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Computer Games Magazine To Shut Down

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the there-are-plenty-of-ways-you-can-hurt-a-man dept.

Spam 54

Gamasutra is carrying the sad news that the second-oldest PC gaming magazine is to shut down. TheGlobe.com, owner of Computer Games Magazine and its sister, MMOG-specific magazine Massive, has apparently opted to shutter the outlets as a result of financial troubles. They were saddled with a judgement by a California court in connection to a series of spam messages that went out across the MySpace social site. An SEC filing stated that the company stood to lose at least $40 Million; these shutdowns appear to be the direct result. "Calls to TheGlobe.com's Florida-based publisher Jayson Dubin, also the publisher of CGM and Massive Magazine, were not returned as of press time, with more recent calls to his direct line getting an automated recording indicating that the number had been disconnected. Besides Computer Games Magazine, TheGlobe.com also operates two other wholly-owned subsidiaries: voice over IP solution prover Voiceglo, and online game retail outlet Chips & Bits."

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Only mentally retarded people use linux (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18339017)

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Myspace? (1)

MeanderingMind (884641) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339023)

Can someone fill us in on the nature of this Myspace spamming? I don't remember hearing about this.

Re:Myspace? (3, Insightful)

McFadden (809368) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340407)

Well a quick look on The Google seems to indicate they weren't entirely innocent.

I'm confused by this. Spamming is bad, but when a spammer suffers the consequences of their actions, we're supposed to feel sorry for them?

Re:Myspace? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18346789)

Just one minor correction. The parent company of the magazine company did all the spamming, and they are the ones with the $40 million lawsuit. As a result, they have decided to close the magazine. The magazine is not directly involved in the spam lawsuit.

Re:Myspace? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 7 years ago | (#18353825)

I'm confused by this. Spamming is bad, but when a spammer suffers the consequences of their actions, we're supposed to feel sorry for them?

Well, in this case, it was the parent company who did the spamming. This leads to the closure of a gaming magazine (which, presumably, didn't spam).

We're happy to see the parent company taking a hit for the spam. Saddened that it has collateral damage of non-sucky things.

This would be like a computer company we liked going under because, say, Time Warner got dinged for securities issues or something. [ I have no idea if T-W owns any such companies, I'm just giving a for instance ]

Cheers

Seems to be a trend (5, Interesting)

Sciros (986030) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339095)

This isn't the first gaming magazine I've seen go (or announce going) away. I guess it just isn't cost-effective enough to operate a gaming magazine nowadays. Sites like Gamespot, IGN, etc. are probably proving to be just too much competition. Perhaps eventually gaming magazines altogether will go the way of the dinosaur.

That's ok with me, personally. I like magazines for their exclusive screenshots and such, but otherwise they really are redundant with respect to the internet. Nowadays the only mags I find worth looking at anymore are automotive or graphics design mags. The former I subscribe to because they're cheap and have decent writing about pretty cars (and better photos than I see online). The latter are just a good resource for learning how to use graphics software, even though they are way overpriced (especialy the British mags). Plus, girls dig the graphics mags lying around. Not so much the Gamepros.

Re:Seems to be a trend (3, Interesting)

thesupermikey (220055) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339195)

I used to be a regular reader of Computer Gaming World and PC Gamer, but ones broadband came online in my area, it no longer made scene to keep getting print mags. Gamespot, and IGN covered all the same things that the print mags had, but the Demo Disk was by far the major reason i kept getting them. However, with broadband, i no longer even needed the demo disc.

While the mags will be missed, the internet is far better of a medium for game journalism than print.

Re:Seems to be a trend (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18339563)

but ones broadband came online in my area, it no longer made scene to keep getting print mags.

Who was it that said the internet makes you dumber?

Re:Seems to be a trend (2, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340611)

While the mags will be missed, the internet is far better of a medium for game journalism than print.

I fully understand why gaming mags would succumb to tech first, but can the rest of print journalism be far behind?

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

innocent_white_lamb (151825) | more than 7 years ago | (#18344291)

That depends on the publication's audience.
 
Will a technically-oriented magazine have a natural tendency to move online? Of course.
 
Will a magazine about quilting or tulip bulb planting or knitting or tractor repair move online as easily? Not so much.
 
There will probably always be room for a printed publication laying on someone's table, workbench or truck dashboard. At least, for a very long time yet.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

Lemmy Caution (8378) | more than 7 years ago | (#18350361)

I'm willing to read short news pieces and such online. Literary fiction, long academic papers, in-depth work , or art/photo-rich articles, not so much. (For academic articles, I'm likely to print them out and read them.)

What is a little ironic to me is that there is only one game magazine published in the US of which I would be willing to buy paper editions: The Escapist, which happens to be digital-media only. (In the UK, I would buy Edge; in Japan, I'd buy Continue.)

Re:Seems to be a trend (2, Insightful)

70Bang (805280) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341237)


Having grown up with hardcopy, I still use it. If I find something whilst online, that's fine.

Someone was mentioning Game Magazines, it's almost as if they are interchangeable.

For a long, long, long time, there have been but three PC-only game magazines:

1. Computer Gaming World
2. PC Gamer
3. Computer Games

Other magazines mentioned PC-based games on their covers and dedicated a minimal number of pages to PC-based until consoles were such a major force.

Then there was the issue of PC-only games, desktop-only, and MMORPGs. Once it was evident the MMORPGs was making hand over fist, charging 300'000 people only $10/month for $3'000'000 per month or $36'000'000/year. Other business forces saw this as a salt lick and jumped on the bandwagon, but like a pizza delivery firm, you can't take the pizza out before it's done, expect it to bake, even a smidgin on the way there. As a result, you get lots of chewy pizza.

This is what happened to MMORPGs, when a shell game was made available (what was it? My memory is failing me in my old age. It was a military game) and a 20MB patch was required to actually do anything, surpassing several months of (Microsoft's) Patch Tuesday. Even then, there was a modicum of a game, asking the customers to bear with them, still charging the clientele, meaning money was coming in and they didn't have quite the urgency they would have had when no money was coming in. Of course, that would have created a Death March.

Companies who want excellent reputations and keep their entire staff happy, especially in the game industry, do not impose Death Marches lightly. Unless you've been out of college for fewer than five years, you know Death Marches are the same in every industry which may claim allegiance to the people who pound keys.

Large PC-based computer games are dying a slow death. Multiple versions of Windows, different drivers for many graphics cards, inconsistent amounts of memory, disk space, etc. is too much of a headache to make it worth the while. Consider being a hunter and every animal requires a small range of different gauges, distances to do the damage, and so on. One gun doesn't work in all situations.

A console-based game, standalone IOR online is more a matter of competition against any other vendor without worrying about the spectrum of hardware.

I'm still a desktop-only, PC-based game fan, but it's going to be jumping from puddle to puddle for anyone willing to remain with my confines.

It would almost be more worthwhile for Linux-based & -only games because there are fewer variables in the equation. (I'm not pushing Linux, I'm just saying the math is simpler.)

I remember starting to work for a computer book publishing division (late '92) which wrote about technologies they wouldn't use. Word/DOS until I dragged them to Word/Windows, when it jumped from 2.0 to 6.0. Create toolbars with buttons to relieve the tedium of finding any special characters inventoried for the Production Department, count and|or renumber tables, figures, etc. You'd be surprised how many things which were done manually.

[Almost] everyone had a door so they could isolate themselves and focus upon the text (task) at hand. I took the full version of Wolfenstein with me not long after I started for somewhere between 1-2 work weeks, the Wolfenstein Productivity Virus hit. Even the pacifists who wouldn't have picked up a gun to save themselves, their children, etc. were playing. If you knocked on someone's door......."Hold on!" (no boss key) I believe productivity was chasing an asymptote of zero.

In the 93-94 timeframe DOOM emerged and several of us broke into a phone closet and found some NIC cards sitting around, wired the spare connections in our offices & closet, and at 5pm every day, we locked our doors, put our phones on conference call mode with speakerphones turned on, and played DOOM.


<sigh> Those were the days.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

Lord Lemur (993283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18342355)

Wolfenstein Productivity Virus.... that takes me back. Why can't we find games that... enthralling anymore? I'm in the same boat you are. I swore off console games some time around the Turbo Graphix 16. The reason I gave them up for PC-only gaming was very straight forward for me. There is no game that you can play on multiple systems in which the PC version wasn't the best. The level of flexability in input mapping, settings, and (to relive a classic with a new twist) cheating, was unmatched. Some time back in around 2000ish? something seemed to happen to the PC game market however. I guess it's the direct result of the bubble bursting. The sea of isles of PC games turned in to an isle or 2. I imagine it's a matter of capital investment, and risk. Game manufactures are too condensed and risk adverse. Every thing was the same, the sequel, or 'teh sux'. There have really been what, 1 big New game each year since. I think that is more of the slow death of the Large PC game then simply the preceived increase in complexety of hardware. I can remember when games required me to input every detail of my hardware everytime I played. (Which IRQ is my sound card again :) ?) I think the shrinking market place of titles must also have been effecting the mag. I'm sure the lawsuit was a big nail, but my vote was death was inevetable from both the low cost alternatives and the decline of the game. Just my 140,000 Yen.

Re:Seems to be a trend (0, Offtopic)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 7 years ago | (#18343825)

There is no game that you can play on multiple systems in which the PC version wasn't the best.

There are many such games.

Every thing was the same, the sequel, or 'teh sux'.

Gee, I've never heard this one before. It must be true because everyone keeps repeating it.

Re:Seems to be a trend (4, Insightful)

Call Me Black Cloud (616282) | more than 7 years ago | (#18342931)

I'll take my gaming news in magazine format, thank you. I'm not lugging my laptop into the john with me, but that's where I read gaming mags.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

master_p (608214) | more than 7 years ago | (#18345153)

Magazines like 'the Edge' prove you wrong.

A magazine nowadays can not simply present the games. It needs to include interviews, analysis of the game industry, comparisons between technologies, and other stuff that online editions do not offer.

The curse of Old Media (4, Insightful)

Skadet (528657) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339271)

You are correct in what you are saying; however, it goes even deeper. Magazines, as well as other "old-school media" such as radio, are quickly scrambling to find relavence in the age of new media. I used to work for Clear Channel Radio as a webmaster for KFBK-AM [wikipedia.org] , a radio station with a significant history in Sacramento [oldradio.com] . The fact is that people go to the Internet for their information more than they go to TV and Radio -- and if you're not even going to watch TV, what are the odds you'll pick up a magazine?

I'm more than a little saddened to see historical entities like newspapers (anyone keeping up with Knight-Ridder?) and AM stations going down the tubes. But such is the cost of evolution.

The curse of Slashdeaths. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18339667)

"I'm more than a little saddened to see historical entities like newspapers (anyone keeping up with Knight-Ridder?) and AM stations going down the tubes. But such is the cost of evolution."

Um, I know it is the current fad to predict the death of something (like it's gospel or something). But I suggect you read this [pbs.org] before proclaiming something dead.

BTW here's my contribution to the "3D Mars" story, since Taco has a retarded posting limit. Map the Mars photos to a globe and put a skybox around it. Then with the gravity feature one can walk around Mars. Megatexture should really help here.

Re:The curse of Brainless Media (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340561)

The fact is that people go to the Internet for their information more than they go to TV and Radio -- and if you're not even going to watch TV, what are the odds you'll pick up a magazine?

Sick of idiotic crap on TV != doesn't read.

....au contraire....

Re:The curse of Brainless Media (1)

Skadet (528657) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341095)

Sick of idiotic crap on TV != doesn't read.
*shrug*. Everyone I've met who complains that TV is inane impresses me as sanctimonious. How is it that the Discovery Channel is for idiots with square eyes, and discovery.com is for the enlightened? With insane amounts of programming, the only reason to be exposed to "idiotic crap" on TV is to choose to watch it. There's plenty of idiotic crap on the Internet, too, isn't there, but the same people who smugly proclaim their lack of TV dick around on the Internet. Right.

For the record, this wasn't an intent to flame you, or really directed personally at YOU at all. Your comment kind of sparked my brain on that subject. That is all.

Re:The curse of Brainless Media (2, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341409)

*shrug*. Everyone I've met who complains that TV is inane impresses me as sanctimonious. How is it that the Discovery Channel is for idiots with square eyes, and discovery.com is for the enlightened? With insane amounts of programming, the only reason to be exposed to "idiotic crap" on TV is to choose to watch it. There's plenty of idiotic crap on the Internet, too, isn't there, but the same people who smugly proclaim their lack of TV dick around on the Internet. Right.

No comparison imho. I can consume internet content at a much faster rate than I can watch or listen to the radio. Watching something like mythbusters for example; I find it unwatchable -- they take a bloody real-time hour (including commercials) to deliver content that can be summarized completely in half a dozen text paragraphs. Sure I "miss out" on the explosion, the chick who says "Wow" everytime something happens, the guy covered in yellow goo, the incessant 'coming up in the next scene' scenes before commercials, and of course the commercials themselves. But I don't need or want any of that.

The worst part is that even in video format there's only maybe 10 minutes out of the 45 that are worth watching. (60 counting commercials)

All the informational content can be summarized on a single page, and absorbed in ~1 minute by a decent reader of reasonable intelligence.

Even on the 'real world' internet which is choked full of ads and that one page worth of information isn't concisely presented, and you have to link-surf, scroll around ads, etc to find anything - you can still get all the information in a couple minutes.

(This is why I HATE 'audio' and 'video news' clips on the net. I don't want to listen to, or even worse WATCH some low res video segment for 5 minutes (often prefaced with a commercial). I want to read a transcript, which takes maybe me 10-15 seconds to skim.)

The only time I want to watch or listen to content delivered in real time is for entertainment purposes. Or when I need to see something. (e.g. I'd be interested in watching footage of a storm hitting a town, for example if I'm interested in the storm or town for some reason.)

But in general audio/video in realtime, padded with useless filler, then padded with teaser scenes, then padded with commercials is an excruciatingly painful way to absorb information.

my 0.02

Re:The curse of Brainless Media (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341933)

You managed to sum up most of the reply I was about to give. As for the GP's rant? Rather than being "sanctimonious" concerning TV, I'm just bored with it instead. Nothing personal.

Re:The curse of Brainless Media (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 7 years ago | (#18360091)

Podcasts are the worst. One hour of audio that contains roughly the amount of information that would fit on one A4 page. But instead of downloading a few kBs of text and reading it in five minutes you get a file of several megabytes that takes a looong time to listen to. Never mind that in the age of multimedia you can put images or even videos to illustrate something in your text instead of talking for five minutes to explain what you mean. You can't easily skip uninteresting bits in a podcast like you can in a text since there are no visible paragraphs. Also the usual complaints about radio [homestarrunner.com] still apply to podcasts.

Re:The curse of Old Media (1)

Eivind Eklund (5161) | more than 7 years ago | (#18345883)

I don't watch TV, as it consume too much time/bit. I read magazines, as they actually consume less time/bit than reading online.

I know I'm not alone (for instance, my girlfriend is the same, and has been since before we met.)

Eivind.

Seems to be a downloadable trend (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18339367)

"Perhaps eventually gaming magazines altogether will go the way of the dinosaur."

And so will their cover discs. Good thing everyone has broadband.

Re:Seems to be a trend (3, Funny)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339655)

Perhaps eventually gaming magazines altogether will go the way of the dinosaur.
They'll turn into birds?

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

Sciros (986030) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339833)

No no I mean they'll suffer from a major climate change when Yellowstone goes kaboom and slowly die out. Maybe one or two magazines will evolve through this period and become VR feeds you plug directly into your brain, but most will turn into, um, oil reserves.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340061)

No, but we'll burn them and contribute to global warming.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

cspariah (958194) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340257)

Hmmm... I don't think it's a safe assumption to pin these closures on anything regarding the gaming magazine industry. Check out Troy Goodfellow's blog entry on the topic [flashofsteel.com] . According to him, the magazines were doing fine, but theglobe.com simply couldn't deal with the massive fines dealt it in the MySpace suit.

Computer and Video Games already toast (1)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340387)

This isn't the first gaming magazine I've seen go (or announce going) away. I guess it just isn't cost-effective enough to operate a gaming magazine nowadays.
Yep; Computer and Video Games [wikipedia.org] (C+VG or CVG), the British magazine that had been running since 1981 was shut down in late 2004 (supposedly a temporary rest for a few months, but it hasn't returned, and I don't think it's likely to now). Of course, it was probably more susceptible to competition from the net, being a no-cover-disk, lower-middle market magazine with bite-sized content and aimed mainly at tweens/early-teens. That is, the type of content that can go online most easily, with the type of audience most likely to want to find it online anyway...

But all that probably tells us is that CVG was an early warning, going first because it was most prone. The more adult-oriented mainstream publications such as "Computer Gaming" falling seems to indicate a trend (or perhaps it really was just down to the parent company's financial problems?)

But regarding CVG, what intrigues me is whether it's still possible to sell a computer games magazine aimed at a similar under-16s market. What form would it take? It can't compete with the net directly, or be as up-to-date, but perhaps they could focus on maps and large multi-page playing guides that might be hard to put online effectively (or print out). I don't think that alone is enough to sustain a magazine, though.

Re:Computer and Video Games already toast (1)

Andrew Kismet (955764) | more than 7 years ago | (#18344087)

The guides and hints are better found online - the huge maps for games being an annoyance and waste of pages to the reader who doesn't happen to own that specific game. The Prima Guides with their glossy covers and absolute coverage of the games outdo the comparatively homebrew efforts of the magazines. Only the official magazines, and the more attentive mags such as Edge [edge-online.co.uk] and games(TM) [gamestm.co.uk] with more mature, reasonable, industry-centric content will continue to flourish. Although games(TM) do seem to dedicate a few too many pages to retro-gaming for my liking; I was raised on Sonic the Hedgehog, not Atic Atac.

Re:Seems to be a trend (1)

RyoShin (610051) | more than 7 years ago | (#18342457)

Sites like Gamespot, IGN, etc. are probably proving to be just too much competition. Perhaps eventually gaming magazines altogether will go the way of the dinosaur.
And even those sites are hurting a bit. It's not just the online media outlets, it's the internet in general.

Back in the day, gaming magazines were pretty much the it source for news about upcoming games, reviews, previews, and demos. Then the internet came along and turned everything on it's head. First gaming magazines migrated to an online presence, offering daily news instead of monthly, videos for viewing, and surviving off ad revenues.

But this was back before the internet really took off. Now any dick and jane can speak their piece about a game and have it be heard; preview videos can be had at most developer websites, or shared amongst many sites such as YouTube. I don't read gaming sites anymore; instead, I go to fan-created and/or user-run websites that aggregate news and opinions, such as Fark, Slashdot, and 4chan's /v/. If something is relevant, it shows up on one of these three sites.

Furthermore, it's not just gaming sites that are under this pressure. The advent of the Social Internet, one where almost any layman can generate their own content, is quickly turning the tides of the online business- it's much more profitable to just have a backend that allows users to upload their content, which is then viewed by other users.

MySpace, Slashdot, YouTube (with questionable success), Fark (which now has its own "TV" show), 4chan, Digg- all of these websites are big, popular, and produce almost none of their own content. It's merely places for users to congregate, offering the necessary code and helpful filtering (and even that is going to users, such as Slashdot's Firehose and Fark's Voting feature for TotalFarkers). Video game sites (and, much quicker, magazines) are not exempt from this shift.

There's still a place for content generated by reporters, though- they have the training to make lasting cohesive articles. Plus, without gaming reporters we wouldn't get interviews with industry leaders or "hot news" on early previews.

Justice Served (0)

antirelic (1030688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339499)

$40 million is quiet harsh, but shit, I hate spammers so much, that I'll just have to ignore the fact that they got pwned by the legal system.

It Happens (3, Insightful)

El Torico (732160) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339575)

This just in, many horse whip manufacturers are out of business due to the success of the automobile. Industry analysts predict that only niche markets such as horse racing and S&M remain.

Re:It Happens (1)

26199 (577806) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339607)

Lots of new potential for magazines, then.

Horse racing and S&M (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 7 years ago | (#18349525)

Industry analysts predict that only niche markets such as horse racing and S&M remain.

Oh, now you're just flogging a dead horse.

uh oh (4, Funny)

mackil (668039) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339745)

I just renewed my subscription today, not 3 hours before seeing this post. I hope I can get my money back.

Re:uh oh (1)

illegalcortex (1007791) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341349)

You could try reversing the charges, if you paid by credit card. Mostly that's for fraudulent/problem vendors. But you could probably make a case to the phone rep that there's no way you'll get the product you ordered.

Re:uh oh (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#18343229)

> I just renewed my subscription today, not 3 hours before seeing this post. I hope I can get my money back.

No you didn't Mackil. I was passing through a chatroom (don't remember which one sorry) and some Russian hacker was boasting he'd used your credit card number. Maybe he was making it up, but if the charge appears on your bill you should mention this.

This is just awful (1)

Butisol (994224) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339829)

Now I'm going to have to read articles by one of their myriad direct competitors instead.

Quantity wins over quality (3, Insightful)

Gertlex (722812) | more than 7 years ago | (#18339915)

I find this news very unfortunate. It was a good read and hadn't degenerated to inane banter and crude statements. The key example I hold up is EGM. That POS is so bad that readers write in complaining about it's degenerative trend and the editors publish these letters and then bash the opinions of their subscribers in direct reply.

I get the feeling that EGM has a larger subscription base (by far), is suffering sales problems too, and is ultimately resorting to the aforementioned behavior. It seems quality has lost out in the bid for quantity.

spam (2)

Johnny Mnemonic (176043) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340099)


"If you spam, you could lose your business".

Seems pretty reasonable to me, provided they were in fact responsible for the My Space spam.

Hopefully that becomes the rule instead of the exception.

Progress (2, Interesting)

6-tew (1037428) | more than 7 years ago | (#18340167)

It's progress. I still read some gaming and computer magazines, mostly because I like the writing and they are easier to take to the can. The whole notebook on the can thing is awkward and uncomfortable, so it the stare I get from my wife when she sees me heading to the can with a computer... or PDA... or cellphone. She's really quite old-fashioned I now realize.

When I was in college we had this great discussion about the relevance of print media in the 21 century. This was in 1999 so we had to guess. My professor thought the best the traditional outlets could end up doing was being relevant in newspapers. Magazines would inevitably loose out because of delays going to print (which the web is immune to) and cost.

He also made two other good points. Newspapers don't need batteries, neither do books and magazines. A good point, to a point -- no doubt technology will soon provide a solution. Also the "old guard" has the money to hire the good, known writers who can try for higher quality. This approach would suffer over time, new talents would emerge, old talents fade; ultimately this is a bandage solution.

Savvy outlets have built their online outlets up in the hopes of being ahead of the curve. Ultimately we don't really loose anything, we get the same thing from somewhere else. Like trading up from dial-up to cable, same service, better package.

I am so sad... (2, Interesting)

Giolon (1006069) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341213)

This is the magazine that got me started reading video game magazines when I was a kid. I first received a complimentary issue as part of an order from Chips & Bits, since my brother and I had to order our PC games from there being that our small town had no computer store. It's consistently been the highest quality magazine over the past 10 years that I've had a subscription, with the best articles, the reviews I trusted most, and some of the most interesting columns I've read. While I've picked up and dropped subs to other magazines, mine to CGM has been constant. Now, I'm very sad. :( I hope to see the mag's staff pop up elsewhere.

Computer Games Magazine To Shut Down (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341493)

Gamasutra: I quit.
MMORPG Player Dude: Can I have your stuff?

History (2, Informative)

SirBruce (679714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18341899)

Computer Games Magazine was originally known as Strategy Plus, and then changed its name to Computer Games Strategy Plus, before reinventing itself as the new Computer Games fairly recently. Next to Computer Gaming World, it's certainly been my favorite computer games magazine and it will be missed. I'm also disappointed that yet another MMOG-focused magazine, Massive, will be ceasing publication as well.

Re:History (1)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 7 years ago | (#18343261)

> I'm also disappointed that yet another MMOG-focused magazine, Massive, will be ceasing publication as well.
Why do you only hear about useful things when they go out of business.

As a substitute, check out Terra Nova: http://terranova.blogs.com/ [blogs.com]

It's fairly academic, but good for a no-nonsense read on what's up with MMOGs. Koster, other MMOG bigwigs and academics post there.

Re:History (1)

SirBruce (679714) | more than 7 years ago | (#18344737)

Yes, there are a lot of good MMOG blogs and such out there. However, if you're looking for another print magazine, we still have Massive Online Gamer: http://www.beckett.com/beckettMOG/default.osi [beckett.com]

It was the best one of the few left (2, Informative)

snuf23 (182335) | more than 7 years ago | (#18342053)

I found the editorial content and voice of Computer Games magazine to be significantly more mature than either of the two remaining major computer game publications (Games for Windows and PC Gamer). They offered some excellent articles discussing the nature of games as well as a very good reader submitted column.
I wondered how they managed to pay their bills seeing as they had few advertisers. I guess younger readers prefer magazines with less insight and more fart jokes.
I will be very sad to see them go and boy what a colossal fuckup with the spam.

This has been coming for a while (1)

bigbigbison (104532) | more than 7 years ago | (#18342473)

OF the three PC-centric videogame mags in the USA computer Games has been thinner than PCWorld or CGW aka Games for Windows Magazine. For a few years now they've been trying to broaden the audience with crap like "Now Playing" which was an attempt to cover music and movies, which they tried to spin off into a magazine, and most recently with "Massive" which also spun off of CGM. Their reviews have often been a month behind the other mags too.

That being said, they were more thoughtful and had better coverage of things like videogame legislation and mainstream media's scare mongering around videogames (such as the Hot Coffee incident and such). They didn't get the fancy cover stories that the other mags did, but they had a lot to offer. I'll miss it.

Gaming mags may always be out of date compared to web sites, but like an old fashioned card catalog the nature of the format was that you might find something you wouldn't have ordinarily found if you weren't flipping through it. And I'm still reluctant to take my laptop into the bathroom with me or to lie in bed with it before I go to sleep.

well....damn.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18344103)

Been a subscriber to CGM for many, many years. Very sad to see it go, as it was the best of the remaining computer gaming magazines out there. One which was written intelligently and with adults in mind, something of a rarity for gaming magazines. It will be greatly missed. I guess all that's left for me is Edge, a magazine I only recently discovered, but will now likely subscribe to. Here's to hoping it doesn't go under as well.

I also enjoyed the whole two issues of MASSIVE magazine. RIP to the both of them, and best of luck to those who wrote for them.

Who gets the money? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18346945)

I didn't RTFA all the way through, but if Myspace gets 62 million, does any of the end users who actually received the spam and may/may not have been influenced get compensation? Or does it all go back into Myspace pockets?

Of all the spammers to get it, it had to be CGM (1)

fruitypops4ever (1075713) | more than 7 years ago | (#18349527)

How sad. Just a little spam. But I guess if you got money and spam, someone is going to come after you.
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