and the writing is bad, but it was strangely compelling and I just had to find out what happened at the end.

So just be careful you don't go and piss off an advanced civilisation with your undersea drilling!

Mother Earth (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 7 years ago | (#18232394)

A gash? Well, now really, can't they afford the old girl some privacy?
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