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Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the oof-excuse-me dept.

Space 110

gollum123 writes with a link to the Berkley site about an impressive star explosion that took place some tens of millions of years ago. We first caught sight of it in 2004, when there was a bright outburst, ahead of a massive supernova. "All the observations suggest that the supernova's blast wave took only a few weeks to reach the shell of material ejected two years earlier, which did not have time to drift very far from the star. As the wave smashed into the ejecta, it heated the gas to millions of degrees, hot enough to emit copious X-rays. The Swift satellite saw the supernova continue to brighten in X-rays for 100 days, something that has never been seen before in a supernova. All supernovae previously observed in X-rays have started off bright and then quickly faded to invisibility."

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supernova burps (4, Interesting)

Uksi (68751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624455)

Interesting older article [findarticles.com] on supernova burps.

Re:supernova burps (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624491)

In other news, Uranus farts, then soils it's rings. Details at 11.

Re:supernova burps (0, Offtopic)

pk69 (541206) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627033)

i lold IRL

Re:supernova burps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18627261)

"its"

Re:supernova burps (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18628407)

I guess the submitter, gollum123, burped mid-word and Berkeley came out as Berkley.

The question that leaves me with is... (4, Funny)

jimstapleton (999106) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624471)

I wonder what it ate? I hope it wasn't the fish...

Re:The question that leaves me with is... (2, Funny)

darjen (879890) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624641)

I wonder what it ate? I hope it wasn't the fish...
And there's no mention of it saying "excuse me" afterwards. I guess a little politeness is too much to ask from an exploding star...

Re:The question that leaves me with is... (3, Funny)

Trails (629752) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625845)

The star exploded after eating a mint. This surprised most astronomers, since the mint was wafer thin.

Hey I didn't even eat the mousse... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18625487)

Hey, I didn't even eat the mousse...

Re:The question that leaves me with is... (2, Funny)

Columcille (88542) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627325)

some of that tainted dog food, I'm sure.

Oblig. Python (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18628015)

It was the Salmon Mousse!!

Re:The question that leaves me with is... (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 7 years ago | (#18628363)

No, if you eat fish for dinner, this is what happens, as described by Dr Rumack:

It starts with a slight fever and dryness of the throat. When the virus penetrates the red blood cells, the victim becomes dizzy begins to experience an itchy rash, then the poison goes to work on the central nervous system, severe muscle spasms followed by the inevitable drooling. At this point, the entire digestive system collapses accompanied by uncontrollable flatulence until finally, the poor bastard is reduced to a quivering wasted piece of jelly.

For those of you not getting the reference, this is from Airplane!.

How do we know it wasnt a fart? (5, Funny)

krbvroc1 (725200) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624489)

Did the White House force the scientists to change their qualified 'fart' into a 'burb'? Investigations are needed.

Also, is there a term for Astronomers such as the one we use called 'Anthropomorphism?'

*YAWN* (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624537)

Did the White House force the scientists to change their qualified 'fart' into a 'burb'? Investigations are needed.

did you come up with that yourself or did mommy help you out?

Re:*YAWN* (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624879)

It was funnier than your mommy reference.

Re:How do we know it wasnt a fart? (2, Insightful)

krbvroc1 (725200) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624839)

How is this a troll? Its supposed to be funny. All these Astronomers describe their 'work product' with Antrhopomorphic terms, add 'pretty colors' to their space images, etc. Apparently you guys have no sense of humor either!

Re:How do we know it wasnt a fart? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624925)

Don't soil yourself on the way out.

New alka-seltzer commercial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624503)

That's-a spicy supernova!

Title misleading. (5, Funny)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624509)

Phew. Before I RTFA'd, I thought they were talking about Rosie O'Donnell....

Re:Title misleading. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624635)

If only we'd be so lucky.

Re:Title misleading. (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624821)

If only we'd be so lucky.

Be careful of what you wish for. I highly recommend [myspace.com] renting the movie "Ghostbusters".

Re:Title misleading. (0, Offtopic)

Glog (303500) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624931)

Hi, Donald Trump!

Re:Title misleading. (0, Offtopic)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625049)

It's Bill O'Reilly this week.

Re:Title misleading. (1)

Randolpho (628485) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625655)

Phew. Before I RTFA'd, I thought they were talking about Rosie O'Donnell....
This is Slashdot, not Fark!

Re:Title misleading. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18626051)

She doesn't burp, she explodes right away.

Re:Title misleading. (1)

JohnnyLocust (855742) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626247)

Phew. Before I RTFA'd, I thought they were talking about Rosie O'Donnell....

It's a damn shame we can't mark that comment as (Score:20 Funny)

But monsieur.... (5, Funny)

qazxswedc (821424) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624531)

It's just a wafer-thin mint!

Re:But monsieur.... (1)

treeves (963993) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624861)

Bring me another bucket!

Eta Carinae Next? (5, Informative)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624533)

Eta Carinae [wikipedia.org] could go any time and it's only 7,500 to 8,000 LY away.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624653)

You mean it could have gone any time? I mean, if it exploded 7000 years ago we'd still not have seen the explosion, and wouldn't for another several hundred years.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627133)

You mean it could have gone any time? I mean, if it exploded 7000 years ago we'd still not have seen the explosion, and wouldn't for another several hundred years.

This is true. When we look up into the night sky we see history, not the present -- where stars, galaxies, globular clusters, nebulae, et al, were at their respective lightspeed/distance relative distances.

In any event, when the various wavelengths of light and radiation get here will we survive? An event like this could have played a role in mass extinctions.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (3, Interesting)

alienmole (15522) | more than 7 years ago | (#18628857)

By all estimates I've seen, we're safe from Eta Carinae going nova. See e.g. Earth likely spared from one form of cosmic doom [nasa.gov] (NASA), which says that a supernova would need to be within 26 light years of Earth to cause significant damage.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (3, Insightful)

operagost (62405) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624895)

You mean it could have gone at any time...

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

Lockejaw (955650) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625969)

And if it hasn't, "any time now" on an astronomical scale is... well... longer than I want to wait.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

ajs (35943) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626143)

You mean it could have gone at any time...
Not exactly. It could go at any time implies a time in the present or future. What you said implies any time at all. We know that it didn't happen more than 7,500 years ago (since that's the light we see).

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627127)

"You mean it could have gone at any time..."

It hasn't happened until we know it has happened.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

Cervantes (612861) | more than 7 years ago | (#18628683)

It hasn't happened until we know it has happened.

So, if I shoot your mother, she isn't dead until the cops call you?

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18629031)

"So, if I shoot your mother, she isn't dead until the cops call you?"

Consider that example yourself, for a moment. Your world hasn't changed until the news has arrived. Think of it another way: Is your neighbor alive right now? He could be. He probably is. He may not be. You really couldn't say that he is or isn't already dead. To put it another way: The odds of his survival are in his favor, but they become 1 in 1 when you find out the outcome.

Think about it. :P

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

Cervantes (612861) | more than 7 years ago | (#18629347)

Consider that example yourself, for a moment. Your world hasn't changed until the news has arrived. Think of it another way: Is your neighbor alive right now? He could be. He probably is. He may not be. You really couldn't say that he is or isn't already dead. To put it another way: The odds of his survival are in his favor, but they become 1 in 1 when you find out the outcome.

Think about it. :P


Ah, but you're arguing a different outlook on the universe. It's been a long time since I took my philosophy classes so I can't recall the specific words for it, but you're basically discussing your universe, not the universe. The reality of your dead mother doesn't change, whether you know it or not. Your relatavistic outlook on the universe may be different, but "the cold hard truth" is what it is.

Of course, none of it matters, because the entire universe is actually just a construct in my mind... this is one long dream, you all are fictional constructs of my subconscious, and when I awake, this reality will cease to exist.

Think about it. :P

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18629647)

"Ah, but you're arguing a different outlook on the universe."

No, though I understand how you interpreted that from what I said. I apologize for not being clearer. I'm saying we don't actually know that the star is gone so it isn't entirely appropriate to use the phrase: "You mean it could have gone at any time..."

"Your relatavistic outlook on the universe may be different, but "the cold hard truth" is what it is."

Right, but in this context, the truth isn't known. A relatavistic outlook is all you get. If you wish to be empirical, that is.

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

Xayma (892821) | more than 7 years ago | (#18629917)

We can't be affected by this until the light reaches us. If it blew up 1000 years ago in our frame of reference, then there is some velocity at which an observer will see today happening here before the star explodes. If the light has had time to reach us, then there is no velocity in which that will occur. However, in the case of the mother, the distance between him and his mother is quite small, so she isn't dead until the light has time to reach him (ie if it is a distance ct away, time t)

Re:Eta Carinae Next? (1)

sharperguy (1065162) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627925)

perhaps a better way of putting it would be "we could see it any time now"?

Burps then explodes (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624535)


Massive Star Burps, Then Explodes

First seen in 2004... the same year Marlon Brando died... coincidence?

This happens to me all the time.. (4, Funny)

Cristofori42 (1001206) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624551)

4) The star finally runs out of fuel and the core collapses

That's like a segmentation fault right?

Re:This happens to me all the time.. (4, Funny)

Anon-Admin (443764) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624609)

Sounds more like a core dump.

Re:This happens to me all the time.. (2)

x2A (858210) | more than 7 years ago | (#18630251)

No you're thinking of uranus.

Re:This happens to me all the time.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624629)

no this is like the oom handler killing your process

Re:This happens to me all the time.. (1)

e4g4 (533831) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626191)

Seems to me to be more like a laptop carrying a Sony lithium ion battery.

The battery runs down, then....BOOM!

Re:This happens to me all the time.. (1)

jcuervo (715139) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627397)

LOOK! A 7-DIGIT UID!

It's more like... (1)

DeadCatX2 (950953) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627433)

..a stack overflow.

dinner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624573)

i warned him he shouldnt have have eaten at taco bell...
did he listen? noooooooo.

Has The Reverend Al Gore (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624587)

. . . linked this to man-made global climate change yet?

Oh God, I hope so!

Re:Has The Reverend Al Gore (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18625259)

Alternate: Goracle

Oops (2, Interesting)

aktzin (882293) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624601)

Is this what Sir Arthur C. Clarke meant when he said that supernovae may be "industrial accidents"?

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18629747)

Heh... I was modded down for making the same suggestion in a Slashdot thread on the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider awhile back. Every time you see a supernova or a gamma-ray burst, there's another civilization reaching that particular point of technological development.

trool4ore (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624615)

Berkeley has an "e" in between the "k" and the "l" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624759)

The correct spelling is also in the URL! If spelling is too hard, then just call it Cal.

Re:Berkeley has an "e" in between the "k" and the (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18625303)

Pay Attention to this, Mods. BERKELEY, not BERKLEY. Fix the spelling, plz.

That's what I call old news. (3, Funny)

tanguyr (468371) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624775)

...impressive star explosion that took place some tens of millions of years ago...

Oooooooold news!

Well... (3, Funny)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625293)

...this is slashdot, after all.

Re:That's what I call old news. (1)

Bazzible (661545) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625805)

In a galaxy far far away?

This is the height of "old news" (0, Redundant)

kpainter (901021) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624801)

After all, it "took place some tens of millions of years ago".

Massive star burps, explodes... (2, Funny)

diesel66 (254283) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624837)

I really don't know if I'd call Rosie O'Donnell a star...

At least I can start watching The View again. (Oh, boy!)

Ejecta, eh? (2, Funny)

bubbl07 (777082) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624877)

As the wave smashed into the ejecta, it heated the gas to millions of degrees, hot enough to emit copious X-rays.
Strange, that usually happens when my ejecta smashes into something else, not the other way around...

Oh wait...

Intriguing Alternate Possibilities (4, Funny)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 7 years ago | (#18624883)

[ ] G'Thak Meld testing out new nova bomb. Gas / dust shell was actually a cloud of mothballed habitats and light collectors towed to the system to see how blast would effect a dyson shphere.

[ ] Elder Race equivalent of Jackson Pollock at work.

[ ] Young Earth creationists are right; like anything more distant that 6,000 LY, this was actually elaborate illusion created by God.

[ ] Extremem upper limit of Mentos / Diet Pepsi reaction now known.

Stefan

Download The MacGuffin Alphabet [sjgames.com] .

Things that happened in 2006 happened in 2006 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18624971)

I cannot see a single reason why a supernova observed in 2006 should be said to have occurred "tens of millions of years ago" just because that's when it happened in the rest frame of the Earth. There's a perfectly good frame of reference in which it occurred in 2006. Since all inertial frames are equally valid, why not pick the one that actually makes a tiny bit of sense?

Re:Things that happened in 2006 happened in 2006 (2, Insightful)

Akaihiryuu (786040) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625933)

Because it *did* happen that long ago. It just took the light from the supernova that long to reach us, so that we could see it.

Re:Things that happened in 2006 happened in 2006 (1)

jcuervo (715139) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627427)

Because it *did* happen that long ago. It just took the light from the supernova that long to reach us, so that we could see it.
But then, didn't it not happen that long ago until the light reached us, or something?

Re:Things that happened in 2006 happened in 2006 (1)

x2A (858210) | more than 7 years ago | (#18630315)

No it happened now but it took us that long to get to the light it emitted.

Re:Things that happened in 2006 happened in 2006 (2, Insightful)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626321)

Given that all inertial frames are equally good, why not just pick the one that's popular with readers of the article? Seems fair to me, after all you need some coordinate system if you're going to communicate physics. In fact, I'm a bit confused by what you mean by "the one that actually makes a tiny bit of sense". The only one I can think of is an inertial frame of the supernova itself. In that frame, here and now is also tens of millions of years later than when the supernova happened. But maybe you have another one in mind.

Last seen heading towards the back door (1)

Alzheimers (467217) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625129)

...Malcom McDowell whistles innocently, and tries to slip out the backdoor and through Nexus unnoticed.

The Death of Planet Krypton... (1)

LEX LETHAL (859141) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625135)

So how much longer until Superman gets here?

Re:The Death of Planet Krypton... (1)

CatsupBoy (825578) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626703)

So how much longer until Superman gets here?
Just shortly after his legacy fades away... 77 Million years from now.

Wow... and damn (1, Redundant)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625257)

I read the headline and thought this was going to be a John Candy story...

Re:Wow... and damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18625491)

Your comment is dumber than you are, asshat!

Re:Wow... and damn (1)

Kozz (7764) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625979)

Hey! John Candy is dead. You should have said Chris Farley, instead.

What? oh... nevermind.

Re:Wow... and damn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18626443)

There's always Louis Anderson

Is that you... (1)

ehrichweiss (706417) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625701)

Tom Cruise?

wallpaper damn you (1)

Floritard (1058660) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625895)

These Berkeley assholes need to get their priorities straight. After all the whole point of letting them do their million dollar research is so that I can have a pretty new desktop wallpaper to impress/alienate my coworkers with my profound appreciation of the cosmos. Paging down through their "print-quality" photo section all I can see are disturbing pictures of smiling old men, like some haunting NAMBLA forum.

Huh? (2, Insightful)

SirKron (112214) | more than 7 years ago | (#18625917)

about an impressive star explosion that took place some tens of millions of years ago

But my priest told me God made the universe 10,000 years ago. How can that be? Maybe it exploded in the universe we had previous to ours, you know, the one with the dinosaurs.

Re:Huh? (2, Insightful)

Kazrath (822492) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626165)

What??? Before you try to critisize a religion or hell even a topic you should at least have some understanding of it.

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

Farmer Tim (530755) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626917)

Before you try to critisize a religion or hell even a topic you should at least have some understanding of it.

And hurtling towards us from the decaying supernova remnants is a probe with a single mysterious inscription on the side:

"You must be new here."

The unasked question (1)

koddso (1084485) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626237)

What I am wondering is who would win in a belching contest? Massive star or Booger?

Could this be the way to save Earth? (1)

djones101 (1021277) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626251)

Picture it: The future, our sun is getting ready to explode, and then a massive mission is sent to the sun to infuse it with...antacid?

Re:Could this be the way to save Earth? (1)

Scarletdown (886459) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627121)

Of course, the mission would have to be carried out at night so they don't burn up.

waferthinmint (1)

brian0918 (638904) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626277)

I nominate this for besttagever. And if anyone is wondering what it refers to, first hand over your honorary nerd badge, and then watch this [youtube.com] .

Could it be... (1)

ajlea2k (931096) | more than 7 years ago | (#18626837)

Star Jones? We can only hope...

NEWS???? (1)

cabinetsoft (923481) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627263)

gollum123 writes with a link to the Berkley site about an impressive star explosion that took place some tens of millions of years ago
"News for nerds. Stuff that matters."... right!!! You expect us to care about a thing that happened tens of millions years ago??? I can even complain this was on digg already since is it predates it. Pfew!

Spontaneously combusting stars (1)

vimh42 (981236) | more than 7 years ago | (#18627495)

My first thought when reading the headline was some fat actor belched and then exploded. Just one more, it's wafer thin!

Faster than light travel? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18627815)

I did a little calculating. At 10 million miles per hour, that means the pieces of the star are traveling at about 15 times the speed of light. I would think that would have been something to bring up in the article. I've been led to believe that nothing can go faster than light speed.

Re:Faster than light travel? (1)

flabbergasted (518911) | more than 7 years ago | (#18628665)

I hope you aren't an accountant, because your math sucks. A speed of 10 million miles per hour works out to about 3000 miles per second which is way below the speed of light.

Re:Faster than light travel? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18628671)

You must be using a different value for the speed of light, or a different value for the number of seconds in an hour (its 3600, not 60) to get your incorrect result.

Re:Faster than light travel? (2, Informative)

Rick Genter (315800) | more than 7 years ago | (#18628807)

I did a little calculating. At 10 million miles per hour, that means the pieces of the star are traveling at about 15 times the speed of light.


You did your calculations wrong.

c is approximately 186,282 miles per second. That translates to over 670 million miles per hour. 10 million miles per hour is only about 1.5% of lightspeed.

mod 0P (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18628817)

sinCe we 8ade the

the plans (2, Funny)

f1055man (951955) | more than 7 years ago | (#18629915)

for the hyperspace bypass have been on public display for some time now. They should have taken a greater interest in galactic affairs.

-----
am I strange for wondering if I'm being callous?

Seems famiiar... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18630579)

As the wave smashed into the ejecta, it heated the gas to millions of degrees, hot enough to emit copious X-rays.

Does this person write for Penthouse too?

Thats a one spicy pizza (1)

infonography (566403) | more than 7 years ago | (#18631059)

maybe a bit too much garlic?

Burrpp!! (1)

TheCybernator (996224) | more than 7 years ago | (#18631603)

Excuse Me!!

For some nagging reason... (1)

Anti-Trend (857000) | more than 7 years ago | (#18631651)

...I honestly expected to see an "oldnews" tag on this article.
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