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Electrically Conductive Cement

samzenpus posted more than 7 years ago | from the let-your-display-harden dept.

Science 159

zero_offset writes "The Tokyo Institute of Technology has announced a process for creating an inexpensive, nearly transparent, electrically conductive alumina cement. The conductivity is comparable to metal, and the transparency should be adequate for use in display panels. The process relies upon commonplace and inexpensive metals compared to the rare metals such as iridium currently used in display panels."

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It's about time! (3, Funny)

Robotech_Master (14247) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696817)

I see they're finally getting around to using that formula Scotty provided. [wikipedia.org]

Re:It's about time! (0, Redundant)

InvalidError (771317) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696845)

That was my first thought as well.

Re:It's about time! (2, Funny)

Robotech_Master (14247) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696891)

But it was my first post. :)

Re:It's about time! (1)

Aereus (1042228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696965)

Now we just need them to invent transparisteel and tritanium... ;)

Re:It's about time! (2)

ChaosWeevil (1004221) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697175)

Don't forget Trinium, Naqahdah, and Naqahdriah!

Re:It's about time! (1)

Goeland86 (741690) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697383)

what about permacrete?
I wonder if we'll get any closer to wedge impeller drives for starships, along with Warshawski sails for FTL travel... Who knows what science holds for us in the future...

Re:It's about time! (1)

arodland (127775) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698387)

Crystoplast / armorplast would be reasonably cool, although really if you think about it it's just another standin for transparent aluminum. Impellers, though, would just rule.

Re:It's about time! (2, Interesting)

quixote9 (999874) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696983)

Be nice if it was just the first step to implementing all that stuff. You know: no poverty, competent government, no wars (except with Klingons and such, of course).

Re:It's about time! (4, Insightful)

DAtkins (768457) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697065)

Not that I'm normally this deep or anything...

The nice thing about progress is that everything is a small step toward that.

It's the period between then and now that you have to worry about. Star Trek had 2 more World Wars before Cochrine developed the warp drive. :)

Re:It's about time! (4, Insightful)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697129)

no wars (except with Klingons and such, of course).

Nothing brings people together like a common enemy, so for us to have no morewars here on Earth, the most likely catalyst would be war with an alien species. Keep in mind that with that competent government, there was complete global control, and we have only ever seen that government through the eyes of it's military officers.

Re:It's about time! (0, Offtopic)

JonBuck (112195) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697677)

If they really want to do something new and inventive with Star Trek, they should center around a civilian ship. I'd like to see Starfleet and the Federation Government through the eyes of an entrepreneur. We saw hints of that in a couple episodes that involved cargo ships in Enterprise. There's a huge, untapped potential for storytelling in the Trek universe.

Re:It's about time! (0, Offtopic)

zebulonjoad (1076457) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697823)

Different universe, I know, but you might want to check out Firefly. They even modeled the Alliance uniforms off the Federation to a degree.

Re:It's about time! (4, Interesting)

InsertCleverUsername (950130) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697769)

Nothing brings people together like a common enemy, so for us to have no more wars here on Earth, the most likely catalyst would be war with an alien species.

True, but it would have to be a really good hoax. Otherwise it's not likely we'd have a prayer against aggressive aliens. As Sagan and many others would point out, a space-faring civilization is going to be much older and more technologically advanced than us. Reminds me of that old saying, "don't bring a knife to an phaser fight."

Re:It's about time! (3, Funny)

Proofof. Chaos (1067060) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698289)

Otherwise it's not likely we'd have a prayer against aggressive aliens. As Sagan and many others would point out, a space-faring civilization is going to be much older and more technologically advanced than us.
Why do you think we're trying to so hard to find alien life. If aliens find us, they are probably way more advanced; But if we find THEM first, it likely means WE are more advanced than them. Then all we have to do is spread rumors that they insulted Jesus, Mohamed, Buddha, Ghandi, Martin Luther King, Elvis, called all our mamas "nappy headed hos," and that they "Hate Freedom." We will have all humanity united behind our efforts to introduce "Democracy" to the new planet with interstellar ballistic missiles.

Re:It's about time! (1)

VoidCrow (836595) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698795)

But, yes. That's been a power play for as long as our ancestors have talked, and perhaps even before. A good kill sorts out issues in the pack hierarchy.

Re:It's about time! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697073)

"Computer! hello computer!"

Re:It's about time! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697729)

* picks up mouse *

"Helllo, Computer!"

Re:It's about time! (1)

PresidentEnder (849024) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697781)

Given the number of "Transparent Aluminum omg omg!" articles we've seen in the past, I'm surprised that this (which looks better than any of those before) didn't get the Star Trek treatment, too.

Re:It's about time! (1)

Gotta ask yourself.. (977664) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699417)

Others have modded you up as funny, but this is serious as hell!

The more time passes, the more events happen, the more it looks like whatever one can possibly imagine one day will come true.

Looking forward to flying pigs now.

Attn. Slashdot Community: (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18696821)

Q: Why does 'Open Source' software suck so bad?
A: Because the programmers can't see the screen [ukdirtypanties.com]

lol

Typical Linux User. [ukdirtypanties.com]

But seriously, I hate every last one of you loser slashdot fucks. Yeah, you heard me, you faggots. No digg. lol. Fuck every single one of you.

This will be great for around my pool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18696825)

Bzzzzt!

Indium, not iridium (4, Funny)

Kelson (129150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696829)

Hazards of sans-serif fonts at small pitches, I guess.

Re:Indium, not iridium (3, Funny)

zero_offset (200586) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697455)

Actually, hazards of a poor short term memory created by a misspent youth. :)

Star Trek! (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18696835)

Alumina! Star Trek! NNggnnng!

Just to get it over with. Carry on.

ut oh (2, Funny)

HomelessInLaJolla (1026842) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696837)

Soon there may be some real repercussions when I'm lounging on the concrete wall outside the library and the security guard comes around to say,"Hey! You can't be sleeping here!" *bzzt* OUCH!

Never mind display panels... (3, Funny)

TheSHAD0W (258774) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696853)

Use it to build RF-proof houses. No more problems with Wifi security!

Re:Never mind display panels... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18696885)

RF-proof houses?

I want a Faraday castle.

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

LuxMaker (996734) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697149)

Use it to create pee free zones. This would fix those people who like to urinate in public. One wrong pee and you are zapped good.

Re:Never mind display panels... (5, Informative)

freefrag (728150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697269)

Urine streams do not conduct electricity because they separate into droplets.

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

Watson Ladd (955755) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697303)

A sufficiently high voltage could overcome that.

Re:Never mind display panels... (2, Insightful)

mrbcs (737902) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697411)

Umm wanna piss on an electric fence to prove that?

Re:Never mind display panels... (4, Informative)

freefrag (728150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697671)

Yah, Mythbusters busted that one.

ObRenAndStimpy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697989)

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

loganrapp (975327) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697813)

Just the rebel drops after a few sodas.

After a night at Howl at the Moon at the Universal City Walk? That's no stream, it's a river!

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

delvsional (745684) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698367)

tell that to anyone who's ever peed on an electric fence.

Re:I believe urban legends in spite of proof. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18699491)

Yeah, like my cousin's friend's uncle! He peed on a fence and his testicles exploded. True story! Ask 'im!

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

deander2 (26173) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699027)

hah. wow. if any comment has ever deserved a +5 informative, this would be it. :-P

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

_merlin (160982) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697183)

I know it was supposed to be a joke, but your WiFi wouldn't work too well inside the house anyway because of all the multipath interference from reflections (802.11n will help there). And if you wanted to read slashdot on your notebook in the backyard, you'd be totally screwed.

Re:Never mind display panels... (1)

pimterry (970628) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697281)

Even better, you can now see through your walls! Hunt the pesky kids down!
(On the other hand, they can see when you're out, and nab all your bandwidth)

Plexicorp (2, Informative)

krnpimpsta (906084) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696857)

Re:Plexicorp (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697507)

except they got the recipe wrong, it wasn't supposed to be conductive, and you wouldn't believe the stink an electrocuted whale makes.

Re:Plexicorp (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698515)

First of all, Scotty didn't expect Plexicorp to instantly make him a bunch of transparent aluminum; he exchanged the formula for sheets of plain old plexiglas.

Second, according to Wikipedia (although un-cited), the formula shown was actually that of Lexan, so it wouldn't have been electrically conductive anyway.

Re:Plexicorp (1)

Proofof. Chaos (1067060) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699537)

One thing I never understood about that movie. Why did they need a transparent material at all? They weren't trying to turn the ship into an aquarium. All they needed, was to build a tank to hold the water and whales for a couple of hours (at the most) for transport. I think the crew on any modern day naval vessel could do that by simply tearing down a few bulkheads and using a simple welder. Probably be a good idea to build an improvised heater or cooler with a thermostat, too. Whales don't need to be in water anyway (they breath air), all you need is a couple guys with hoses to keep them wet. That's how whales and dolphins are transported today.

Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (3, Interesting)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696863)

Does anybody else remember the conductive LEGOs introduced with the 9V system? It just seems to me that this, if cheap enough, might be useful in construction environments where wire is difficult or impractical to route.

Depending on its conductivity, it might even be useful for home and industrial high-current applications.

Granted, electrical wiring is a pretty mature field, but I'm sure that something like this opens up possibilities.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (3, Interesting)

daeg (828071) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697105)

One step further: combined with recent advances toward nearly transparent, thin solar cells for covering, well, everything. Windows and sides of buildings would be first, and given enough durability, sidewalks, cars, roofs, and the Chines could all become miniature power plants.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

tygt (792974) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697221)

It might just affect your concerns about lightning strikes.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697343)

It could be advantageous. Imagine if all your walls are grounded with a material capable of carrying a high current.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

Khashishi (775369) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698361)

When is wire ever impractical to route? Well, I can think of places, but not anywhere where LEGOs would be any easier.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698493)

Not LEGOs, per se, but a conductive setting fluid that can be poured or mixed with existing construction materials. Primarily useful for new construction, sure. But with such a beast, you could have an entire wall serve as a touch-sensitive light switch, or a moisture-detecting OSB/electronic hybrid. (Useful for predicting when a floor's rotting out, or when the roof is leaking again.)

The conductive LEGOs are relevant because they moved electrical wiring in LEGO structures from unroutable wiring to a hidden mechanism.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

CmdrGravy (645153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699611)

If you integrate this with one of those 3D printing machines you can print entire houses complete with windows, wiring and walls. All you'd need to add was the plumbing and fittings.

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (4, Informative)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698541)

Does anybody else remember the conductive LEGOs introduced with the 9V system?

Uh, I don't know about yours, but my 9V LEGOs (such as in the monorail) weren't electrically conductive themselves; they just used regular plastic blocks with metal bits embedded in them. For example, see the pictures on this site [akasa.bc.ca] .

Re:Does anybody else remember conductive LEGOs? (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698585)

Mine were the same way. I only call them conductive because, within the limits of how LEGOs could be assembled, they may as well have been. (Well, yeah. They had two conductive channels. But still.)

Just what we need (4, Funny)

Atario (673917) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696875)

A stadium where the entire surface of the building blinks and scrolls ads at you.

That, or extra-heavy monitors.

keep you eyes on the road. (2, Interesting)

Original Replica (908688) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697161)

It could have some interesting applications as a road surface. traffic alerts and stop lights being part of the road itself.

Re:keep you eyes on the road. (1)

veganboyjosh (896761) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697477)

i've been singing the praises of a solar-panel-as-roadway for several years now. nowhere in print, of course, except i think in several /. posts. this is a step in that direction...

Hello computer! (1)

c0d3h4x0r (604141) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696897)

So does this technically qualify as transparent aluminum?

Re:Hello computer! (1)

Hucko (998827) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699401)

translucent = almost transparent to not opaque

so, no, technically it would be translucent aluminum

Tokyo Institute of Technology (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18696901)

I'm sooooo going to TIT

Re:Tokyo Institute of Technology: TiTech (3, Informative)

abushga (864910) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697567)

The acronym is TiTech. These kids design pico-satellites and put them into low earth orbit, among other things.

Indium (3, Informative)

nuzak (959558) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696977)

RTFA, the rare metal in LCDs is Indium, not Iridium.

Mafia ... (1)

SimonInOz (579741) | more than 7 years ago | (#18696999)

No, Franco, I said concrete BOOTS, not concrete BOOKS.

Cement != concrete (5, Informative)

jfengel (409917) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697015)

Cement = anything used to glue things together

Concrete = a building material composed of aggregates and cement

Concrete is used for buildings, roads, sidewalks, etc. The aggregate in that case is usually rocks. The cement is usually Portland cement. It's not correct to call it "cement", though people will usually understand what you mean.

But judging from the comments so far, not in this case. This isn't a replacement for Portland cement, and they're not talking about building materials. This is the kind of cement used to glue bits of LCD screens to each other.

Re:Cement != concrete (1)

Sj0 (472011) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697407)

Ah, I never would have guessed. I saw the article, but didn't read too deeply. Shame, the things you could do with a clear version of portland cement would probably change just about every industry in the world.

Re:Cement != concrete (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697895)

Ya, OK, so it'd be massively expensive to build a house-sized monitor, but I'd still like to see a house made of this!

neener, neener

Re:Cement != concrete (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697925)

Care to take that back? From the Oxford dictionary: cement noun a powdery substance made by calcining lime and clay, mixed with water to form mortar or mixed with sand, gravel, and water to make concrete. another term for concrete ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French ciment (noun), cimenter (verb), from Latin caementum 'quarry stone,' from caedere 'hew.'

Re:Cement != concrete (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697931)

But judging from the comments so far, not in this case.

A shame - I would have stereotyped everybody here as having used model cement at least once in high school, for building models or other things.

Coincidentally, I just learned tonight that the black sludge that gets mixed with sand and aggregate to make asphalt is called 'asphalt cement'.

Re:Cement != concrete (2, Interesting)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698551)

Coincidentally, I just learned tonight that the black sludge that gets mixed with sand and aggregate to make asphalt is called 'asphalt cement'.

Likewise, the end result after that mixing is properly called "asphalt concrete," not just "asphalt."

Re:Cement != concrete (2, Interesting)

lessthan (977374) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697943)

Umm... I hunted "alumina cement" [wikipedia.org] down on Wikipedia, which states : Applications - in construction concretes, rapid strength development is achieved, even at low temperatures (truncated for clarity) Is that not the correct entry?

Re:Cement != concrete (1)

Marty200 (170963) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698767)

Umm... I hunted "alumina cement" down on Wikipedia, which states : Applications - in construction concretes, rapid strength development is achieved, even at low temperatures (truncated for clarity) Is that not the correct entry?

Cements are used in construction, but you wouldn't make a wall out of them.

Re:Cement != concrete (1)

lessthan (977374) | more than 7 years ago | (#18699667)

Again, I get the feeling that I'm missing something. The entry implies that cement is added to the concrete to endow certain properties. Alumina cement added chemical resistances to concrete, in fact it was invented to offer sulfate resistance. (Yes, I'm pulling that straight from the article) Further research I did, found this [www.agcc.jp] which makes direct comparision to Portland cement.

Editors? Anyone? (3, Insightful)

eskwayrd (575069) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697051)

The conductivity is comparable to metal

'metal' is pretty generic, and 'metals' conduct at varying levels (understatement). TFA actually states 'manganese'. Why distort the original posting in the summary?

...compared to the rare metals such as iridium

WTF? TFA states 'indium'.

Methinks the poster should rely on the copy/paste strategy more often than 'transcribe it manually'.

Anyway, cool stuff. Anyone know enough about display panel construction to give an off-the-cuff estimate of whether this new stuff will take more energy to produce?

Re:Editors? Anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18699311)

The conductivity is comparable to metal

Why wouldn't it be? The conductivity of PVC is also comparable to that of metal. The question is how well it fares in that comparison...

Let's see, here... (0, Troll)

greenguy (162630) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697087)

1. Find a way to use this stuff to make computer chips, as well as monitors.
2. Start using 3D printers to make them. Suddenly, hardware is open source.
3. ???
4. Profit!

Re:Let's see, here... (2, Interesting)

fabs64 (657132) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697893)

actually that sounds like a pretty brilliant way of printing simple "wires" on things.

So if my house was made of this stuff I... (1)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697089)

...wouldn't have to strap myself to a pipe with a wire whenever I decided to work with CMOS components. Sounds pretty useful.

Home circuit fabs? (4, Informative)

Teancum (67324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697113)

When I read this, I was thinking of Fab@Home [fabathome.org] with the idea that perhaps you could use this process to help build crude home-built ICs out of simple and cheap materials.

Unfortunately, it seems as though the process is a bit more complicated, and I don't know how you can get a nozzle heated to 1100 degrees C in a reduced oxygen environment (presumably why it is in a sealed glass tube to work) that would also be something you would want on your kitchen table.

While of interest to a materials science guy, this really isn't that spectacular of a deal here. It does have the potential of improving LCD screen luminance values, reducing power requirements for laptops (the screen sucks quite a bit of power in the overall system), and helping in other ways. But it isn't something that simply can be poured out of a nozzle.

Re:Home circuit fabs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697901)

> When I read this, I was thinking of Fab@Home with the idea that perhaps you could use this process to help build crude home-built ICs out of simple and cheap materials.

Cheap, like pure crystal silicon? :)

I wish... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697125)

I had one of their sweatshirts. I remember seeing a visiting group of engineering professors from the university walking around with "TIT" written proudly on their shirts.

Environmetally-friendly? (4, Insightful)

Velocir (851555) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697133)

From TFA: "the cement would make an environmentally-friendly alternative because its ingredients are more readily available". That doesn't make it environmentally friendly, it just makes it less environmentally damaging. There's a BIG difference.

Also, is 30kg grip strength pretty low for an adult male? I'm pretty sure it is...

Re:Environmetally-friendly? (1)

644bd346996 (1012333) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697551)

I'm not sure how 30kg compares to what the average adult can do, but any decent rock climber can do a lot more than that. I've known quite a few people who can do things like one-fingered pull-ups on a campus board, something most slashdotters can only dream about.

Re:Environmetally-friendly? (2, Interesting)

Chris Pimlott (16212) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698193)

A more abundant material will occur naturally in greater concentrations, which reduces the amount of effort to retrieve and process a high-grade sample. For example, in an area where gold is plentiful, you may be able to find a large quantities of gold just by hand-panning in a stream. In an area where good is scare, you may have to sift through entire mountains to extract the same amount. The latter takes much more energy and investiment and has a much higher toll on the environment than the former.

Re:Environmetally-friendly? (1)

khallow (566160) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698495)

The usual definition of "environmentally friendly" is whatever the marketer intends it to mean.

real purpose (3, Funny)

digitalderbs (718388) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697145)

What they won't tell you is that it was really developed as a deterent to public urination in the streets.

Re:real purpose (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697491)

actually, the tingle is quite titillating.

And just when thought....... (3, Funny)

edwardpickman (965122) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697159)

Las Vegas couldn't get more annoying. Everywhere from sidewalks to bathrooms blaring logos at you. Even worse would be the saturation subliminal advetising. "No really honey, the floors and walls told me to gamble more".

Are we ready for our broadband over cement? (1)

LuxMaker (996734) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697165)

Will it turn out like broadband over powerlines?

cheaper tvs? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697213)

Forgive my ignorance, but most of the comments only refer to large/heavy structures using this material. But, the article seems like it's saying that this could be used to replace Indium in televisions. Can this not possibly lead to cheaper and more efficient televisions or am I missing something? Can this also not be useful in making cheaper displays in general?

Re:cheaper tvs? (2, Informative)

Teancum (67324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697541)

I guess many of those posting havn't heard about Rubber cement [wikipedia.org] , commonly used for building model vehicle kits. Or other kinds of cement like the solvent used in PVC pipes.

While making it cheaper may be true, the big problem that happens with displays is that you have wires which cross between pixels on any display.... simply to turn the pixel "on" or "off". These can be quite thin and are made of several different kinds of materials, but they do get into the way of the display. By making these wires transparent, you would have a huge increase in the throughput of the light coming from something like a back-lit light source (common for laptops).

As far as replacing Indium or other rare earth metals... I don't understand that at all. Those metals are used to floresce in a CRT (television picture tube) and produce color pixels. This is what makes the TV be in bright colors. This article on color televsion [digitaltvdesignline.com] gets into some of the specific color properites of Indium compounds and how they enhance the color gamut that can faithfully reproduce color from electronic media. This cement is not going to have those same kind of properties.

Re:cheaper tvs? (2, Informative)

glesga_kiss (596639) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697977)

As far as replacing Indium or other rare earth metals... I don't understand that at all.

I believe the main benefit is the cost of Indium and similar substances.

specific color properites of Indium compounds and how they enhance the color gamut

This substance isn't intended to be part of the light emitting (or blocking) part of a display. It's for the wiring to those parts, built into the screen. By making it more transparent, the light level required can be reduced which saves battery life in laptops and possibly the cost of the light components.

Re:cheaper tvs? (2, Informative)

Teancum (67324) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698685)

I highly doubt that the value of the 2 grams of Indium used for a display is going to be a major factor in the overall cost of the display. You could use Gold or even Iridium and it wouldn't even be a factor. Californium, perhaps, but that element is sold by the gram. I just don't buy that as a serious argument.

Trust me when I say that it is the use of Indium compounds and their phosphorescence at bold primary colors that makes it so valuable, and is driving up the world market price of Indium. Compared to Gold, Indium is a lousy conductor. A Gold or Silver trace would be much easier to hide because you would not have to use as much material. The use of Indium as a wire is not the issue, although the amount of the Indium compounds could be reduced slightly in a matrix of this cement and other composite materials used in a display system. That would be something that would appeal to a CEO or bean counter that is really concerned about the expense of getting Indium on the world metals market, but the concern would be about simply getting bulk Indium in the first place.

Re:cheaper tvs? (1)

Adambomb (118938) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697553)

What you're saying really IS the purpose of this material, those who are confusing you took the usual rtfa-less slashdot tangent and ran with it.

Sopranos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697347)

Fangulo... we can't use concrete for body disposal anymore.
But we can for some cool electricuting.

alarm application (1)

steve426f (746013) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697461)

Using this for your outside walls in combination with a high-voltage alarm system should be more effective than a siren!

Mistakes in the article! (4, Informative)

dr. loser (238229) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697499)

The author of the actual paper is Hideo Hosono [titech.ac.jp] , not "Hideo Hono". The paper, available here [acs.org] , was not published in the April 11 issue of Nano Letters. Rather, it was published on-line on March 22.

Re:Mistakes in the article! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697581)

Hono? Hosono? I say SO what!

Now we just need to make toilets from this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18697579)

Last I knew, it would help with the transmission of Google TiSP [google.com] .

I just love that place (1)

nanosquid (1074949) | more than 7 years ago | (#18697973)

The Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japanese equivalent of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)...

Re:I just love that place (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18698245)

Tokyo Institute of Technology... equivalent to MIT.... Glad you love the place but I have to say I'm more of a legs man myself

Uhm... Old News? (2, Informative)

Wandering Wombat (531833) | more than 7 years ago | (#18698417)

I did a college engineering report on this... in 2004.
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