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194 comments

Let's hope (4, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406843)

Given that Musk has stated that his patients and pockets are not unlimited, and we only have a few more shots at this, lets all hope that today's launch goes off as planned. It's a nice design overall, and I'd hate to see it fail due to a few technical glitches.

Re:Let's hope (1)

cmowire (254489) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406881)

Well, also if it took you 10 blown up boosters before you got it right, I doubt you'd attract any customers. :P

Re:Let's hope (3, Informative)

Albert Sandberg (315235) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406899)

It looks very windy, I think they will push the deadline... at least they should.

Re:Let's hope (2, Informative)

jdray (645332) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406973)

When I first looked at the webcam, I thought the rocket was wobbling. Then I realized it was the camera itself on the stand. Still, it was momentarily unnerving.

They'll probably still launch if the winds are only at ground level. If the nav system can't get it off the ground and stabilized in a little crosswind, they don't deserve to be launching.

Re:Let's hope (1)

Nick_Allain (997908) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407071)

I thought my feed was messed up when I saw that but then I realized that they chose an island for launch. Those islands are known for a constant breeze which can likely be accounted for with a little simply rocket science mathematics. I don't think they would have chose an island if they didn't expect some wind. Besides, it's not likely windy up above. On another note, the wonderful blue sky - island paradise webcam is a stark contrast to the 2 inches of snow falling outside my own window at the present.

Re:Let's hope (1)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407399)

According to an (unofficial) post by Kimbal Musk [blogspot.com] in 2005, "The highest winds we want to launch in is 24 knots [~27.6 mph]." I don't know if that's still there policy, but current wind speed is just around 15 mph [weather.gov].

Re:Let's hope his PATIENTS are NOT unlimited (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407081)

Having unlimited PATIENTS is only good for Drs and hospitals (and perhaps not even then!).

Having lots of patience isn't too bad though.

Re:Let's hope his PATIENTS are NOT unlimited (2, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407337)

Yeah, I deserve that for posting so hastily. ;)

Back on topic: it's such a shame that they have Kwaj as a launch site. It's a horrible place due to corrosion, shipping costs are high, and if you discover that you need something that you don't have onsite, it's a major blow to your schedule.

Re:Let's hope (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407225)

Given that Musk has stated that his patients and pockets are not unlimited
I guess it depends on the size of the hospital that he is using. But since they are out in the middle of the Pacific Ocean I would guess that they are probably just using someone who went to one of an auxiliary ship's sick bay. Just taint the food or water and he'll be good for another 10 launches.

Re:Let's hope (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407267)

Given that Musk has stated that his patients and pockets are not unlimited,

So he's a doctor, too?

Re:Let's hope (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407395)

What kind of doctor puts his patients in a rocket to space?

The New Hope: Warp Drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407429)

These devices using chemical fuels for propulsion are just toys. They limit us to space travel on the order of centuries between galaxies.

We can do better with warp drive. Dr. Burkhard Heim [wikipedia.org] has already developed the basic theory, and the US Air Force is working on a prototype space ship [scotsman.com].

Huh. That's odd. (2, Funny)

jpellino (202698) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408013)

Have you been to an emergency room lately? There are plennnnnnty of patients. Is he using them for ballast or fuel?

hmm (1)

mastershake_phd (1050150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406887)

FTA: After the upcoming demonstration flight, Falcon 1 is scheduled to launch a satellite for the US Navy Research Laboratory

Should the US government be using private launch vehicles? Might be a good way to jump start private investment though.

Re:hmm (2, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406927)

They should use exclusively private launch vehicles and demand competition from their suppliers.

Re:hmm (3, Insightful)

hey! (33014) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408135)

They should use exclusively private launch vehicles and demand competition from their suppliers.

You mean like Haliburton?

I think we can be pretty certain that any industry which caters primarily to the government will not be dramatically more efficient than the government at doing anything, and possibly less efficient. All the negative risk aversion aspects of government decision making are retained, with whole new opportunities for graft and fraud added on.

At best, it's like the difference between a golf ball landing on some blade of grass, and a golf ball landing on a particular blade of grass. Buying something on the open market is like the golf ball landing on some blade of grass. If there are things out there which are proven to do the job, the might not be exactly what you'd want, but the difference between perfect and good enough is negligible. The difference between landing on one blade of grass on the green and another a foot or so away is negligible.

Specifying something for government consumption is like trying to get a golf ball to land on a particular blade of grass. In order to make sure the competition is fair, you have to ensure a level playing field. In order to ensure that the playing field is level, you have to make sure everybody is proposing to deliver exactly the same thing more or less. Not only does the solution have fewer degrees of freedom, the number of organizations who can respond to such an RFP is limited. In other words, the usual suspects. In other words Haliburton.

And so far we've been talking about the best case.

The worst case, you assume that because the private sector is supposed to be more efficient, you are saving money by using a private contractor. There are very few companies capable of delivering certain things the government wants, and fewer still who can negotiate the contracting process as well. This means that when the government buys those things from the private sector, it is not necessarily buying them from the free market.

I'm not saying that buying from the private sector is a bad idea. What I'm saying is that the problem of financial efficiency, when we are talking goods and services primarily consumed by the government, is an orthagonal problem to insourcing or outsourcing.

It's not a bad idea, it's just not an automatic win. Not until there is a healthy industry that can exist without government business.

Re:hmm (1)

B_tace (802354) | more than 7 years ago | (#18406941)

Hey, if a private firm can do the job for a fraction of the price, sure! they should be using them and save some taxpayer money in the process.

Most launches are private rockets. (3, Informative)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407009)

This is something that the general public is fairly misinformed about. The majority of rocket launches in the US are using rockets designed and build by private companies like Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Orbital Sciences. This includes NASA launches. Space X would be competing with these companies, not with NASA.

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407123)

I don't think they're so much as "misinformed" as the really big companies (e.g. Lockheed, Boeing, ... that's about it) feed so tightly off of NASA and the government that it really doesn't seem like they're private anymore.

That, and everyone loves an underdog. ;-)

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407591)

Yeah, especially with the creation of UAC, err I mean ULA. I love how politicians constantly praise the benifits of the "free market" while all of our interactions with private industry result in a government monopoly propping up a private one.

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (3, Insightful)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407349)

To elaborate on my previous post and provied some examples:

Mars Rovers were launched with a Delta II built by Boeing.
Cassini probe was launched with a Titan IV-B built by Lockheed-Martin.
New Horizons was launched with an Atlas V built by Lockheed-Martin.
Many satellites, including the latest GPS satellites are launched using Delta IIs by Boeing.

The Minotaur rocket is built by Orbital Sciences using decommisioned Minutemen ICBM engines and are used to launch some military satelites. They also build many of the rockets used for missile-defense tests.

At least at first, SpaceX would most directly compete with the Pegasus rocket by Orbital Sciences, and hopefully would help to expand the market to include new cliental that can't afford current prices. If they show themselves to be reliable they could also go on to challenge the bigger launchers.

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (5, Interesting)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407377)

This is something that the general public is fairly misinformed about. The majority of rocket launches in the US are using rockets designed and build by private companies like Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Orbital Sciences. This includes NASA launches. Space X would be competing with these companies, not with NASA.

Now if we could only do the same with the exploration missions, such as Mars and the moon.

Can you imagine the glorious caucophony if NASA turned its budget into prizes? $1B for the first Mars rock returned to Earth. $2B for the first Mars ground base active for one year. $4B for the first human on Mars. $4B for the first man-year on Mars.

And what a fantastic spectator sport it would become again. GE, Lockheed, Chevrolet, HP, maybe even Google might all be in a literal race for the prizes. It would be consensually dangerous, as corners got cut to save time and money. The risks would attract more volunteers than ever.

To my eye, one of the great benefits of space exploration is its entertainment and inspirational value. NASA has managed to destroy that by becoming bureaucratically risk-averse. They can't allow even a broken fingernail during a mission, else they get castigated in the next Senate budget conference. And that ruins the experience of being a fan, of the sort we once had in the 1960s.

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (2, Insightful)

pavon (30274) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407813)

Those goals are too large for anyone to meet with private investor funding, and the prizes are too small for tasks that don't have other profit motive behind them (and don't go off about space mining - it is not economically viable). I mean really, a prize managed to provide some tipping point motivation for a (very cool) suborbital rocket plane, and now people think that can scale to sending someone to Mars?

Both NASA and the military are giving SpaceX serious consideration for their future contracts and that will do more to shake up the launcher industry than a silly competition ever will.

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (1)

inviolet (797804) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407921)

Both NASA and the military are giving SpaceX serious consideration for their future contracts and that will do more to shake up the launcher industry than a silly competition ever will.

The prizes would be in billions, not millions. A billion will get everyone's attention. Corporations can handle space exploration if there is a quantifiable return, such as a cash prize. They can budget for it, calculate risk/return tradeoffs, and manage it to completion -- precisely the three behaviors that corporations are organized to perform.

And if two billion is not enough to swing the project, then make it ten. Or twenty. How much is NASA already planning to spend to go to Mars, especially considering that they must necessarily overspend on safety?

Re:Most launches are private rockets. (2, Insightful)

Rei (128717) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407851)

Prizes work well in the small scale, where you only need a few people to form a team, and where a few million dollars can win fame and PR that can be cashed into real commercial projects that bring in more money. Prizes work very poorly in the large scale. There, market forces take the lead: if investors are going to put five billion dollars into a project, they're going to want a return on that. The more the risk, the more the return they'll want.

Re:hmm (1)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407031)

Should the US government be using private launch vehicles? Might be a good way to jump start private investment though.

Should the government use private aircraft or private automobiles? There are of course certain situations where private industry is unable to provide what government needs, but the government should never be in direct competition with private industry.

It is called cots (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407099)

NASA is starting down this path (again). Do not be surprised to see this pushed more in the next 3 years as more systems come on line. What will be interesting is that L-mart and boeing just merged their rocket divisions. Now, they will have to learn how to compete.

Re:hmm (1)

Nyeerrmm (940927) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407131)

The only public launch vehicle in the US is the Shuttle at this point. The difference here is whether its a traditional big-aerospace company or a small startup that hasn't become dependent on government contracts (i.e. they get paid for results, not attempts.)

However, even there, Griffin's managed to push some stuff through. Commercial Obrital Transport System (COTS) is a program to supply the ISS cheaply, and currently SpaceX (with the larger Falcon 9) is one of the two finalists, along with Rocketplane-Kistler. We should see some results before 2010, and if the launch today is successful that should go a long way to getting it there.

(BTW, if it does blow up again, all major rockets have had about half of the first few launches blow up.)

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407257)

But those major rockets have all had government funding backing them. There's a limit to the amount of failures SpaceX can handle financially.

Re:hmm (1)

Sean Riordan (611520) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407375)

Nearly all launch vehicle platformsin the US outside of the shuttle are privately owned.

Atlas V [lockheedmartin.com] is Lockheed Martin
Delta [boeing.com] is Boeing
And my current personal favorite due to the recent perfect ride they gave us, the Minotaur [orbital.com] is Orbital.

Useful ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18406933)

Is this in any way a space vehicle, or is this just another "single stage to balloon height" effort ?

Re:Useful ? (1)

cmowire (254489) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407025)

If it doesn't blow up, it's two stages to orbit at a mere few million a launch.

Not big enough to launch people or anything, tho.

Re:Useful ? (4, Informative)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407061)

Is this in any way a space vehicle, or is this just another "single stage to balloon height" effort ?

Um, it's delivering a payload into orbit.

Ehehe (1)

nnn0 (794348) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407089)

This will never work. The clock seems to be stuck at T+00:00:29, the rocket seems to have been made of rubber or something and there is some serious leakage going on there :)

Re:Ehehe (1)

Weaps (642924) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407169)

Yeah, it does seem a tad windy. The rocking back and forth is making me space-sick.
Countdown hold?
Of course, it seems as if the entire scene is swaying...I know, seismic acitvity!

Re:Ehehe (1)

alexj33 (968322) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407475)

Hmmm.... It's amazing how many gusts of wind can fit into T 00:00:29- which has lasted for ten minutes now.

the launch has been scrapped and is venting lOX? (1)

nietsch (112711) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408017)

You saw much the same as I did: a clock that was at T+29sec and a rocket still on the pad letting of a could of vapour. I interpret that as the launchatttempt being scrapped due to some reported malfunction. Then you have a rocket loaded with fuel and oxidiser standing on the pad, which is a pretty dangerous situation. there is no way you are allowed to walk up to the rocket and attach some hoses to pump out the LOX. So they have to do it remotely by slowly letting the LOX boil off. That is the white cloud you see escaping from the rocket, I think.
But I could be wrong, maybe that that vapor is just the normal amount of LOX boiling off in the heat of the sun.

Re:the launch has been scrapped and is venting lOX (1)

Yendys (729283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408111)

Well, the arm just came down at T-8:00 so I am assuming they are going for the launch.

Re:the launch has been scrapped and is venting lOX (1)

jpop32 (596022) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408263)

Well, the arm just came down at T-8:00 so I am assuming they are going for the launch.

And then it went up again at T-1:02. This-or-that abort sequence. It's not clear what happens next.

Re:the launch has been scrapped and is venting lOX (1)

blueadept1 (844312) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408311)

From http://spaceflightnow.com/falcon/f2/status.html [spaceflightnow.com]

2355 GMT (7:55 p.m. EDT)

The problem appears to be related to Range telemetry. The team needs another 10 minutes to examine the situation.

2350 GMT (7:50 p.m. EDT)

Engineers are working on the problem that stopped the countdown. SpaceX has time available to troubleshoot the issue and try the launch again -- so the flight has not been scrubbed for today.

Staying behind the curve (1)

psaunders (1069392) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407143)

Yes, it's always very tempting to buy these things as soon as they come out. Who doesn't want their own RP-1 launch vehicle...but the real question is, do you need it right away? Historically, the rate of technological development means that the price will decrease dramatically over the next six to twelve months, making it more affordable for the average, budget-minded consumer.

Other info sources (4, Informative)

FleaPlus (6935) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407217)

For anybody looking for more frequently-updated sources of info and don't feel like watching the entire webcase, here's some other useful sources of info:

* SpaceFlight Now's Mission Status Center [spaceflightnow.com]: According to the status center, they're having some problems with remotely-monitoring the telemetry stream, which may end up postponing the launch.

* Kimbal Musk's "Kwajalein Atoll and Rockets" blog: [blogspot.com] Kimbal is Elon Musk's brother, and often posts interesting (and highly unofficial) updates from the launch site. He sometimes goes into liveblogging mode, but hasn't done this yet today.

Re:Other info sources (2, Informative)

HUADPE (903765) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408043)

He does appear to be in liveblogging mode now, this probably changed between your post and mine. /. is not the greatest means for getting this sort of info. T minus 13:30 as of this post.

wind velocities for Kwaj (1)

ridgecritter (934252) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407287)

look normal to me from the way the palm trees are moving. It's usually windy there. The apparent vehicle sway is actually the camera mount structure swaying, which you can see by using the upper left corner of the image frame as a position reference and watching the tree sway in perfect synchrony with the rocket. Since the tree and rocket present very different wind loads, it's the camera that's moving.

I'll bet every asset the PMTR has on Kwaj is pointed at the launch vehicle. Nothing like a live launch by somebody outside of your organization to calibrate the tracking sensors and wring out procedures. Hope the USAF and the others on the island don't fry the LV electronics with all those radar emissions....

Re:wind velocities for Kwaj (1)

Sean Riordan (611520) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407457)

Generally you get a waiver from everyone in the area for certain bands. Specifically those freqs used for your self destruct and what not. It's probably easier to get the Navy to pay attention to them out on Quaj than Florida or Virginia too.

Launch hold? (1)

n6kuy (172098) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407495)

Looks like T plus 29 seconds???

WTF?

Re:Launch hold? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407891)

It appears to be a joke since that's the time when their last launch failed last year

from the wtb-ticket-pst dept? (1)

fuo (941897) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407583)

many people wait awhile to buy new home electronics until after a few iteration and all the "launch" issues are fixed... i think that reasoning definitely applies here. you couldn't pay me to get one something like that this soon.

Hehe (1)

nnn0 (794348) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407599)

NEW LAUNCH TIME. Liftoff is now targeted for 2345 GMT (7:45 p.m. EDT). Fueling of the rocket had been suspended while trying to correct the data transmission problem between Omelek Island and the company's headquarters in El Segundo, California. So the launch team is now working to get back on track for liftoff.

Re:Hehe (1)

ak_hepcat (468765) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407635)

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007
2252 GMT (6:52 p.m. EDT)

"The data is back up in El Segundo. I do believe we are a little bit behind in the count. I think we delayed some of the propellant loading activities," says Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX vice president of business development. "It looks good for today, which is obviously good news."

How far behind the countdown is running or the target launch time isn't clear at the moment.

http://spaceflightnow.com/falcon/f2/status.html [spaceflightnow.com]

New Launch Time (3, Informative)

DumbSwede (521261) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407615)

From Space.com

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007
2257 GMT (6:57 p.m. EDT)


NEW LAUNCH TIME. Liftoff is now targeted for 2345 GMT (7:45 p.m. EDT). Fueling of the rocket had been suspended while trying to correct the data transmission problem between Omelek Island and the company's headquarters in El Segundo, California. So the launch team is now working to get back on track for liftoff.

Launch delayed to 23:45 GMT/16:45 Pacific (1)

mungewell (149275) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407639)

Appears that they have had (and fixed) data connectivity problems(???).

Launch delayed 45mins.
Simon.

Re:Launch delayed to 23:45 GMT/16:45 Pacific (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18407731)

If they were serving the web camera directly from the island(!), it would have been simply slashdotted.

Re:Launch delayed to 23:45 GMT/16:45 Pacific (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407877)

They're using the akami CDN. Not gonna toast that one, I think. T-25 minutes.

Its delayed. (1)

AdmiralLawman (1073516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407709)

MONDAY, MARCH 19, 2007 2257 GMT (6:57 p.m. EDT) NEW LAUNCH TIME. Liftoff is now targeted for 2345 GMT (7:45 p.m. EDT). Fueling of the rocket had been suspended while trying to correct the data transmission problem between Omelek Island and the company's headquarters in El Segundo, California. So the launch team is now working to get back on track for liftoff. Blast it.

Houston.. (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407809)

We have voice on the video feed. Sounds like they're on step 103 of the checklist, no change in weather, fuel loading complete.

Re:Houston.. (1)

AdmiralLawman (1073516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407859)

Checklist, eh? Where would I find this 'Checklist'?

Re:Houston.. (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407913)

Not a clue; just saying there's a checklist involved. I assume some Googling will be useless, but ne'er the less, into the abyss I go... They're on 110 now, finished safety checks, stopped helium pumps, started helium top.

Re:Houston.. (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407985)

As a past member of launch operations crew for a competing company, I can affirm that these checklists are typically not published.

But good luck to you anyhow - given Elon's unorthodoxy, you may actually find something.

Re:Houston.. (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408065)

If you've got the time, care to fill the plebs in on the acronyms?

Re:Houston.. (2, Informative)

bughunter (10093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408371)

LC - Launch Control (the smartsexy voice reading the countdown sequence instructions)
LCC - Launch Control Center (aka Mission Control)

some other TLAs overheard

SB - Strongback (the scaffold holding the vehicle until approx t minus 4 minutes)
MD - Mission Director (responsible for mission-level and enterprise-level decisions, probably Elon Musk himself)
RSO - Range Safety Officer (responsible for making sure all is clear downrange for a few miles)
GSO - Ground Safety Officer (responsible for making sure the immediate vicinity of the rocket is clear)
FSO - Flight Safety Officer (part of the Kwaj range; these guys have their finger on the destruct button)
FTSO - Flight Termination System Officer (SpaceX person responsible for verifying the command destruct receiver, ordnance, batteries, etc, are functional)

and some guesses
AVI - Air Vehicle Instrumentation (?) (flight engineer monitoring ground telemetry)

any others I've forgotten?

4:17 PM (1)

Orig_Club_Soda (983823) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407847)

It looks like they are starting up the engines. There is white smoke coming out the side.

Re:4:17 PM (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407889)

That is ullage (boil-off) from the liquid oxygen tank as they fill it.

Mark T minus 25 minutes

Re:4:17 PM (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18407945)

Not just as they fill it- it's gonna be there till there's some other drain (IE firing). Fuel loads are complete now. Just looked and it's stepped up. Now a lot of boiloff- probably because it's now full?

Countdown continues (1)

bughunter (10093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408053)

At t minus 14 minutes they have elected not to hold, and are waiting for t minus 11 minutes to proceed with the sequence.

All stations are reporting ready.

As someone who has done this before, I can tell you, every stomach in the LCC is twitching in nervous anticipation about now.

Terminal Count Abort (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18408195)

T- 1:02 Abort

Aborted (0)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408201)

Well they just aborted the launch a minute before launch. Given the windy conditions I'm not sure why they fueled it in the first place.

Terminal Count Abort (0, Redundant)

bughunter (10093) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408213)

No reason given by the LC.

We can expect an announcement in 15 to 30 minutes if they intend to recycle for today or stand down.

discrimination against other media players? (0, Offtopic)

proudhawk (124895) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408229)

ok,
I found this to be rather rude on their part. I don't run a mac and I don't have windows.
so how am I to enjoy this feat of modern technology from a LINUX desktop.
Apparently I can't (not with these guys anyway).

Re:discrimination against other media players? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18408241)

mplayer works fine for me. you can load mms streams if you have the right codec (WMV3)

Re:discrimination against other media players? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18408265)

Paste this into Kaffeine mms://a141.l2216521225.c22165.g.lm.akamaistream.ne t/D/141/22165/v0001/reflector:21225

Re:discrimination against other media players? (1)

Dungbeetle (45214) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408269)

Try this from a terminal (assuming you've got mplayer installed).
It's how i'm watching it - not that you're missing anything at the moment ;/.

mplayer -cache 64 mms://a141.l2216521225.c22165.g.lm.akamaistream.ne t/D/141/22165/v0001/reflector:21225

Re:discrimination against other media players? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18408315)

"...so how am I to enjoy this feat of modern technology from a LINUX desktop."

Mmm, nothing like the smell of proprietary codecs on the open web. You can do it. One approach is to get xine from here [puc-rio.br] and add the w32codec-0.52-1.i386.rpm. And get the MediaPlayerConnectivity [mozilla.org] plugin for Firefox and you should be able to view it.

Evil villain? (1)

yulek (202118) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408231)

anyone else think that the launch site looks like it's on some remote tropical island? okay, so it's not inside a volcano, but still... definitely evil villain style.

AnomalyNet (1)

tehmorph (844326) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408235)

I assume that is their internal network for comms? Only a matter of time, I suppose, before they come back on public and give the verdict.

afk 10 minutes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18408291)

They mentioned something about a telemetry error.

Not scrubbed yet (0)

Rixel (131146) | more than 7 years ago | (#18408323)

"2350 GMT (7:50 p.m. EDT)

Engineers are working on the problem that stopped the countdown. SpaceX has time available to troubleshoot the issue and try the launch again -- so the flight has not been scrubbed for today."

2355 GMT (7:55 p.m. EDT)

The problem appears to be related to the Range and telemetry. The team needs another 10 minutes to examine the situation.
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