Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Caves on Mars?

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the little-green-cavemen dept.

Mars 99

RockDoctor writes "The BBC is reporting that the photo-surveying of Mars has revealed seven suspected cave entrances in the Arsia Mons volcanic area. This has been hinted at before — long sinuous channels in the same region have been interpreted as collapsed 'lava tube' caves — but the scale of the suggested entrances (sheer drops of 80 to 130m from the surrounding surface) makes my troglodytic hands twitch for my abseiling gear."

cancel ×

99 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Bin Laden? (5, Funny)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385555)

Maybe THATS where he's been hiding!

Re:Bin Laden? (0, Offtopic)

ezratrumpet (937206) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386155)

Mod parent funny.

Re:Bin Laden? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18388235)

Mod parent so offtopic
Mod moderator anal

That explains everything (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18391583)

I have been wondering why we were going to the Moon instead. I am guessing that W. got real intelligence that backs up what you said.

Ob. Futurama (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385561)

Zapp: Behold...the Great Stone Face of Mars. The only known entrance to the Martian reservation.
Leela: What about the Great Stone Ass of Mars?
Zapp: Well, yeah, but it's way over the other side of the planet.

Re:Ob. Futurama (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388399)

Behold...the Great Stone Face of Mars.

Mardoz!
     

Osama caves (-1, Offtopic)

thatchman1 (470825) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385597)

Maybe osama is in the caves on mars...

news? (4, Interesting)

wileyAU (889251) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385599)

Is this really news? To be completely honest, it had never occurred to me that there wouldn't be caves on Mars.

Re:news? (5, Interesting)

onion2k (203094) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385671)

It depends on the caves really. Fracture caves or lava tubes would certainly be expected because they're formed by volcanic and tectonic movements. If Mars didn't have that then something very odd would be going on. Solutional cave formations are less of a certainty though. These are the sorts of caves formed by water absorbing CO2 during rainfall, turning to carbonic acid, and dissolving certain sorts of rock. For them to exist you need both water and CO2 obviously, and specific mineral deposits to desolve. Their existence could tell us more about the chemical makeup of the martian surface.

Plus, caves would be a likely place for microbes to continue to thrive. Caves on Earth of full of life.

Re:news? (1)

Spock the Baptist (455355) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386923)

Ooooooh!

Giant Martian Cave Spiders....

STB

Re:news? (1)

AJWM (19027) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388493)

Martian Cave Spiders....

Of course. The spiders from mars [wikipedia.org] are legendary.

Re:news? (3, Informative)

Diamonddavej (851495) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387189)

Caves can form in rocks other then limestone, such as gypsum - CaSO4.6H2O. In this case water simply dissolves the gypsum, which is slightly soluble in water irrespective of CO2 content. Gypsum is common evaporite mineral on Mars and can form pure deposits e.g. Pollack Crater has gypsum on its floor, it looks like Karst to me.

Re:news? (1)

beckerist (985855) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388251)

But again, water is still a requirement... I think THAT'S what's most significant (at least to me) about this revelation.

Re:news? (1)

LordVader717 (888547) | more than 7 years ago | (#18394017)

Actually, no tectonic movements. That's how Olympus got so big.

Re:news? (4, Insightful)

rmadmin (532701) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385681)

To some of us, it is news. To be completely honest, it had never occurred to me that there would be caves on Mars.

Caverns of Mars, 1981 (2, Informative)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386357)

To some of us, it is news. To be completely honest, it had never occurred to me that there would be caves on Mars.
Greg Christensen [wikipedia.org] was more insightful than you then. :-)

Re:news? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385869)

Yeah, it's no big deal... I've been there and there not all that great... I only saw a couple of paintings and they that aren't all that good...

Re:news? (5, Interesting)

phrostie (121428) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385965)

although water formed caves would be exciting from a geological standpoint, i like the lava tubes theory.
a lava tube would have the possibility of being sealed and an atificial atmosphere created for habitation.
It's be safer than an inflatable structure on the surface.

Red Mars / Green Mars / Blue Mars (1)

calyxa (618266) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386765)

In Kim Stanley Robinson's brilliant Mars trilogy, a key settlement is inside a lava tube cavern complex.

Re:Red Mars / Green Mars / Blue Mars (1)

Tekoneiric (590239) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387633)

And they seem to be on the same scale too.

Re:news? (3, Interesting)

ozbird (127571) | more than 7 years ago | (#18389347)

a lava tube would have the possibility of being sealed and an atificial atmosphere created for habitation.

Given that lava tubes appear to be prime habitat for any potential life on Mars, pumping one full of toxic oxygen raises a few ethical issues.

Re:news? (1)

Teancum (67324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18395091)

Ahhh... the Red Mars/Green Mars debate by Kim Robinson.

And part of the same philosophy that has suggested that all of Mars ought to be preserved as some ecological nature park like Antarctica is at the moment... only scientist need to apply for a visit and nobody can settle there permanently.

While I can understand this point of view, it is hardly the only opinion here and there are very legitimate reason to want to use lava tubes like this. Still, that there are ethical issues to raise about this is something that is valid to raise, even if you think there are greater rewards that may come from those who choose to fill tubes like this with oxygen for human habitation.

Re:news? (1)

getonwithit (1077353) | more than 7 years ago | (#18396457)

I agree. The pace at which NASA and the other space agencies release this information makes me feel like I'm being spoon fed. They've also just announced that they found all of this frozen water. Give me a break. They've known this for a long time. I'm totally convinced that they already know there is biological life on Mars. There are plenty of MGS pictures of the south pole that look like forests growing in the middle of ice covered fields. I wish they would just get on with it already. We can handle the truth. We've gone from red/dry/dusty to possibility of water to probable water to confirmation of some small amounts of water to confirmation of huge amounts of water. Next will be announcement of possible microbial life to probable microbial life to confirmation of microbial life to possible intelligent life to probable intelligent life to confirmation of intelligent life to . . . Good grief . . . get on with it already. I'd like to hear the last announcement sometime during my lifetime.

I keep my... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385601)

troglodytic hands in a box in storage.

If their so smart they can find their own way out.

Re:I keep my... (3, Funny)

cypherz (155664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386801)

Might have been funny if you had spelled "they're" correctly.

their != they're

Re:I keep my... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18387139)

"If their so smart they can find they are own way out."

Yeah, your way makes SO much more sense. Good job flaming someone when you can't do it right yourself.

Re:I keep my... (1)

cypherz (155664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387319)

Gee, I guess I should quit smoking crack!

Re:I keep my... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18392879)

Naa, just edit your first comment...

Re:I keep my... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18387343)

"If they're so smart they can find their own way out."

Way to keep your eyes open, Mr. Smartypants.

obligatory (0)

jb.cancer (905806) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385615)

so that's where all martians are!!

Mars canyons (1)

Werrismys (764601) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385625)

Filled with green martians in flying saucers bent on invading Earth.

yes, but (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385639)

Does Mars have a Bat Cave?

Martians are Cavemen? (1)

6-tew (1037428) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385669)

Now that we know where they are I feel foolish for not seeing it sooner.

abseiling gear? (0)

polar red (215081) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385699)

I suggest you mount rocket boosters then ... Mars has a lower gravity; but no atmosphere, so No planes, no choppers, ... only rockets will keep you up.

Re:abseiling gear? (0, Offtopic)

polar red (215081) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385719)

Sorry ... I thought poster meant paragliding ... Go ahead with abseiling ... it'll be easier than on earth.

Re:abseiling gear? (1)

KingArthur10 (679328) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385847)

Mars has a decent atmosphere. Nothing compared to Venus or Earth, but many surveyor mission ideas dealt with light weight, flying craft to do reconnaissance. Other ideas include balloon craft to circle the surface and image, which would also require atmosphere.

Re:abseiling gear? (1)

rHBa (976986) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385915)

Didn't I hear somewhere that Mars has very high speed winds?

If that is the case then, despite the thin atmosphere, paragliding might be possible. It looks like there might be some nice terrain for soaring [nasa.gov] . Obviously you'd need some pretty solid gear to withstand all the sand (ferrous dust) flying about, not to mention a space suit.

Re:abseiling gear? (1)

fireylord (1074571) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385985)

no, the atmosphere is too thin for paragliding to work. you'd have a minimum air speed of something stupidly high

Re:abseiling gear? (1)

Eideewt (603267) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388809)

IIRC, the atmosphere is so thin that by the time you were going fast enough to get off the ground you wouldn't be able to actually maneuver.

Re:abseiling gear? (1)

Teancum (67324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18395307)

It isn't that thin. It is on the order of manuvering in the stratosphere, and due to the much lower gravity on Mars the atmosphere doesn't thin out as you gain altitude to the degree that it does on the Earth. At some of the lower altitudes on Mars (like at the bottom of Hellas Basin or Valles Marineris), all you would need to survive there as a human is good winter clothing (like being in Antarctica) and an oxygen mask. The atmospheric pressure there is similar to being at the top of Mt. Everest... and people have climbed that mountain without even using an oxygen mask (the atmosphere of Mars has different composition of atmospheric gasses... so the need for an oxygen mask is clearly more critical).

Commercial passenger airliners on the Earth can and do maneuver in those atmospheric conditions, although you would be correct that it would be much more difficult and require much, much longer "runways" to accomplish the task. A Helium baloon, however, certainly could do some manuvering (or even use Hydrogen since it would be harder to burn on Mars).

For an excellent comparison of the size different between Mars and the Earth, I love this picture [wikimedia.org] . Unfortunately, it doesn't show comparisons to other airless objects like the Moon.

All I'm pointing out here is that there are terrestrial analogs that you can use to show how flight on Mars wouldn't necessarily have to involve a power decent engine like you need on the Moon.

Mars Planes (1)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390557)

Mars has a lower gravity; but no atmosphere, so No planes, no choppers, ... only rockets will keep you up.

Mars does indeed have an atmosphere, albiet a thin one. So planes designed for Mars can actually fly: http://www.x-plane.com/mars.html [x-plane.com]

News for Nerds. Prussiks matter. (2, Insightful)

lightversusdark (922292) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385715)

Who here knew rock-climbers were nerds?

Re:News for Nerds. Prussiks matter. (1)

mustafap (452510) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386019)

>Who here knew rock-climbers were nerds?

We are up there wiht cyclists as gadget freaks, that's for sure.

"FailzOrs? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385735)

thi[s mistake 0r who sell another

I predict ... (1)

eck011219 (851729) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385741)

... the next Geico auto insurance ad.

Mars Rover II -- so easy, even a caveman can do it.

Here's What They'll Find Inside... (3, Funny)

cybrpnk2 (579066) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385791)

OF COURSE there's caves on the Red Planet. Doesn't anybody read Chapter 8 of The Warlord of Mars [cmu.edu] anymore?.

Re:Here's What They'll Find Inside... (1)

TorKlingberg (599697) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386183)

I love how they page says "This page is an experiment; if I am succesful, it should take advantage of Netscape 2.0's advanced features without breaking other browsers."

Re:Here's What They'll Find Inside... (1)

cybrpnk2 (579066) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386667)

Then, turning about the corner of a wall-like outcropping of granite, we came upon a smooth area of two or three acres before the base of the towering pile of ice and rock that had baffled us for days, and before us beheld the dark and cavernous mouth of a cave. From this repelling portal the horrid stench was emanating, and as Thuvan Dihn espied the place he halted with an exclamation of profound astonishment. "By all my ancestors!" he ejaculated. "That I should have lived to witness the reality of the fabled Carrion Caves! If these indeed be they, we have found a way beyond the ice-barrier. "The ancient chronicles of the first historians of Barsoom--so ancient that we have for ages considered them mythology--record the passing of the yellow men from the ravages of the green hordes that overran Barsoom as the drying up of the great oceans drove the dominant races from their strongholds. "They tell of the wanderings of the remnants of this once powerful race, harassed at every step, until at last they found a way through the ice-barrier of the north to a fertile valley at the pole. "At the opening to the subterranean passage that led to their haven of refuge a mighty battle was fought in which the yellow men were victorious, and within the caves that gave ingress to their new home they piled the bodies of the dead, both yellow and green, that the stench might warn away their enemies from further pursuit. "And ever since that long-gone day have the dead of this fabled land been carried to the Carrion Caves, that in death and decay they might serve their country and warn away invading enemies. Here, too, is brought, so the fable runs, all the waste stuff of the nation--everything that is subject to rot, and that can add to the foul stench that assails our nostrils. "And death lurks at every step among rotting dead, for here the fierce apts lair, adding to the putrid accumulation with the fragments of their own prey which they cannot devour. It is a horrid avenue to our goal, but it is the only one."

Re:Here's What They'll Find Inside... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386875)

The first discovery of the caves was in the film 'Robinson Crusoe on mars'.
In the same footage it shows rocks that can be heated to provide oxygen, and examples of lifeforms.

NASA is, as usual just replicating old discoveries and claiming them as new. Still waiting for the rovers to come across the loin cloth clad natives and their little huts.

Re:Here's What They'll Find Inside... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18391343)

What they'll find inside is megatons of frozen oxygen and an alien reactor.

Now get your ass to Mars!

This just begs the question (0, Redundant)

maGiC_RS (946022) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385807)

Do martian terrorists hide in martian caves?

The actual article's URL (5, Informative)

simonbp (412489) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385919)

Here's the actual article's URL; the also had some supporting papers at LPSC that show up at ADS...

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?bi bcode=2007LPI....38.1371C&db_key=AST&data_type=HTM L&format=&high=44e3b245f913347 [harvard.edu]

Simon ;)

Re:The actual article's URL (2, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 7 years ago | (#18385961)

Thank you. I wondered why an article on "caves" would not have anything resembling a graphic, especially since they were discovered by photographic mapping. But looking at the article explains it. They look like nondescript bubbles and the theory that they represent a cave like structure comes from the thermal spectrum of the objects. Not much to see here...

And why are these "caves" all named after women? No, let's not go there....

Spacemen become Cavemen (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385945)

FTA:
The authors say that the possible discovery of caves on the Red Planet is significant.

The caves may be the only natural structures capable of protecting primitive life forms from micrometeoroids, UV radiation, solar flares and high energy particles that bombard the planet's surface.


Like maybe Earthlings?

Re:Spacemen become Cavemen (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386033)

Yeah, maybe, but only after we're sure a suitable cave is free of Martian life.

Wait - does that mean we wait outside if it is full of life?

Or - does it mean we clean it out with Lysol and Scrubbing Bubbles?

Or a mix of both - is one cave worth sacrificing for a base from which research on other caves could be performed - it's unlikely that the organisms (if any) in the caves would be identical.

Of course, these caves are quite a distance from the poles and the "known" water and solar resources.

Re:Spacemen become Cavemen (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388331)

The caves may be the only natural structures capable of protecting primitive life forms from micrometeoroids, UV radiation, solar flares and high energy particles that bombard the planet's surface.

Micrometeor a threat? "Look Squiqq, I evolved a flegellum, wiggle wiggle." Fffmmp! "Shit, now I'll have to start over."

Seriously, though, caves may be the only practical way for astronauts to be protected from radiation. Astronauts only stayed on the moon for a few days, but if one is on a naked planet for a month or more, then radiation becomes a big problem. If they could explore the insides of caves, then bulky suits and houses may not be needed.
       

Re:Spacemen become Cavemen (1)

smchris (464899) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390693)

Yeah, that's been speculated for a while. But I say, "'Primitive', hell!" How many other people are dying for a good "Aliens-type" caves of Mars movie using current science as the backdrop?

Creationism (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18385989)

If God created everything specifically- and we were created specifically and all that- then why create all these 'empty' planets/galaxies?

It seems to me, that the mere existance of other planets disproves intelligent design- or at least calls into question whether we're the only ones - which would call in to question intelligent design by default.

I believe there's a supreme being/beings, but I think we were still created through evolution- what better way to get to 'perfection' (I don't think -we- are perfect by a longshot, but future generations may be closer).

Just the fact that mars seems so much like our planet in so many ways- including water, tells me that if there's a planet that close to habitable that close to us, there's -got- to be other lifeforms out there either on similar 'm class' planets or on totally different atmospheres with totally different biology. After all, there are creatures that live in the deepest parts of the ocean on all kinds of toxic (to us) chemicals.

I'm not slapping creationists in the face, but I do think you can be Christian and believe in God and Jesus or be Muslim and still believe in Allah, etc and believe that we are here by a different means albeit perahps one that [insert deity] started in motion.

The thing that's always bugged me is that the bible was written by humans and not even in english, translated by humans several times, and yet people hang on specific wordings of specific versions. I firmly believe the bible is more of a guideline than an absolute as a result. The stories are supposed to suggest meanings/ideals, not fix behavior into stone based on someones interpretation- we all know how well interpretation works under the law.

Re:Creationism (-1, Offtopic)

GooberToo (74388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386129)

If God created everything specifically- and we were created specifically and all that- then why create all these 'empty' planets/galaxies?

The canon reply is to test your faith. The same reason the earth is 5000 years old (or whatever) but bones, artifacts, and fossils are found which date back much further. Again, the canon reply is to test your faith.

I'm not slapping creationists in the face, but I do think you can be Christian and believe in God and Jesus or be Muslim and still believe in Allah, etc and believe that we are here by a different means albeit perahps one that [insert deity] started in motion.

Actually, let me know where the line starts. A good face slapping is what a lot of this ignornant idiots need. ;)

Re:Creationism (0, Offtopic)

kwrxxx (1038350) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386159)

What makes you think they are empty? They could be filled with life from other dimensions. BTW, how does a cave on Mars begin a discussion about creationism? Religion so easy a caveman can do it?

Re:Creationism (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386391)

If God created everything specifically- and we were created specifically and all that- then why create all these 'empty' planets/galaxies?

Why not? Or for that matter, why create a world in the first place? Perhaps our existence would seem emptier and less meaningful if the entire world was obviously specifically tailored towards our well-being?

In my opinion, the sibling's "to test your faith" answer isn't a good one, but I have no problem accepting that if an intelligent supreme being exists, then it's certainly possible--even likely--that we are simply unable to understand it fully. If we were able to understand the motivations of God perfectly, we would be godly ourselves. (I'm an agnostic, for the record.)

Re:Creationism (2, Funny)

SharpFang (651121) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386555)

Oh well, I'd say it's quite obvious. If they took a rock of martian soil and put it under a microscope they'd read: //reserved for future use

Re:Creationism (1)

hal9035 (827327) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390751)

Naaahhh, Mars was a previous attempt.....

Re:Creationism (1)

GooberToo (74388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18394717)

That would imply God is not perfect. Strike one. ;)

Re:Creationism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18388097)

"I firmly believe the bible is more of a guideline than an absolute as a result. The stories are supposed to suggest meanings/ideals, not fix behavior into stone based on someones interpretation- we all know how well interpretation works under the law."

A nice thought, but it undermines the authority of the church if everyone's interpretation is valid.

And as church still equals state in much of the world, that cannot be allowed.

Re:Creationism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18389477)

I think Noah lived on Mars, and the human race took a 'ship' to Earth.

Controlled Singularity (0, Offtopic)

SMACX guy (1003684) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390377)

Some would ask, how could a perfect God create a universe filled with so much that is evil. They have missed a greater conundrum: why would a perfect God create a universe at all?

Re:Controlled Singularity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18390911)

Boredom eh'

Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1)

SloWave (52801) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386003)

Didn't anybody see this movie. It predicted caves on Mars a long time ago. See here -- http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058530/ [imdb.com]

Re:Robinson Crusoe on Mars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386117)

Indeed, this is what came to my mind. One of my first exposures to SciFi. Rather good classic.

Question for the Space Anthropologists (1)

dracphelan (916527) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386037)

Does this mean that there are cave-martians?

Re:Question for the Space Anthropologists (4, Funny)

Walt Dismal (534799) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386359)

Ask Aunt Anthro

Dear Aunt Anthro, are there cave-martians?

Sincerely, Timmy in Ohio (age 8)

Dear Timmy;

I want to encourage your interest in science! Yes, there are cave-martians. They have huge fangs and many clawed tentacles. They drool stinky green ichor and crawl like nothing you've ever seen before. They are known for hiding in dark closets and under beds. Also, they have flying saucers and know where Ohio is.

Science fiction story.... can slashdotters help? (1)

Traf-O-Data-Hater (858971) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390489)

Many years ago as a kid I read a science fiction novel about a mission to Mars. What was interesting was that the explorers wore compressors on their backs instead of air tanks. The plot revolved around one explorer getting lost and discovering an ancient martian city. He's captured and taken underground by the remaining martians, who incarcerate him by taking away his compressor. I do recall the chief martian's name as Spitz-Rlll or something like that. I'd love to find the name and author of this book, probably written in the 1950's. Does this ring a bell with any slashdotters?

It's a traaaaap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386141)

It's a traaaaap!

Starsiege (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18386173)

All we need is a mining team to find alien technology, lead a rebellion, and fight in large robotic vehicles.

David Bowie was right! (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386209)

From Life On Mars:

Oh man, look at those cavemen go
It's the freakiest show

Re:David Bowie was right! (1)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387901)

From Life On Mars:

"Y'know, back in Hyde, we'd wait till we actually had evidence against a Martian before we went stomping in and turning his cave upside down..."

Re:David Bowie was right! (1)

ettlz (639203) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388135)

Is that not from Life on Mars? As in, "Don't move, you're surrounded by three-armed, web-footed bastards?"

Alien base (2, Insightful)

ms1234 (211056) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386397)

Well, the sectoids have to live somewhere don't they?

Be very carfull... (1)

Brad1138 (590148) | more than 7 years ago | (#18386403)

Caves can be dangerous [yavin4.com] .

Re:Be very carfull... (3, Interesting)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388367)

Caves can be dangerous [link].

I almost clicked, and then realized this topic may be a perfect setup phrase for a goatse trick. I don't volunteer to check it.
       

Re:Be very carfull... (1)

o'reor (581921) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388785)

I don't volunteer to check it.
I did it for you. It's a little reference to Star Wars' "The Empire Strikes Back", perfectly safe for work.

Caves on Mars? (1)

popeye44 (929152) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387131)

I dunno, but I bet there's one near Uranus....

Re: Caves on Mars? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18390613)

I dunno, but I bet there's one near Uranus....

At first glance, I thought your handle was poopeye44

Of course (1)

finkployd (12902) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387491)

And inside the cave is a crying alien.

Obviously (1)

umbrellasd (876984) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387765)

Those are the exit vents for the Martian atmosphere generator.

Re:Obviously (1)

coredog64 (1001648) | more than 7 years ago | (#18387995)

Richter, Give dees peepul dair aiyur!

(Translated from Austro-English that's "Richter, Give these people their air!")

Not an exit at all (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388111)

They are no exits! They are the secret entrance to the nuclear reactor that is powering the shields of the star.

Re:Obviously (1)

alexj33 (968322) | more than 7 years ago | (#18390505)

Yes- these atmosphere generators are the reason Mars is warming up- it must be. (Pay no mind to that big fiery ball burning in the middle of the solar system... Nuthin to see here, nuthin to see...) The Mars rovers and orbiters are of course making it warm up there too.

On earth of course the global warming is man made, since the "science is settled."

Could be worse.. (1)

JackMeyhoff (1070484) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388047)

could be a story about spots on Uranus.

Re:Could be worse.. (1)

o'reor (581921) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388747)

Yup. Talking of cavern entrances in your Arsia gets pretty damn close to that kind of joke, though...

FreePlanet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18388407)

Hey, maybe The Pirate Bay could use those caves to set up a bunch of servers.

Arne Saknussemm (1)

AJWM (19027) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388435)

In a related story, researchers are trying to determine the significance of what appears to be the letters "A.S." scratched onto one of the cave walls.

Micro-Rovers (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388481)

I think NASA should send a bunch of "micro-rovers" to investigate dozens of curious sites. Rather than a few bigger expensive rovers, they should *survey* Mars, and then send in the big rovers when they narrowed it down. The microrovers could be the size of Sojourner or smaller (but not dependent on a lander). Smaller rovers may also make it practical to take more risk and land in valleys, mountainous areas etc. without the worry of all-or-nothing losses.

But what is inside the caves? (1)

Scrith (831632) | more than 7 years ago | (#18388617)

I suggest playing the classic computer game Caverns of Mars to find out! URL:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caverns_of_Mars_( computer_game)

Ob Star Wars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18389807)

"That's no cave!"

Obligatory Zork joke (1)

paj1234 (234750) | more than 7 years ago | (#18393201)

It is dark. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

What's in the caves.... (1)

whitroth (9367) | more than 7 years ago | (#18394291)

Coming next: NASA reveals pictures of 3-meter tall, four-armed green Martians riding thoats out of the caves....

Yeah, I know, it's White Martians down at the south pole....

      mark "
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>