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CompTIA Certifies Home Network Integrators

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the I'm-a-level-7-cable-connector dept.

Networking 56

prostoalex writes "Consumer Electronics Association and Computer Technology Industry Association introduced a new certification for individuals and companies installing home networks and connecting consumer electronics devices to a central PC: 'The certification is geared to individuals who install, integrate and maintain "smart" homes, in which the PC is the hub controlling lighting, security systems, audio-visual and digital entertainment gear, including home media centers.' The home networking market is predicted to grow at 20% a year globally."

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I coulda used someone with that cert (1)

bensafrickingenius (828123) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438127)

last month when my home's thermostat blew. I thought it was going to be a snap to find a WiFi enabled replacement, so I could program it remotely -- from the basement *or* from the campground. Never did find one.

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18438181)

I'm trying to think of a sarcastic comment that let's people know the depth of my contempt for CompTIA certs. I've worked with enough A+ cert'ed jackasses to count them as a negative.

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (3, Funny)

fastgood (714723) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438705)

One cert makes you an "Agent" at the Best Buy store, and I actually got a phone call from someone who identified themselves as a "double Agent" ... I never figured out if it meant they worked on Macs too, or something else.

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (2, Informative)

iamstretchypanda (939837) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438989)

A double agent is someone who works in the field/makes house calls and inside the store. They usually seem to be the best from my experience (i.e. they can sell you a part without reading the specs off the box). Hope that helps :]

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (1)

iamstretchypanda (939837) | more than 7 years ago | (#18454845)

haha rephrasing for better readability. A double agent is someone who works in the field (makes house calls) and works inside the store.

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (1)

westlake (615356) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438395)

I thought it was going to be a snap to find a WiFi enabled replacement, so I could program it remotely -- from the basement *or* from the campground. Never did find one.

Carrier's high-end residential HVAC can be programmed over the net. Climate Control Over the Internet [digitalmedianet.com]

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (1)

bensafrickingenius (828123) | more than 7 years ago | (#18442077)

Thanks, but that's not what I needed. I have a fairly new HVAC system -- all I needed was a new thermostat. It just really shouldn't be that hard to put a web server and a wireless card in a thermostat! Think of the functionality you would gain! On the first day of vacation, you realize you forgot to turn the heat down or the air off at home. There goes a lot of cash and wasted energy out the door. Not to mention it would be a lot easier to program the thing for maximum comfort and efficiency via a browser than the clunky interfaces they currently sport. Eventually, you could just download the desired profile from the web and import it into your thermostat. Oh well. Maybe I'll be an inventor in another life.

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (1)

Critical Facilities (850111) | more than 7 years ago | (#18442567)

You mean something like this? [lightstat.com]

Re:I coulda used someone with that cert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18448565)

Nope. Looks good until you start reading. You need to subscribe to their service. They run the web interface, and you have to route all of your configuration settings through them. I have no idea what they'd charge for this unnecessary service, but it's not an option. It simply doesn't have to be that complicated!

This Makes a lot of sense (1)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438209)

I've been waiting for home automation to "hit" for about four years now. Only after part-time work with a moving company did I see new homes with all the necessary "wiring" at that point I knew this was coming soon. Also, if you check employment listings you will see "construction technology specialists" listed, another hint.

This Makes a lot of sense-MSCE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18438291)

Now watch the slashcrowd turn up their noses at this bit of news.

Re:This Makes a lot of sense-MSCE (1)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 7 years ago | (#18494677)

google says "Did you mean: MCSE"

Re:This Makes a lot of sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18438871)

youre waiting for ipv8

It's official. I can wire X10. (5, Informative)

lightversusdark (922292) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438281)

Did any new standard supplant X10 in this field?

Isn't this basically an electrician with knowledge of niche product availability?

I can't imagine this qualifies you to build and install a soffit-mounted machine and code up some custom serial control. That's a service I would pay for.

Re:It's official. I can wire X10. (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438371)

Is there anything that is X10 that's not junk? The standard stuff is garbage. Even their fanciest stuff that I've seen looked and felt flimsy.

Re:It's official. I can wire X10. (1)

Leebert (1694) | more than 7 years ago | (#18441233)

Did any new standard supplant X10 in this field?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-Bus_(protocol) [wikipedia.org]

Both wired (CAT-5) and wireless.

Ok, I'm sorry but... (1)

dharbee (1076687) | more than 7 years ago | (#18444145)

X10 is a joke. Our company is one of the largest home automation/lighting control integrators in the state, and we wouldn't use X10 if they gave it to us.

These are the big guys, the ones the pros (us) use.

http://www.control4.com/ [control4.com]
http://www.lutron.com/ [lutron.com]
http://www.crestron.com/ [crestron.com]
http://www.homeauto.com/ [homeauto.com]

They're quality. X10 is... not.

Re:Ok, I'm sorry but... (1)

innerweb (721995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18450887)

Hmm.. Glanced at the websites. Can any of these be integrated with a windows or *nix machine? X10 can (I know it is cheap). If these solutions could, then I might be more interested in them personally.

Things I can do with X10 -

  • Make a phone call to modify settings (via asterisk)
  • Hit a website to view status/modify settings
  • Link cameras with lights for security - sensor ir tripped, lights come on, cameras record - affordably.
  • Automate watering of the plants and trees we have inside.
  • Control baffling in the central air system.
  • Do all this in a scripting language (perl, python, ...)
  • Do all of this with only one system, not several independant systems that will not work together well.

There are many things I do not like about X10, but then there are many things I have been able to do with X10 that I simply can not (or do not know how to) do with anything else. I do not consider myself an expert by any means, only a hobbyist. But, we hobbyists are buying the technology and making it do interesting things (like Mr House.)

Please share with us how to do these things with the other systems, I would be very intered in reading them. I would love to go to a system that does not use the power lines to work. I would rather use wirerless or run new wire (not hard in my house).

-InnerWeb

CompTIA exams (4, Informative)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438361)

Got Network+ certified a couple of months ago. The actual test material isn't bad, and it covers a lot of networking fundamentals from a vendor neutral standpoint. I had heard they had really made the test a lot harder. Boy, if my test was hard, I would have hated to have seen the easy test. It seemed repetitive and all very easy, with a lot of port number questions, firewall questions, and basic TCP/IP utility questions, most of which I could have passed without hardly any actual study.

Now, I see no reason to make it so hard that hardly anybody can pass (Cisco are you listening?), but it would be nice to have a test that reflected the study material a little better. All in all, I have had Brainbench exams that were much, much harder to pass.

Transporter_ii

 

Re:CompTIA exams (1)

Some Kind Of Record (829533) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438735)

Not to be snide, but I think the weight of a Network+ certification matches its easy questions. In other words, nothing.

The fact you even mention BrainBench [wolff-hamburg.de] in the same post, makes me think you should aim a little higher. A lot higher.

Re: Brainbench (2, Insightful)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439071)

I'm actually taking two Cisco exams in April. Not sure if I will pass, but I do feel I have a shot at it.

And I will say, the worst thing about Brainbench is its kind of stupid name, in my opinion. But if I was an employer and had to hire someone, first, I would go for someone with actual experience, but failing that a Brainbench certification would impress me a heck of a lot more than a CompTIA cert.

I guess I'm just White & Nerdy, but I actually have some free practice test web sites, so I work with test questions quit a bit (not that that makes me an expert or anything), and the actual test questions on a Brainbench exam are really good, I don't care what anybody says. I took a couple of Cisco exams there that made sweat bead up on my forehead. I know people who took Cisco classes in college, and I would bet good money none of them would be able to just breeze through the exams.

I do agree that their certifications are basically worthless, but I think as far as the questions go, they are solid questions.

Transporter_ii

Re:CompTIA exams (2, Insightful)

flosofl (626809) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438845)

...I see no reason to make it so hard that hardly anybody can pass (Cisco are you listening?)

You're kidding right? Not to take away from your accomplishment, but most certifications are not worth the paper they're printed on. Your first paragraph pretty much illustrates that. All these certifications prove is how well someone can memorize and regurgitate facts. Basically, Certification bodies are nothing more than a way to make money by convincing clueless management types that they actually mean something. And CompTIA is at the head of the list for that.

There are very few of these professional certifications that are actually a valuable gauge of ability. Cisco's CCIE comes to mind, along with GIAC Gold-Level certifications. To get these you actually have to demonstrate a deep understanding and an ability to creatively apply your knowledge. But for the most part, most certificates are a scam.

And before someone tries to say I'm sour grapes because I don't have any... I have a few of these. Some Cisco certs, CISSP, and a few GIAC silver level (working on a gold at the moment). The primary reason for them? Well, in the case of the CISSP, my department (InfoSec) has decreed we all need them. Whatever... hasn't changed anyone's abilities or performance. The others? Well, they're for C.V. fodder. It just makes it that much easier to get an interview where I can demonstrate what I really know and can do.

How certifications work (4, Insightful)

transporter_ii (986545) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438905)

Ok, I snagged this from a Slashdot post a while back, author unknown:

Assume there are 2 people up for a job:

(1) If neither has the experience and one has the certification, the one with the certification wins.
(2) If one has the experience and no certification and other has no experience but a certification, the person with experience wins.
(3) If both have the same experience and only one has the extra certification, the one with the certification wins.
(4) If both have the same certifications and the same experience, the one who is cheaper wins.
(5) If both have certifications and neither has any experience, the one who talks better wins.
(6) If neither has any certifications or experience, the one who looks better wins.

Transporter_ii

No this is a FAKE QUALIFICATION (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18440269)

The cheapest one wins because the customer doesn't have any way to measure the fitters experience or know about the worth of the certificate. So the guy who is cheapest wins, and he's the one that spents more time doing stuff than getting a certificate for doing stuff.

THIS IS A SALES TRICK. This is just another qasi organisation (CompTIA = Software Patent front group for Microsoft and Nokia) trying to sell qasi qualifications.

THIS USUALLY MEANS INSTALLING ONLY A FEW VENDORS KIT. In this case since it's CompTIA, they'll certify you for installing Microsoft kit I guess.

Better yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18441657)

The guy with the college degree always wins over any certification. A 4 year degree from a U.S. university is like having all the MS certs, all the Cisco certs and all the A+ certs wrapped up in one. Now if you don't have a degree, you won't like that, but a 4 year technical degree from a U.S. university is like gold. No way around that.

Depends on the job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18444537)

OK, I'm a manager at a "real" engineering shop. We develop consumer products and hire mostly EE and a few CS grads. We do real electrical engineering (RF, IC design, power supply, etc) and real CS (complier design, information theory, and some real bleeding edge stuff that will have the patents issue soon - oops wrong place to brag about that). We will also hire self taught engineers if their experience is outstanding. We pay among the best in the area (cash, not stock). We also have an IT department that we have little contact with - they are just plumbers from our point of view. This makes us different from much of /. When I hire, if I see one certificate I toss the resume. I want to see a real education and the ability to think and learn. From my point of view, those who spend all of their time getting certs rather than learning and doing are suspect. While it is true that we end-up mostly hiring EE/CS types I would rather see an anthropology major who has designed their own DSP in Verilog than an EE with a long list of certs. A real education teaches you to critically read, write, think and learn. The other thing I don't bother looking at code samples, but I do ask for writing samples. Real engineers must be able to communicate.

Engineers spend their careers here, but if I ran an IT where people come and go I guess I understand why you grab a body with a cert. -rant- Sorry if this is a bit harsh, but I see custom IT going away and begin replaced by standard products. The wave of outsourcing is proof that the world is ready for the next step of standardization and the knowledge of what is required has been captured those outside th end user. Does every shop need its own custom accounting or inventory package? I can't imagine writing a custom word processor or spread sheet. If I ran the IT world there would be thin clients of every desk and a standard preloaded server box in every IT closet. -/rant-

Re:CompTIA exams (1)

EonBlueTooL (974478) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439255)

Maybe its because I'm generally good at test taking but I found the same thing. Network+ questions were either insanly hard or insanly basic and therefore easy, and there were not a lot of hard ones. (and the hard ones I had were novell/server03 based) Oh, and a lot of the easy ones were STUPID easy. Like what does ip stand for (exageration) easy, they could really do a better job of forcing some actual thought as opposed to memorized answers...

Net+ isnt so much vendor neutral as vendor "fair", and when I make that distinction I mean they asked questions about each.

Re:CompTIA exams (1)

davidsyes (765062) | more than 7 years ago | (#18443915)

Well, the new homes building industry might have a cozy relationsihp with contractors, or being the installers themselves, might not want newly certified technicians to muscle in on "their" turf. But, for new homes, it would be vastly easier for those still wanting copper vs wireless....

Re:CompTIA exams (1)

Technician (215283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18446067)

I would have hated to have seen the easy test. It seemed repetitive and all very easy, with a lot of port number questions, firewall questions, and basic TCP/IP utility questions, most of which I could have passed without hardly any actual study.

Why is the exam so expensive? It is an order of magnitude above what I paid for my ISCET journeyman exam.

Re:Foot in mouth.. (1)

Technician (215283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18446259)

I just looked.. The prices of the ISCET exam has gone up also, but it is still 3x the price.

ISCET exam prices..
TESTING FEES
Associate and One Journeyman Exam $75.00
Journeyman Exam $50.00
Associate Exam $45.00
Endorsements $50.00

http://www.iscetedu.net/ec/certManager/registerInf o.jsp [iscetedu.net]

I did pass on my first try. I have also taken my Low Voltage NEC classes. (Class 2 electrical)

So at todays prices the ISCET exam is $75 compared to $225 for the non-member in home tech exam.

Somehow I don't think this is really useful (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438367)

I don't think this certification is going to necessarily make anyone suddenly become useful. A random look at some of the sample questions is sort of scary.... Two sample questions from their website http://certification.comptia.org/resources/practic e_test.aspx [comptia.org] Question 3 (corresponding objective: 1.a.10) A technician is asked to troubleshoot a residential network that reported no problems yesterday. Today, the user's computer is not able to communicate with any of the other networked devices. Which of the following should the technician check FIRST? A. Power supply to the network devices B. Operating system for viruses C. System resources used by the network interface cards D. Protocols installed on the system Question 4 (corresponding objective: 1.b.10) A client has a 100 watt stereo receiver. The client has purchased speakers rated at 200 watts. The receiver keeps shutting off, and the distortion is high. Which of the following is the best explanation? A. The speakers need more power than 100 watts. B. The strands of wire are touching. C. The speaker cable is the wrong gauge. D. The protective fuses in the receiver are too weak.

Re:Somehow I don't think this is really useful (1)

Dragonslicer (991472) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438803)

Question 3 (corresponding objective: 1.a.10) A technician is asked to troubleshoot a residential network that reported no problems yesterday. Today, the user's computer is not able to communicate with any of the other networked devices. Which of the following should the technician check FIRST? A. Power supply to the network devices B. Operating system for viruses C. System resources used by the network interface cards D. Protocols installed on the system
How about E. Is it plugged in?

Re:Somehow I don't think this is really useful (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438831)

fsck, forgot that. The actual correct answers were A and B respectively.

A. Power supply to the network devices

B. The strands of wire are touching.

What I meant to say... (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438421)

sigh,

The previous post should have looked like this:

I don't think this certification is going to necessarily make anyone suddenly become useful. A random look at some of the sample questions is sort of scary.... Two sample questions from their website http://certification.comptia.org/resources/practic e_test.aspx [comptia.org]

Question 3
(corresponding objective: 1.a.10)

A technician is asked to troubleshoot a residential network that reported no problems yesterday. Today, the user's computer is not able to communicate with any of the other networked devices. Which of the following should the technician check FIRST?

A. Power supply to the network devices
B. Operating system for viruses
C. System resources used by the network interface cards
D. Protocols installed on the system

Question 4
(corresponding objective: 1.b.10)

A client has a 100 watt stereo receiver. The client has purchased speakers rated at 200 watts. The receiver keeps shutting off, and the distortion is high. Which of the following is the best explanation?

A. The speakers need more power than 100 watts.
B. The strands of wire are touching.
C. The speaker cable is the wrong gauge.
D. The protective fuses in the receiver are too weak.

Good CCIE Bad CCIE? (1)

Wazukkithemaster (826055) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438489)

Did anybody else read the title as saying "Network Interregators" ? Thoughts went immediately to the RIAA shouting at networks for a couple hours and claiming evidence of piracy...

Ridiculous... (0)

Vexler (127353) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438565)

This "cert" is in the same camp as the thoroughly pointless MCSA and MCDST. For every friggin' level of technical ability there must now be a "recognition" for achievement, the cover story being that not only do we need a diverse pool of talents of varying level (which is true, because it makes little sense to send a CCIE to re-cable a living room), but we also need to recognize them individually for all those little steps that they take.

Reminds me of those people who would put down "CCIE-Written" as one of the "certs" that they have earned on their way to the big leagues. Either you have the necessary skills, or you don't. Stop using Mickey Mouse certs to hide your lack of technical knowledge. As for organizations that certify people and companies that recognize these certs, stop enabling pretenders from crowding out the contenders.

Ridiculous...competition. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18438601)

"Reminds me of those people who would put down "CCIE-Written" as one of the "certs" that they have earned on their way to the big leagues. Either you have the necessary skills, or you don't. Stop using Mickey Mouse certs to hide your lack of technical knowledge. As for organizations that certify people and companies that recognize these certs, stop enabling pretenders from crowding out the contenders."

Translation: I can't find a job. "Won't someone think of the contenders?"

Re:Ridiculous... (1)

overbaud (964858) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438757)

How does an organisation seperate the "pretenders from crowding out the contenders" ? All they generally have to go on during the hiring process is a resume and interview. If a role requires 'some skills' but isn't suited to 'no skills', minor certification(s) provide a good, quick, recognisable baseline to filter through the applicants.
 
Anyone with no skills will be found out pretty quickly regardless of their certification(s).
 
The only real alternatives are time consuming... either calling references (which for a minor role would be a waste of time, and not workable for the initial filtering of candidates) or setting up a 'labl' situation for people (bigger waste of time).
 
Further I would not want to work for a company that thought it was fine to have ten people work through a 'lab' scenario to hire one, thus wasting the time of 9 others.
 
Your obviously one of those morons that shoots their mouth off, has no extended business knowledge and can easy criticise but finds suggesting alternatives more difficult. Maybe you could put NFI after your name to fill in the gap where letters could be, but aren't because well... "Either you have the necessary skills, or you don't." and as such you you are to l33t to pursue certification because you have skillz.

Who woulda thunk... (1)

jo42 (227475) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438635)

...that you could get certified for "insert male RJ-45 connector A into female RJ-45 socket B"...

Wot next?

From the people who brought us the A+ cert (3, Insightful)

zoomshorts (137587) | more than 7 years ago | (#18438683)

Are you serious? CompTIA is basically useless. I have seen far
too many of their 'certified' people be nothing more than paper tigers. They have
a piece of paper and that is all.

Their paper is suitable for lining bird cages.

ATTENTION HUMAN RESOURCES - CompTIA training is a joke. Rinse, repeat.

Re:From the people who brought us the A+ cert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18439031)

Are you serious? CompTIA is basically useless. I have seen far
too many of their 'certified' people be nothing more than paper tigers. They have
a piece of paper and that is all.

Their paper is suitable for lining bird cages.

ATTENTION HUMAN RESOURCES - CompTIA training is a joke. Rinse, repeat.


Oh good grief... yes the tests are easy but no, you pussifying about it on here isn't going to make it go away. I had been a component level electronics tech, a computer tech, and a network tech for ten years before I broke down and nailed both A+ and Network+ just to make it over the moat that is HR. They don't understand what we actually do, but they have considerable input into the hiring process, so they need a litmus test.

And for that matter I've seen too many degreed people who are paper tigers.

And I've seen people with neither certs nor education but a bullshit resume that claims all sorts of experience, and a number of them are paper tigers as well.

Re:From the people who brought us the A+ cert (4, Insightful)

Simulant (528590) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439039)

I agree that most certs are generally meaningless to most tech savvy people. I would never rely on a cert as an indicator of ability and would probably be suspicious. But... if one were, say, to go into business as a "Home Network Specialist" the average, not so technically inclined customer might feel comforted to see some sort of certification on your business card.

Given that the market shows promise and I that can probably handle most of the tech involved with my eyes closed, I am seriously consider dropping out of the corporate rat race and starting up a little business helping normal people with the tech they have at home. May take the test myself just for marketing purposes.

Re:From the people who brought us the A+ cert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18439275)

Sounds like somebody didn't get that $10/hr geeksquad job at BestBuy!

Re:From the people who brought us the A+ cert (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18439511)

Well, these tests are useless, unless you value being paid $8.00 /hr by compUSA or the geek effing squad!!!
Bobby

re: CompTIA useless? (1)

King_TJ (85913) | more than 7 years ago | (#18447463)

I'd only agree to an extent... I got my CompTIA A+ cert. years ago, figuring it couldn't hurt to have it, since it was obviously all stuff I knew anyway. (Easier to show a cert. on a resume than to prove, indirectly, you know the same material to some guy you never met before in your life, and you only have 1 hour or less to speak with in an interview.)

CompTIA certs. are entry-level. They only show you have *some* basic knowledge of the topic, vs. some random guy off the street.

I think part of the problem with them is that some employers assume they mean too much. An A+ means you know the equivalent of somebody who had NO former computer experience at all, but spent about 6 months working on PCs with someone giving him some hands-on training. That's not much - but might be all a retail store really wants, considering their unwillingness to pay more for better people.

I'm surprised to see CompTIA is still around (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18439385)

is anyone else?

great (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439471)

Oh great, another worthless certification! I am so sick of these

Cisco.... (3, Funny)

HockeyPuck (141947) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439911)

I for one can't wait for my CCIE:Linksys.

In the sprit of CCIE: R&S (Routing and Switching)... one would have to know indepth the common protocols used in the house to include (but not limitted to) at the frame/packet level:

Ethernet.
TCP/IP
UDP
Netbios
CIFS
BitTorrent
Various streaming audio/video protocols.
PPOE..

It shall be in the style of the "old CCIE:R&S" exams, which had a TWO day lab, in which if you failed the first day, you didn't come back the second day. Additionally, while setting up the gear, you will have to contend with a crying baby, a large dog that wants to play, a husband that "thinks he knows it more than you" and a housewife that says you charge too much.

Another way for a company to get your $$'s. (1)

Vskye (9079) | more than 7 years ago | (#18439945)

The certification test is offered to CompTIA members for $180. The fee for non-members is $225.
 
Wow, a person can't actually setup their wireless router/access point. Big frick'in surprise. And now you should pay an additional fee to have a cert that any well mannered geek should be skilled at to begin with.
 
I feel that this is more of a manufacture issue, doc/instruction wise. Come on, enough is enough. IF people actually had a clue. Wireless routers suck big time from some manufactures. Belkin won't even support 8MB down on some models. Then you have issues with them losing IP address's from the cable modem, doing a power cycle on the router and all is well. Linksys seems to be good at this one. (yep, I work tech support at a broadband company) Poof!

Beware of CompTIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18440349)

CompTIA is not our friend. As an organization they are trying to standardize the IT field. Whether or not this is good or bad is debatable. What you should also know about them is that they are a lobby. The lobby for things relevant to the software industry. You will be happy to know that they have actively lobbied in favor or software patents. When you take their exams you are funding that lobby.

It's a sales gimmick to sell vendor kit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18440493)

Vendors wanting to sell their network and PC kit (e.g. Cisco and Microsoft) get together under an umbrella organization (CompTIA) and make a 'certification'.

The reality is it training in selling Cisco and Microsoft kit, the kit of the member companies under CompTIA, that's what you're being certified for. You're not being certified to use cheap Taiwanese no brand products even if they're cheaper and just as reliable.

The qualification is worthless in itself, it's a pseudo qualification designed to give a marketing gloss to the vendors kit.

About CompTIA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18440657)

to cert or not to cert (2, Informative)

KenStech (1015127) | more than 7 years ago | (#18441267)

I suppose this goes without saying but certs are only as good as the person behind them.

A few years ago I helped a guy pass his MSCE exam. The funny thing was this guy knew zip about computers before (and mostly after). He had been a carpet installer in his previous life. Anyway he passed his exam and was then hired as a sysadmin for a small town municipality for about 50 grand. I suppose OJT is the best kind of training anyway.

Certs have their uses, but it's no replacement for real knowledge. Back when I was still repairing computers for a living, I got my A+ cert because I thought it would help my marketing. Big shock. The test was so easy I didn't believe it when it ended. My respect for certs in general plummeted after that.

It is possible for some people to screw it up however. One of my employers sent an employee to a 2 week $2500 A+ cert course (note, they never reimbursed me for the cost of MY test); She still failed. LoL! Maybe that's karma in some way. I guess that is the real purpose of the certs, to separate the genuine idiots from the merely lazy.

-Ken

Easy to weed out the "experts on paper" (1)

smchris (464899) | more than 7 years ago | (#18441469)

First time they drill into a power line.

Seems problematic. Like this should be in a carpentry trade school track "with assistance from CompTIA" or something.

I dont know about the US but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18443421)

I dont know how A+ and Network+ are regarded in the US, but over here in The Netherlands, i have personally NEVER seen any job offers that required either of them. I did them both and i too was solidly unimpressed.

I work in the IT detaching scene as a network/systems engineer and like most people in my line of work, im filled to the brim with all kinds of certs. I have my MCP, MCSA 2003, MCSE 2003 with Security specialisation, A+, Network+, VCP ESX Server 2.5 and 3, as well as my ITIL and Prince2. It really says nothing about ones knowledge if you pass them all through testkings, you just create paper tigers.

Nevertheless, it does impress the average manager, and i think thats the largest part of the problem. Uninformed IT managers who know jack about IT only look at the paperwork.
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