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File Sharing — Harmful to Children and a Threat to National Security

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 7 years ago | from the root-of-all-evil dept.

Security 342

jkrobin writes to mention that a recent report from the US Patent office calls peer-to-peer file sharing harmful to children and a threat to national security. "Interestingly, the report makes numerous references to RIAA and MPAA legal actions against file actions, as well as cites a 2005 Department of Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge."

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342 comments

Whereas: (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355331)

Software patents are harmful to the US economy and the whole of humanity.

<sarcasm>You go USPTO!!!</sarcasm>

Re:Whereas: (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355551)

Software patents in and of themselves are not harmful, it is US Patent Office that is. Software merely takes a generalized machine and turns it into a specialized machine. Clearly a unique specialized machine should be patentable.

That said, the Patent Office doesn't have a clue about how to evaluate software patents. The number of obvious (vs non-obvious) inventions that make it through is just incompetence. The fact that things that have existed in the open for decades can be patented as unique wouldn't fly when it comes to mechanical patents and it shouldn't with software patents either.

Re:Whereas: (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355725)

> Software merely takes a generalized machine and turns it
> into a specialized machine. Clearly a unique specialized
> machine should be patentable.

No the general purpose machine is the patentable invention. Specific information (ie: software) should be protected by copyright. Pure software is not patentable and all software is pure software.

Stop the INSANITY! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355337)

Stop the INSANITY!

This is getting just stupid.

We live in a MEDIA driven State of Fear.

Re:Stop the INSANITY! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355869)

This is the smartest thing anyone has said about this so far!

Americans are so easily manipulated. They have been so conditioned by advertising it's not even funny.

Re:Stop the INSANITY! (5, Insightful)

eonlabs (921625) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356049)

MPAA and RIAA with flagrant and excessive lawsuits directed at random are potentially harmful to children?

Senators who don't keep file sharing software away from classified files (or don't actively restrict the software from sharing those files) are a security threat?

hmmm...

Wording could be important on this issue too.
Maybe what we want is for people to RTFM on some of the software they install on their machines. Senators are being paid enough to have a work machine that does not have crap on it. This is a modern world, and if people being elected into office can't keep up with it, they shouldn't be elected. Once they are there, it's there responsibility not to screw up on something stupid like that.

Someone else figure out the RIAA MPAA problem. They're beyond me.

children (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355345)

oh please wont someone think of the children

Re:children (2, Insightful)

Duhavid (677874) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355457)

We are.

Next up,

Websites, email, and ftp are also bad for children, and a threat to national security.

Re:children (3, Insightful)

Aphex Junkie (633436) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355523)

We are. Next up, Websites, email, and ftp are also bad for children, and a threat to national security.
Just as I thought: gopher and USENET are safe for children and American as apple pie!

Re:children (4, Funny)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355715)

your comment has been deemed harmful to children and kittens.

Do not leave your house, place your hands on the wall and wait, a mind correction team will be with you shortly...

Re:children (1)

Duhavid (677874) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355787)

Ha!

I got rid of my mind some time ago.

Correct away!

LAME! (0, Redundant)

balloonhead (589759) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355359)

OMG think of the children the terrorists have won WTF

When you pirate MP3s, you're downloading COMMUNISM (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355693)

I can't believe this [modernhumorist.com] hasn't been posted yet.

The "When you pirate MP3s, you're downloading COMMUNISM!" poster dates back to 2000; it only took us seven years to go from wacky parody to grim reality.

Hmm (4, Insightful)

TheMeuge (645043) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355363)

It's good to know that RIAA and MPAA are willing to expend so much energy and money to educate our public officials. After all, we wouldn't want any extra freedoms to slip under the door.

Re:Hmm (5, Funny)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356009)

Reminds me of when my brother got busted with pot. He lost his car and about $3k in fines and court costs. My parents blamed pot. Although pot didn't do that to him the government did. Pot only ever got us high.

good thing it's 80 pages (5, Funny)

EllynGeek (824747) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355371)

So we have a GOOD reason, for once, to comment without reading the article.

Re:good thing it's 80 pages (4, Funny)

vivaoporto (1064484) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355419)

You must be new here. I thought this being Slashdot was the good reason.

Re:good thing it's 80 pages (1)

br0d (765028) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355809)

Another good reason: maybe we consider RIAA related threads to be automatic flamebait.

Pencils -- Harmful to Children etc. (5, Insightful)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355377)

The ordinary pencil is, in our modern America, a flagrant excess that cannot be tolerated. Pencils can be used to copy national secrets from one piece of paper to another, and leave no identifying marks of any kind on the documents that have been copied. Their sharp ends can be used to gouge; children can inflict grevious rubber burns upon one another using the rubber end. Perhaps most shocking of all, the pencil graphite is conductive and could be used in any number of explosive devices where conductive elements are required.

The Pencil manufacturing concerns of America, however, are resolved to work with the U.S. government to mitigate this crisis. Henceforth, all pencil purchases are tracked with a unique REAL ID-coordinated identifier. Authorized use of pencils will require a tiny microchip implanted under the skin of the right hand. A left-handed version of the chip is expected to be available before 2020--until then, pencil-using left-handed Americans will have to make the sacrifice of writing less legibly until the chip is available.

Wow, I'm really bored today.

Class (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355417)

> Wow, I'm really bored today.

If you produce that level of satire as a result, please be bored more often ;-)

Re:Paper -- also Harmful to Children etc. (4, Funny)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355435)

Recently, Paper has also been called into question.

If you take a heavy-stock piece of high quality paper, fold it into quarters, grasp the edges, and slam your arm down to force air through the middle flap, you can create a sound that will stop an airport in its tracks.

The Etch-A-Sketch brand has been revived and is being offered as a paper-replacement tool, but Microsoft has expressed doubt that the One Etch-a-Sketch Per Child program will work.

Re:Paper -- also Harmful to Children etc. (5, Funny)

cyberbob2351 (1075435) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355663)

But we cannot get rid of paper, for paper beats rock, and rocks are the BIGGEST concern.

We need to abandon earth and become a space-faring civilization - otherwise our children's children will be plagued by potential weapons (rocks) to use against one another.

I call for a disbanding of the NRA (The national rock association)

Re:Pencils -- Harmful to Children etc. (4, Insightful)

fair_n_hite_451 (712393) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355489)

What bothers me about this report ... and everything like it which has been trotted out over the last few years ... is that people are expected to be stupid enough to believe it.

I mean, how dumb do you have to be to believe that because children could be manipulated into violating the law by some evil website designer, this has ANYTHING to do with national security?

Unless they think that when we fence off England and turn it into a giant prison island (I mean, they're already halfway there on the surveilance front) there won't be any young males left to fight our wars if we've put them all in jail for stealing copyrighted (copywrit?) items.

These MAFIAA people don't think like I do, and that scares me because they obviously don't have the same moral (in terms of what's right and what's wrong, not anything religious) standards that I do ... and they seem determined to turn me into a criminal for some reason.

Re:Pencils -- Harmful to Children etc. (4, Insightful)

Rycross (836649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355621)

Well enough people seem to think that video games can influence children to break the law... I don't see why you think its such a huge logical leap to think the same for web sites. Its the same thing with people thinking Harry Potter or Dungeons and Dragons will encourage kids into witchcraft. Its sad, but people are stupid enough to believe it.

Re:Pencils -- Harmful to Children etc. (1)

Elfboy (144703) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355793)

there won't be any young males left to fight our wars if we've put them all in jail for stealing copyrighted (copywrit?) items.

or the more dastardly side of it that was used in the Vietnam draft era. Serve time or Serve your country.

They're going for the high score! (5, Funny)

Rycross (836649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355379)

So they busted out the old terrorist chesnut and "Think of the children?" All they needed was to add something about immorality (implying Christian morality), and they would have had a perfect score.

Re:They're going for the high score! (4, Funny)

miskatonic alumnus (668722) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355821)

Bird flu. Don't forget the bird flu.

Re:They're going for the high score! (1)

rthille (8526) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356071)

Hey, bird flu is on my mind today. I spent this morning pulling dead pigeons, maggots & bird-nest out of the eaves of my house today....

Don't forget greenhouse gasses. (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355937)

I'd have added baby seals, but those seem to have fallen out of favor.

Just as well: When you paint 'em green to save 'em from the fur market the mothers stop nursing them and they stave to death.

Or maybe they think they won't have to save as many now if the polar bears are going to have to swim farther go get between ice floes.

Security of what? (5, Insightful)

LoudMusic (199347) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355397)

File Sharing -- Harmful to Children and a Threat to National Security

[snip] ... Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge.
File sharing? Sounds like ignorance about security is the real threat. And they're in charge of security? We are so fucked.

Re:Security of what? (5, Insightful)

synjck (1069512) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355465)

it's analogous to say "guns are a threat to national security" or "airplanes are a threat to national security."

as always, personal responsibility is brushed aside in the name of hype.

Re:Security of what? (0)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355717)

Guns and aeroplanes are both a threat to national security. The solution, of course, is for 'us' to make sure we have more of both than 'they' do. If file sharing networks are also a threat, then the solution must be for the DoD to invest in building a lot more of them.

Re:Security of what? (1)

Kamots (321174) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355783)

The real issue here is why do systems with classified information have access to anything other than a tightly controlled internal network?

Where I work, having classified information on an "open" computer is a good way to have all sorts of fun with departments you don't want to have fun with :P

Maybe instead of blaming file-sharing networks, the report should have focused on the horrible security policies in place that allowed this to occur? But then, that wouldn't support special interests, would it? Bah, I'm getting ever more cynical :/

Wait-- children AND terr'ists? (2, Insightful)

markbt73 (1032962) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355407)

It's two-- two-- two scare tactics in one!

Re:Wait-- children AND terr'ists? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355605)

But you wrote the word "two" three times!!!

Not the real issue.... (5, Insightful)

cyberbob2351 (1075435) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355409)

file-sharing software could be to blame for government workers who expose sensitive data and jeopardize national security after downloading free music on the job

It sounds like the network administrators in said "governmental offices" should take the precautions neccessary to police the bandwidth. Furthermore, any environment in which said p2p applications are capable of leaking any private information need to be under closer scrutiny.

Don't blame the p2p networks for the actions and negligence of those in control of their own computer infrastructure.

A decade ago, the idea that copyright infringement could become a threat to national security would have seemed implausible. Now, it is a sad reality.

Since when is copyright infringement, and not massively-propagating worms and keyloggers, the problem for national security. The latter causes FAR more breeches of personal identity information and credentials.

Re:Not the real issue.... (2, Funny)

UbuntuDupe (970646) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355781)

It sounds like the network administrators in said "governmental offices" should take the precautions neccessary to police the bandwidth. Furthermore, any environment in which said p2p applications are capable of leaking any private information need to be under closer scrutiny.

Yeah, imagine if they had p2p in Star Wars:

FULL DEATH STAR PLANS!!!NO KIDDING!!!!.R2D | DroidFile | 5.1 Gb
deathstarschematics.r2d | DroidFile | 5.1 Gb
Death Star 1of20.r2d | DroidFile | 250 Mb

Classified info (4, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355411)

The threat to national security is not the file sharing software it's the asshats who have access to classifed documents,who are installing Kazaa on their government owned work computers. You could just as likely leave a few thumbdrives with trojans sitting around where these guys have lunch.

Re:Classified info (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355463)

This is indeed the root of the matter. Why is it even possible to copy this data to a computer? They should be accessing it through an application that doesn't even let them do so. I mean, if you want security, you have to design for it.

Re:Classified info (1)

Rycross (836649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355477)

So.... DRM?

Re:Classified info (3, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355519)

So.... DRM?

This is precisely what "trusted computing" is actually useful for.

There ARE times in which your computer should not trust you! These are times in which it's not really your computer - which is to say, when it belongs to your employer. And double-extra-when your employer is the government and you have access to classified information.

Re:Classified info (2, Insightful)

Rycross (836649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355599)

Just making sure that we're on the same page. I actually agree :) Although its kind of frustrating that a potentially useful technology is being used in a futile effort to make sure that we don't copy the latest new pop song. Its kinda like pandora's box: yeah, theres some good stuff in there at the bottom, but you have to let all the crap out as well.

Re:Classified info (2, Insightful)

sconeu (64226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355565)

The other question questions are "Why are machines with classified data able to access the internet? And why did users have permissions to install said software?"

NISPOM chapter 8 specifies the requirements for a classified machine.

Whenever I set up a classified net, one of the last things I do before I get certified is to yank the internet connection. All classified nets should be physically isolated.

Also, all software changes to a classified computer must be logged. Ordinary users should not have permissions to install such items, and any attempt to do so should be logged as a potential security risk. I would think that the network/sysadmins of these systems are NOT doing their job properly.

Re:Classified info (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355627)

This is indeed the root of the matter. Why is it even possible to copy this data to a computer? They should be accessing it through an application that doesn't even let them do so.
You don't seem to realise that in some departments (think CIA), nearly EVERYTHING is classified, right down to emails inviting your colleagues out for a drink tonight. Make data access too restrictive and they won't get any work done at all. Well, maybe you think that would be a good thing... :)

The trivial solution is simply to have anyone caught doing this crap publicly executed, preferably by wild horses or flaying alive or some such. These people are stupid enough to think it's a good idea to install Kazaa on their work computer. For the good of the human race, we cannot risk letting them breed.

Re:Classified info (1)

br0d (765028) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356115)

The threat to national security is not the file sharing software it's the asshats who have access to classifed documents,who are installing Kazaa on their government owned work computers.

Those people are serious idiots, but the real problem is a lot more insidious...people are not installing private applications on company computers so much as installing private applications on private computers and then connecting those private computers to company resources via either VPN/extranet or sneakernet (laptops.) This problem is pervasive and promises to be one of the largest security challenges going forward.

Haha I said "going forward"

Dumbass government workers (1)

Secret Rabbit (914973) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355413)

"""
as well as cites a 2005 Department of Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge.
"""

I don't think this is the fault of file-sharing programs. It's more the profound stupidity of the government worker. I mean seriously, making info public when secret docs are lying around!?!? Perhaps the government should work more on enforcing existing policies instead of putting the blame (falsely) elsewhere.

Re:Dumbass government workers (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355603)

Perhaps they should try installing a goddamn FIREWALL on their networks, and block all outgoing ports by default. If a P2P program can access outside resources, so can some real malware.

Re:Dumbass government workers (1)

Secret Rabbit (914973) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356105)

No shit! Wasn't there a story a while back about almost all of the government agencies not passing some cyber security test? Perhaps this is some fallout and they're trying to limit there own responsibility.

Some ISSO and SAs should lose their jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355421)

"2005 Department of Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge"

Applications must be thoroughly reviewed and only installed per authorized usage on secured systems. Somebody needs to be fired over this.

Jim

Not only that..... (5, Funny)

Stanislav_J (947290) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355425)

Also may cause dizziness, insomnia, psoraisis, and the Creeping Crimean Crud.

The cause of the fall of the Roman Empire? File sharing.

JFK's assassins? File sharers.

Besides, file sharing isn't mentioned in the Bible, so it must be forbidden by God.

Re:Not only that..... (5, Funny)

Haeleth (414428) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355741)

Besides, file sharing isn't mentioned in the Bible, so it must be forbidden by God.
Well, there's all that stuff about "render unto seeders"... :P

(And the Feeding of the N-thousand, of course; if Jesus is going to go round making thousands of unauthorized copies of someone else's bread, he can hardly send you to hell for sharing a few tracks, now, can he?)

Re:Not only that..... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356127)

Well, there's all that stuff about "render unto seeders"...

      I swear to you I can see the parable of the (mustard) seed having something to do with BitTorrent.

Chicken Little (5, Funny)

macdaddy357 (582412) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355431)

The sky is falling! The sky is falling!
Oh, and while we're at it, Wolf! Woooooooooooooolf!

Re:Chicken Little (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355779)

A wolf mysteriously falls on macdaddy357 from 30,000 feet.

There's no patch for human stupidity (4, Funny)

cl191 (831857) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355437)

"Department of Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge."
How about changing the title to: Human Stupidity-a Threat to National Security?

Threat to our children? Did you read the summary? (5, Interesting)

StewedSquirrel (574170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355443)

This is farking hillarious!!!!

They say that file sharing is a "threat to our children", but did you read WHY?

* that peer-to-peer networks could manipulate sites so children violate copyright laws more frequently than adults, exposing those children to copyright lawsuits and, in turn, make those who protect their copyrighted material appear antagonistic,


So... it's file sharing's fault that the RIAA looks like profiteering litigious bastards for suing a dozen teenage kids. Somehow, file sharing made them do it

I can't believe I just read that.

gah.

I'm moving to the Czech Republic or something.

Stew

Re:Threat to our children? Did you read the summar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355831)

This is farking hillarious!!!!

No, it's not (spelling aside) - it's yet another attempt to create certain "truths" that support a specific political agenda (which is a corporate agenda after all, but where's the difference today?). Repeat lies often enough and they become truth. Support your "report" with "evidence" that national security and/or kids are in danger, and you can count on it that your arguments will be heard and spread, no matter how wrong or - in this case - mindboggingly stupid they are. To even question - as lots of /.ers do - who in his clear mind would believe the findings of the report is denying how credulous people are. This is a report from a government agency, after all, and it mentions kids! And homeland security! Fear always works as a motivator. It is going to fall on fertile ground and it's another piece in the "p2p is evil" puzzle... . Not exactly hilarious, that.

Patent Office? (1)

failure-man (870605) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355447)

What do they have to do with this? Get back to rubber-stamping that patent on the two-dimensional pointer array. Go now, before congress yells at you for not rubber-stamping enough!

bogus and reality check (3, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355467)

So the "harmful to children" line is completely bogus. LOTS of stuff is harmful to children. That is why parents have to take some responsibility to protect their kids. ... Oh, think of the children. Yes, think just how terrible it will be to grow up under information tyranny.

The second line is much most interesting. p2p really IS a threat to the nation state system. More generally, free information exchange will erode the power of the state significantly. Lots of people all freely sharing information will mean the whole concept of countries starts to break down. If everyone can get all the information they need from anywhere across the globe and across borders, why do we need those borders still? To protect the physical resources? Hardly. Information is the last (latest) great resource humanity has stumbled upon and now people are making Googles of money doling it out, just like the oil barons, and other folks who have controlled major resources in the past.

The really cool thing about information is that you don't loose it when you copy it, so there CAN NEVER be scarcity of information (at least long term) UNLESS the laws and the state artificially support systems to create information scarcity. WHY WOULD HUMANS CHOOSE THAT? Quite simply, they won't, when they fully understand the choice. p2p works directly against the idea that information should be artificially maintained as a scarce resource by laws, and hence, it gives the 'ole thhhhbbbtbtbtbt to the nation state and the lynch pins of it's power and ability to control the people.

Life is a such beautiful thing. It unfolds exactly as it should. This is good.

Re:bogus and reality check (1)

Rycross (836649) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355561)

Beautiful rhetoric, but innacurate.

Actual resources are far more important than information. Information won't feed or clothe me, it won't quench my thirst, and it won't give me materials to build a roof over my head.

Furthermore, people will chose to put artificial limits on information if there is a choice between having that information with restrictions, or not having the information at all. Whether the dichotomy exists and in what situations is very much up for debate.

And lets not forget that the "information" being traded here is, by a vast majority, entertainment. Its not stuff thats going to help you our in life, other than blowing off stress.

Re:bogus and reality check (4, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355805)

I disagree. Information is far more valuable that physical resources. With the right information, we know which trees grow food, how and where to grow them, and when and how to harvest them, also which plants grow (just like weeds) that we can weave and wear, and how to build the best structures with available materials. Rinse and repeat for most all of the physical resources people need.

The choice between ignorance and tyranny is a false choice, provided by those who wish to control your access to information in order to take money and energy from you.

I strongly disagree with the implication that just because some information has "entertainment" value that it is of a lower class or less important than other information. Who are you to judge what someone else values and why? You might consider reading more about myths and how they have evolved over time - and learn how stories are the transport layer for the structure of civilizations. Do you think people who make movies do so only to distract us from our "more important" business pursuits? Wow.

Re:bogus and reality check (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18356139)

To use one of your examples, which is more important in your eyes, information on how to grow and harvest your own food or the latest hit song or movie? You can't honestly tell me that "information" created for entertainment is as valuable as information that allows you to survive. You may be entertained, but you're gonna starve.

Re:bogus and reality check (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18356025)

So the "harmful to children" line is completely bogus. LOTS of stuff is harmful to children. That is why parents have to take some responsibility to protect their kids. ... Oh, think of the children. Yes, think just how terrible it will be to grow up under information tyranny.

From the description in the summary of the report, it seems to me that responsible parents wouldn't help against what they describe. How will parents taking responsibility to protect their kids make it so that the children don't dislike the RIAA and don't consider them antagonistic and litigious? The problem here is that the paper has a completely bizarre conception of harm to children.

To use the pencil analogy that others here have used, the report isn't just complaining that children might be stabbed by pencils. It is also complaining that children might read about pencil stabbings and decide that society must have problems.

priceless (5, Funny)

cyberbob2351 (1075435) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355471)

  • Windows XP SP2 - $83
  • Mac Tiger OSX - $129
  • Half life 2 - $29.99
  • 20Gb of music - ~$2000
  • Getting all of the above with p2p - Free
  • Murdering children and bringing to a halt the fabric of modern society - Priceless
  • ?????
  • Profit!
For this and everything else, there's Bittorrent

Harmful to children (4, Insightful)

phorm (591458) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355475)

Which is to say that, of course, music and movies depicting or narrating gangbangers pimping hoes, killing rivals/cops/etc, and committing various other crimes are not harmful to children.

Hmmm... well at least their glass houses get a lot of light.

Glad I'm no kid today (1)

crassico (1058002) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355491)

Maybe I am, but if by the time I was 12 it'was as easy as today to download full pr0n movies, I would surely have missed some things good.

Many of the classified documents on p2p networks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355499)

...are merely bogus with repetitive loops of non-classified material.

In fact, when a classified document becomes particularly popular, the CIA floods the network with bogus info and entire documents of redacted text.

Any bets on whether the classified KaZaA ... (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356027)

Many of the classified documents on p2p networks...are merely bogus with repetitive loops of non-classified material.

In fact, when a classified document becomes particularly popular, the CIA floods the network with bogus info and entire documents of redacted text.


Any bets on whether the KaZaA install allegedly publishing the classified information was actually a disinformation operation in the first place - with the Dept of Homeland Security warning part of the operation?

"Oh, DEAR! Some idiots installed KaZaA on machines with REAL, GENUINE, USEFUL to ENEMIES classified information and it LEAKED! Oh the HORROR! (Snicker.)"

everyone knows how stupid this is... (1)

3seas (184403) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355505)

What it is really saying is how stupid those who are promoting it really are.
Or maybe they are just being deceptive, mostly to themselves.

Guess what, I just shared a file... the one this message is contained in.
what method of sharing has nothing to do with any arguement.

I've recently used FTP to download, http to download, even ssh to edit my own site which is sharing files eveytime someone access it.

I have also used bittorrent recently to download dynebolic and other linux distros as well as watched and saved some videos from youtube.

I've sent some CDs (linux) to friends, etc...

So My question is when are we going to take the computers away from those who preceive them and their use to be bad? And lets niot for get about their cars too.....
 

Re:everyone knows how stupid this is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355637)

even ssh to edit my own site which is sharing files eveytime someone access it.

I agree with some of what you said and... No offense but your site is evidence in support of censorship or outlawing the free exchange of information.

Hmmm... (4, Informative)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355507)

Wouldn't it be better to say:

"Government Employees - A Threat to Children and National Security"

File sharing on the job?? (1)

mad_psych0 (991712) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355527)

For the Federal Government, this threat became manifest during 2005, when the Department of Homeland Security warned all Federal Agencies that government employees or contractors who had installed filesharing programs on their home or work computers had repeatedly compromised national and military security by "sharing" files containing sensitive or classified data. These users probably did intend to use these programs to download popular music, movies, software or games. But it seems highly unlikely that any of them intended to compromise national or military security for the sake of "free music." The only thing scary about this is the fact that there are people with access to documents that could compromise national security that a) store them on their personal home computers, and/or b) are to daft to figure out how to figure a p2p client to share specific folders instead of their whole computer.

Paper -- Harmful to Children etc. (2, Funny)

Looce (1062620) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355531)

We need to outlaw conventional paper and force the use of PDF documents everywhere.

Think of how many times you have cut your finger on the edge of rough paper. And now, can you tell me that paper is harmless to children and not a threat to national security? I don't think so.

I, for one, think this law will enable greater national security and protect the children from harm.

If the risks are so great... (1)

Mortimer82 (746766) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355555)

We may as well move all the children into special homes where they can't do anything to harm themselves, in fact we will do the whole human race a favor and keep them drugged so they don't do anything stupid.

I am too angry at the audacity of this statement to try justify why it so insanely stupid, you can't blame technology when stupid/ignorant/careless people are to blame. For a poor attempt at an analogy, should we also ban the use of motor vehicles because of all the fatalities each year from them?

File sharing doesn't kill people. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355559)

A recent report from the US Patent office calls peer-to-peer file sharing harmful to children and a threat to national security.

File sharing doesn't kill people. People kill people.

If we ban people first, I'm pretty sure file sharing will be a complete non-threat to either children or national security. If we ban file sharing first, I'm pretty sure children and national security will both be in just about as much danger as they're in today.

This is merely an example of iggerunce. (2, Interesting)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355569)

The fact is, most government officials were adults and very busy before personal computers were common. Since they have been so busy with their careers they have had little time to educate themselves about technology. It isn't exactly correct to call them ignorant, because that's too respectful. More precisely, they are iggerunt.

Remember, Ted Turner, the founder of CNN, called the Time-Warner merger with AOL, "better than sex" [bbc.co.uk] . Immediately after, the combined company lost 88 billion dollars because of the deal. Quote from the linked article: "AOL reported a loss of nearly $100bn for 2002, after a loss of $44.9bn for the final three months of the year."

Ted Turner is a smart guy, but he was iggerunt about technology.

The proper response to "Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO" Jon W. Dudas is, "Dude, you're fired."

Re:This is merely an example of iggerunce. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355705)

Remember, Ted Turner, the founder of CNN, called the Time-Warner merger with AOL, "better than sex". (...) Ted Turner is a smart guy, but he was iggerunt about technology.

... or maybe he just likes his sex very rough!

Re:This is merely an example of iggerunce. (1)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355823)

You will no doubt agree that an 88 billion dollar loss is very rough.

Re:This is merely an example of iggerunce. (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356015)

88 billion dollars can certainly buy you a lot of sex, too!

Warning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355579)

My Gringo friends your country is more and more sounding like a dictatorship of the New World Order (NWO).

President Kennedy wanned you all about this check the video [youtube.com] .

America and the world are really in a mess.

MOD PARENT UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355891)

the US is on the fast track to VBP: Very Bad Place.

Government workers to blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355583)

This is kind of a damning double edged statement. Classified material isn't supposed to be processed on the same systems as non-classified material. The military has a completely separate network [wikipedia.org] for classified info. This to me says that there's a complete lack of understanding, awareness, and general common sense used in the administration of governmental networks (is this statement redundant?).

First question: Why was filesharing software installed (it's against regulations)?
Second: Why was classified material on an unclassified machine?
And last, who got fired for this oversight?

File Sharing on the job??? (1)

mad_psych0 (991712) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355607)

preview-owned on the previous comment..

For the Federal Government, this threat became manifest during 2005, when the Department of Homeland Security warned all Federal Agencies that government employees or contractors who had installed filesharing programs on their home or work computers had repeatedly compromised national and military security by "sharing" files containing sensitive or classified data. These users probably did intend to use these programs to download popular music, movies, software or games. But it seems highly unlikely that any of them intended to compromise national or military security for the sake of "free music."

The only thing scary about this is the fact that there are people with access to documents that could compromise national security that a) store them on their personal home computers, and/or b) are to daft to figure out how to configure a p2p client to share specific folders instead of their whole computer.

Re:File Sharing on the job??? (1)

PhxBlue (562201) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355857)

Many (if not most) members of Congress have at least a Secret clearance. Depending on what panels they're on, their clearance may be a lot higher.

Scary, but true. It's not just geeks who have clearances ... it's people who wouldn't have a clearance in a million years if the Peepul(TM) hadn't given them their jobs.

pr0n (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355639)

well, if you dont want them looking at pr0n just chmod 000 /usr/bin/vlc. of course using a OS where one can have simple control over execute permissions is great.

who (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355649)

government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge.
 
Was it Michael D. Brown?

the real threat (1)

TheSlashaway (1032228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355733)

I guess it never dawned on them that government workers are the real threat to national security and to our children.

How the hell does that work ? (1)

Joebert (946227) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355737)

Interestingly, the report makes numerous references to RIAA and MPAA legal actions against file actions, as well as cites a 2005 Department of Homeland Security report that government workers had installed file-sharing programs that accessed classified information without their knowledge

Wait a second, does that mean the workers didn't know the file sharing programs accessed classified information, or that we don't even know what our own government workers are doing ?

Re:How the hell does that work ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355855)

OK so now the RIAA needs to file lawsuits against the government workers. We wouldn't want anyone getting away with free music. They filed against the dead guy so let's go after the government worker. We have a few dollars lying around that we don't need to send to Iraq, Samalia, Egypt, Vietnam, China, or any other third world country so lets give it to the riaa, those assholes need it more than the starving poor people do.
Just my two cents.

Perfect defense? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18355775)

From the report, page 1 (I. Executive Summary): This report concludes that the distributors of these five filesharing programs... (BearShare, eDonkey, KaZaA, LimeWire, and Morpheus) ...have repeatedly deployed features that had a known propensity to trick users into uploading infringing files inadvertently.

If this were true, what's to stop every user that gets sued from claiming "BearShare/eDonkey/KaZaA/LimeWire/Morpheus made me share those files, I had nothing to do with it!"? If the RIAA's and MPAA's lawsuits are based on the fact that the files were illegally made available, would that not then be the perfect defense since it would cast reasonable doubt on the case?

Better drop windows as it (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355829)

shares your HD by default under a hidden share.

Give every reason but the real one, as usual (4, Interesting)

retrosteve (77918) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355841)

What the propagandists are trying not to say is simply this:

"The US economy was once based on manufacturing. Our cars and buildings and aeroplanes and weapons were the best you could buy, and people bought them and America prospered. Lately people have stopped buying all those things, and we no longer manufacture anything for export but movies, music, and software.

Our economy has gone from world-leading to "service-based" in just a few decades, and our only hope of exporting something that people might want to buy is in movies, music and software. Unfortunately, all those things are now digital, and easily copied millions of times for free. Even more unfortunately, the more we try to protect our eroding export figures with DRM and IP enforcement, the more we realize that other countries don't have to play by the rules we make up. And it's those other countries that count most.

So it's time for education. Or perhaps Re-education. Time to teach everyone that, despite our own flagrant disregard for the Berne conventions and international IP rights from 1886 up until 1989 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berne_convention), it's vital that the world now all fall into the US party line on IP enforcement and DRM. And if we can't do it with WTO, IMF, WIPO, and Most Favored Nation status, we'll do it with propaganda.

File sharing kills babies! File sharing promotes pedophilia! File sharing is communist and fascist and Saddam-loving! File sharing destroys family values and promotes the gay agenda!

I've wanted to say this for a long time.

But seriously, folks (1)

retrosteve (77918) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355987)

File sharing harms the U.S. economy. That's the bottom line.

Back in 1890, when all the interesting IP was being produced in Britain, the US were unabashedly pirating all they could. And they did well.

Up until 99 years later, when the balance tipped, and the US economy started to depend on exporting its own IP. Then the US converted to the side of righteousness, joined the Berne convention, and became evangelistic about it. Meanwhile China and most of Asia and Africa are net importers of IP, and are unabashedly pirating all they can. The cycle continues.

What I think -- I think Americans should, for patriotic reasons (having nothing to do with children's morality), strongly support copyright and IP.

I think other countries should decide what's best for their own citizens.

And let the market work out as it may.

Of *course* it's a threat. (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355935)

Of course it's a threat to national security. It's difficult to censor, difficult to trace, there's a low barrier to entry, and, worst of all, it allows Freedom.

I'm afraid it's true (1)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355955)

Allowing secure, uninhibited communications amongst individuals is a grave threat to national, and more importantly, corporate security. We must put procedures in place to register those who wish to apply for the privilege of uploading anything other than their credit card number.

They're right (1)

lewp (95638) | more than 7 years ago | (#18355989)

Insofar as outdated, unjust laws and inept government employees with far too much access to unsecured computers and networks are the fault of P2P, I suppose the patent office is on to something.

File sharing a threat to idiots (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18356019)

and children of idiots.

Holy Shit! (1)

webheaded (997188) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356067)

Thank god they let me know in time! I will stop my file sharing immediately or it could result in the destruction of the free world! Jesus Christ, how could I be such an insensitive clod?!

Why just *file* sharing? (1)

Dormann (793586) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356079)

Does it have to be a file to hurt children and national security? What's so unique about having the information in a file, as opposed to sharing a photograph or a pamphlet?

It would appear that letting other people have things is really the source of what threatens our way of life. And sharing? Not expecting anything in return? Not in my America, bub.

Just ignore them (1)

DogDude (805747) | more than 7 years ago | (#18356089)

Anybody with half an ounce of business knowledge knows that the MPAA and RIAA are not going to be around much longer. Media distribution isn't a viable business any more. Times change. We also don't need buggy whip makers any more, either. So why not just relax, ignore them, and stop buying their products?

We already have tons and tons of *good* independent music that you can get without dealing with them. Movies will come soon. It'll be painful for them, and for the industry-created "artists" (ie: virtually all "musicians" that are invented for teen consumption), but they'll go away soon enough. I'm looking forward to seeing movies both becoming popular and being distributed via whatever the You-Tube equivalent is a few years from now.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go download some Pearl Jam shows.
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