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IT Salary Comparisons Worldwide

Cliff posted more than 14 years ago | from the resources-for-the-job-market-wanderer dept.

The Almighty Buck 741

What's the going rate for a geek in today's high paced IT world? Both Bagpiper and Johnath are about to enter different sectors of the job market, and would like some references on salaries in various computer-related areas, both in the US and abroad. Interested to see what the starting salary for your average coder is in North Carolina? How about Germany? Click below for more.

Bagpiper asks: "The combination of a recent /. comment, as well as my wife's desire to live overseas, started my pondering about what my pay (mid-Atlantic US software/firmware engineer w/ 9 yrs exp.) would compare to that of a similar job in another country? Several sources tell me what I'd be making in The Valley or Seattle, but none tell me what I'd make if I moved to Ireland, or to Germany, or to Taiwan (you get the idea)? A related question is what kind of standard of living would I expect in another country on the expected salary? (And just in case my current employers or headhunters see this, I'm not currently looking! I'm just curious."

and this from Johnath: ""The more I look at places like monster.com (and it's Canadian Counterpart) the more I see "Salary: TBD" or "Please submit salary expectations with your resume and cover letter" or other equally vague phrases. As someone in the last year or two of his university education, this gets a little disturbing since I can't really tell what my salary expectations are without some reference for comparison. Normally, I'd get that by looking at the job postings themselves, but of course, they've all taken to being painfully cryptic. So what I want to know is - what's a geek cost these days? What kind of money do Slashdotters make in the various Computing and IT related fields.

What are the broader ranges - do network guys/gals get paid more than code monkeys? How does the pay of the web design team compare to the network admin that keeps the site running (and if they're the same person, how much better is the pay?"

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Salary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546428)

(I'm posting as a AC as I'm not allowed to post salary info in my company's terms and conditions, I think. Better safe than sorry, right?) I'm a sysadmin who's been with this company 5 years, with solid levels of certification to back it up (RHCE, CNA, etc). I am responsible for thousands of users' email, news, dedicated circuits (to DS3 level), web hosting, as well as internal systems. I manage a crew of several people (more than a half dozen). And I make about 33.5K a year. I'm located in Ohio Valley region (not gonna get more specific or the higher ups will know who I am). Tell me I'm not getting screwed?

Ireland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546429)

The market in ireland is short of staff, so the wages are good, but there are a few drawbacks, the tax rate is very high, and the cost of housing is extremly high if you are anywhere near dublin where most of the techie work is.

Starting rate for a programmer I'd guess is about £18-20k, but with experience and qualifications you could be making £30k

Re:Salaries in the UK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546430)

What is suprising is that non-graduates can earn exactly the same as those with degrees. My experiences as someone who came to England to work are along these lines - First contract with making 25UKP/hour on a short term 3 month contract. With extensions and more work, it quickly climbs to over 40/hour. If you are willing to do contract work and know your stuff, then you can make some serious money (should be enough to keep a wife on). However, the government to trying to get more money out of the small business contractor by introducion IR35 mandate (with anyluck, it will ammuse the lords will will just bin it). More in London but be prepared for the extra costs as living in London can be very hard on the pocket.

What is a IT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546431)

What is a salary? a comparison?

I don't understand.

Salaries at a Fortune 100 Company in NC, USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546432)

We start our coders at around 35,000, though that will usually rise to around 42,000 afer the first year. Network and operation guys make a little less. Someone with 5-7 years experience should expect around 60 - 65,000. It's been my experience that the starting salery is relatively high, but the curve flattens as the geeks salery approaches that of thier management. Contract work is a whole different ballgame though.....

salary comments... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546433)

now that first post is out of the way, this is for real.

This depends on your line of work. I was consulting in Boston last year for upwards of 100K per year at 100% travel (graduated with BS 5/98). The work was boring, though, so I left for greener pastures which turned out to be grad school.

Companies more oriented to building the technology (rather than e-commerce systems, data warehouses, etc.) were offering things more in the range of 47-52K starting. Most of these were in northern VA or RTP.

A lot of this money thing depends on what you want to do. Are you willing to sacrifice your geek-soul to go do consulting work? Very rarely is that kind of thing technically challenging or rewarding IMNSHO. Or, are you more willing to take a pay cut, not travel every week, and do some very cool work? The coolest stuff I could find on the east coast was my own agenda which is why I'm back in grad school.

If you're worth your salt technically, the money will come. The other thing to consider is where you want to live (RTP in NC - yuck!, WA, CA, MA) and what it costs to live there.

I'll be watching this discussion too since I'll be looking for real work in another year myself.

Good luck...

UNIX: Yea Baby (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546434)

Working as a UNIX consultant in the Northern Virginia area:
$110K, Salaried w/ benefits.

Damn, its nice to be the best. I've been doing UNIX since I was a teenager (I'm 27 now): the experience pays. Guys, this is a sellers market. Negotiate, negotiate, negotiate. Repeat after me: They can't find someone else to do this job! If they think they can, then you don't want to work for the idiots anyway.

(This posting is anonymous to protect the innocent.)

How much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546435)

7$ an hour.
For unix systems administration and shell scripting.
*grin* they sure can rip you off when you don't have your degree yet, ne? ;)

- Rei

Salaries in Sweden (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546436)

If you work in Stockholm, Gothenburg or Malmo you
can expect to make about 40-50 K USD/year.
SysAdmin pays less than a fancy "web designer" title.

Re:Salary is just a part of the equation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546437)

> For example, in Silicon Valey, you will get a high salary, but you have to pay >500k
> for a decent house. In other part of the world you will get lower salary, but the cost
> of life is much lower. So in fact you can make a better living elsewhere.
> Now to answer your question, in Montreal the mean salary for someone who is just out of
> the University is 40,000$CAN.

But there, you can buy a house 20 minutes by foot from downtown for less than $150,000.

And if you don't mind suburbia, that amount will get you a pretty big house... So, you get plenty of small change left to go to all of those restaurants (and the bars close at 3 in the morning, too!)...

Re:Salary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546438)

I'm earning $27k doing sys admin work in a hospital. Count your self lucky. As a semi-government body we get paid on a different scale from reality.

I'm moving to Seattle/Tacoma as soon as I can get things sorted out here.

Here's what I make (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546439)

I've been working as a programmer for 16 years now. The past 6 years have been as a Windows C++/MFC developer (I know, I know... sacrilege).

My current salary is $83,000/yr in Dallas, TX. I also get bonuses, typically, based on our firm's performance, and those are usually around $6,000.
The hours we work are quite easy -- get in around 9:30, leave about 5:30, 1 - 1.5 hours for lunch. Of course, we don't balk at putting whatever hours are needed to get things done on time, to spec, within budget, etc. But, thus far, we just about never do any deathmarches.

This salary is in combination with full family health coverage, insurance, and 401k.

Hope this helps.

Same wages, higher taxes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546440)

you can expect to make about the same as in the US, but expect to pay higher taxes, and many social security type insurances are mandatory.

Argentina (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546441)

Anywhere in the range of 20K to 50K per year

UK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546442)

I reckon about 14,000GBP (20,000 USD) for a grad in the country. A decent banking IT contractor in London gets 100,000 GBP (150,000 USD). London is a bit more expensive than New York though. Check out http://www.jobserve.com/ for jobs in the UK.

Boston, MA EE w/MS Degree (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546443)

Fresh out of school with a Masters in EE, working at a startup in Boston. I'm on the real low end of my pay scale here at $50K/yr and no benefits, but in return I do cutting-edge R&D under Linux.

The more conventional offers I was looking at were more like $60K/yr and stock options, health, 401K...



Re:Salary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546444)

Yep, you're definately getting screwed. I have no certs, 5 years experience, no degree. Working for a starup in TX. I make 70K. Really, you should contact Amphigory and get another job :)

Re:Salaries in the UK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546445)

It's not as bad as Belgium either. I'm British, but working as a Consultant in Belgium and trust me the tax system over here is substantially worse than the UK.

Almost exactly half of what I earn goes to the taxman!!!

Re:My web position (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546446)

I get around $120k pa in Central London with 1 months paid holiday & training... Similar experience, 3 1/2 years pro webmaster.

MN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546447)

Well, in MN my company starts programers at just over $40k a year. Goes up from their, with expirence you can get over 100k/year. We also have a reputation of being a cheap with paying companies, but somehow have managed to attract some top notch people so that some of us have refused offers for more money just because we would have to (pick which is more improtant) leave good co-workers behind, or work with something other then windows. Most of us are well aware that we can make more money though we are not sure it is worth it.

In other parts of the country the pay is different. I know one person who left to Silicon Valley for double the pay, and said that due to cost of living the true pay is the same.

In MN we have the problem that we are not on the coast, so big shots are never in the area, they may fly overhead, but they never stop so they never see us. Just as well as it keeps the population down, but we do miss some opertunities that way.

North Carolina (mid state) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546448)

average is 45k. I make 50k with no college. started this job with Zero experience at 45k still have less than one yr exp.

this is consistent for VB, Java, add $$ for C++.

Re:Salary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546449)

Get a new headhunter, bro....I am a network fool and I make 12k more then that. Maybe its my personality:)....

Sunny Orlando, Florida (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546450)

As Programmer/Analyst I was at $60,000. The market here tops out around $65k for sysadmins and $75k-80k for coders. As an independant contractor, I'm making closer to $90,000. High-school dropout, 5 years sysadmin/programming experience. The money's not great, but the cost of living here is quite low.

Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546451)

In Sydney Australia I started on $35,000 which is about 25,000 US dollars. Good developers would get 80-100 (66000 USD) pa. Cost of living is cheap and the living is good!!

arkansas (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546452)

in arkansas, you're more likely to make good pay at mcdonalds. its really quite a joke.
unless you work FOR the university, you're peak income is probably 30K. and thats if you're doing everything including turning the water into wine at dinner.
pennyless in arkansas

Re:Salary - YIKES (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546453)

Well considering the fact that just a few miles north we get as starting salary $56,900.00 with a cap of $64,550.00 and only serve 60 users and 4 remote offices with fiber links (full control of what we buy and use! no managers saying we like cisco's logo. use that stuff) yes you are getting screwed.. I would start looking for better and then secure an offer that is solid then tell the boss "meet the salary or I am gone." your boss knows that he is under paying you.

Re:How much? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546454)

Yeah, that's why I wouldn't consider looking in Champaign Illinois for a job. Being the home of one of the biggest CS schools in the nation, I'd have to compete against starving college students for salaries. I picture it something like this:


Interviewer: What kind of salary would you be looking for if we were to hire you?


Me: $60-$70K


Interviewer (Lauging Uproriously): You have got to be kidding. I just hired a developer out of the University for $6/hr and a pizza budget. Thankyou for your time (wiping a tear away from his eye from laughin so hard).

Finnish IT-salaries (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546455)

(USD per month, average 2/99)
coders $2410
education/consulting $3571
computer import $4428
sofware company $3151
computer analyst $3035
management $3866

Reduce 50% if no experience at all
Add 50% if exp > 20 yr.

Source in Finnish: http://www.tietoviikko.com/tutkimukset/palkkatutki mus-taulukko.html

Starting salary in NL (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546456)

Well, I know I'm not being paid enough at fl 3500 gross a month, but I have a reasonably cool job, working 36-hour weeks, and haven't finished college yet. If I were to have my degree and started doing some true IT I'd probably be looking at at least fl 5000 a month. And then it goes uphill, a few percent a year usually. Taxes are 37.5 % over the first 40000 (or so) guilders a year, 50 % over the following 20000 (or so) and 60% over the rest of your income. (Oh, use http://www.x-rates.com/ if you're monetarily handicapped... ;))

Re:Ireland (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546457)

Last years crop of youngsters started at 17-19.5 K
So this year its gonna be about 18-20 alright...
However, there is not *THAT* much delvelopment in Ireland.
But ther is alot of localisation.

Steer Clear, Crap pay. Crap Crap Crap!
Trust me I Know

Irish rate's of pay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546458)

Ireland the rates certainly start at about £17k ($24k) a year. But tax and cost of living are high is high (not as high as most of europe though) and drink and tobacco are heavily taxed (As of march 2000, 20 Marlborough will cost about 6 or 7 dollars)

Irish rate's of pay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546459)

Ireland the rates certainly start at about £17k ($24k) a year. But tax and cost of living are high is(not as high as most of europe though) and drink and tobacco are heavily taxed (As of march 2000, 20 Marlborough will cost about 6 or 7 dollars)

IL salary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546460)

As with many others, I'm posting as AC due to company policy on salary disclosure.

I'm the web developer at a marketing company in Northern Illinois. I'm responsible for any and all HTML coding and perl scripting. I also do some small amount of tech support within the company and am responsible for setting up new machines with NT (I know, I know) when they come in.

I make $38k, up from $30k when I started a year and a half ago. I have no formal education (dropped out of high-school) and I'm soon to be 21.

www.realrates.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546461)

There's an ongoing salary survey and a contractor/consultant hourly rate survey at http://www.realrates.com/

Some folks who know SAP and PeopleSoft are making in excess of $150/hr in the bigger markets like Chicago.

Me? I just landed a 3 month gig at $125/hr in Texas as a software architect.

I feel fortunate -- I'm going to save my pennies while the market's still hot.

Try contracting (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 14 years ago | (#1546777)

If you have experience and want to travel, you could try contracting. The market in Europe is bouyant at the moment - especially for Java, CORBA and database people.

You can look for anything between $50 and $130 an hour. As a contractor you need to incorporate and then you are responsible for your own pay/taxes etc. Get legal advice on this.

Standard of living varies across Europe, as does facilities etc. London is an expensive place to live, Brussels is a good place for transient living (flats rented by the day, good restaurants etc) etc etc

A good place to look for work is www.jobserve.com

The downsides of contracting? You can be isolated from the main life of the company you work for, you have to deal with agents who are often the scum of the earth and you can't really take a sneaky sick day or holiday without suffering cash flow qualms.

Re:Salaries in the UK - cost of living (0)

martin (1336) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546797)

well its not as bad as Sweden - there you get badly by taxes and the Beers mega-expensive too :-(

Re:Salaries in the UK - cost of living (1)

martin (1336) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546798)

well its not as bad as Sweden - there you get hit badly by taxes and the Beers mega-expensive too :-(

Re: No chance (2)

Matts (1628) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546802)

Sorry but you're completely off base with those figures (mostly at the low end) - perhaps if you go right to a merchant bank in London you might hit the top of that scale here, but for the most part a graduate can expect around 14 up to 24 depending on location - the further north you get expect it to be lower (the UK's wonderful north/south divide is alive and well thanks to Maggie!).

Graduate salaries aside - a good IT worker here can expect to top out about 35-40k (according to the latest offerings in computer weekly - a trade mag) without going contracting. This is because the UK still is stuck in the 1970's with regard to who should get higher pay - management (big bosses can earn silly money here). On the contracting side of things it's much rosier. Expect low end to be around 25/h (although all contractor segments have been badly hit of late with a market slump prior to Y2K) and upper end can be anything really - I've seen/known people charging 100/hour or more for the right skills.

My advice: Go it alone, either contracting or your own business. IR35 has been killed for a while (do a net search to find out what that's about) and the contract market is looking up again. Also the Chancellor keeps announcing excellent measures for small businesses.

recent grads (1)

madHomer (2207) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546817)

I just went through all of this same stuff myself being a recent college grad. I pretty much looked at the large consulting companies. It seems that most companies will start coders at $42,000 range with a signing bonus of ~$2000. The is the "middle ground" though. I have seen some start at $55,000 with a $5,000 bonus (in NYC) to salaries as low as $37,500 + $1500 bonus (in RI where the cost of living is a bit lower)

These figures would be for a entry level job into some type of large consulting company. AS far as startups go, you can probably squeeze more money out of them if you have "mad skills."

Now salary is very important, but there are also many other factors to look at when choosing a company that will effect your finances. Other important factors are out of pocket expenses for medical, dental and vision. How much will your company match for a 401k plan? How many years until you are vested?? If you go away for business will they pay to put your pets in a kennel?? (It can get expensive!) Is there a profit share/stock option plan. These "fringe" benefits can add up to be a lot of extra money.

Re:Salary (1)

Amphigory (2375) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546818)

You're getting screwed. Email me. If you really know your stuff, I can double that /easy/.

Re:How much? (1)

Amphigory (2375) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546819)

Email me. Degrees don't mean jack in this day and age.

Working in the Netherlands (1)

Riddles (2787) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546827)

The going rate in the Netherlands would be about US$39.000 per year. Entered your information on http://www.intermediair.nl/ using the following information:
- College-degree,
- >4yrs experience in IT,
- 31-35 yrs old
Most of Europe has the same shortage in IT-staff as the US, pushing up the rates.

Come to Canada.... (1)

robbo (4388) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546832)

we have better beer!

I did *not* need this question right now. :) (4)

Pascal Q. Porcupine (4467) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546840)

For the on-topic bit: I was suckered out to Virginia for $50k/year fresh out of college, but I've got lots of skill in realtime 3D which this company wanted, but they didn't know how to treat their employees and so I left after a few months.

For the off-topic bit: I have come to realize that the industry isn't for me. Academia is where I belong. I'm not a mercenary programmer. So of course, after a few months of living relatively large (figuring I'd be gainfully employed for a long time) I'm having my world kinda crash down around me, financially anyway. It doesn't help at all that I incurred some debt in moving out here which I, very stupidly, put off paying back. All in all, I'd have about broken even for the whole experience were it not for the various tech toys I suddenly found myself able to buy... Even though I rationally know that grad school is best for me, and emotionally know it as well, it just doesn't help to have all you mercenary types rubbing my nose in what kinds of salary I'm giving up. :)

I've never been into computing and programming for the money, except for a brief period of time when I was graduating college and I got suckered into putting off my happiness for the promises of getting to keep doing the cool stuff while also making enough money to live very comfortably. Of course, those promises never panned out, and the company I got hired by turned out to be nothing more than a pair of two-bit swindlers doing whatever they could to control spineless employees who didn't know better and weren't at liberty to leave for a variety of reasons.

I need to give some advice to academic types who might be reading this thread: which do you prefer, money or happiness?
---
"'Is not a quine' is not a quine" is a quine.

Re:UK (1)

Psiren (6145) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546846)

I would have said a little more than that. I started on 16K, straight from Uni. Although I have a fair amount of experience in Unix. Maybe a Windows only techie wouldn't get quite so much. Not sure myself, as I never looked at any non-Unix jobs ;)

cost of living (1)

Thrakkerzog (7580) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546848)

Cost of living has a lot to do with variations in salary between places. Of course, not putting salaries on the job description... I can't figure out why they're doing that, unless they want to possibly get you for less than what they would have gotten you for if they had given a price.

Hungary (1)

sTeF (8952) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546850)

Here as a plain coder you get between 15k USD (300k HUF) and 24k USD (500k HUF) netto a year. As a sysadmin, or webdesigner expectations are around the lower mark. I know that's a great interval but it depends on who your employer is, 24k is already very highly paid.

With 20k a year you can get along quite nicely...

hope this helps

Salary. (1)

mke2fs (9166) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546851)

I'm in Norway.
I've actually no formal education but still get paid well...
With well, I'm thinking in the line of $30-35000 a year.
Very well paid is ofcourse the double :)

Philadelphi Business (1)

Tim Randolph (10300) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546854)


In the Philadelphia area programmers not long out of college seem to be starting somewhere around 50K, but it really varies.

If you can talk to business people and solve their problems salaries climb very fast and seem to level out in the 75-85K range. If you are a C coder working as the lowest rung in a big team, it will take longer to get there. If you are a risk taker and go for contract work you can make twice (or half) of that.

If you are primarily interested in money, I think that Business application programming is the easiest way to get there. Especially if you know the ins and outs of a big system that a big company has made a multi-million dollar bet on (Oracle, Domino, SAP, etc.) It is gratifying to see how your work can truly raise productivity (and this is why you will be well rewarded), but it sure isn't sexy.

--Tim

Another factor to consider.... (3)

cswiii (11061) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546859)

...stock options. Some companies offer options up front, in lieu of a higher salary. Granted, this is a gamble in a lot of cases, but with a competitive IT field and a raging stock market, it's nonetheless becoming more and more prevalent.

Re:Salaries in Canada (2)

loki7 (11496) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546862)

That's about right for Canada. I've mostly seen between $38k and $48k CAD.

But salary's only a part of your compensation. Comparing benefits packages is much more difficult. What do their retirement benefits look like? Stock options? Discounted stock?

/peter

Huge range in UK.. (1)

maroberts (15852) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546876)

A significant number of UK geeks are self employed and hire themselves out on contracts of 3 months or more - this may be about to change as the government attempts to change the tax laws.

Banking & Finance related computing posts in London are probably the best paid, with contract rates of 3000UK+ pounds ($5000) per week being rumoured if you have 5 or more years experience. More typical rates are around 1000-2000UK pounds per week, again with about 5 years experience. The figures I've quoted are gross and do not take into account the fact that being self employed you do not get
* holiday entitlements,
* company pensions/ health insurance
* cars
* social club memberships
* training etc
unless you set them up yourself.

I can't comment on graduate salaries, but I suspect that a graduate geek will earn around 17-25,000UKP ($27-40,000) per annum. Higher salaries again may apply in the SE/London area, and lower the further away from London you get. My starting salary in 1985 was 7800UKP ($12000) as a graduate working for a major defence avionics company! :-)

Although the UK is small compared to the US, there's a huge regional range in salaries, especially London/SE England compared to the rest of the country.

Cost of living in England is quite high, according to most opinions, with petrol, motor cars, beer, tobacco and electronic equipment either attracting a lot of tax or being more highly priced than the rest of the EU. London itself can be a very expensive place to live. On the plus side we do have a reasonable National Health Service, although if you would like to be operated on within two years you are well advised to back that up with health insurance ;->. Employee protection is better than that of America, and with a Labour government in power this is increasing, but less rapidly than some people feared.



Network Nerd / Perl Person in Germany (1)

Bartmoss (16109) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546884)

A friend of mine was hired by a large German ISP last year, on entry level, no university degree (but a 2-year technical degree) to do general network and cgi-bin (perl) programming.

He was offered 36000 DM pre-tax a year, which would be re-nogiated after a year (he hoped to make 45000 pre tax after one year). He took the job.

I'm not going to disclose what I earn, sorry, but it IS more than my parents makes after 30 years of work experience. ;-)

InfoWorld has a site (1)

The Evil Dwarf from (17232) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546895)

InforWorld [infoworld.com] does an annual salary survey. The 1999 survey is here [infoworld.com] . They do a decent job of surveys in various IT areas. They survey a wide variety of occupationas and locations from their readership so they survey isn't exactly perfect.
You might find info for the US at the the Census Bureau [census.gov] .

Here in the UK (2)

GC (19160) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546898)

Network Support Analyst £25k (=US$41K)
Network Manager £35k (=US$57.4K)

For a database on average salarys this [jobworld.co.uk] is an useful resource - UK only though...

Incidentally I am currently looking for alternative employment in the London area. Experience of LAN/WAN connectivity using Cisco Router and Switch equipment. Good NT experience. Experience of UNIX systems. Firewall Experience and general network security knowledge. Any offers?

Idea (1)

schporto (20516) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546904)

I know there are salary surveys out there. But I have to agree that a lot of times the surveys are kinda vauge, leaving you to interpret the results as best you can. If you don't exactly match then you have to start guessing how it could effect you.
It would probably be interesting to see a site where you could fill out a form of where you live, what you do etc. Then add in your last raise, bonuses, and your actual salary. Then based on some mystical calculation involving the number i a set of numbers come back describing what you should make. It takes you numbers and puts them into the database to update the values appropriately.
Of course this could already exist as far as I know. If it does where?
-cpd

Call me lucky.. but.. (1)

cybrthng (22291) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546909)

i didn't go to college, dropped out and got my GED for that matter. I did do what I needed to do and that was work my way up. Your average college entry level job isn't going to be the glamorous stock option get ritch in a year job. If you start your own company yourself or with some friends or get some good connections, well that can happen. Most jobs start out 10-12.00 an hour for entry level. Experience is a must, there is a *WHOLE* concept about IS/Networking/Consulting that school just can't teach you.

Figure within 5 years of any experience in the IT field your looking at 50k. I current make 55k, got 5 years of networking and unix experience. No college, doing that on the side. I get 401k, full medical/health/disability and life insurance, since the company is privatly held, they trade in some listed stocks that i get matchings from with deposits into my options and 401k plans. so in all i'm making a good deal for only being 23 years old.

It just depends.. I had a *HUGE* stock option once, company bellied over, 2 years later i sold my thousands of shares for 700.00 on the OTC market, so thats a risk you take.

Also.. If you like job hopping, you can always hop up to more cash, work here, there, get broad experience, training.. if you don't mind being busy all the time and on the road alot and no place to call home, i'd say you can easily make 80k a year...

And for those of you interested in being a systems administrator and looking at that shinny "up to 90k a year" salary, you'd better be prepaired to give up your life, and remember that a few thousand employees are *relying* on you that you gave up everything to run those servers.. its a very self gratifying position, but again, if you want to keep your marriege, deal with a lil bit less stress and simpler job and take the lower expectation salary :)

Cool, Isn't this illegal? (1)

Black_Macrame (23938) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546913)

Seems like I recall some law or something that is supposed to keep people in the dark about comparative wages in an industry. Its some form of collusion if people actually 'talk' about what wages they make at x company compared to y company.

I always thought that was BS, so I'm thrilled to see it on /.

But does anyone know what I'm talking about? Its a vauge memory from something I read somewhere...

Latin America != First World, but... (1)

gwolf (26339) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546916)

In Mexico, I have seen IT salaries ranging from about $3,000 to $30,000 a year (extremely under- and over-paid - it would be more real to say it goes from $7,000 to $15,000, it's much more usual).

However, that doesn't mean we are underpaid; the cost of living in Mexico is WAY under what you would expect... I have a relatively expensive way of living, and I spend about 15 dollars a day. It is not hard to live (and pretty decently) with about 5 dollars a day. In fact, the minimum wages go at US$2.2 per day - and many people live with less than that.

Re:Dutch situation (1)

Ivo (26920) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546917)

I think the situation you depict is quite ok. (Note however there's a big difference whether you studied university or 'hogeschool' (the official english term for that nowadays is 'university of professional education', but the salary is still lower than someone who did a 'real' university.)

I think in general the cost of living in the Netherlands is lower than in the US. (Some exceptions ofcourse, we pay more then twice as much for gas for your car.)

Greetings,
Ivo

Rates in Ireland (1)

bigdaisy (30400) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546930)

Jobfinder.ie [jobfinder.ie] should have all you need to find out about IT jobs in Ireland. They have a salary survey (a year or two old) that's reasonably accurate (look under "Career Resources" on the main menu).

Due to the current nature of the economy in Ireland, expect it to take you at least eight hours to get a job in Dublin! Less if you're not fussy. We're the world's second biggest exporter of software after the US. Not bad for a country with only 3.5 million. But then we are Microsoft's distribution point for Europe.

Reasons not to come here: the weather is crap, tax is a bitch, traffic is a nightmare, the price of housing has gone up over 100% in the last few years, the weather is crap, and, in case I forgot to mention it, the weather is crap (unless you like rain).

Reasons to come here: just the chance of seeing the sun once every few years fills you with hope; the beer is good; despite the fact that we're level with Canada's Hudson Bay, it rarely gets below freezing in the winter (average temp. in January is 9C/48F, just right for some nice soft rain); tax is coming down every year; more jobs in IT than you can shake a very large stick at; we speak English (but then, so do the Dutch and the Finns but they have cold winters, it just rains here); the beer is good (well the socialising around beer is good).

Problem: work permits can be hard to come by if you don't have an EU passport. You mightn't be as free to change jobs as the locals. You could check that out somewhere else. I think they've relaxed things of late.

Oh, in case I forgot to tell you, it rains a lot, so bring an umbrella. You won't need any sun-screen.

Enjoy,
Daisy.

Rates in Ireland (1)

bigdaisy (30400) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546931)

Jobfinder.ie [jobfinder.ie] should have all you need to find out about IT jobs in Ireland. They have a salary survey (a year or two old) that's reasonably accurate (look under "Career Resources" on the main menu).

Due to the current nature of the economy in Ireland, expect it to take you at least eight hours to get a job in Dublin! Less if you're not fussy. We're the world's second biggest exporter of software after the US. Not bad for a country with only 3.5 million. But then we are Microsoft's distribution point for Europe.

Reasons not to come here: the weather is crap, tax is a bitch, traffic is a nightmare, the price of housing has gone up over 100% in the last few years, the weather is crap, and, in case I forgot to mention it, the weather is crap (unless you like rain).

Reasons to come here: just the chance of seeing the sun once every few years fills you with hope; the beer is good; despite the fact that we're level with Canada's Hudson Bay, it rarely gets below freezing in the winter (average temp. in January is 9C/48F, just right for some nice soft rain); tax is coming down every year; more jobs in IT than you can shake a very large stick at; we speak English (but then, so do the Dutch and the Finns but they have cold winters, it just rains here); the beer is good (well, the socialising around beer is good).

Problem: work permits can be hard to come by if you don't have an EU passport. You mightn't be as free to change jobs as the locals. You could check that out somewhere else. I think they've relaxed things of late.

Oh, in case I forgot to tell you, it rains a lot, so bring an umbrella. You won't need any sun-screen.

Enjoy,
Daisy.

Salaries in Canada (3)

_J_ (30559) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546934)

In my experience starting salaries tend to be around $40K CDN - or about $27K American. That's for any type of coding. Of course, rates rise with experience

Anybody want to offer more?:)

J:)

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

paitre (32242) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546937)

(To get that in US$, multiply by 1.64)
That's not bad actually: 30k+ a year :)

Re:Starting in Washington DC (1)

paitre (32242) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546938)

Heh, I dropped out of school and am making 35 a year in Baltimore *grin*
With the experience I've garned in that year and a half, the degree will push me up to closer to 50-55 *grin*

Re:Salary (1)

joshamania (32599) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546940)

Oh boy are you getting screwed. Of course many small companies will try to keep the wool over your eyes because they don't want/cant pay a real salary. Of course, a certain amount of Rock Stardom helps the salary level, but I'm makeing 30% more than you are fixing desktops(primary responsibility, but I make it a point to stick my nose in everything). I do have my MCSE, but that's only a foot in the door type of thing. You might want to look for a computer services company such as IBM, EDS or Perot Systems. They get all the hot shots and pay commensurately.

Re:How much? (1)

Foogle (35117) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546944)

You're damned right.

I started at $8, doing system administration for a small software company (NT and OpenBSD). Of course, I was 16 at the time, so you'd never hear me complain about it. Now I'm 18, and working there part-time for $12.50 while I go to college for my BS in CS.

Still, there's a plus to be "unprofessional". I go to work, and though everyone else wears a shirt/tie business-look, I wear sneakers and sweatshirts :) When they start giving me benefits, then I'll put on a tie.

-----------

"You can't shake the Devil's hand and say you're only kidding."

Re:UNIX: Yea Baby (1)

nevets (39138) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546947)

I've been using Unix since I was 19, and I'm now 31. So does this mean that I can make 110K too?

Becareful about this negotiating. It may get expensive, and the companies might see a large number of MSCE's that are cheap. And a business person (non-techie) will think "whats the difference between Unix and NT/2000. 50K for support". And then you will really be in trouble.

Steven Rostedt

Best source for current rates (4)

smalltalker (41026) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546951)

The site I always use first to determine going rates is Janet Ruhl's Realrates.com [realrates.com] . It has rates (both contract and salary) anonymously submitted, can can be searched by all the expected criteria, including location. And although most positions are US/Canada, it does have some elsewhere in the wolrd. The state/country code seems to want an excamation point before country codes (e.g. !UK, !DE, !AU).

I'd also encourage folks to contribute their current rates - kind of like open source for salary information!

Companies are vague because it can vary...A LOT (1)

dr0n3 (47107) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546961)

It's hard to give an "average" in terms of pay simple due to the fact that it can vary tremendously depending on many things:

- Experience (length of time in field)
- Type of degree (BS, MS, PhD, etc)
- The length of time you're with the company
- Any significant achievements

Basically they take a look at everything about you, weigh out the good and the bad, then decide...For example, I worked at a consulting firm for a while...here's some average full time salaries:

Web designer (little experience): $15/hr
Web designer/ webmaster (2+ yrs exp): $25/hr
System admin (2+ yrs exp): $25/hr
Network admin (4+ yrs exp): $35/hr
Programmer (C/C++ entry level): $20/hr
Programmer (C/C++ 2+ yrs): $30/hr
Senior network eng (8-10+ yrs exp): $45/hr

Generally the longer you're out there, the more you can ask for...it all depends on your resume...anything goes...were you involved in any leadership positions? (project leader, etc)...any specially challeging projects? How good were you with the deadlines? Balance in expertise? They like to see people that can do many different things and tackle anything that gets thrown at them, but at the same time, a jack of all trades that has no special expertise can be a big minus.

For the post-college people, it also matters any relevant courses you've taken, any important research, your GPA (duh), and also the school you graduated from (not as big of a deal as many people would think...it mainly helps you get the foot in the door and also when competing for a position against other people).

If there's something about you that you truly feel puts you above the average, it's ok to ask for more, but be realistic.

Also, in many cases, not simply $$$ is enough...most of the people I know didn't pick the offer that gave the most $$$ up front...they balanced out many things such as health benefits, stock options, cost of living in the area, etc...

The one thing you wanna keep in mind though is not $$$....money in most cases is one of the least important things...the most important thing is whether you'll be happy or not at the job...would you rather make a lot of money and work at a place where they make you wear a suit, fill out tons of bogus reports and have an a**hole of a boss or at a more casual place, where maybe you'll make less, but you'll get along with the people better, etc...Getting a job isn't a "go where the money is" kind of thing...you should REALLY keep that in mind.

-dr0ne

Not only cost of living but diffrent tax-rates (1)

a2800276 (50374) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546963)

Just as cost of living in diffrent parts of the world differs vastly, so do the tax laws and social dues.

I program Java in Germany and make aroung DM 5K/Month (divide ~2 for Dollars) before taxes and end up with about DM 2.9K. When you start really making money (as an employee) your tax+health insurance+unemployeement etc gets really close to 50%.

As far as I know, it's even worse than that in Scandinavian countries.

Ohio (1)

lyonsj (51249) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546965)

The average starting salary for a programmer in Ohio seems to be from US$40-45K/year. I'd suggest avoiding public universities here - the pay seems to hit US$40K only after you've been there for 10 years!

Salaries in Denmark (1)

RasmusW (56000) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546971)

I started out with 300.000 DKr/Year (~42K $), when I got my first job after graduating from the University. Last month I was offered a company car as a pay-rise :)

I general the salaries are very good for the skilled programmer i Denmark. (But the taxes are high: 50-60%, depending on your income).

Re:Salary is just a part of the equation (1)

fpepin (61704) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546986)

A little note about Canada (and Quebec in particular, where I live): the taxes are pretty high so you could expect to loose around 40% of that to taxes (I think anything over 50K CDN is pretty much taxes at 50%). You also have to deal with 13% sales taxes.

But then education's a lot cheaper and hospitalisation's free (but you usually have a good health insurance when you get hired in the States). The cost of living is also a lot less. And social security can keep you afloat for longer in case of trouble (but that isn't very relevant in this case).

Fact is, you can get by with less than you would need in the States, even if the salaries are higher.

The way I see it, you can probably afford to live a little better with the base salary in the States than here in Canada. The difference would increase when you get more experience I think since I haven't heard of many jobs offering monstrous amounts of money around here.

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

shawnhargreaves (66193) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546992)

For those of you who aren't familiar with the currency rates, that translates to about 35k US $. Cost of living is only slightly higher than the US for most things (tax is higher, but we do get some cool stuff back for it like the health service), but as far as hitech products go, most manufacturers keep the figures the same regardless of whether they are charging in US $ or UK £, so this is a bad place to be buying computers, hifi equipment, etc.

Re:cost of living (1)

shawnhargreaves (66193) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546993)

> Of course, not putting salaries on the job
> description... I can't figure out why they're
> doing that, unless they want to possibly get
> you for less than what they would have gotten
> you for if they had given a price.

It's because they aren't sure who will apply, and how much those people will be expecting. If they get a bright, talented recent graduate without much experience, they might be able to snap you up for 30k and have you feel good about the deal, while someone who's been around for a while and is coming from a high salary job somewhere else won't even consider less than 60k. If they printed 60k, they'd end up having to pay that much to the recent graduate, but if they print 30k, the experienced person wouldn't even bother to apply. Since they don't know which one is out there, they play it safe and don't mention any figures at all.

Salary is just a part of the equation (2)

javatips (66293) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546994)

Hi,

First the gross salary is just a little part of the equation. You also have to look at the cost of life.

For example, in Silicon Valey, you will get a high salary, but you have to pay >500k for a decent house. In other part of the world you will get lower salary, but the cost of life is much lower. So in fact you can make a better living elsewhere.

Now to answer your question, in Montreal the mean salary for someone who is just out of the University is 40,000$CAN.

For people with 5 years of experience it can go from 50K to 90K ($CAN). This is relative to what technologies you have experience with and how aggressive you are when negociating your salary.

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

0sb0rne (66455) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546995)

That's a bit over the odds... for a graduate you'd be better off thinking in the 14-18k (21-27k US) type range... the biggest thing to consider with England though is the cost of living... compared to almost anywhere else in the world it's astronomical...

Re:Working in the Netherlands (1)

0sb0rne (66455) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546996)

There is lots of work currently in Holland (where I am at the moment) and there is a big market for contractors for those of you that like that sort of thing as well... contracting rates in general for networking skills at the moment seem to be somewhere between 120 and 180 Guilders an hour, which translates to about 60 to 90 USD per hour...

Re:Working in the Netherlands (1)

0sb0rne (66455) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546997)

Forgot to add... the cost of living in the Netherlands is similar, if not slightly cheaper than the USA... about 1/3 of the cost of England...

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

0sb0rne (66455) | more than 14 years ago | (#1546998)

Come to Holland then... there are loads of tax perks here, and the cost of every day living is 1/3 of that in england...

Salaries in the UK (1)

GCsoftware (68281) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547004)

The going rate for graduates in the South of England is anywhere from 20 to 27 KGBP per annum. Expect to get more the nearer London you get, and less in the north of England and Wales, and Scotland.

Swiss Salary Rates / Standard of Living (1)

Chechen (72204) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547012)

Im based out of Geneva(Switzerland) and have been for the last 2 years. I can't comment on the rest of Europe however, regarding Geneva:

Minimum wage in the IT industry, (for example for a junior, no experience, PC support technician or help desk) is about USD 40,000 per annum

Going up scale (eg. skilled junior software developer- max 1 year professional experience, in MS technologies - eg. VB or ASP) USD 45,000 - 55,000 per annum

Further up (eg. DB certified specialist - Oracle, MS SQL Server etc. with knowledge at least 1 development language, eg. Perl, C/C++, VB, Delphi) USD 60,000 + (assuming about 2 yrs experience)

After that it really depends on you, I don't reckon you could realistically average it out. I know a couple of guys technically down the ladder from me, working in development earning up to 55% more than I do.

If you working with *nix's or the large (non-MS) DB servers - you can usually name your own salary. I mean this! ;-)

Quality of Life in .ch it is extremely high, in fact I think the highest in Europe. Living is expensive, high tax rate (so you try to get a tax-free position with an organization like the UN)

I would recommend that you dont try and get an equivalent of your current US salary - aim for a minimum 15% higher or else you're talking a noticely drop in lifestyle ;-)

You'd probably get a better idea of things talking to your embassy over here to get an idea of the differences. I think they have some sort of professional counsel who can talk you through the various aspects of relocating to various countries in western Europe.

BTW, above are my own observations. You really would have to get a more authoritative source of info. But I doubt you'll get much definitive info.

Houston, Texas (1)

kyanite (73015) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547018)

The starting salary for coders is ~45K straight out of college. It's ~55K if you have a masters degree as well. The cost of living is actually quite low compared to the wage earnings which is why I would never want to live in California where you may make twice that money but never afford a good living condition because of the insane living expenses.
_________________________
Words of Wisdom:

Philly pay ain't bad as long as you aren't a... (1)

mattz (82905) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547049)

defence contractor. I am only half way to six figures, but for newgrads, my company pays really well...my brother w/2 years less experience than me started out real close to what I am making. If only they payed you to make the world safe for democracy.....me and my damn fool adventures.

Useful? (1)

Hermetic (85784) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547054)

This question has doubful useability...

I am a field tech/troubleshooter type guy in the Washington, D.C. area. We command fairly high salaries here because most of the population doesn't have a clue as to what they are doing.

Any "high tech" areas with a large percentage of people without computer skills is going to be the same way.

However, if I were to go to silicon valley or Seattle, or wherever there are a lot of really talented geeks, I wouldn't get paid squat, since my skills wouldn't be unique. Supply and demand, right?

The same goes for coders. An english-only programmer isn't going to find much work programming Malaysian software, you know? Or, a very good Malaysian tech isn't going to get a tech support job here in DC if he/she can't speak any english.

The only way to find out how much you will make is to ask. Be honest. Tell employers your story, and ask what a decent salary for a beginner should be. When you interview, ask for 20 percent more, and negotiate from there.

Dutch situation (3)

joost (87285) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547060)

In Holland, you can expect at least fl. 3500 (before taxes) per month if you're fresh out of shool. That's about $1750. Getting a cellphone and notebook is usually no problem.

If you start working at a big company, you can expect fl 5000 (US$ 2500) per month plus a company car. But you'd have to conform to that company (might be hard for die-hard geeks - they tend to love Microsoft).

If you're thirty (-something) and have lots of experience, and don't mind working hard, fl 8500 or more is usually no problem. In Holland, that kind of salary will buy you anything you want. It's about 3 times average.

Big management positions (IT, IS, ITIL management) start at fl 150k/year plus all the usual bonusses.

Remember that healthcare is standard and LOTS cheaper than in the US (that goes for all European countries).

Most salaries grow 10% per year, but this can vary as well. 20% increases are starting to become more common.

Salaries are lower in remote parts of the country (provinces like Limburg or Friesland).

And there's the occasional bonus, some companies will give you up to fl 20.000,- (before taxes) (US$ 10,000) if you stay with them for a year. But those companies are often quite clueless (they think Windows NT is the *only* server OS in the world. And your job will most probably doing VB/ASP stuff, so you don't want that anyway ;).

Combat Pay (2)

Raffy (89138) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547064)

As a luser-support martyr (ISP Tech Support, lately in documentation), the going rate seems to be $20-30K to start (with annual / promotional increases, of course), higher in major metropolitan areas (the Valley, SF, NYC, Boston, &c).

Top-notch coders seem to be able to command $80K and up (six figures isn't uncommon. . . makes me wish I knew PERL!)

As with every job, having experience means you can command greater compensation. After two-plus years on the job, I've conditioned my employer to add some intangibles to the job environment: tolerance to eccentricity, a certain level of buy-in to new ideas, &c.

Just remember that the full package isn't just the bottom line on your W-2, there are health insurance, 401(k), profit sharing, and any number of other forms of additional compensation to factor in. Ask at the interview what kind of total compensation the company offers, and what kinf of tenure / vesting structure exists. Some companies give health insurance after 90 days, the potential for 401(k) after 6 months, and start vesting in various things after one, three, or five years, depending. There is so much variance with these that it never hurts to ask.

For example, my company offers discounted memberships (payroll-deductible) to the local health & wellness center and free/discounted service to employees. This doesn't show up on my pay stub every other Friday, but is worth probably $40 a month.

Just remember: no amount of financial compensation will make up for a job you don't enjoy. I can speak from experience that a good job atmosphere with interesting and enjoyable work to do makes a smaller paycheck more attractive than becoming a psychotic stress-monkey at a job that makes your gut clench the instant the alarm clock goes off in the morning.

Anyone looking to hire a slightly freaky tech writer?

Rafe
V^^^^V

My web position (1)

DirkDaring (91233) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547072)

I have 5 years web design experience, 2 years strictly professional, BFA in Graphic Design. Master in Photoshop, html, Dreamweaver, others. Know unix, Win9x etc etc. In current professional job for 16 months, pay is $42,000 US (no stock or other) in DC Metro area in Virginia. How much would I make overseas as a good comparison to these skills?

Get info from your college career office (1)

JeremyH (91289) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547073)

Go to your College carrer office/ career center, whatever. If they are any good they will have binders full of all kinds of info on salary, that will give you a good idea of the going rate based on degree/major/job field/location/etc. You should be able to look up the national salary surveys (done by the college board I think) for the past few years and also may be able to get the survey for grads from your school as well.

Good Luck!

I did this when I graduated, and took the information with me to the salary negotiation. It made it much easier to back up my demands and I ended up getting a decent number from my employer (granted that they knew me well from co-op experience and weren't out to lowball me in the first place).

Finland. (1)

rasjani (97395) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547092)

Comparing incomes between countries is really difficult because the living costs are different from country to country. And throw the taxes to that you you end up with really small salary

Anyway, normal coder in Finland may receive from $20K to $40K in year without taxes and taxrate is around 20% up till 50% (which i happen to be paying from my second job)


--

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

Richks (98235) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547093)

I'm a recruitment consultant (boo hiss) working in the south of England, and I'd say that the £16K-£20K are about the right sort of salaries for computing grads. People working in the city of London tend to get payed more, and this includes grads.

The shortage of skills is most noticable in the internet and ecommerce sectors. Guys with 3 years experience in thos technologies are getting placed at £40K+ in the south, and you can't find them in London for love nor money.

I recently placed an ecommerce developer with a company outside Southampton on £50K. He was exceptional, but it still gives you an idea how much these salaries are.

The weird thing is that people in the electronics/embedded market seem to earn far less than people working for banks doing straightforward VB SQL stuff. Realtime control work always strikes me as the hardest thing in software, so how come Database developers get payed so much more?

Re:Salary (1)

zimbu (99236) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547103)

Well I work in Systems Administration, the only experience I had before this job was working with my own Linux and NeXTStep systems and I'm making about $32K before taxes. I'm in the Durham, NC area and oh did I mention I'm just an intern. You might want to start sending out that resume.

Re:How much? (1)

zimbu (99236) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547104)

$7 eh? You work for a university right? I don't have a degree and I'm making more than twice that with no job experience.

Re:UNIX: Yea Baby (1)

Crazy Diamond (102014) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547109)

Are you actually a consultant or sysadmin? If you are actually consulting, you are actually being severely underpaid. For an experienced sysadmin, I would say that's an average salary.

Re:Salaries in the UK (1)

perky (106880) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547124)

depends on the degree. As a first year engineering student, I spent a number of hours looking at possible vacation placements for next summer recently, and spoke to a number of companies. It seems that I can expect up to 20 K sterling pro-rated for 3 month contracts, and with a top degree and vacation experience in relevant fields up to £30k when I graduate.

also worth mentioning is that the IT consultancies pay through the roof for grads since there is a shortage of geeks who can also have proven management and presentation/inter-personal skills.

Salaries in New York City (1)

up2ng (110551) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547138)

Here in NYC, E-Commerce and Web Design are king. The going yearly salary hovers around 60k-70k, for someone who can do both (well). The better the performance of the site you are working on, the more you can get down the road. up2ng http://www.up2ng.com

Re:cost of living (2)

hpclumpy (110590) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547139)

This is a very typical tactic.. Currently the IT and IS field is flooded with "junk" employees. (All of you know what I mean!) and the employer having just went through 3 MCSE people for the IS department and fired them or let them go because they were worthless will be a bit gun shy.

Michigan generally get's you $35K to $50K but then the cost of living is dirt cheap compared to california.. A $150K home is in some areas here are beautiful and huge homes. while the same price range in the valley get's you a shed with no door.

If you call a place or email them, and ask what is the range they are looking at so you wont waste your or their time, will not tell you what they will pay DO NOT APPLY THERE!


it isnt worth the time to get through the process to the offer and they say, "Great Mr.X.. We want you to work here for $25,450.00 with no benifits" you just wasted a week or more for these idiots.

Starting in Washington DC (1)

DevilEye (110877) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547141)

Just out of school, I got started at $45,000. Of course, you have to look at the cost of living in DC.

Sweden (1)

CPol (112725) | more than 14 years ago | (#1547145)

The going rate for a Civil Engineering graduate in Sweden is about 18 000 SEK (slightly more than US$2000) per month. This is slightly higher for computer oriented proffesions, but not always, as Swedish engineers are grossly underpayed compared to their EC and US/Canada counterparts. An expert in a highly specialized field, such as network designing or some forms of situation specific coding (such as controlprograms for the Swedish military unmaned Helo experiment) can get as much as 35 000 (about $4000) with a few (say 5) years of experience. These are the correct numbers but you have to calculate taxes and benefits into this. Income tax in Sweden ranges from 30% to 50%. Benefits are usually nonexistent, instead employees are expected to rely on the state benefits, such as fairly cheap and pretty good medical and dental care (optometrists and contacts are another matter). Companies often sponsor employees with cars, mobile phones and similar essentials, but they count as part of the salary and you have to tax for them.
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