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Dealing With Venom on the Web

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the not-the-guy-with-the-symbiont dept.

The Internet 326

theodp writes "In a world where nastiness online can erupt and go global overnight, BusinessWeek finds Corporate America woefully unprepared and offers suggestions for how to cope, including shelling out $10,000 to companies like ReputationDefender.com to promote the info you want and suppress the news you don't. And in what must be a sign of the Apocalypse, BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up as a model for maintaining civility in message boards."

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Mod this! (-1, Troll)

rumplet (1034332) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658091)

Frosty piss!

Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Funny)

Compact Dick (518888) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658093)

Clearly, they must be new here.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Insightful)

GenKreton (884088) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658111)

You must admit, Slashdot's moderation system is infinitely more successful than Digg's system.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Interesting)

metlin (258108) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658197)

Today, yes. It wasn't always so, and some of us do remember a time when there was a big hue and cry over this as well. And I do not know how many of you here remember michael, and the whole moderation abuse that happened.

That said, Slashdot has a relatively mature audience compared to digg (I know, I know). While there are imbeciles here too, for the most part, the Slashdot crowd tends to be in the industry and/or college and seems a tad experienced in the ways of the world.

Digg crowd, for the most part, seems to be full of highschool kids who just learnt about the Intranets and decided to hop on and share their extremely mature views on things. And give these people the ability to moderate anyone and everyone, you have an inherently flawed system.

Not that Digg doesn't have the occasional good article or two, but the comments and the participation are not anywhere close to the levels seen on Slashdot. Once again, age plays a role - Slashdot comments, ignoring the idiotic and inane ones, tend to contain a few genuinely good ones. Even if you took an article on something obscure (say, something obscure in medicine or chemistry or whatever), you will find the occasional comment by someone who knows what's going on.

This is hardly the case with Digg, which has a bunch of kids who have no idea what's going on, and is choke full of nothing but opinions and little else (not that Slashdot doesn't have its fair share of asshats, it's just not as big a number).

My two cents.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (0, Troll)

philpalm (952191) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658287)

College educated? In the Industry? I got here because for a time I could download Slashdot to my palm device (drat they closed the quick method). As soon as slash dot "dumbs down" there will be more morons and illiterates here as opposed to Answers on Yahoo. Your comment adding your "two cents" is so baby boomerish, I wonder how long you had to lay with Digg to realize that you were with the wrong crowd?

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658291)

Going by your UID and his, I'd say he's been here longer than there ever was a Digg.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (4, Funny)

hobo sapiens (893427) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658833)

As soon as slash dot "dumbs down" there will be more morons and illiterates here as opposed to Answers on Yahoo

And what, you are here scouting it out for them?

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (2, Informative)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658533)

And I do not know how many of you here remember michael, and the whole moderation abuse that happened.

You wouldn't be referring to the bitchslap.pl woud you?

LK

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658545)

It could always be worse...

For starters http://www.4chan.org/ [4chan.org] has some amusing civility issues on its boards.

Let it be known, after /b/ on 4chan, the first statement still stands.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (4, Insightful)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658665)

Digg is OK for churning news links to the surface that one would otherwise not see but as a place to hold civilized, rational discussion on important topics, it's useless.
Anytime someone says something useful and productive on Digg, it gets buried.
That is unless it's about tits, condoms or illegal drugs, all of which seem to be priority #1 on Digg.
Commenting on Digg is a total waste of time. Unless you're a teenager.

Just goes to show the level of maturity of the average, typical Digg member.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (1, Informative)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658797)

digg is full of whiny bitches, slashdot is moderatly better. i attribute it the to seemingly higher % of mac fanboys on digg. if you want a real news site where the posters have learnt to toughen up a bit fark.com is the go. unfortunately it's constantly broken and incredably useless to use.

ATTN: SWITCHEURS! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658185)

If you don't know what Cmd-Shift-1 and Cmd-Shift-2 are for, GTFO.
If you think Firefox is a decent Mac application, GTFO.
If you're still looking for the "maximize" button, GTFO.
If the name "Clarus" means nothing to you, GTFO.

Bandwagon jumpers are not welcome among real Mac users [atspace.com] . Keep your filthy PC fingers to yourself.

Re:ATTN: SWITCHEURS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658235)

Is that anything like Claris?

Re:ATTN: SWITCHEURS! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658279)

If you think Clarus is just a misspelling of Claris, you really need to GTFO. NOW.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Interesting)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658211)

Slashdot moderation maintains civility?

I'd say on most days it does a fair job of at least hiding the blatant trolls from view. The nice thing about Slashdot's threaded system is that heated arguments don't mean the entire story is taken over. Besides, I think arguments in the comments is one reason some people read them.

Of course Slashdot's moderation is also at the whim of the subset of users that have mod points on a given day. For example on April Fools, all somebody has to do is say "Please mod my post insightful! kthxbye." and they hit +5 in minutes. Alternatively, a story like this might prompt someone to say "Reverse the polarity of the moderation flow!" suggesting moderators go nuts modding up trolls and flamebait and modding down everything else. (That would actually be pretty funny. Read More -- 10 of 381 comments). And of course moderators would probably do it, just to spite the system :)

(That actually sounds like a funny April Fools joke for next year. Give everyone mod points for the day and then randomize or invert what they do. Heck, even just giving everyone infinite mod points would be funny, and probably break Slashdot in the process).

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (3, Interesting)

nanosquid (1074949) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658509)

I'd say on most days it does a fair job of at least hiding the blatant trolls from view.

Unfortunately, it also lets fanboys/shills for platform/company/philosophy X hide comments critical of platform/company/philosophy X. And they do, with great regularity.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (5, Insightful)

zeroduck (691015) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658779)

Of course Slashdot's moderation is also at the whim of the subset of users that have mod points on a given day.

The more I think of it, the more I think that's a bonus. A huge problem on digg is that people will go through and mod up or down anything that they either agree with or disagree with, without regard to the actual content of the post. At least when mod points are scarce, users generally only use them on posts that are actually deserving.

As has already been said, there's a great difference in the userbases of each site. I'd be willing to bet that the average Slashdot user is better educated, has more experience (in industry, in life, ...), and is older. Digg is just in it's infancy compared to Slashdot; I think there could be a lot of improvement when they fix their commenting system and their user base ages a bit.

As a community, Slashdot is pretty critical of itself--but it really is one of the best online communities out there. If you don't believe me, you spend way too much time here.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (3, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658809)

"I'd say on most days it does a fair job of at least hiding the blatant trolls from view."

Erm... if by 'blatant trolls' you mean the GNAA posts, then yes, I agree. However, I've seen quite a few cases of moderation being based on public opinion, as opposed to a more objective line of thought. Unfortunately, I think this has caused the community to develop a style about how they post here that goes against the initial wishes of this system. For example: Take ANY cell phone story and you'll find several +5 comments about how people angrily wish they could get a phone that's just a phone. Umm.. okay. So... that encourages people to make the same post in every story. Microsoft product in a car story? A mad rush to be the first to make a 'crash' joke. Sony? Hehe, you know what I mean.

I do like the moderation system, I just wish there was a better sense of objectivity. Fortunately, though, my complaints about this have gone down a LOT in the last 5 years. I'm just not sure if it's because M2 is actually working (albeit slowly) or if it's because public opinion has shifted in my favor.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (0, Troll)

Jarn_Firebrand (845277) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658277)

Fuck you!

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658311)

Mod this mothafucka up.

Re:Slashdot moderation maintains civility? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658555)

Troll? Whoever marked that as a troll read neither TFA nor the OP... Why must /. have a flood of incompetent mods? So many appear to be incapable of finding their arse, even with a trained guide.

Is Your Son A Computer Hacker? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658655)

As you can imagine, I was amazed. A computer hacker in my own house! I began to monitor my son's habits, to make certain that Cindy wasn't just telling stories, as she is prone to doing at times.

After a few days of investigation, and some research into computer hacking, I confronted Peter with the evidence. I'm afraid to say, this was the only time I have ever been truly disappointed in one of my children. We raised them to be honest and to have integrity, and Peter betrayed the principles we tried to encourage in him, when he refused point blank to admit to his activities. His denials continued for hours, and in the end, I was left with no choice but to ban him from using the computer until he is old enough to be responsible for his actions.

After going through this ordeal with my own family, I was left pondering how I could best help others in similar situations. I'd gained a lot of knowledge over those few days regarding hackers. It's only right that I provide that information to other parents, in the hope that they will be able to tell if their children are being drawn into the world of hacking. Perhaps other parents will be able to steer their sons back onto the straight and narrow before extreme measures need to be employed.

To this end, I have decided to publish the top ten signs that your son is a hacker. I advise any parents to read this list carefully and if their son matches the profile, they should take action. A smart parent will first try to reason with their son, before resorting to groundings, or even spanking. I pride myself that I have never had to spank a child, and I hope this guide will help other parents to put a halt to their son's misbehaviour before a spanking becomes necessary.

1. Has your son asked you to change ISPs?

Most American families use trusted and responsible Internet Service Providers, such as AOL. These providers have a strict "No Hacking" policy, and take careful measures to ensure that your internet experience is enjoyable, educational and above all legal. If your child is becoming a hacker, one of his first steps will be to request a change to a more hacker friendly provider.

I would advise all parents to refuse this request. One of the reasons your son is interested in switching providers is to get away from AOL's child safety filter. This filter is vital to any parent who wants his son to enjoy the internet without the endangering him through exposure to "adult" content. It is best to stick with the protection AOL provides, rather than using a home-based solution. If your son is becoming a hacker, he will be able to circumvent any home-based measures with surprising ease, using information gleaned from various hacker sites.

2. Are you finding programs on your computer that you don't remember installing?

Your son will probably try to install some hacker software. He may attempt to conceal the presence of the software in some way, but you can usually find any new programs by reading through the programs listed under "Install/Remove Programs" in your control panel. Popular hacker software includes "Comet Cursor", "Bonzi Buddy" and "Flash".

The best option is to confront your son with the evidence, and force him to remove the offending programs. He will probably try to install the software again, but you will be able to tell that this is happening, if your machine offers to "download" one of the hacker applications. If this happens, it is time to give your son a stern talking to, and possibly consider punishing him with a grounding.

3. Has your child asked for new hardware?

Computer hackers are often limited by conventional computer hardware. They may request "faster" video cards, and larger hard drives, or even more memory. If your son starts requesting these devices, it is possible that he has a legitimate need. You can best ensure that you are buying legal, trustworthy hardware by only buying replacement parts from your computer's manufacturer.

If your son has requested a new "processor" from a company called "AMD", this is genuine cause for alarm. AMD is a third-world based company who make inferior, "knock-off" copies of American processor chips. They use child labor extensively in their third world sweatshops, and they deliberately disable the security features that American processor makers, such as Intel, use to prevent hacking. AMD chips are never sold in stores, and you will most likely be told that you have to order them from internet sites. Do not buy this chip! This is one request that you must refuse your son, if you are to have any hope of raising him well.

4. Does your child read hacking manuals?

If you pay close attention to your son's reading habits, as I do, you will be able to determine a great deal about his opinions and hobbies. Children are at their most impressionable in the teenage years. Any father who has had a seventeen year old daughter attempt to sneak out on a date wearing make up and perfume is well aware of the effect that improper influences can have on inexperienced minds.

There are, unfortunately, many hacking manuals available in bookshops today. A few titles to be on the lookout for are: "Snow Crash" and "Cryptonomicon" by Neal Stephenson; "Neuromancer" by William Gibson; "Programming with Perl" by Timothy O'Reilly; "Geeks" by Jon Katz; "The Hacker Crackdown" by Bruce Sterling; "Microserfs" by Douglas Coupland; "Hackers" by Steven Levy; and "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" by Eric S. Raymond.

If you find any of these hacking manuals in your child's possession, confiscate them immediately. You should also petition local booksellers to remove these titles from their shelves. You may meet with some resistance at first, but even booksellers have to bow to community pressure.

5. How much time does your child spend using the computer each day?

If your son spends more than thirty minutes each day on the computer, he may be using it to DOS other peoples sites. DOSing involves gaining access to the "command prompt" on other people's machines, and using it to tie up vital internet services. This can take up to eight hours. If your son is doing this, he is breaking the law, and you should stop him immediately. The safest policy is to limit your children's access to the computer to a maximum of forty-five minutes each day.

6. Does your son use Quake?

Quake is an online virtual reality used by hackers. It is a popular meeting place and training ground, where they discuss hacking and train in the use of various firearms. Many hackers develop anti-social tendencies due to the use of this virtual world, and it may cause erratic behaviour at home and at school.

If your son is using Quake, you should make hime understand that this is not acceptable to you. You should ensure all the firearms in your house are carefully locked away, and have trigger locks installed. You should also bring your concerns to the attention of his school.

7. Is your son becoming argumentative and surly in his social behaviour?

As a child enters the electronic world of hacking, he may become disaffected with the real world. He may lose the ability to control his actions, or judge the rightness or wrongness of a course of behaviour. This will manifest itself soonest in the way he treats others. Those whom he disagrees with will be met with scorn, bitterness, and even foul language. He may utter threats of violence of a real or electronic nature.

Even when confronted, your son will probably find it difficult to talk about this problem to you. He will probably claim that there is no problem, and that you are imagining things. He may tell you that it is you who has the problem, and you should "back off" and "stop smothering him." Do not allow yourself to be deceived. You are the only chance your son has, even if he doesn't understand the situation he is in. Keep trying to get through to him, no matter how much he retreats into himself.

8. Is your son obsessed with "Lunix"?

BSD, Lunix, Debian and Mandrake are all versions of an illegal hacker operation system, invented by a Soviet computer hacker named Linyos Torovoltos, before the Russians lost the Cold War. It is based on a program called "xenix", which was written by Microsoft for the US government. These programs are used by hackers to break into other people's computer systems to steal credit card numbers. They may also be used to break into people's stereos to steal their music, using the "mp3" program. Torovoltos is a notorious hacker, responsible for writing many hacker programs, such as "telnet", which is used by hackers to connect to machines on the internet without using a telephone.

Your son may try to install "lunix" on your hard drive. If he is careful, you may not notice its presence, however, lunix is a capricious beast, and if handled incorrectly, your son may damage your computer, and even break it completely by deleting Windows, at which point you will have to have your computer repaired by a professional.

If you see the word "LILO" during your windows startup (just after you turn the machine on), your son has installed lunix. In order to get rid of it, you will have to send your computer back to the manufacturer, and have them fit a new hard drive. Lunix is extremely dangerous software, and cannot be removed without destroying part of your hard disk surface.

9. Has your son radically changed his appearance?

If your son has undergone a sudden change in his style of dress, you may have a hacker on your hands. Hackers tend to dress in bright, day-glo colors. They may wear baggy pants, bright colored shirts and spiky hair dyed in bright colors to match their clothes. They may take to carrying "glow-sticks" and some wear pacifiers around their necks. (I have no idea why they do this) There are many such hackers in schools today, and your son may have started to associate with them. If you notice that your son's group of friends includes people dressed like this, it is time to think about a severe curfew, to protect him from dangerous influences.

10. Is your son struggling academically?

If your son is failing courses in school, or performing poorly on sports teams, he may be involved in a hacking group, such as the infamous "Otaku" hacker association. Excessive time spent on the computer, communicating with his fellow hackers may cause temporary damage to the eyes and brain, from the electromagnetic radiation. This will cause his marks to slip dramatically, particularly in difficult subjects such as Math, and Chemistry. In extreme cases, over-exposure to computer radiation can cause schizophrenia, meningitis and other psychological diseases. Also, the reduction in exercise may cause him to lose muscle mass, and even to start gaining weight. For the sake of your child's mental and physical health, you must put a stop to his hacking, and limit his computer time drastically.

I encourage all parents to read through this guide carefully. Your child's future may depend upon it. Hacking is an illegal and dangerous activity, that may land your child in prison, and tear your family apart. It cannot be taken too seriously.

They must be wrong. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658095)

And in what must be a sign of the Apocalypse, BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up as a model for maintaining civility in message boards.
If they would really spend some time here, they'd realize short sighted the system is.

BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658101)

And in what must be a sign of the Apocalypse, BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up as a model for maintaining civility in message boards."


Queue the modding up of blatant trolling and such silliness.

Re:BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658161)

Queue the modding up of blatant trolling and such silliness.

You mean "Troll the ancient Slashdot modding."

Fa la la la la, la la la la.

Re:BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up (1, Flamebait)

cyphercell (843398) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658219)

indeed, let's discuss slashdots moderation system.

Re:BW holds Slashdot's moderation system up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658367)

I think the digg model works much better, the moderation is almost instaneous.

Digg moderation is horrifically worthless (5, Insightful)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658699)

I think the digg model works much better, the moderation is almost instaneous.
Are you on crack? The Digg moderation is *totally* worthless. Half is rabid fanboys downvoting en masse *anything* that attacks their chosen obsession (typically Apple). Combine this with fairly incomprehensible moderation elsewhere (i.e. I look at it and can't fathom why that particular post was moderated that way), and you have a system that's totally useless for its intended purpose.

The lack of nesting makes it harder to filter out irrelevant discussion subtrees; in short, with Digg, you display all messages or you miss out. Slashdot's moderation may be far from perfect, but it's outstanding compared to the adolescent pack mentality on Digg.

If there's one thing I learned from Spider-Man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658107)

It's that Venom doesn't like loud noises. So when I don't have a church bell handy, I just scream... really loudly... a lot.

Re:If there's one thing I learned from Spider-Man (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658171)

Sonic Firewall covers both of his weaknesses, so it's really the only smart choice if you're a Spider-man out there in the world wide web.

Well... (4, Insightful)

Tarlus (1000874) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658129)

That's not to say that /.'s moderation system completely keeps the nasty posts out, either... it only buries them way out of view. It's still a pretty effective system, though, especially in the way that it automatically picks out the people with the best reputations to handle the moderation. Without manually lowering the viewing threshold, I almost never see rude, disgusting or otherwise insulting posts on here.

If /. were even more serious about keeping the crap out, they could disable the anonymous coward. But as you can see, it is still open to anybody's input, even without requiring a login.

Re:Well... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658199)

My biggest beef with the Slashdot moderation system is the overwhelming majority of posts that are modded high and "funny." It's such a letdown when you want to read good replies only to find that 80+% of the +4s and +5s are "Funny."

Re:Well... (5, Insightful)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658201)

"If /. were even more serious about keeping the crap out, they could disable the anonymous coward.." There's a fine line between an effective system & censorship. Some posts by ACs are interesting, informative, funny... I'm happy reading the good stuff, and if that means I have to burn some time & points modding idiots or sickies down, well, that's a price worth paying. All societies cost - I live in France, and hate paying the high taxes. On the other hand, when I travel to some other places, I miss the ameneties that those taxes bring me and my family.

Re:Well... (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658575)

A private entity is only capable of regulating your access to its resources, it cannot censor you.

Re:Well... (4, Interesting)

fossa (212602) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658721)

I like Tufte's thoughts on moderating [edwardtufte.com] , particularly his point about avoiding "the chronic internet disease of 'All Opinions, All the Time.'" Different websites have different goals of course, but there is nothing inherently wrong with refusing to allow anyone to publish any opinion on your website. Tufte's own forum is much lower traffic than Slashdot, but it has the interesting property of discussions that are years long, and the majority of posts are on-topic and very useful. Slashdot discussions more than a day or two old are all but dead. One thing I see often enough that it bugs me is a post like, "So and so behaves in ways X, Y, and Z" and a followup post correcting it, "No, it's most like X, Y, and W"; further posts support the correction or provide links to further info, but as a reader I'm still stuck reading the whole conversation when I'm more interested in the correct information that could have fit into a single paragraph. Discussion sites tend to shy away from editing and consolidating correct information, preferring to leave everything as individual posts. It would be a lot of work to implement, and perhaps even impossible, but I get the impression that the reason nobody tries is not due to the difficulty but because individual posts are treated as sacred; any editing is "censorship". At the very least, one should not be afraid to delete the GNAA trolls and the like at -1...

Admittedly, editing of comments may be a waste of effort on Slashdot. But many tech blogs will post an article and some points will be corrected in the reader comments. The blog publisher will update the article yet leave the comments as is, creating a confusing page of comments that refer to an article that is no longer there. Is there any reason, other than it's too much work, to not delete the comments that no longer make sense and credit in the article those who made corrections?

Re:Well... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658209)

Yes, it's an awesome way to maintain group-think too. Those nasties that clash with our world view, criticise our pets, or point-out our fan-boyism just get modded to oblivion.

And if you call shenanigans with the editors? Everyone in your thread goes to -1 and you never get to mod again.

Case in point: your post. You first said how nice the system is, then made legitimate criticism over a minor issue, and even a suggestion for improvement. I see now that you are modded as a troll. You've got to drink more of that kool-aid and be a more of a mouth-breathing fan-boy if you want your comment to be seen.

P.S. Linux rulez, Windoze drulez!

Re:Well... (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658255)

Keep the faith - it's a new discussion & the post is on the way back up. Sure, there's some asshats out there who mod everything that does not praise Linux as 'troll', but they are in the minority. Fuck the karma whores - sign up Mr AC and post away!

Re:Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658263)

I almost never see rude, disgusting or otherwise insulting posts on here.
Yes, indeed. ... Why are you looking at me like that?

Re:Well... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658301)

I think allowing AC posts is great. I often want to contribute to discussions here, but I only post anonymously. Not because I'm afraid to stand behind my opinions, but because it's not uncommon for employers to google potential applicants.

I try to maintain the same level of civility on the interweb tubes as I do in RL, and AC posts allow me to express opinions that, while I would be willing to have a civil discussion with most people on, may not acceptable to many of the businesses for which I may want to work.

Re:Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658481)

I post anonymously just so potential employers don't see the time-of-day of my posts :-)

Re:Well... (5, Insightful)

maxume (22995) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658531)

So if you registered "GeeIDidntThinkThatThrough" as a user name, exactly how worried would you be about someone searching for information about you associating the posts with you?

Re:Well... (2, Insightful)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658755)

I think having the anon. option is sensible. However, the coward descriptor needs to be taken at least partly as humor. I'm willing to stand behind my posts if anyone wants to bother to link my real name to my net-o-nym, but let's face it, only a fool never changes an opinion, and only a bigger fool judges someone solely by a post they may have made as a much younger or less informed person. The problem is, we have people running companies or engaging in politics, who are just such fools. Who wants to be judged by someone who is a. an unidentified lurker, b. not openly engaging in the discussion or revealing any of their own opinions, c. giving the poster no chance to clarify or revise their remarks and d. willing to treat a single phrase from a single post made years ago as the only evidence to be allowed in that judgement.
          I certainly hope posters (including you) will show the courage of their convictions somewhere, but it's not fair to assume cowardice, any more than it would be to say anyone who won't stand on a soapbox in a public park before a crowd obviously filled with drunken hecklers, just to make his opinions known is a coward. Sometimes you just think another venue may be more productive, or want to debate on the peaks instead of in the valleys.

Re:Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658313)

And how exactly will disabling anonymous cowards stop trolls? [slashdot.org] Sorry but your post is crap and its high moderation is what's wrong here.

1st p0sterez (-1, Offtopic)

rumplet (1034332) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658131)

Hehe I got it

No help for smaller businesses. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658147)

This is great for a big corporation. But the real damage is done when one vindictive person freaks out on the internet and takes it out on a small business. The small business can't afford legal actions and they can't afford to pay some firm $10k to deal with their reputation. However, there are plenty of websites where you can register and file complaints in the public about a specific company. Even if you've never actually done business with them. Or even if you're just going nuts on the company because you forgot your medication.

I have personally dealt with this where I refused service to someone for harassing my other members on my online business. It's actually less a business than just a hobby, but my name and business name are out there and involved nonetheless. This underage person freaked out and spent months inventing various things to complain about and posting them on every recommendation site possible. They even went so far as death threats and attempting to extort getting their account back or else they'd spread rumors about improper discussions with said person by myself (the owner). Now, again, I never did any actual business with this individual and I knew nothing about them other than they were harassing my users so I shut down their account. That was the extend of it. Yet they have been a thorn in my side for two years now and there is nothing I can do about it. Anyone searching for my company online will find the most horrendous things said about me by a completely anonymous nutjob.

It's just an ad pretending to be an article. (4, Interesting)

khasim (1285) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658237)

From TFA:

"The CEOs of the largest 50 companies in the world are practically hiding under their desks in terror about Internet rumors," says top crisis manager Eric Dezenhall, author of the upcoming book Damage Control.

An author over-hyping a situation for his new book. How ... common.

In the beginning, the idea of this new conversation seemed so benign. Radical transparency: the new public-relations nirvana!

If you've ever worked for or with a PR company, you'll know how wrong that is. "Transparency" is exactly what they do NOT want.

And so on. This is nothing more than an ad piece.

Re:No help for smaller businesses. (2, Interesting)

Colin Smith (2679) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658341)

Yet they have been a thorn in my side for two years now and there is nothing I can do about it.
There's no such thing as anonymity on the internet... Anyone can be found.
 

Re:No help for smaller businesses. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658671)

There's no such thing as anonymity on the internet... Anyone can be found.
If your connection is encrypted, routed through several servers that are not compromised and the logs / keys are gone once you're done then there's just about nothing that can be done to find you.

Maintaining Civility? (3, Insightful)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658153)

If by Maintaining Civility they mean "Only showing what the majority agrees with while everything else is downmodded" then yes, that is a good description. I'm not saying /.'s mod system doesn't have its merits, but it does suffer from groupthink.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658173)

586 replies beneath your current threshold.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (1)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658217)

Groupthink? We in Russia tend to disagree and agree with you simultaneously, in a trollish yet insightfully interesting, informative kind of way.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (2, Insightful)

mav[LAG] (31387) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658751)

In other words: in Soviet Russia, Slashdot contributes to you!

Re:Maintaining Civility? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658223)

Dude, you nailed it. Although long personal anecdotes about working for a specific company also tend to be modded up, often regardless of the soundness of the opinion presented therein.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658275)

Dude, you nailed it. Although long personal anecdotes about working for a specific company also tend to be modded up, often regardless of the soundness of the opinion presented therein.

Unfortunately, I have to agree. I write as an A.C., because no matter what I say, I get a +5 Insightful because of my company.

--Darl

Yep, but.... (4, Insightful)

geek (5680) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658269)

You can probably tell from my UID I've been coming here a long while. In fact I was a slashdot visitor back before it even had a domain name and was hosted on Rob Maldas University server. That said, slashdot has gotten a lot better than it was and I think in part it's because of the moderation system. People who continuously get modded down for the flamebaiting and trolling eventually get frustrated and leave. Some remain, others are just burning karma, but all in all the system is a solution, regardless of how imperfect it is. Yes some group think comes into play but it's generally only on political matters.

The bottom line, to me, is that when dealing with humans who by nature are imperfect, no system can possibly be perfect.

Still here, for the comments. (3, Interesting)

Anarchofascist (4820) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658561)

It was always for the comments.

Slashdot's moderation and meta-moderation system was carefully thought out, and kept ahead of the wave of forum-spam and general "hey look maw ahm on the interweb" disruption that you find in every other forum. For that, it should be held up as an excellent example of the ThinkAboutItCarefully pattern.

Oh, and my UID's lower so thhhhppppt. :)

Re:Still here, for the comments. (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658735)

It was always for the comments.


You must be new h.....

As it is (1)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658777)

I think groupthink is more of a problem on Digg, as I inhabit both. Digg has more frequent articles, some interesting and many frivolous, but reading the comments sections is like visiting the nerdy version of a lockerroom and the intelligence/groupthink that goes with such an environment..

Re:Maintaining Civility? (1)

jZnat (793348) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658281)

If by "groupthink" you mean "groups of 5-10 people", then yes, we have that here. The fact that you were modded up is just another case of proving you wrong.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (4, Interesting)

Southpaw018 (793465) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658543)

By "groupthink" he means people like me, who were banned for being pro-Windows. With enough -1s, inclusive (not a couple of comments scored -1), you will eventually receive one free /. vacation. It's gotten much better recently, but it used to be the point that posting a comment like "I don't think Linux is easy to use at all. The Windows GUI admin tools are much better" would land you at a score of -1. Enough of those, even over relatively long periods of time, and you get banned.

Been there. Yes, it's stupid and moronic. Yes, it happens. There are plenty of mods who feel "overrated" is there to be used on comments with which they disagree.

Re:Maintaining Civility? (1)

Esteanil (710082) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658487)

Score: 3, Insightful.

The groupthink is having trouble deciding wether or not to agree it is groupthink.

civility (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658159)

Please go sodomize yourself with a retractable baton. ^-^

Responsibility is iffy online (3, Insightful)

Larus (983617) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658187)

In the real world, slanderers will face penalties. In certain countries falsely accusing anyone is punishable by death. In the internet world, people are not bound by such physical punishments. You can kick people off temporarily, but you cannot actually prevent them from returning under a different name - just as you cannot ban a paying player from MMORPGs because of offensive behaviors. The part that needs changing is reception, and most people who read net news are not ready for such.

Why *I* like the /. moderation system. (4, Funny)

The Living Fractal (162153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658195)

You'd be amazed what kind of crazy-ass posts you can find if you browse at -1.

TLF

Re:Why *I* like the /. moderation system. (5, Interesting)

Monkeyman334 (205694) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658213)

I don't browse at -1, I just have a flamebait modifier of +5. And let you tell you, it's *hilarious*.

Re:Why *I* like the /. moderation system. (1)

The Living Fractal (162153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658215)

ROFL.. I hadn't thought of that. I'll have to try it.

Thank you.

TLF

Here's a thought ... (3, Informative)

rlp (11898) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658257)

1) Treat your customers, partners, and employees fairly.
2) Empower your employees to deal with problems when they arise and make things right
3) Obey laws (for instance don't cook the books, backdate stock options, spy on employees and the press).
4) Have contact information for problem resolution on your web site.
5) Admit problems when they occur, publicly state what you're going to do to fix them, never cover things up.

Re:Here's a thought ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658489)

6) ????
7) Lose money

If items #1-5 made money, do you think they would do them? You can only do so much of those items you mentioned before it starts affecting your bottom line.

Metamoderation helps (5, Insightful)

e9th (652576) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658283)

At least it can help weed out the most abusive moderators. I seldom call a mod unfair, but when I do I suspect I'm not alone.

Re:Metamoderation helps (5, Interesting)

mgv (198488) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658581)

At least it can help weed out the most abusive moderators. I seldom call a mod unfair, but when I do I suspect I'm not alone.

I read people posting and complaining that they never get to moderate. I've often wondered why this is, especially in how slashdot manages people who get negative metamod's, etc.

Personally I think I get to moderate alot - Probably about once a week, sometimes more often. There are times when I let my 3 days slip by, because its too hard to keep up.

But I do take the moderating seriously. I actually rarely moderate people down, but rather try and pick the good posts and push them up. On a personal stand I've pretty much stopped using underrated and overrated moderations - I may as well be judged for my actions too. Then again, I've never posted anonymously (which you will just have to take on faith as I obviously can't prove this).

Anyway, whatever I do, the mod points seem to keep coming back.

Personally I like to think its because the way I moderate is approved by the majority of meta-mods.

Michael

Re:Metamoderation helps (2, Insightful)

MollyB (162595) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658705)

Since I have lots of time, I participate in meta-moderation every time it is offered. Lately, I have been using the 'See Context' link more often (love Cooliris for this), because in order to meta-mod fairly I must sample the responses and/or parent of post in question. More than a few times, the score has changed, sometimes from 'troll' to 'informative' or the like. I am appalled at the number of comments that are rated 'Funny' when few of them actually are. I look at the moderation system as a necessary chore to make the site livable and am glad that a plurality of users agree. There is an excess of puerile claptrap, but it is easily spotted and dodged.

I wish to applaud the posters who have participated in a lively argument, and managed to find common ground, even if it is agreeing to disagree.

Re:Metamoderation helps (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658843)

"At least it can help weed out the most abusive moderators. I seldom call a mod unfair, but when I do I suspect I'm not alone."

I gave up meta-modding when I was negatively M2'd a couple of times, never to recieve mod points again. Silly thing was, I was M2'd over a couple of BS posts about Microsoft. Since then, I've registerred a new nickname and get mod points occasionally. Sadly, I'm hesitant to use them. If my objectivity goes against public opinion, I'll have to start all over again.

I wouldn't mind M2 if I could challenge it.

nastiness erupting overnight? (0)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658307)

In a world where nastiness online can erupt and go global overnight,


Oh ya, well go to hell submitter.

snake oil (4, Insightful)

ceroklis (1083863) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658321)

From the ReputationDefender wesite:

Our trained and expert online reputation advocates use an array of proprietary techniques developed in-house to correct and/or completely remove the selected unwanted content from the web. This is an arduous and labor-intensive task, but we take the job seriously so you can sleep better at night. We will always and only be in YOUR corner.

No tell me exactly how they are going to remove my old website from archive.org, my embarrassing posts in news groups from google groups, or porn pics done in my youth shared by millions on p2p networks ?
Short of bombing every server on the planet you cannot do anything. Once things are out, there are out, you cannot take them back.

Re:snake oil (2, Interesting)

ColaMan (37550) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658471)

We will always and only be in YOUR corner.

Sooooooo.... what happens when two companies pay the $10000+ to ReputationDefender and have opposing viewpoints?

RD salesman, to client #1: "Yes, that slanderous party are a tenacious bunch, aren't they? I can sign you up for our premium DefenderPack, it's another $20000.... but what's your reputation worth? You will? Ok, we'll start straight away and do our best."

RD salesman, to client #2: "Yes, that slanderous party are a tenacious bunch, aren't they? I can sign you up for our premium DefenderPack, it's another $20000.... but what's your reputation worth? You will? Ok, we'll start straight away and do our best."

RD salesman, to rest of team: "Is anyone actually doing anything for clients 1 and 2? No? Good. Keep it that way."

Err moderation system? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658333)

I have been reading /. for years and never fully understood how it friggin works ..

You gotta be kidding me... (0, Troll)

MSFanBoi2 (930319) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658349)

Post anything remotely pro-Microsoft, anti-Apple or anti-Microsoft and chances are your post will be modded into oblivion even when its 110% accurate...

Re:You gotta be kidding me... (1)

jeremyp (130771) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658415)

I think anybody who says things like "110% accurate" (when "absolutely completely 1+1=2 true" is only 100%) deserves modding to oblivion.

Re:You gotta be kidding me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658599)

What if 1+1!=2? What if pi = 3? What if all your base belong to the Ontario Mega Finance Group?

Bet Bill O'Reilly is behind all this (1)

gd23ka (324741) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658373)

"... including shelling out $10,000 to companies like ReputationDefender.com to promote the info you want and suppress the news you don't."

You sure they aren't affiliated with Fox??

Personal story (4, Interesting)

b0s0z0ku (752509) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658389)

In October 2001, I was at a university concert in a certain small town in Pennsylvania, put on as a benefit to the Red Cross/9-11 victims. The cops came in and busted the show on a noise complaint. One of the cops, who was notorious in the town for handing out unjustified traffic tickets and being a general scumbag backhanded a girl who wasn't doing anything wrong in the face.

As everyone was walking out, I talked to the asshole and said "You fucking pig, shouldn't you be helping in NYC, not fucking harassing innocent students who are trying to make a difference?" I got arrested, charged with felony riot, disobeying a peace officer, summary harassment, and disorderly conduct. The two most serious charges (riot and disobeying...) were dropped the next day. The two other ones, I plead no contest to in exchange for 48 hrs. community service and a year's probation with the informal understanding that I leave the state after graduating that spring and completing the 48 hrs. In retrospect, I should have fought it and plead not guilty, but I was young, naive, and had a stupid attorney.

Anyway, after two years, my record was expunged. However, the original newspaper article; written before I was interviewed but NOT before the police chief was interviewed, remained the first thing that appeared under a Google search of my name for another year or two. Was kind of interesting to explain when I was interviewing for jobs!

For some reason, this no longer appears at all when you search for my name (I think the campus and local newspapers have put up a robots.txt file, and, anyway, there's more recent stuff by me and my business website on the web).

-b.

Information that you don't approve of (2, Funny)

noidentity (188756) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658405)

"Chances are there is information about you and your family on the Internet that you don't approve of. It's time you do something about it." (from reputationdefender.com)

The current administration must love this site! On a more paradoxical note, I bet there's nothing but positive reviews of this website on the web, at least if they're doing their job correctly.

What can "ReputationDefender" really do? (4, Interesting)

walterbyrd (182728) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658407)

Let's suppose scox does not like what is posted on groklaw. So scox signs up for "ReputationDefender." What can ReputationDefender really do? Ask somebody to remove the content?

Accord to the website: "Our trained and expert online reputation advocates use an array of proprietary techniques developed in-house to correct and/or completely remove the selected unwanted content from the web."

Yeah, okay. And that would be what? Send an email to the website maintainer? For $15.95 a month, I doubt that ReputationDefender will be filing any lawsuits.

Re:What can "ReputationDefender" really do? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658517)

They would have to be lying in some way or the other. Sure you can get content pulled by cease and desist letters, or a polite request etc. depending on the situation, but that hardly qualifies as "proprietary techniques".

What they could be referring to is some kind of search manipulation, or masking technique. Like if you have bad stuff referring to Joe Smith you make up 100 plausible variations on the name and then put out a ton of content under each, which makes it very hard to tell which relates to any specific Joe Smith. But this can hardly be called a "removal".

Finally, there's unlawful methods to take content off the web, but I hope they are not doing that.

So, all in all, liars.

Re:What can "ReputationDefender" really do? (5, Interesting)

Fnkmaster (89084) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658799)

As a member of the company's advisory board and a long-time Slashdotter, I can assure you that ReputationDefender does not engage in any illegal activities, pretexting, cracking, etc. in the process of getting information removed from the web. I recognize that some of the marketing copy on the site is less than crystal clear, but in a busy startup, getting the website copy rewritten isn't always the top priority.

In any case, services range from sending polite requests on customers behalf (automated and manual depending on context), search engine optimization techniques, arranging for legal intervention in certain cases, and more. You can find much of this information on our Frequently Asked Questions [reputationdefender.com] page. Many of our customers have found our techniques effective and feel like we've provided them with excellent value for their money.

Nobody can make bad content posted repeatedly by a determined adversary disappear entirely, obviously, and we would be foolish to claim that we could do the impossible.

I should also mention that we hold ourselves to a very high ethical standard regarding the types of intervention we perform and the types of clients we will take on, and we are very sensitive to First Amendment issues and not trying to interfere with the dissemination of genuinely newsworthy content. However, there are a lot of people out there who've faced crazy stalkers and people trying to unfairly bash them, or just chunks of stale information out there that they really didn't want to be public, and having a service offering to track down that information, figure out who's responsible for it, and attempt to get it removed, or in some cases reduce its impact, is quite valuable to many people.

Re:What can "ReputationDefender" really do? (1)

chris_eineke (634570) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658651)

And that would be what?
"It's" name is Tony and he wants a word with you. ;)

V.E.N.O.M. is on the web? (0, Offtopic)

Eudial (590661) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658421)

Oh noes! V.E.N.O.M. is on the web? Quickly, we must alert M.A.S.K. before their evil plans unfold! [wikipedia.org]

All moderation systems are bad, but some are worse (3, Interesting)

MikeRT (947531) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658423)

I think the very worst I have seen is FreeRepublic. Libertarians get banned there from posting all of the time for having the wrong views. Hell, even many conservatives get in trouble there for pissing off the wrong people. The "Admin Moderator" user/users will basically just yank your posting privileges if you buck the status quo. You don't have to be a troll or "mobying" (pretending to be a conservative for liberal causes, to manipulate right wing media). You just piss off the wrong people and instead of getting moderated down, you're silenced.

Civility or groupthink? (-1, Flamebait)

stratjakt (596332) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658469)

Try and find a well balanced discussion of anything here, I dare you.

I guess for a corporate website, where the whole point is to only show one point of view (the one good for the corporation), it'd be good. It's definately prudent to get a handle on dissenting opinions.

Fostering an open and honest discussion of tech? Hahaha... Ya, now lets pretend vista "bluescreens" every 5 minutes, and macs do everything out of the box.

Re:Civility or groupthink? (3, Insightful)

catbutt (469582) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658701)

Groupthink is just disparaging term for what happens in the real world, which most people think is a good thing.

If I participate in a real-world discussion, whether in a social or academic context, and just start behaving disrespectfully (or present an extreme view and don't make a good case for it, or whatever), there are repercussions, which can range from mild social disapproval to being dragged outside and getting my ass kicked.

Moderation systems, in my opinion, do the same thing online, where otherwise anonymity removes those repercussions. I don't see it as a bad thing. I just wish there were more "groups" to choose from with good moderation systems.

Re:Civility or groupthink? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658785)

Actually, groupthink is a term that describes how people in a group tend to build consensus and shut out minority views, even if those minority views happen to be ultimately more correct. This is why concepts such as "crowd wisdom" are fallacious and tend to ultimately bring out the lowest common denominator in quality.

Therefore, whatever is enforced by the group represents the group as a whole. The real world is full of people of varying intelligences, but as the bell curve shows, there are not nearly as many intelligent people as there are dumb and average people, therefore what we get is merely representative of the average, at best.

dealing with unprecedented evile in real time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658573)

as in payper liesense hypenosys stock markup FraUD felons, & life0cidal egomaniacs. there's just just not that much (anything) good to say about it/them, unless they are going away? what a revolutionary concept.

from previous post: many demand corepirate nazi execrable stop abusing US

we the peepoles?

how is it allowed? just like corn passing through a bird's butt eye gas.

all they (the felonious nazi execrable) want is... everything. at what cost to US?

for many of US, the only way out is up.

don't forget, for each of the creators' innocents harmed (in any way) there is a debt that must/will be repaid by you/US as the perpetrators/minions of unprecedented evile will not be available after the big flash occurs.

'vote' with (what's left in) yOUR wallet. help bring an end to unprecedented evile's manifestation through yOUR owned felonious corepirate nazi life0cidal glowbull warmongering execrable.

some of US should consider ourselves very fortunate to be among those scheduled to survive after the big flash/implementation of the creators' wwwildly popular planet/population rescue initiative/mandate.

it's right in the manual, 'world without end', etc....

as we all ?know?, change is inevitable, & denying/ignoring gravity, logic, morality, etc..., is only possible, on a temporary basis.

concern about the course of events that will occur should the corepirate nazi life0cidal execrable fail to be intervened upon is in order.

'do not be dismayed' (also from the manual). however, it's ok/recommended, to not attempt to live under/accept, fauxking nazi felon greed/fear/ego based pr ?firm? scriptdead mindphuking hypenosys.

consult with/trust in yOUR creators. providing more than enough of everything for everyone (without any distracting/spiritdead personal gain motives), whilst badtolling unprecedented evile, using an unlimited supply of newclear power, since/until forever. see you there?

Venom? On the Web? Quick, call M.A.S.K! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658603)

ma-ma-ma-ma-mask!

No-one knows what lies behind the masquerade!

ma-ma-ma-ma-mask!

Don't you cum into my gatorade!

G.I. Joe... (1)

adamziegler (1082701) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658649)

Shucks... I was hoping for something about Cobra Commander. At least Spiderman....

In a world where... (1)

Doctor Faustus (127273) | more than 7 years ago | (#18658677)

"In a world where nastiness online can erupt and go global overnight
But a new wind was about to blow! Payback. This time, it's for real.

go47 (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658745)

Munches the most Take a look at the of the GNNA I

Sometimes real life makes you more careful (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658841)

Many years ago I was threatened with a lawsuit over some comments I made on-line. I'd posted under my name and wasn't hiding anything. (The dispute was with a company, not a person). The next day I got a call from their lawyer; fortunately the matter ended up being settled out of court and I didn't lose anything. If I'd only said the factual matter of the case there probably wouldn't have been any question, but I blew my top about every bad thing I felt about them, all statements I would had to have defended. I also had found out just how expensive legal proceedings are; even if you win you lose.

So today I usually think twice about whatever I post, and there's many times I decide it's better to just hit the delete button. I've been shocked at what some people post online in their blogs; or anywhere on the web with the same user name over and over. They never seem to think that it's very easy today to link it all together and see all the things they assume no one will ever know. You could say I'm just being paranoid, but in today's world it's better safe than sorry.

While we're all gazing into our adorable navels... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18658845)

I know the discussion was quick to turn inward thanks to the flattery of Slashdot, but check out these "reputation defenders". They sound like the freaking Free-Speech Suppression Mafia, despite what their FAQ pays lip service to. I can see it now: ordinary people won't be able to afford to use the service to defend themselves; Big Corporations keep a steady account to asstroturf forums and sue websites whenever they say something about a company that the company doesn't like. Just great. More legal harassment for bloggers!
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