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Russia's War on Piracy/Malicious Software

Zonk posted more than 6 years ago | from the legitimacy-and-furry-hats dept.

The Internet 150

tmk writes "Russian minister Leonid Reiman has announced new legislation to fight software piracy. According to official information the share of pirated software in the Russian Federation decreased in the last years from 90 to 60 percent. Reiman dismissed as a myth the impression that many viruses originate in his country: 'Viruses are written all over the world. Russia is waging a consistent and successful war on malicious software.' Reiman calls for an international organization to fight Internet crime. Last year Russia agreed to take down Allofmp3 after the United States intervened."

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FIRST PIRATE TROUT! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395071)

I aM a FiSh!

Re:FIRST PIRATE TROUT! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395121)

If you keep pirating music, movies and software, you're going to end up like this [wyeuskfoundation.org] .

That's right. A dead trout.

Copyright and fascism (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395075)

Are natural partners. Expect the USA, China and Russia to embrace draconian copyright law enforcement as an _excuse_ to monitor and control all transmission of information with their borders. All copyrightists are scum.

Re:Copyright and fascism (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395677)

Yeah, just keep in mind that when that same government is mugging you for crappy things like Socialist Security et al., those thuggings are somehow OK.
Because CNN said so.

Re:Copyright and fascism (2, Interesting)

EzInKy (115248) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396535)


Yeah, just keep in mind that when that same government is mugging you for crappy things like Socialist Security et al., those thuggings are somehow OK.

Because CNN said so.


Actually Social Security began long before CNN was even a gleam in Ted's eye in an attempt to keep the millions of hopeless people from "thugging" the rich at a time when pure capitalism proved to be a great failure.

Re:Copyright and fascism (4, Insightful)

teh kurisu (701097) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395777)

The US is just defending their interests abroad. They are the largest exporter of copyrighted material in the world, and large-scale copyright infringement abroad can have an effect on American jobs.

All copyrightists are scum.

By that logic, people who use the GPL are scum, since it is copyright law that prevents non-GPL derivatives.

Re:Copyright and fascism (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395823)

GPL users aren't copyrightists - the FSF line has always been "Without copyright, the GPL would be unenforceable. It would also be unnecessary.". Using copyright doesn't make you a copyrightist - supporting copyright law does.

As to hurting american jobs? So what - you're making the classic "broken window fallacy" error. Should we all smash windows to keep glaziers employed?

And do bear in mind that international opinion of the USA is at an all-time low - there are plenty of people who wouldn't normally even think to infringe copyright, but once they hear america claiming that doing so might hurt USA's interests, they do so with abandon,

 

Re:Copyright and fascism (1)

Crayon Kid (700279) | more than 7 years ago | (#18397331)

The stuff about "all copyrightists(sic!) are scum" is silly, but he may have stumbled across something. How come this "call to law and order" comes just as Putin puts together a national body [kommersant.com] to "oversee" all media, a body which is just ripe for censorship and abuse of human rights? I smell a big two-faced rat here.

Re:Copyright and fascism (4, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395843)

We already embrace draconian copyright law and we already monitor all transmissions (it's called echelon or whatever they're calling it these days).

And for people who are going to say "hey, the RIAA/MPAA/BSA/US Government are only protecting our interests abroad!"... um... no. They are only protecting corporate interests abroad and doing so by manipulating and demanding how other nations will behave.

This is a case of American corporations not liking the laws other nations have within their own borders. The reason we want to change their laws and force them to abide by our broken copyright systems is the same reason we want them to become democracies and the same reason that we allow corporations to do business in countries that are a risk to our nation by threat of military actions, spying and have terribly humanitarian records. That reason being that corporations have saturated existing markets. Everyone who is going to by a Justin Timberlake CD in America, Austrlia and the United Kingdom already has done so. To continue expanding their corporations, they need to expand into new markets.

Helping bring other countries into competition with us at the expense of our own nation and citizens will eventually level them off to a point where they can all afford to buy our CDs and DVDs and videogames, as long as their legal systems and copyright systems (which we will force them to devise and comply with to our liking). Meanwhile, the average person in America and the UK can have their lifestyles seriously reduced in quality before they will no longer be capable or willing to buy content from these corporations.

What is a "copyrightist?" (1)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397223)

Is a "copyrightist" someone who believes that some form of copyright should exist? Or is a "copyrightist" someone who thinks copyright laws should be extended in duration and very strong in enforcement? Perhaps a "copyrightist" is someone who uses copyright enforcement as an excuse to implement invasive monitoring of information flow. Or is a "copyrightist" merely someone who disagrees with your views on copyright law?

I may not know what a "copyrightist" is, but at least thanks to your cogent analysis, at least I know they're all scum. But I wonder, where do these "copyrightists" fit on the Scum Ladder? Are they scummier than Big Oil executives? Scummier than used car dealers? Scummier than rapists? What about spammers? Arey they scummier than spammers?

I can't wait (4, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395081)

Russia agreed to shut down Allofmp3
"The government will be expected to begin complying by June 1, 2007."

They only agreed to it is so they could get into the WTO.
We'll see how strong their resolve is & how quickly Allofmp3 returns.

Stop the slanting (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395237)

Call it what it is, "Data duplication." Or perhaps even "copyright infringement."

Stop calling it "piracy." This nomenclature implies a very debatable moral judgment. Since it is quite obvious that data duplication does not include rape or murder, it is a very ill-fitting term to begin with.

Just stop using it.

Re:Stop the slanting (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395275)

That will probably happen just after the media (and everyone else) stops misconstruing the word "hacker".

In other words, not soon.

Re:Stop the slanting (2, Funny)

h2g2bob (948006) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395521)

Keep calling it pirating - pirates are cool!

Re:Stop the slanting (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395775)

OED:

2. The unauthorized reproduction or use of an invention or work of another, as a book, recording, computer software, intellectual property, etc., esp. as constituting an infringement of patent or copyright; plagiarism; an instance of this.
[1654 J. MENNES Recreation for Ingenious Head-peeces clxxvi, All the wealth, Of wit and learning, not by stealth, Or Piracy, but purchase got.] 1700 E. WARD Journey to Hell II. vii. 14 Piracy, Piracy, they cry'd aloud, What made you print my Copy, Sir, says one, You're a meer Knave, 'tis very basely done. 1770 P. LUCKOMBE Conc. Hist. Printing 76 They..would suffer by this act of piracy, since it was likely to prove a very bad edition. 1855 D. BREWSTER Mem. Life I. Newton (new ed.) I. iv. 71 With the view of securing his invention of the telescope from foreign piracy. 1886 Cent. Mag. Feb. 629/1 That there are many publishers who despise such piracy..does not remove the presumption that publishers and papermakers have been influential opponents of an equitable arrangement. 1977 Gramophone Apr. 1527/3 Governments have begun to realize that unauthorized reproduction of records (so-called piracy) adversely affects also the rights of..composers, authors and performers. 1996 China Post (Taipei) 1 May 16/3 Authorities here said they have cracked down on piracy in recent years, but foreign computer firms claim they are still soft on piracy.

The term "piracy" has been used in this context for centuries. Nobody, reading about piracy as in copyright infringement, makes any mental association with the original definition of pirate in any way, since the alternate definition is something they have grown up with. If you want proof, just look at The Pirate Bay. If they honestly thought there would be serious negative connotations, would they name it that? It's not like the term "theft", where there are valid reasons to argue it (e.g., the fact that theft is still a very real problem in people's minds, thus equating the two could sway their opinion). Get over it.

Re:Stop the slanting (2, Insightful)

M. Baranczak (726671) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396085)

OK, fine. You're not a "pirate". You're a "data duplicator". And the RIAA still wants to sue your ass.

Allofmp3 (2, Interesting)

Venik (915777) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395101)

Allofmp3 is still alive and well. What happens to it in June, when new legislation is enabled, is not at all clear. I doubt they will just disappear. As to levels of software piracy in Russia, I doubt they are as high as in the US.

Re:Allofmp3 (5, Informative)

bockelboy (824282) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395147)

Uh... you've never been to Russia, have you?

Walk to the subway station, and there are about 5 vendors who will happily sell you pirated version of any music CD, most DVDs, and almost any software for $5.

While there are plenty of people who download software in the US, you'll have a hard time finding that sort of rampant piracy in the US.

In fact, in Russia, I only remember one store where I could buy non-pirated CDs. The piracy isn't even the same order of magnitude.

Re:Allofmp3 (1, Interesting)

Venik (915777) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395311)

Actually, I am from Russia. Just because they sell pirated software in Moscow subways, does not mean there is more software piracy going on there than in the US. There are many more computer users in the US and in the "West" in general. Many Russians don't even have computers at home, so why would they need to pirate software? Don't confuse Moscow with Russia.

Re:Allofmp3 (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395637)

I respect your desire to defend your country, however you're incorrect. There is simply truckloads of evidence that Russia and its former republics are huge pirate dens. Sorry, but it's well known and well documented.

Re:Allofmp3 (1)

Venik (915777) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396751)

What kind of trucks are we talking about here? Tonka trucks? Do you have any specific numbers that compare software piracy in Russia vs software piracy in the US? Or is your opinion is based solely on Microsoft's press releases?

Re:Allofmp3 (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396941)

Last time I was in Russia ( no, not Moscow ), I had to look for an internet point for hours. When finally found, it was an old PC running winME on a dial up... Yes no doubt piracy is "quite common" there, but seems people just care less, noone dies, noone gets jailed for life if he sells some music CDs on street. Western price is same 5-10$ per music CD? 100-200 rubels? = 1/10th - 1/20th of an average salary. But in west, we are all proud, especially US. We hate pirates, yet enjoy bittorrent downloads on our fancy 10mbit connections.

Re:Allofmp3 (5, Funny)

drix (4602) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396017)

Uh... you've never been to Russia, have you?

Actually, I am from Russia.
Rarely has the entire essence of what this site stands for been summed up in so few lines.

Re:Allofmp3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18397033)

In Soviet Russia sites stand for you!

Re:Allofmp3 (4, Interesting)

cyclone96 (129449) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395369)

Walk to the subway station, and there are about 5 vendors who will happily sell you pirated version of any music CD, most DVDs, and almost any software for $5.

I actually put that to the test last time I was in Moscow. Was in one of the high end shopping districts near Red Square and walked up to one of the multitudes of CD street vendors. Asked her if she had Borat (which had been released to theaters only a couple of weeks before, and is actually banned in Russia).

Yup, had it. Just under the table. Commanded a premium price though, I seem to remember it was around 300 rubles (about $10).

I'm amazed at their distribution network. (1)

khasim (1285) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395437)

Walk to the subway station, and there are about 5 vendors who will happily sell you pirated version of any music CD, most DVDs, and almost any software for $5.

I think what you really meant to say was "most popular" and "newly released".

The same in China. They bootleg whatever sells well ... right now.

But they don't keep massive databanks of every DVD / CD / software ever produced. Ready to be burned, printed and sold to you.

How could you tell the difference between pirated CD's and non-pirated CD's in a store? The ones I see appear identical to me.

Re:Allofmp3 (1)

efence (927813) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395207)

Piracy in Russia is still rampant. Most stores are still selling pirate software exclusively. As well as many organizations are running it.

obligatory (0, Redundant)

Ixlr8 (63315) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395109)

In Soviet Russia malicious software fights you!

Re:obligatory (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395161)

Regarding intellectual property, the Soviet Russia joke is (unfortunately) more accurate when reversed :

e.g. : In Soviet Russia, you own your software, in America your software owns you.

Re:obligatory (1)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395243)

The second I saw the title, I knew in my heart that I'd find a Soviet Russia joke here.

Re:obligatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396517)

In Soviet Russia, the joke finds YOU.

Re:obligatory (1)

Das Modell (969371) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396731)

Oh snap!

Great. I can't wait till... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395129)

... the Chinese, Russians, Americans, etc come looking for me because I use http://www.openpgp.org/ [openpgp.org] , http://www.truecrypt.org/ [truecrypt.org] , and http://www.openvpn.net/ [openvpn.net] .

-terrified Canadian

yarr, malicious software must go... (1, Redundant)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395173)

but thy pirates will keep dem treasures buried and safe. To all Prussian pirates, Yarr maties!

Russian Pirates, (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395189)

that is, [cough]. YARR!

Re:yarr, malicious software must go... (4, Funny)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395191)

First of all, 'thy' is improperly used.

Second, you've got the word 'but' and 'pirates' MUCH too close to each other for my liking.

Re:yarr, malicious software must go... (1)

init100 (915886) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395907)

Yarr maties!

Do you know why this yarr phrase is associated with pirates? I see it everywhere on the 'net, but I fail to see the connection. My spontaneous guess is that it comes from some movie, but I really haven't got the faintest idea.

Re:yarr, malicious software must go... (2, Interesting)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396881)

Your guess is right. The actor playing Long John Silver in this movie [imdb.com] started this "pirate dialect" tradition that included "arr" and "matey".

Damn! (0, Redundant)

cyberbob2351 (1075435) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395187)

For instance, a number of plants that were producing illegal copies of CDs and DVDs have been closed down


Damn!

Re:Damn! (3, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395287)

No, I think Damn is still producing cracks, but I could be wrong.

Eye witness report. (5, Interesting)

rumith (983060) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395193)

I am system administrator in a large nuclear physics institute in Moscow, which is by no mere coincidence a vital part of the Russian internet backbone. Since my day one I've been advocating Linux and free software, and here's the fruit: already about 10% of the institute's workers, including the director himself, use various distributions of Linux [mostly Ubuntu/Debian, Mandriva and Red Hat]. Besides, I'm currently engaged in talks with Sun regarding our migration to Sun Ray, which will run on a customized Debian system.

I believe that if the result will look as I expect it to, the university [it's the largest university in Russia and AFAIK Europe] which we are a significant part of might break off Microsoft crap in toto, although this statement can be considered a pure speculation at this moment.

Re:Eye witness report. (-1, Flamebait)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395441)

What Linux zealots modded this up? It has nothing to do with the story, unless you count the tenuous Russian connection.

Linux > Microsoft. Now mod me up, too, sheep.

Re:Eye witness report. (3, Insightful)

rumith (983060) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395541)

It is connected if you engage your brain a little, little troll. The piracy-fighting hype [among which was the physics faculty wide order to remove all the pirated software from faculty computers before March, 31th] was one of the reasons the migration was started in the first place. So I brought this in to show that yes, the piracy rate is decreasing, but not quite the way Microsoft and BSA would like it to.

Re:Eye witness report. (3, Interesting)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395609)

So all I had to do was add context not suggested by either the article, or your post, and it all made sense. I can see how that's reasonable.

Re:Eye witness report. (2, Funny)

Alsee (515537) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397149)

Free software IS piracy!

Damn Russian communists!

-

Re:Eye witness report. (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395585)

This is good, I often times wonder how people that buy pirated software know that there isn't spyware embedded in it or a rootkit preinstalled on the disc for reinfection each time the software is reinstalled.

At least with Linux, it is fairly easy to know where the code is coming from and verify that it is the same as all the other copies.

Re:Eye witness report. (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395695)

At least with Linux, it is fairly easy to know where the code is coming from and verify that it is the same as all the other copies.

Is it still so easy when your only source for Linux is the sidewalk vendor and your only access to the net is the Internet Cafe?

Re:Eye witness report. (1)

N3Roaster (888781) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395997)

Yes. You hash your copy, go to the Internet cafe and check that your hash matches the hash of what you thought you were getting. It isn't fool proof, but it probably is good enough.

ISR (0, Redundant)

eneville (745111) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395263)

In Soviet Russia virus makes you!!

Re:ISR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395471)

I know, I can't think of any good Russian reversal jokes either.
Would be so funny...
It's a travesty, but at least you tried...

Also, it would be virus writes you.

Re:ISR (1)

eneville (745111) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395875)

I know, I can't think of any good Russian reversal jokes either.
Would be so funny...
It's a travesty, but at least you tried...

Also, it would be virus writes you.
yes, the article had so much promise, but the headline just didnt have enough material for a good joke. i think its obligatory that we all make the jokes now.

Imperialism (4, Interesting)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395309)

Why else would a country enact laws against the interests of both country's population and its future economic power? I can see limited term copyright laws being beneficial in Russia, but only with exemptions for income levels and educational use. How does anyone benefit from a kid being computer illiterate because his parents one year salary still can not buy Vista, Office and Photoshop? If one day oil cartel countries force US women to wear burkas, you will know how that feels. Stop mucking with democratically chosen laws of sovereign nations.

Re:Imperialism (2, Insightful)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395653)

Why else would a country enact laws against the interests of both country's population and its future economic power?

To keep your domestic cultural product -- your cultural heritage -- from being utterly extinquished by cheap foreign imports?

Copy Wrong: Internet Piracy and Dickens and Melville [americanheritage.com]

To help build and protect an export market?

How much do you suppose "James Bond" and "Harry Potter" have returned to the UK? J.K. Rowling went from being on the dole to being richer than the Queen in under ten years.

Re:Imperialism (4, Insightful)

MadJo (674225) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396413)

But do they really need more than 50 years of monopoly on their copyrighted material?
How long did it take JK Rowling to earn that much money? Certainly not the amount of time that currently is set in the copyright laws. It's just too long. A lot of great content is locked up by this law, no one in this generation will ever learn of them if this law will still stand.

I'm not against copyright laws, but the ones in place right now are outright ludicrous in regards to amount of time they span.

Re:Imperialism (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396985)

Certainly not the amount of time that currently is set in the copyright laws. It's just too long. A lot of great content is locked up by this law, no one in this generation will ever learn of them if this law will still stand.

There are over 1,000 titles in print in the Penguin Classics series alone. 750 pounds of books. 80 linear feet. The Penguin Classics Complete [amazon.com]

The Movies Unlimited catalog runs to 800 pages.

Conservation costs money. Restoration costs money. That is why your $2 commercial DVD rip of a movie from a public domain source and not a studio master looks and sounds like crap.

There is nothing significant missing from the Disney studio achieves. Its archieves are self-financing.

That can be said of almost no other film and television studio in the world.

Re:Imperialism (1)

MadJo (674225) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397077)

So you are saying that we don't have to be able to preserve content, because Disney's stuff is well preserved? In other words, only Disney makes content that's worthy of preservation.

Are you serious?

There are a lot (and I do mean a lot) of content that's missing from public record, and we are denied access to it, by these insane laws.

The copyright-law's intention is to encourage content creators to make new content, and to have a short period of monopoly on their product, before it went into public domain for other people to build on. In the olden days people were able to stand on the shoulders of giants, if you do that right now with music or film, you can be certain to be sued to oblivion and back.

btw, when was the last time you could buy a copy of Steamboat Willie? You know that first piece of film where Mortimer -Oh excuse me- Mickey Mouse played a part. It might be well-preserved, but we, the people, aren't allowed to make remixes of it, or create a sequel on it (if we would desire to do so)

Re:Imperialism (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397063)

J.K. Rowling went from being on the dole to being richer than the Queen in under ten years.

In the meantime, if copyright laws were not so strict, other writers would be able to get off welfare to decent living by writing additional stories in Harry Potter universe. In time, some of them would build up their reputation and publish further books unrelated to Harry Potter. UK would have a thousand new good writers, J.K. Rowling would still be doing well and British people would avoid the embarrassment of having a few books valued more than a thousand years of tradition.

Re:Imperialism (1)

cyclop (780354) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395661)

As much as I hate copyright and agree with you, the potential benefit of it all could be a massive switch to free software. Let's wait and see (not that I have many hopes...)

Re:Imperialism (2, Insightful)

stubear (130454) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395817)

"Stop mucking with democratically chosen laws of sovereign nations."

Russia is requesting membership into the WTO and part one of the requirements is to respect international copyright law. They are more than welcome to ignore international copyright laws all they want but it will come at the cost of not being allowed membership into the WTO.

Re:Imperialism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395901)

The WTO needs russia, not vice-versa. Russia should grow a spine. But of course, the fact of the matter is that Putin WANTS strong copyright law and is using this shit as an excuse to get it. Copyright is just the state power to censor* sliced into chunks and doled out to the state's cronies.

* No semantic games: if you can be restricted from passing on any information at your discretion to a willing recipient, you're being censored. Censorship by copyright holders is commonplace and may be accepted in america, but is little different to censorship by the state.

Re:Imperialism (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397095)

China has censorship, forced abortions and is threatening to invade an independent, peaceful nation. They are in WTO. India has widow burning and widespread starvation right next to prosperous technology parks. They are in WTO. If an organization puts copying mp3s above burning people alive, perhaps it's not in a decent country's interest to seek membership.

It's the bourgeois, stupid. (0)

Pig Hogger (10379) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396279)

Why else would a country enact laws against the interests of both country's population and its future economic power? I can see limited term copyright laws being beneficial in Russia, but only with exemptions for income levels and educational use. How does anyone benefit from a kid being computer illiterate because his parents one year salary still can not buy Vista, Office and Photoshop?
It's the bourgeois. The bourgois will only act in their self-interest, and too bad if this goes against the national interests. The US has a lot of nice goodies for bourgois all over the world who will toe their line, so the bourgeois will always seek to subvert democratic institutions in order to please Uncle Sam, because when Uncle Sam is happy, he happily gives them little trinkets while they make money on the back of their own countries.

Re:Imperialism (1)

GaryPatterson (852699) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396305)

Copywrite's got little to do with pricing levels. There's nothing to stop companies like Microsoft releasing their products at lower prices on the streets of Russia and China than they do on the streets of the US. This is the whole "what the market will bear" thing, after all. Capitalism was meant to be about that.

Given the above, how is copywrite law against the interests of the population and future economic power? Do you fundamentally disagree with the concept of copywrite, or do you disagree with the pricing models set up by US software companies?

Re:Imperialism (1)

davecarlotub (835831) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396463)

Copywrite? Sounds like some obscure backup command...

Re:Imperialism (0)

iamacat (583406) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397107)

It's not a priority of companies like Microsoft to sell to poor people, say like 90% of russian population. Well-off individual should be indeed required to buy software for a limited (say, 7 years) duration of copyright. There is no point to impose this restriction on people who are not able to financially reward the content creator.

Re:Imperialism (1)

servognome (738846) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396799)

How does anyone benefit from a kid being computer illiterate because his parents one year salary still can not buy Vista, Office and Photoshop?
There are many alternatives that would make a kid actually computer literate rather than just another powerpoint whiz.
It is in the best interests of countries to not develop their economic infrastructure based primarily on a foreign product like Windows. Because if they continue allowing copyright violations then the rich countries impose sanctions and stifle investment. Also, Cold war hysteria aside, there is the possibility of the US government working with Microsoft to track/steal information (only to stop terrorists of course).

An article +pix on huge pirate market Gorbushka (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395365)

Cracking down? So why is Gorbushka growing?

Have a look here:

http://www.moscow-blog.com/?p=202 [moscow-blog.com]

War on piracy...pffft! (0)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395375)

What we need is a war on copyright. That's your REAL piracy, right there. The only legitimate issue is plagiarism. Everything else is no different from the old railroad monopolies maintaining their turf. It is pure robbery.

So put down your keyboard and pick up a gun
We're gonna have a whole lotta fun
And it's one, two, three
What are we fightin' for
Don't ask me I don't give a damn
Next stop is Disneyland
And it's five, six, seven
Open up them big steel gates
Aint no time to wonder why
WHOOPIE! we're all gonna buy...

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (3, Informative)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395453)

What we need is a war on copyright. That's your REAL piracy, right there. The only legitimate issue is plagiarism. Everything else is no different from the old railroad monopolies maintaining their turf. It is pure robbery.
That's only too true. Fortunately, there are some freedom fighters left: http://pirate-party.us/ [pirate-party.us] , http://www2.piratpartiet.se/international/english [piratpartiet.se]

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395797)

these guys are just immature kids who justify stealing other peoples hard work. dont try and legitmise theft as some kind of grown up 'stick it to the man' bullshit. its kids in their basement trying to steal stuff they couldnt make on their own.
stop dignifying the idiots supporting that trash, and pay your fucking way.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396529)

I've created this: http://www.p-i-x.net/ [p-i-x.net] What have you created?

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (2, Interesting)

The PS3 Will Fail (998952) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396037)

You actually believe there's no benefit whatsoever to copyright? I haven't heard this a lot. Most people want to see copyright reformed - with reasonable limits on exclusivity before the content enters the public domain. Is it your opinion that copyright just shouldn't exist? And if that is the case, do you also see no value whatsoever in what copyright offers?

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396449)

It is my opinion that copyright should not exist, except for anti-plagiarism provisions (i.e. no right to restrict redistibution, only a right to be identified as the author of a work). Copyright has brought us the USA's "culture". If attacking copyright diminishes the power of the USA, that has got to be a good thing.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396477)

I see a distinct value in affirming author's moral rights; to be recognized as the author/creator and to be able to prevent misuse of their works, such as them being used to promote values clearly not in line with the author's.

If the reason is to create artificial scarcity in an effort to maintain a certain type of private monopoly, I see no societal use for copyrights whatsoever.

US copyright has good fair use, European copyrights have good moral rights. I'd like to see those two combined and the rest stripped away as much as possible.

Here's a piece to think about: http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/10/07/opinion/eds miers.php [iht.com]

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

The PS3 Will Fail (998952) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396545)

"If the reason is to create artificial scarcity in an effort to maintain a certain type of private monopoly, I see no societal use for copyrights whatsoever."
If an author creates a work that is read by tens of thousands but only actually sold it to 1 person, who then copied it and profited, that author will not continue to have the time to write other works because he'll need to have another job to pay the bills. Do you not see it that way?

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396725)

No. He _chose_ to create the original of the work. I did not ask him to do so. He might have sold it or the first copy too cheaply, but that was his choice too. Moral: he should have charged more for the first copy (or the service of creation thereof). Why should I have my every communication monitored (because that's what these fucks really want), because he can't do simple math?

Frankly, if being without copyright law means being without the "wonderful" creations of the copyrightists, I'm still happy.

I hold that only copies of information exist (you will never show me information absent physical medium). Physical property rights over physical media and an additional right to be recognised as the author of an information pattern are sufficient for justice in the information age (NOT the "knowledge economy" - knowledge is NOT economic unless made so by artificial scarcity, and well, fuck that).

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

richie2000 (159732) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396775)

If an author creates a work that is read by tens of thousands but only actually sold it to 1 person, who then copied it and profited, that author will not continue to have the time to write other works because he'll need to have another job to pay the bills. Do you not see it that way?
No, simply because this is not what actually happens. It is a theoretical worst case scenario with no grounding whatsoever in reality. First off, how do you propose this person could profit from the author's work? He does not have the author's support in selling copies (no book-signing tour, no live gigs, no nothing), no advantage in production (printing and distribution costs are the same whether or not you are the author) and he still has to out-sell the author by a 10 000-to-1 margin. That's quite impressive.

Now, let's say this person instead makes a digital copy and releases it for free. What happens? Well, we actually know what happens since not only do several authors give away their books for free (Cory Doctorow, Larry Lessig, to name but a few) as does several bands and record companies. They still sell lots of books and records, even though the subject matter is available for free. Most report increased sales after freeing their content, due to the advertising value in doing so.
People are willing to pay, even if there is a free option. Sometimes the motive is a perceived increase of value in the "real deal" but often, it is simply the easiest way to confer appreciation to the author. Paypal donor buttons work pretty well for many on-line comic artists, even though it is totally free to read their strips. Heck, Scott Adams is pretty well off, even though I can read Dilbert for free every day. I give away my pictures for free on the web and rake in the Adsense dough (OK, I don't get rich, but it's paid for a brand new camera). Judging by the competition, I could not realistically expect to sell a single copy of any of my images. :-)

Also, there's yet another flaw in your argument: You pre-suppose that it is not the norm today that author's have day jobs. They do. There is a large (and growing) industry of printer/publishers who, instead of giving you an advance on your upcoming book, simply charge you for printing and distributing it. And people flock to them in droves.

There is simply no reason to assume that people create things only because they may sell a copy some day. People create things of their own volition today, on their own time, on their own dime. Very, very few can live off creating and manage without that day job. The rich artist is to a very large extent a myth created by the publishing industries to avoid having to pay reasonable wages. "Don't worry, you'll live in luxury off the royalties later, we'll just deduct this expense from them, no worries". The result? This: http://www.negativland.com/albini.html [negativland.com]

There's an anecdote about a similar situation (which apparently copyright does not actually protect against in all cases):

The first edition of The Lord of the Rings to be published in the United States was a pirated edition from Ace Books. For reasons which I now forget, Tolkien could not take legal action against Ace. But when Ballantine came out with its own official author-approved American edition of The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien started a campaign against the Ace edition. The Ballantine edition was released with a notice from Tolkien in a green box on the back cover stating that this was the only authorized edition, and urging any reader with respect for living authors to purchase no other. Moreover, every time he answered a fan letter from an American reader, Tolkien appended a footnote explaining the situation and requesting that the recipient spread the word among Tolkien fans that the Ace edition should be boycotted.
Although the Ace edition was cheaper than the Ballantine, it quickly lost readers and went out of print. The boycott was successful.
It might be objected that Tolkien devotees tend to be more fanatical than the average readers, and so such a strategy of boycott could not be expected to succeed in ensuring such loyalty generally. True enough. But on the other hand, Tolkien's boycott was entirely unorganized; it simply consisted of a then-obscure British professor of mediæval language and literature scribbling hand-written responses to fan letters. Think how effective an organized boycott might have been!

http://libertariannation.org/a/f31l1.html [libertariannation.org]

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

The PS3 Will Fail (998952) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396939)

"He does not have the author's support in selling copies (no book-signing tour, no live gigs, no nothing), no advantage in production (printing and distribution costs are the same whether or not you are the author) and he still has to out-sell the author by a 10 000-to-1 margin.
The author wants his book distributed in a certain format, let's say hardcover. Barnes and Noble purchases a single hardcover and begins printing paperback editions and/or digital copies that the author did not want his work published in. Without copyright, this is completely legal and since Barnes and Noble owns the distribution chain, they'll have no problem outselling him. In fact, they can choose not to carry the author's release so there's really no competition in many areas.

"Well, we actually know what happens since not only do several authors give away their books for free (Cory Doctorow, Larry Lessig, to name but a few) as does several bands and record companies."
You can't cite a niche of the market and say it will apply to the whole. That's not good statistical analysis, "we" do not know how it will work.

"You pre-suppose that it is not the norm today that author's have day jobs."
No I do not. I do pre-suppose that authors supplement their income with secondary jobs but they do earn money on the writing they do. My worst case scenario takes that away and so there's no incentive for them to continue.

"There is simply no reason to assume that people create things only because they may sell a copy some day."
I never made that assumption. I do believe that it is in society's best interests to allow the author some control over work after the sale though.

I would appreciate a more respectful tone in any further replies.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18397061)

but they do earn money on the writing they do. My worst case scenario takes that away and so there's no incentive for them to continue.

Again, even apart from the rest of your drivel, and not necessarily accepting their financial gain will be reduced, you apparently think the only incentive is monetary gain, basically. This reflects more on you than anyone else!

We might (or might not) get less art without copyright law - but if get less art "inspired" primarily by the desire for financial gain (and even glorifying it - witness chart "rap" music!), that's fine by me.


"There is simply no reason to assume that people create things only because they may sell a copy some day."/
I never made that assumption.


Er. Yes you did, blatantly. Lying troll-wannabe.

I would appreciate a more respectful tone in any further replies.

No doubt you might. You don't really deserve it though. Suck it down, chump.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395799)

So put down your keyboard and pick up a gun
We're gonna have a whole lotta fun

The call to arms from the privileged elite. You never quite know whether to cry or to laugh.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (2, Interesting)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395863)

The call to arms from the privileged elite.

Yeah. Just like the old days [jstor.org] . Kinda makes me nostalgic.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397237)

Yeah. Just like the old days. Kinda makes me nostalgic

The Virginia planter was sunk in debt before the Revolution. The Virginia planter would be sunk in debt after the Revolution.

Export low priced agricultural goods. Import high priced manufactured goods.

Work the soil to exhaustion. Tie up your capital in slaves and land. Invest in nothing else.

The trade financed at both ends by bankers in London and New York, at a very good rate of interest.

Re:War on piracy...pffft! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396063)

"privileged elites" are people from families like Gates, Kennedy, Bush and so on, the modern american aristocracy. Tech geeks are not "privileged elites", nowadays often making less than unskilled construction workers, at least where I am - it is copyright and patent law that places artificial limits on human ingenuity and the uniquely human ability (at least in degree) to learn from others and apply that learning and keeps the geek down. It's past time to reject it.

If programming worked like the way lawyers draft legal documents (intrinsically open-source - funny how you don't see lawyers suing over patents on innovative legal strategies or complaining that another contract has clauses inspired by one they drafted! The Lawyer elite knows and understands the benefits of unlimited open source, they just don't want us non-privileged-elite tech geeks to be allowed to have them too), then programmer salaries would be on a par with lawyers.

Yup, businesses now get audited and sued (2, Interesting)

melted (227442) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395623)

Heard of this from a sysadmin friend who lives in Saratov, Russia. His company got raided and its owner was dragged to court and had to pay fines. Fines were substantial. He was also required to comply with licensing requirements in full, so fines weren't his only expenditure. I tried to "sell" them on Linux at least on the servers, but the boss is afraid of anything "free as in beer" now.

Re:Yup,but nothing to do with copyright.... (1)

Sad Adam (1036862) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396073)

I would venture anything the reason he had to go to court was because some competitor in the same town had paid the inspector to raid him, and take him out.

I'm around 100% certain these incidents have nothing to do with copyright violations, but are rather an extension of commercial warfare, Russian style.

In Soviet Russia... (0)

Wicked Zen (1006745) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395625)

...Allofmp3 take down YOU. (may god and /. mods forgive me)

piracy rate 90% - 60%? (1)

hackingbear (988354) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395703)

Anyone believes Russian piracy rate has dropped from 90% to 60% over the last year(s) should instead believe the Russian government is capable of solving all their poverty and corruption problm by the end of this year.

I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear fire (0, Flamebait)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395757)

we have people starving in the streets in developing nations, nobody raises a stink about it.

we have people dying of diseases that are curable or quite treatable because big pharma wants their patent money, you dont see anyone threatening to boot the US out for utter cruelty and neglect of human life.

we have confirmed human rights violations (and related labor rights violations) across the boards with several of our major trading partners, and nobody raises a voice.

but as soon as hollywood stirs ever so slightly... OMG WE GOTTA ACT KICK THIS ONE THREATEN THAT ONE. hell i wouldnt be surprised if we went to war because of it (and coincidentally, copyright laws more draconian than ours were one of the first institutions the provisional government set up in iraq, at the behest of monsanto)

i hope we as a species die in a fire, preferrably nuclear, so the roaches can grow up and inherit the earth. theyre much cleaner, gentler creatures than we are.

Re:I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear f (1)

Caspian (99221) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395937)

Here's to the Apocalypse. It's been a good run, but you're right, we're totally broken. *Raises a beer to toast the coming World War III*

Re:I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear f (1)

GaryPatterson (852699) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396335)

You need to get out more and read a bit of overseas news.

Your points may be good as far as they go, but they hardly capture the sum total of the Human Race. Still, if you feel this way and are certain that you're right, then go ahead - lead the charge into oblivion. You go on, and the rest of us will be along later.

Re:I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear f (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396371)

What developing nations have people starving in the streets? As far as I know the only starving people are in impoverished countries, and even then they aren't being ignored, we ARE trying to help. What have you done to help? These starving people deserve nothing from me, I have no obligation to help them and neither does anyone else, and yet we do because we have compassion for them. When you understand compassion and love, you will not want our species to die in a nuclear fire. Think about it.

Re:I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear f (1)

plasmacutter (901737) | more than 7 years ago | (#18397411)

"compassion and love" are merely means to an end for the vast majority of people.

for corporations and governments it's for PR issues.

for individuals it's to engender the good graces of others by being able to say to others "i donate to this charity".

It's all about posturing, engendering friendship in people to use in order to further your own goals, it has nothing to do with this noble compassion and generosity you say exists.

real compassion is donating anonymously, without claims, and dying with that secret.

I only know of one person who has ever done this, and that man is dead now.

the truth is an ugly thing is it not? oh but i assume ill get the good old -1 (troll) or (flamebait) because the truth is so ugly apparently the mods cant stand to look at it.

Re:I give up on humanity,hope we burn in nuclear f (0, Troll)

servognome (738846) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396871)

we have people starving in the streets in developing nations, nobody raises a stink about it.
We try to get them food, but unfortunately people shoot at us when we do. If we shoot back then we are the evil ones.

we have people dying of diseases that are curable or quite treatable because big pharma wants their patent money,
And without the patent money, big pharma would never have developed many of those medicines in the first place.

we have confirmed human rights violations (and related labor rights violations) across the boards with several of our major trading partners, and nobody raises a voice.
We raise our voice, we protest, we issue statements of condemnation. There's nothing short of war we can do to stop such violations.

hell i wouldnt be surprised if we went to war because of it
I wouldn't doubt it in the next few decades, though probably not about the early release to the internet of the new 007 movie.
Information is quickly becoming the most valuable commodity, and I'm sure widespread cybercrime will lead to global political conflict.

i hope we as a species die in a fire, preferrably nuclear, so the roaches can grow up and inherit the earth. theyre much cleaner, gentler creatures than we are.
Compared to the average /. reader... I think you may actually be right.

Allofmp3.com shut down? (1)

gradster79 (878963) | more than 6 years ago | (#18395815)

Allofmp3.com is still operating as normal. www.allofmp3.com

Re:Allofmp3.com shut down? (4, Interesting)

fyoder (857358) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396297)

It operates within Russian law. There are two ways they can shut it down
  1. Poison everyone involved with radioactive pellets.
  2. Change the law so that allofmp3.com is operating outside it.

Basically, American perception that the Russian gov't is shutting down allofmp3.com is a misperception, and one which I suspect the Russians are happy not to correct. Perhaps they'll get around to changing the law, but remember that allofmp3.com pays a cut to some Russian licensing agency -- not sure where that money goes, but wouldn't surprise me if money is finding its way into gov't coffers (or politicians' pockets?)

Re:Allofmp3.com shut down? (1)

Alsee (515537) | more than 7 years ago | (#18397397)

There are two ways they can shut it down

      1. Poison everyone involved with radioactive pellets.
      2. Change the law so that allofmp3.com is operating outside it.


An interesting sidenote... the RIAA were narrowly outvoted on that.

-

Amsterdam to Russia with Love (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18395945)

About 85% of the attack attempts at my site originate in Amsterdam but have a reference URL at ?????.by.ru These include filenames like cmd.txt, cmd.gif, r57.txt and such but, in reality, are scripts to compromise the system. The source IP is usually in Amsterdasm for some odd reason. Maybe the .NL people are lax in hacking enforcement. Just an observation anyway. Posted anonymously to protect my web site :)

What about all the other AllofMyMP3s-like sites? (2, Interesting)

Sad Adam (1036862) | more than 6 years ago | (#18396011)

Yeah right. There are literally 10s of other AllofMyMp3 like sites. They have flourished like mushrooms. And not just in Russia. They seem to run out of every former Soviet republic.

Not to mention the incredibly effective job that street based anti-piracy enforcement has achieved.Not.

At best, it provides another opportunity for the cops to shake down stall holders.

  I think you will find anyone selling pirated CDs finds it easier to pay the cops or copyright inspects an "on the spot fine". That way everyone is happy. The CD software seller gets to keep doing business, the cop is paid, the cops boss gets a cut, and business continues.

What are you worried about? This is the market is supposed to work, after all.

ho80 (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#18396899)

if I remain more. If you feel be fun. It used the most vibrant 220 running NT a previously conversations where notwithstanding, of playing your this mistake or 'first post' God, let's fucking = 36400 FreeBSD Argued by Eric Hear you. Also, if with THOUSANDS of Of progress. gains market share the above is far everything else the 'community' they're gone Mac If you have a dead man walking. personal rivalries FreeBSD continues lead to 'cleaner when done playing Jesus Up The their hand...she

Giggleski (2, Funny)

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) | more than 6 years ago | (#18397109)

> "Russian minister Leonid Reiman has announced new legislation to fight software piracy."

Oh Mercy Me! It's great to begin my week with a good joke!
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